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American Politics: Waiting for the Verdict

For discussion and debate about anything. (Not a roleplay related forum; out-of-character commentary only.)

How Will Trump Be Found?

Guilty
7
37%
Not Guilty
2
11%
Guilty On Some
4
21%
Hung Jury
6
32%
 
Total votes : 19

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Shrillland
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Posts: 22533
Founded: Apr 12, 2010
Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

American Politics: Waiting for the Verdict

Postby Shrillland » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:30 pm

Well NSG, the presidential primary ended, Congressional and state primaries continue, and Trump is moving along with his court cases. Oh, and we banned asbestos. Hurray, I guess. Now let's return to our regularly scheduled election of nihilistic despair, shall we?

Of course, there's other news for American Politics that will come, and here is where we'll talk about it. You all know the rules, right? Good. Let's go then.

Plebiscite Plaza 2024:

First, there's Amendment 1 on March 5. Since 1984, Alabama's had the Budget Isolation Resolution Amendment, which says, among other things, that the state's general and education budgets must be the first things the Legislature approves unless 60% of the legislature grants a waiver for any other bill. Since the Budgets are actually done last, this effectively means a 60% threshold for most legislation. This Amendment would automatically exempt local laws or Alabama's infamous local/county amendments from the isolation process, meaning they could be passed with simple majorities regardless of when the budgets are approved. REJECTED

Alabama's first November measure is a County Amendment because of course Alabama's going to have at least one on here. This amendment would allow the Franklin County Board of Education to manage, sell, or lease lands or the natural resources on lands that the Franklin County School System owns in Fayette and Walker Counties further south.

Alaska will be voting on a measure that would repeal RCV and top-four primaries, a system that was narrowly approved in 2020. It would take everything back to the previous model of FPTP party primaries and general elections.

A second measure would increase worker's rights and benefits. First, the state minimum wage would be increased to $15 an hour incrementally to July 1, 2027. Second, employees would be allowed to accrue up to 56 hours of paid sick leave a year if they work in a business with 15 or more employees and up to 40 hours a year if they work somewhere with less than 15. Third, employers would be banned from taking adverse actions against employees who refuse to attend company-sponsored meetings regarding political or religious issues. Religious organisations could still require them without trouble, colleges would still be allowed to discuss coursework regarding such subjects, and skipping other types of meetings can still be considred actionable.

Proposal number one would create a new $20 court cost for each conviction a person receives. The money would go to a new fund that would pay out a benefit of $250,000 to the spouses and children of first responders killed in the line of duty. If the fund contains more than $2 million, then excess money would go to things like responder training and equipment.

Proposal number two is an amendment that would allow the Legislature to terminate states of emergency and alter the Governor's authority for them. It would also automatically terminate a state of emergency after 30 days unless the Legislature renews it or it's caused by war, fire, or flood.

Proposal number three is an amendment that would require partisan primaries for partisan offices and expressly forbid jungle primaries statewide. This was put up alongside companion legislation that would ban RCV in general elections, but that bill was vetoed with no possibility of being overridden.

Proposal number four is an amendment that would raise signature thresholds for ballot initiatives. Currently, getting on the ballot requires 10% of the number of people who voted for Governor statewide in the last election to sign it if it's a statute and 15% if it's an amendment. This would change that to 10% and 15% in each legislative district instead.

Proposal number five would allow property owners to apply for a property tax refund if the city, town, village, etc, where the property sits isn't enforcing public nuisance laws, including laws that ban illegal camping, loitering, panhandling, public voiding of bodily waste, obstructing thoroughfares, and drinking or posessing illegal drugs in public.

Proposal number six would provide for life imprisonment for anyone convicted of sex trafficking minors.

Arkansas is voting on an amendment that would allow the State Lottery to fund grants and scholarships technical institutes and vocational-technical schools as well as regular colleges and universities.

First, we've got Prop 1 on March 5. This changes the Mental Health Services Act to the Behavioural Health Services Act. First, it would change how money collected under this law is spent. Counties' share of money would go down to 91%(from 95%) and state share would go up to 9%(from 5%). Counties would be required to include housing interventions, early interventions, and full-service partnership programmes to help people regardless of mental health status. 30% of county money would go to housing interventions(50% of which would go to fighting chronic homelessness), 35% to full-service partnerships, and 35% to behavioural health supports and services(51% of which would be committed for people age 25 and younger). As for the state's share, 22% goes to a reserve for counties, 33% goes to a behavioural health workforce initiative run by the state Department of Healthcare Access and Information, and 44% goes to the state Department of Public Health mental health and substance-abuse prevention measures. Second, the current 16-member body that provides oversight would grow to 27 members(all still appointed by the Governor). The 11 new members would include five who either themselves have or are relations of people who have substance abuse disorders, a veteran or a veteran's organisation representative, an expert in housing and homelessness, a representative of a disability rights organisation, a current or former behavioural health director, a children's or youth organisation representative, and a person with knowledge and experience in community-defined evidence practices and reducing behavioral health disparities. Third, it would issue $6.38 billion in bonds, $4.3 billion of which would go to behavioural health treatment and housing, $1.05 billion to homeless veterans with mental or substabce abuse issues, and $922 million to housing for people at risk of homelessness with behavioural health issues. APPROVED

On to November. The first proposition would raise the minimum wage to $18 an hour by 2026 for all employees and index it to inflation thereafter.

The second proposition would repeal the Private Attorneys General Act and replace it with a new law. This is a law, passed in 2003, that allows employees to file lawsuits and collect civil penalties for violations of state labour laws if the state doesn't respond to a complaint in a given amount of time. In its place, the Fair Pay and Employer Accountability Act would come into being. This law would double the existing statutory and civil penalties and require that 100% of all penalties go to aggrieved employees(up from the current 25% requirement). It would also provide resources to employers to ensure compliance. Next, it would require the state Department of Labour Standards Enforcement to be a party to all labour complains filed with the Labour Commissioner. It wouldn't award the parties attorney's fees, which PAGA does currently. Finally, it requires the state to fund the Labour Standards Enforcement Department to fulfill its new obligations.

The third, fourth, and fifth propositions are all amendments with a connection to each other. The third measure would lower the threshold for cities and counties to approve taxes and bonds for housing. It would go down from a two-thirds majority to 55% plus one. The fourth measure, on the other hand, would increase thresholds by defining all state and local levies, fees, and charges as taxes and require both a two-thirds majority of the legislature and voter approval for state taxes. Currently, only one of those two is required. It would also require two-thirds voter approval for local tax increases, which currently only need a simple majority on top of local government passage. Finally, the fifth measure would require all future measures that change voter thresholds to supermajorities would have to pass by the supermajority that's being proposed. It would also allow localities to put up advisory referenda.

The sixth proposition is a veto measure. Back in 2022, the Legislature passed SB 1137, which put limits on where new oil and gas wells could be drilled, effectively banning them within health protection zones, which are within 3,200 feet of pretty much anywhere where people could be such as homes, schools, businesses, hospitals, prisons, etc. CalGEM(California Geological Energy Management Division) would be required to report on these health protection zones starting in 2027. Companies could only redrill or rework existing wells within these zones to plug them up or to improve public and environmental safety. They would also be required, starting in 2025, to set up leak destection system for wells within these zones that could be regulated by CalGEM, the Air Resources Board, and the State Water Board. Drillers would also have to provide contact information for public complaints and assurances that light and noise will be limited, dust will be mitigated, and speed limits for vehicles will be met among other things. The oil companies and many of the state's unions got this measure on the ballot to veto the law. A Yes vote here will mean the law is upheld.

The seventh proposition is an income tax increase of 0.75% for anyone with incomes over $5 million. This would last 10 years, and the money would go to the new California Institute for Pandemic Prevention, which would provide grants for creating a pandemic detection system and supporting CDPH(Public Health) efforts to prevent future pandemics. A nine-member board would oversee the Institute and a three-member panel wouldoversee grants, all of which would be awarded publicly. The Institute would last until 2035 unless there's still money available, in which case it could continue giving grants until 2040. It would also create the Community Pandemic Response Fund, and the School Disease Spread Prevention Fund, both of which would focus on preventing disease spread in high-risk communities and schools, respectively.

The eighth proposition would repeal the Costa-Hawkins Act, the 1995 law that prohibits rent controls. Cities and counties could now control rents on any housing or apartments built after February 1, 1995, and they could also impose limits on how much landlords could charge first-time renters.

The ninth proposition is an amendment that would repeal Article 34 of the state's constitution, which says that low rent publicly-funded housing projects have to be approved by a local referendum. This measure was ratified by Prop 10(1950) and was intended as a redlining measure.

The tenth proposition would repeal Prop 8(2008) and formally grant same sex couples the right to marry. This is primarily symbolic, but a popular plan nonetheless.

The eleventh proposition would add a one-semester personal finance course as a requirement for all high school students. All schools would be required to have it as an elective course by SY 2026-27, and it would be required starting in SY 2029-30.

The twelfth proposition would label any organisation that participates in the federal 340B drug price discount programme, owns at least one licence to operate a pharmacy, health insurance plan, or hospital in California or works contracts with Medi-Cal(the state's Medicaid) or federal Medicaid as a special needs or primary care organisation, spends at least $100 million on things unrelated to direct medical care over a 10-year period, and operates or owns at least one multifamily dwelling with at least 500 high-severity safety or health violations as a prescription drug price manipulator. Such manipulators would be required to spend a minimum of 98% of all 340B revenues on direct patient care or have their medical licence taken away. It would also permanently enshrine the Medi-Cal RX programme into law. If these criteria seem oddly specific, that's because only one organisation in California, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, fits them all, and some have claimed that this is a politically motivated measure due to the foundation's work on removing rent controls given that the main sponsor for this prop is the California Apartment Association.

Measure number one would limit statewide property tax growth to 4% above last year's revenue and require statewide voter approval to keep any revenue above that limit.

Measure number two would expand a property tax exemption for disabled veterans. Currently, veterans with a 100% disability rating get 50% exempted from the first $200,000 of their property's value. This would expand the exemption to include veterans with individual unemployability status, which means they have one service-related issue that causes 60% disability or two or more issues that have a combined 70% disability or one of those issues causing 40% disability.

Measure number three would create a new Independent Judicial Discipline Adjudicative Board that would supervise cases against judges or lawyers sent to it by the Commission on Judicial Discipline. This would be a 12-member board consisting of four district court judges, four attorneys, and four citizens. Cases would also be made public when formal proceedings begin rather than when everything is finished. Tribunals would consist of three members, one from each category, and they could be appealed to the State Supreme Court or to a tribunal if the case is against a Supreme Court Justice or their family or more than two Justices recuse themselves.

Measure number four would remove a suspect's right to bail in first-degree murder cases if the presumption is great and the proof is evident.

Measure number five would require all future ballot measures to include an economic impact statement showing the effects the measure would have on employment, the state's GDP, and state and local revenues, expenditures, taxes, and fiscal liabilities.

Measure number six would make slight changes to the timeline for filing and signing ballot initiatives as well as for judges and justices to signify if they're running for office again. Filing a ballot initiative would now have a deadline of three months and a week, the deadline for referendum signatures would be reduced from 90 days after the Legislature adjourns to 83 days, the deadline for publishing initiatives would be moved from 15 days prior to the final day of voter registration to 45 days before the final day of voting(remember, it's all by mail in Colorado), and expand the time for judges to file an intent of re-election from between 3-6 months before the general election to 3-and-a-week to 6-and-a-week months.

Measure number seven would repeal Amendment 43 from 2006, the constitutional amendment that bans same-sex marriage.

Measure number eight would allow the state to retain any revenue from sports betting taxes over $29 million, the cap placed on it in 2019's Prop DD, which legalised sports betting in Colorado.

Measure number nine would create a new 6.5% sales tax on all gun manufacturers, dealers, and ammunition dealers that make more than $20,000 a year for their wares. The tax is expected to make $39 million in revenue, $30 million of which would go to the state Crime Victim Services Fund, $1 million to the School Security Disbursement Fund, and $8 million going to the Behavioural and Mental Health Services Fund. All of these figures would be indexed to inflation each year.

Connecticut will be voting on an amendment that would allow the Legislature to implement no-excuse absentee voting.

Amendment 1 would, starting in 2026, make school board elections partisan for both primary and general elections.

Amendment 2 would establish a right to hunt and fish into the state constitution.

Amendment 3 would legalise recreational marijuana in Florida. People over age 21 could have up to three ounces of weed with up to five grams of concentrate. Medical marijuana treatment centres would be allowed to become full dispensaries, and the legislature would be allowed to pass legislation allowing other dispensaries.

Amendment 4 would create a constitutional right to abortion before foetal viability or when needed to save the mother's life thereafter.

Amendment 5 would adjust Florida's property tax exemption($25,000 for all primary properties and an additional $25,000 for any property valued between $50-75,000) for inflation every January 1.

Amendment 6 would repeal a constitutional public funding option for political campaigns that agree to spending limits.

And a reminder that in Florida, a 60%+1 majority is required to ratify amendments.

Georgia will be voting on an amendment that would create the Georgia Tax Court. This would change the structure of the currently existing Georgia Tax Tribunal, which oversees things like appeals for denied refunds, property assessment appeals, and tax challenges, and put it into the judicial system(it is currently an executive agency). It would have concurrent jurisdiction with the Georgia Business Court and state Superior Courts. The Legislature would be allowed to set the numbers of judges and how they can handle things with the requirement that all judges must serve four-year terms and be appointed by the Governor with confirmation from the Judiciary Committees of both Houses.

They're also voting on a measure that would raise the states personal property tax exemption limit(for everything except vehicle, trailers, and mobile homes) to $20,000 from the current $7,500.

Their third measure would create a second homestead exemption to limit property tax increases, but it would allow school districts, counties, or municipalities to opt out of it.

Hawaii will be voting on an amendment that would repeal the legislature's right to ban same-sex marriage.

Their second measure is an amendment that would change how district court judges are appointed. They would still be appointed by Hawaii's Chief Justice, but the process would now be the same as the one used by the Governor to make Supreme Court appointments. The Senate would have 30 days to approve an appointment, and if they don't vote either way, it'll be confirmed.

Idaho will be voting on an amendment that says only US Citizens can vote.

Indiana's voting on an amendment that would remove the Superintendent of Public Instruction from the official line of succession for the governorship. This is effectively a formality since the Superintendent of Public Instruction, an elected office, was dissolved in 2021 and replaced with an appointed Education Secretary.

Iowa's first amendment would say that only citizens could vote in elections and it would also allow 17-year-olds to vote in primaries if they'll be 18 by the general election.

Their second amendment would formally make the Lieutentant Governor the Governor upon that office's vacancy and give then the right to appoint a new Lieutenant Governor, something that isn't formalised currently. The Lieutenant takes over the duties but doesn't officially get the job.

Kentucky will be voting on an amendment that would allow the state to fund non-public education.

Another amendment would require that only citizens can vote.

Here's some measures coming on December 7. First, an amendment that would require a waiting period before the Legislature could vote on conference committee reports or Senate Amendments to Appropriations bills. They couldn't be considered until 48 hours after the amendments and a summary of the changes are distributed to all legislators.

Second, an amendment that would allow the Legislature to extend its regular sessions by two-day increments, up to a maximum of six extra days, if it needs the time to consider appropriations bills or the Budget.

Maine will be voting on a measure that would change the state's flag, making them the third state to do so in two years. The current flag isn't all that popular, and this proposal would bring back the old state flag used before 1909.

Here's the current flag of Maine: Image

And here's a version of the old/new flag: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/47/Flag_of_Maine_%281901-1909%29.svg/640px-Flag_of_Maine_%281901-1909%29.svg.png

Their second measure would limit people, corporations, and other entities who want to donate to SuperPACs to a maximum donation of $5,000.

Maryland will be voting on whether or not to include a right to reproductive freedom in their constitution.

Minnesota will be voting on an amendment that would allow the Lottery to continue to dedicate funds to the state's Environment and Natural Resources Fund until December 31, 2050. This commitment is currently set to expire in 2025. It would also allow the state to spend 7% of the fund's market value annually(up from the current 5.5% allowance) and allow the state to set up grants for environmental education, resource conservation, and addressing environmental issues in communities adversely affected by such issues.

On August 6, Missouri will vote on Amendment 1, which would exempt childcare properties from property taxes. If only part of a property is used for childcare, such as a corporate daycare, that part would be exempt.

Also in August, Amendment 4 would allow the legislature to pass a law that would be effective until December 2026 that would require a city to increase funding for a police force established by a state board of police commissioners without compensation by the state and allow the legislature to go around a constitutional provision that otherwise requires such compensation. Only Kansas City has a police force that fits the amendment's criteria, and the amendment is seen as a response to KC cutting police funding. This was actually already passed in 2022, but the Missouri Supreme Court invalidated it on May 1, 2024, after it was proven that the fiscal note that came with it, which said it wouldn't lead to additional state or local costs, was inaccurate and that voters were, therefore, misled. It would, in fact, cost KC $39 million a year. This one will include a revised ballot note with the corrected amount.

On to November. The first measure is an amendment that would allow the state to levy fees to pay for the salaries and pensions of county sheriffs and their deputies, prosecuting attorneys, and circuit attorneys.

The second measure is an amendment that would say only a citizen can vote and would also explicitly ban RCV and Jungle Primaries in future elections.

Question 1 would strip the Board of Regents from the state constitution and allow the state Legislature to change the structure of Nevada's university system.

Question 2 would update offensive language in the constitution concerning people with mental illness or other disabilities.

Question 3 is an amendment would change the electoral system. Nevada would move to open primaries where the top five candidates would go to an RCV general. This measure would cover everything state and federal race save the Presidency, and it would require implementing legislation to be passed by July 1, 2025 at the latest. Since this is a citizens' measure, it has to pass twice. It already passed in 2022, so if it passes here, it'll be approved.

Question 4 would close the "convict loophole" in Nevada's constitution by banning slavery and involuntary servitude as punishments.

Question 5 would exempt child and adult diapers from sales taxes.

New Hampshire is voting on an amendment that would raise the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75.

In New Hampshire, amendments require a two-thirds majority to be approved.

First, there's a measure that would extend the current property tax exemption for disabled veterans to all disabled veterans and their spouses/widows based on their disability rating. Currently, it's only available to those with a 100% rating.

Second, another measure would increase the property tax exemption for all veterans from $4,000 to $10,000 and adjust it to inflation each year.

Third, there's an amendment that would allow the dean of the University of New Mexico Law School to authorise a designee to serve as chair of state's Judicial Nomination Commission, which nominates and appoints Appellate Judges. This designee would have to be either a former dean, an associate dean, or a fellow active or retired faculty member.

Fourth, another amendment would allow County Commissioner Boards to set the salaries of county officers, like County Clerk and so on, instead of the State Legislature as now. It would also clarify that any fees collected by a county go to the county treasury.

New York doesn't normally make even-numbered year appearances, but they technically can do so with any measure they wish. In this case, Proposal 1 would add an Equal Protection Clause based on gender, race, age, disability, national and ethnic origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy status and outcomes, reproductive autonomy, and gender expression.

First, a measure to be voted on June 11. Initiated Measure 1 would impose a maximum age limit on anyone serving in the US Congress. If it passes, people would no longer be allowed to serve in Congress if they reach the age of 81 by December 31 of the year before their term ends. If a court blocks enforcement of the age limit, then those candidates would be forbidden from being on the ballot, and if a court strikes that down, then the ballot would be required to show what age they would be at the end of their next term. It also gives standing to any elector to enforce the article and standing to the court on whether or not it is constitutional, but it also requires the State Attorney General to defend the measure in court.

On to November. Constitutional Measure 1 would update language in the constitution concerning people with mental illness or physical and mental disability.

Constitutional Measure 2 would make changes for citizen initiatives. First, it would add a single-subject rule for all measures up for a vote. Second, it would raise the signature threshold for constitutional questions from 4% of all state residents to 5%. Third, it would require such measure to be approved twice, first at the June primary and again in November.

Constitutional Measure 3 would cut how much could be spent from the state's Legacy Fund, which is a fund that receives 30% of all revenue from oil and gas production. Instead of 15% of the fund over two years, the state could only spend 5% over that period. In addition, the state would have to set a part of the fund aside to a new Legacy Earnings Fund instead of moving it to the General Fund like they do now.

SQ 833 would amend the constitution to allow the creation of public infrastructure districts, which would be allowed to issue bonds for public improvements within their borders. They would be created by a municipality if that city or town receives a petition signed by all the property owners that would be in the new district.

Oregon, alone in the United States, does not have any mechanism to impeach their elected executives. This first measure would change that and allow the Legislature to impeach the Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney General, Treasurer, and Commissioner of Labour and Industries. it would take a two-thirds vote of the House to impeach an individual and a two-thirds vote of the Senate to convict them.

Their second issue would create(or technically recreate) the Independent Public Service Compensation Commission. This commission would set salaries for nearly all major elected officials from the Governor to Supreme Court Justices to legislators. This is actually Oregon's third attempt at a commission like this as two previous commissions(one in 1983 and another in 2007)were basically left to wither on the vine after losing their funding to continue.

Their third issue would introduce RCV to Oregon. This would take effect in 2028, and unlike other states that have implemented it, there would be no jungle primaries. Standard partisan primaries would just be required to have RCV ballots. Also, unlike other states, Oregon would even use it for Presidential ballots with the state's electoral votes going to the majority winner. If however, the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact ever comes into effect, they would hand their electors off according to the compact while still showing their final round votes.

As they must every 10 years, Rhode Island will be voting on whether or not to have a Constitutional Convention.

An amendment up for a vote would say that only citizens can vote in elections.

Constitutional Amendment E would update all language in the constitution to be gender-neutral in nature.

Constitutional Amendment F would allow the Legislature to impose work requirements for Medicaid for anyone who isn't diagnosed as physically or mentally disabled.

Constitutional Amendment G would legalise abortion in South Dakota. It would be forbidden to regulate during the first trimester, regulations in the second trimester “must be reasonably related to the physical health of the pregnant woman," and it could be restricted in the third except when a doctor considers it necessary to protect a woman's life or health.

Constitutional Amendment H would create a Top-Two Jungle Primary system for South Dakota. This would apply to the Governorship, state offices, state legislators, county offices, and federal offices except for the Presidency.

Initiated Measure 28 would prohibit state sales taxes on all goods fit for human consumption except for alcoholic beverages and prepared meals. Municipalities and counties could still impose their own sales taxes on these items.

The first amendment would require all counties to have sheriffs that would be elected every four years. Since all 29 counties already do this, this is effectively a formality.

The second amendment would increase the amount of money that can be spent on public education from the State School Fund from 4% annually to 5%.

The third amendment would require property and income taxes to fund public education that uses a portion of the Uniform School Fund and provides for a budgetary stabilisation account and allows the state to use such revenue for other purposes after all educational purposes are met, something that is not currently allowed.

Virginia's voting on an amendment that would change the language involving property tax exemptions for veterans and their surviving spouses. "Killed in Action" would be replaced by "Died in the Line of Duty," wherever it appears.

Initiative 2109 would repeal the state's 7% capital gains tax on all stock sales for people with capital assets of over $250,000, which was passed in 2021.

Initiative 2117 would repeal Washington's Climate Commitment Act(passed in 2021). This law requires all businesses that produce more than 25,000 metric tonnes of CO2 to purchase allowances every quarter from the State Ecology Department. They can sell any excess allowances to other companies, and emissions-intensive, trade-exposed companies(including Boeing) can get a certain amount of allowances free until 2034. I-2117 would also forbid any future cap-and-trade or cap-and-tax programmes meant to reduce or offset carbon emissions.

Initiative 2124 would allow individuals to opt in and out of the WA Cares fund, a state-run fund created in 2019 that's the first state fund for long-term health care insurance(extended hospital stays, nursing home care, etc). It's funded by a payroll tax, and I-2124 would make it so employees would have to opt in to have the tax taken off their paycheques.

Amendment 1 would constitutionally ban euthanasia and medically-assisted suicide in West Virginia.

First, there are measures being voted on on April 2. Question 1 is an amendment that would prohibit any government from accepting non-governmental funds or assistance for administering elections.

Question 2 would require that only election officials designated by law could administer elections.' BOTH APPROVED

On to August 13, where there will be a measure would prohibit the legislature from delegating its power to appropriate money.

A second measure would require the legislature to pass a joint resolution before the Governor could spend Federal money appropriated to the State.

On to November, where another measure would say that only a citizen could vote.

Amendment A would create residential real property as a new separate category for taxation purposes and allow the creation of a separate subcategory of owner-occupied primary residences, which could be taxed at a different rate from other real estate.
Last edited by Shrillland on Wed May 29, 2024 2:48 pm, edited 51 times in total.
How America Came to This, by Kowani: Racialised Politics, Ideological Media Gaslighting, and What It All Means For The Future
Plebiscite Plaza 2024
Confused by the names I use for House districts? Here's a primer!
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La Xinga
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Posts: 5601
Founded: Jul 12, 2019
Corrupt Dictatorship

Postby La Xinga » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:32 pm

*grabs first post* :D

Shrill regains the OP once again...
Last edited by La Xinga on Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Washington Resistance Army
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Founded: Aug 08, 2011
Father Knows Best State

Postby Washington Resistance Army » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:34 pm

Regarding the Initiatives in WA, I have a pretty good feeling all 3 of them are going to pass tbh. 2109 and 2117 especially seem to have a lot of steam behind them.
Hellenic Polytheist, Socialist

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Turussniya
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Founded: Dec 08, 2023
Father Knows Best State

Postby Turussniya » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:39 pm

Louisiana?

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Bombadil
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Posts: 18719
Founded: Oct 13, 2011
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Bombadil » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:41 pm

The right love to point to homelessness in California as a sign of failed Democrat leadership however..

When Diana Stanley and her team at The Lord’s Place, one of Palm Beach county’s largest and longest-established homelessness charities, opened a new engagement center last year, she figured a few dozen people would show up in search of help.

Now, almost 200 people a day are relying on the facility just for lunch. Staff are overwhelmed by the demand for residential accommodation from families, veterans and the elderly in particular.

“There’s no question there’s an increase in homelessness,” Stanley, the organization’s chief executive, said, her anecdotal evidence supporting a federal study published in December reflecting a 12% rise in just one year of people lacking permanent sheltered accommodation nationally.

“We’re seeing more and more families experiencing homelessness for the first time. And I would be remiss if I didn’t talk about the older adults, later in life, losing housing due to affordability, and being homeless at an age of 60 plus. It’s not a good situation right now.”

And things could be about to get much worse, Stanley and numerous other advocates for the unhoused warn. That variable relies on Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, signing an “inhumane” bill currently on his desk that seeks to sweep the state’s sizable unhoused community from public view.

The new law will require counties and municipalities without sufficient existing capacity to establish homeless camps, with state oversight, far away from more prominent facilities such as parks and waterfront spaces, and impose penalties if they allow or authorize rough sleeping outside of them.


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Shrillland
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Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Shrillland » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:44 pm

Turussniya wrote:Louisiana?


Has nothing yet, but there's still time.
How America Came to This, by Kowani: Racialised Politics, Ideological Media Gaslighting, and What It All Means For The Future
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Confused by the names I use for House districts? Here's a primer!
In 1963, Doctor Who taught us all we need to know about politics when a cave woman said, "Old men see no further than tomorrow's meat".

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The Xenopolis Confederation
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Anarchy

Postby The Xenopolis Confederation » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:51 pm

The Black Forrest wrote:
The Xenopolis Confederation wrote:It might be an idea to just ignore GMS rather than insult him. The more attention you give him, the more he's going to post. Plus, if he is disabled then it is probably not great form to be insulting him.


I tried working with him. Worked with a boy scout how had autism. Got him his first rank. Also, have autistics on my street. One non-communative and her brother is very. They would eventually learn things….

I think much of the posting is schtick. Not going to debate it. Simply an opinion….

*If* it is schtick, then that is all the more reason to ignore it.
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Postby The Black Forrest » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:54 pm

Bombadil wrote:The right love to point to homelessness in California as a sign of failed Democrat leadership however..

When Diana Stanley and her team at The Lord’s Place, one of Palm Beach county’s largest and longest-established homelessness charities, opened a new engagement center last year, she figured a few dozen people would show up in search of help.

Now, almost 200 people a day are relying on the facility just for lunch. Staff are overwhelmed by the demand for residential accommodation from families, veterans and the elderly in particular.

“There’s no question there’s an increase in homelessness,” Stanley, the organization’s chief executive, said, her anecdotal evidence supporting a federal study published in December reflecting a 12% rise in just one year of people lacking permanent sheltered accommodation nationally.

“We’re seeing more and more families experiencing homelessness for the first time. And I would be remiss if I didn’t talk about the older adults, later in life, losing housing due to affordability, and being homeless at an age of 60 plus. It’s not a good situation right now.”

And things could be about to get much worse, Stanley and numerous other advocates for the unhoused warn. That variable relies on Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, signing an “inhumane” bill currently on his desk that seeks to sweep the state’s sizable unhoused community from public view.

The new law will require counties and municipalities without sufficient existing capacity to establish homeless camps, with state oversight, far away from more prominent facilities such as parks and waterfront spaces, and impose penalties if they allow or authorize rough sleeping outside of them.


Link


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The Black Forrest
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Postby The Black Forrest » Mon Mar 18, 2024 9:55 pm

The Xenopolis Confederation wrote:
The Black Forrest wrote:
I tried working with him. Worked with a boy scout how had autism. Got him his first rank. Also, have autistics on my street. One non-communative and her brother is very. They would eventually learn things….

I think much of the posting is schtick. Not going to debate it. Simply an opinion….

*If* it is schtick, then that is all the more reason to ignore it.


Oh I am finally on the bandwagon.

I will also state I am not a trained professional to declare such conditions are true or not. Like I said…..just an opinion….
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* There is actually a War on Christmas. But Christmas started it, with it's unparalleled aggression against the Thanksgiving Holiday, and now Christmas has seized much Lebensraum in November, and are pushing into October. The rest of us seek to repel these invaders, and push them back to the status quo ante bellum Black Friday border. -Trotskylvania
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The United Colonies of Earth
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Postby The United Colonies of Earth » Mon Mar 18, 2024 10:17 pm

The Black Forrest wrote:
Bombadil wrote:The right love to point to homelessness in California as a sign of failed Democrat leadership however..

When Diana Stanley and her team at The Lord’s Place, one of Palm Beach county’s largest and longest-established homelessness charities, opened a new engagement center last year, she figured a few dozen people would show up in search of help.

Now, almost 200 people a day are relying on the facility just for lunch. Staff are overwhelmed by the demand for residential accommodation from families, veterans and the elderly in particular.

“There’s no question there’s an increase in homelessness,” Stanley, the organization’s chief executive, said, her anecdotal evidence supporting a federal study published in December reflecting a 12% rise in just one year of people lacking permanent sheltered accommodation nationally.

“We’re seeing more and more families experiencing homelessness for the first time. And I would be remiss if I didn’t talk about the older adults, later in life, losing housing due to affordability, and being homeless at an age of 60 plus. It’s not a good situation right now.”

And things could be about to get much worse, Stanley and numerous other advocates for the unhoused warn. That variable relies on Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, signing an “inhumane” bill currently on his desk that seeks to sweep the state’s sizable unhoused community from public view.

The new law will require counties and municipalities without sufficient existing capacity to establish homeless camps, with state oversight, far away from more prominent facilities such as parks and waterfront spaces, and impose penalties if they allow or authorize rough sleeping outside of them.


Link


The return of the Hooverviles. Wasn’t Hoover a Republican?

He was. Hoovervilles were slums of ramshackle housing set up by those driven out of better domiciles.
DeSantis is just creating, in the spirit of hyperbole, concentration camps for the homeless.
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The Black Forrest
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Postby The Black Forrest » Mon Mar 18, 2024 10:26 pm

The United Colonies of Earth wrote:
The Black Forrest wrote:
The return of the Hooverviles. Wasn’t Hoover a Republican?

He was. Hoovervilles were slums of ramshackle housing set up by those driven out of better domiciles.
DeSantis is just creating, in the spirit of hyperbole, concentration camps for the homeless.


Concentration camps might be the wrong words. I get them impression the homeless can leave them……
*I am a master proofreader after I click Submit.
* There is actually a War on Christmas. But Christmas started it, with it's unparalleled aggression against the Thanksgiving Holiday, and now Christmas has seized much Lebensraum in November, and are pushing into October. The rest of us seek to repel these invaders, and push them back to the status quo ante bellum Black Friday border. -Trotskylvania
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Greater Somoiland
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Postby Greater Somoiland » Mon Mar 18, 2024 10:27 pm

Bombadil wrote:The right love to point to homelessness in California as a sign of failed Democrat leadership however..

When Diana Stanley and her team at The Lord’s Place, one of Palm Beach county’s largest and longest-established homelessness charities, opened a new engagement center last year, she figured a few dozen people would show up in search of help.

Now, almost 200 people a day are relying on the facility just for lunch. Staff are overwhelmed by the demand for residential accommodation from families, veterans and the elderly in particular.

“There’s no question there’s an increase in homelessness,” Stanley, the organization’s chief executive, said, her anecdotal evidence supporting a federal study published in December reflecting a 12% rise in just one year of people lacking permanent sheltered accommodation nationally.

“We’re seeing more and more families experiencing homelessness for the first time. And I would be remiss if I didn’t talk about the older adults, later in life, losing housing due to affordability, and being homeless at an age of 60 plus. It’s not a good situation right now.”

And things could be about to get much worse, Stanley and numerous other advocates for the unhoused warn. That variable relies on Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, signing an “inhumane” bill currently on his desk that seeks to sweep the state’s sizable unhoused community from public view.

The new law will require counties and municipalities without sufficient existing capacity to establish homeless camps, with state oversight, far away from more prominent facilities such as parks and waterfront spaces, and impose penalties if they allow or authorize rough sleeping outside of them.


Link

I feel like democratic policies make it easier to be homeless, so naturally...

I really hope someone doesn't take that sentence out of context later
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The Black Forrest
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Postby The Black Forrest » Mon Mar 18, 2024 10:29 pm

Greater Somoiland wrote:
Bombadil wrote:The right love to point to homelessness in California as a sign of failed Democrat leadership however..

When Diana Stanley and her team at The Lord’s Place, one of Palm Beach county’s largest and longest-established homelessness charities, opened a new engagement center last year, she figured a few dozen people would show up in search of help.

Now, almost 200 people a day are relying on the facility just for lunch. Staff are overwhelmed by the demand for residential accommodation from families, veterans and the elderly in particular.

“There’s no question there’s an increase in homelessness,” Stanley, the organization’s chief executive, said, her anecdotal evidence supporting a federal study published in December reflecting a 12% rise in just one year of people lacking permanent sheltered accommodation nationally.

“We’re seeing more and more families experiencing homelessness for the first time. And I would be remiss if I didn’t talk about the older adults, later in life, losing housing due to affordability, and being homeless at an age of 60 plus. It’s not a good situation right now.”

And things could be about to get much worse, Stanley and numerous other advocates for the unhoused warn. That variable relies on Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, signing an “inhumane” bill currently on his desk that seeks to sweep the state’s sizable unhoused community from public view.

The new law will require counties and municipalities without sufficient existing capacity to establish homeless camps, with state oversight, far away from more prominent facilities such as parks and waterfront spaces, and impose penalties if they allow or authorize rough sleeping outside of them.


Link

I feel like democratic policies make it easier to be homeless, so naturally...

I really hope someone doesn't take that sentence out of context later


Ok? What policies make it easier to be homeless?
*I am a master proofreader after I click Submit.
* There is actually a War on Christmas. But Christmas started it, with it's unparalleled aggression against the Thanksgiving Holiday, and now Christmas has seized much Lebensraum in November, and are pushing into October. The rest of us seek to repel these invaders, and push them back to the status quo ante bellum Black Friday border. -Trotskylvania
* Silence Is Golden But Duct Tape Is Silver.
* I felt like Ayn Rand cornered me at a party, and three minutes in I found my first objection to what she was saying, but she kept talking without interruption for ten more days. - Max Barry talking about Atlas Shrugged

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Senkaku
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Postby Senkaku » Mon Mar 18, 2024 11:32 pm

Carrying on from the last thread--
Torisakia wrote:
Senkaku wrote:I think if your goal is to be informed, you’d be better served by keeping up with what various outlets of all stripes are saying and trying to relate their stances to their compositions and interests, rather than limiting yourself to a very narrow slice of highly-online Yankee centrist sources. Truth is something to be arrived at dialectically; you’re not going to be better informed by restricting yourself only to the disingenuous antipolitics ideology of pundits like Nate Silver, you’ll just be passively absorbing their framing of every issue. Presenting oneself and one’s content as “neutral” is itself an ideological act.

Look, I just want to read about who's running, what platform they're running on, what they think on certain issues, and the like. I don't particularly care nor have an interest in some talking heads going on a three hour spiel about how Biden is actually a reincarnation of Charlemagne who is the savior of all humans or how Trump's immigration policy is actually a reference to Neon Genesis Evangelion. Those media outlets only exist to fling shit at the other side with no meaningful commentary or insight into anything. So far I've found those "highly-online Yankee centrist sources" to be very informative and easy to understand, unlike the Democratic/Republican circlejerk that exists on CNN, Fox, OANN, and others. Also given that I don't plan to vote for neither Biden nor Trump, I find the need to consume Democrat or Republican media to be redundant.

I'm not saying you have to endlessly chug from the bottomless well of Content from mainstream cable, watching every meandering daytime panel of pundits squawking at each other or listening religiously to every episode of every hack podcast. I'm saying partisan sources are something you should pay some cursory attention to to pick up on significant movement, trends, or revealing moments. Nor do I think your voting preferences should lead you to massively restrict your view of the media landscape: not only should you be consuming a bit of "Democrat media" and "Republican media" just to keep abreast of what's going on with them, there's a vast world of content from political cliques or tendencies within each party that can be very revealing of intellectual currents that are shaping outlooks of different elite factions within the US. You don't have to bail on 538 if you find it informative and easy to understand, but you shouldn't make yourself dependent on sources from a single political tendency, and you especially shouldn't obscure this ideological subscription by drinking their Kool-Aid about their "neutrality" or "independence." Everyone has an editorial and ideological line! Anyone telling you they don't is either lying to themselves or trying to sell you something. Have a poke around Dissent and First Things, take a peek at what's going on on Breitbart or Jacobin, check up on what narratives are getting traction and airtime on liberal and conservative TV networks, hate-follow a few people on YouTube and TikTok and Twitter just to see what they're trying to present or focus on and how they're doing it, etc. etc. It's much the same rule as one should apply to examining news from overseas-- there's a number of countries whose state media or private media outlets associated with specific elite factions I find untrustworthy or whose political bosses I find deeply odious, but it's still worthwhile to monitor what they're presenting and how to get a more complete picture of what's going on than I can necessarily get from the Western press alone. Trying to keep yourself informed when living in an information battlefield, the struggle of any contemporary media consumer, requires taking in as complete a view of the battlespace and developments within it as you can.
Last edited by Senkaku on Mon Mar 18, 2024 11:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Corrian
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Postby Corrian » Mon Mar 18, 2024 11:51 pm

Washington Resistance Army wrote:Regarding the Initiatives in WA, I have a pretty good feeling all 3 of them are going to pass tbh. 2109 and 2117 especially seem to have a lot of steam behind them.

I'm not sure how I feel about any of them yet.
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Postby Umeria » Tue Mar 19, 2024 12:06 am

Shrillland wrote:[California] First, we've got Prop 1 on March 5. ... APPROVED

I don't think it has yet; somehow they're still counting votes after two weeks. Currently leading by 0.1%
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Postby Shrillland » Tue Mar 19, 2024 12:08 am

Umeria wrote:
Shrillland wrote:[California] First, we've got Prop 1 on March 5. ... APPROVED

I don't think it has yet; somehow they're still counting votes after two weeks. Currently leading by 0.1%

They are, but it hasn't changed, and Prop 1's opponents conceded last week that they didn't expect to flip to a No vote, and I don't see that happening myself.
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Postby Hidrandia » Tue Mar 19, 2024 5:40 am

Could 2024 be an election were democrats lose the popular vote and win the electoral college.
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Postby Great Bulgarian Kingdom » Tue Mar 19, 2024 5:43 am

Hidrandia wrote:Could 2024 be an election were democrats lose the popular vote and win the electoral college.

Almost certainly no, because the electoral college heavily favors rural, low population states which almost always vote Republican. Thats why any time that happens it's a Republican. (at least, modern day)

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Zurkerx
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Postby Zurkerx » Tue Mar 19, 2024 6:04 am

Ah, that new thread smell!

Corrian wrote:Apparently Trump has been having a small donor issue. Biden's getting more than 3X as much from smaller donors as Trump.

I wonder if a chunk of Trump supporters are even going "Yeah, we like you, but we're not paying your legal fees"


So, there's a few things on this actually. Yes, there are donors, particularly, big donors that seem hesitant to give him money for that reason. We can expect Trump's fundraising to pick up, but there's probably a good reason why we aren't seeing this burnout of donors as well: some illegality might be involved:

In short, the arrangement appears to swap out the refund process with a new batch of donations. It clearly requires more work behind closed doors, but the bottom lines remain the same, and at least to that end, it all comes out in the wash, so to speak.

Given Trump’s personal financial history, critics may be tempted to assume his campaign is simply lying, holding on to the money and daring the government to do something about it. (The FEC has never taken action against Trump.) That, of course, would be wildly illegal, carrying serious, potentially criminal penalties not just for the campaign, but also for his outside treasurer and the established political accounting firm that processes and signs his reports.

But the campaign doesn’t appear to just be holding the money—at least, not exactly.

Instead, it appears the Trump team has engaged in some creative accounting, exploiting structural and regulatory nuances to report an artificially low refund rate. The tactic, it seems, accounts for refunded donations through mathematics, without engaging in financial transfers that would trigger reporting requirements.

In other words, the campaign may have found a way to make refunds disappear, thanks to the fungible property of money. While several legal experts consulted for this article couldn’t say how the scheme fit within the framework of campaign finance laws, here is how it appears to work.

In the interest of maintaining a reasonably fair financial playing field, individual campaign donations are capped at relatively low amounts. For 2024, federal campaigns can accept up to $6,600 from a single source—$3,300 for the primary and $3,300 for the general election. Anything above that must either be returned to the donor, redesignated to a spouse, or reallocated to a different committee or election.

Trump’s setup hinges on the joint fundraising committees. These committees collect donations on behalf of a group of participating committees and campaigns, then divvy the money up according to allocation terms. The donations are often transferred to the participants in large collective lump sums, with the individual contributors specially marked and identified for tracking purposes.

In November, the FEC flagged a nice 69 Trump campaign contributors who appear to have cracked the limit between July and the end of September. In his Dec. 21 reply, the campaign treasurer explained that “Sixty-Eight (68) of the listed contributors’ contributions were returned to a joint fundraising committee (‘JFC’) in which the Committee participates for proper allocation,” adding that “the relevant information will be reflected on a subsequent Committee report.”

Only one of the contributors on that list was “properly and timely refunded,” he wrote.

The treasurer’s note told the FEC that all of the campaign’s refund action will be reflected on a future report. That report came in at the end of January, and—as promised—added one new individual refund, a $400 rebate to a nuclear medicine specialist in Florida who broke the limit. (The Trump campaign’s remaining $1,000 in refunds all went back to Texas GOP Gov. Greg Abbott’s campaign in November.)

But that donor had given directly to the campaign, disclosures show. The other 68 donors had not. The day the campaign filed its response, it also filed an amended version of the report, reflecting the same totals to the penny. But today, some of the original excessive donations appear to have vanished from FEC data.

The campaign has yet to reply to the most recent FEC notice, which flagged a much longer list—running to 286 pages—showing that more donors are maxing over time.


Basically, the Trump campaign hasn't issued many refunds ($1,400 in refunds since November 2022), which is highly unusual and suspicious (Biden's campaigned has issued hundreds of thousands). What appears to be happening though is that Trump donors (thanks to Trump and the RNC exploiting them through automatically recurring donations), donors are hitting the maximum amount they can contribute. However, they aren't getting refunds back.

So, let's say you and I donated to Trump's Campaign, and the limit for each person is $1,000. You donated $500 but I donated $1,500, which is over the legal limit. By law, the Trump Campaign would have to refund me back $500. But what they did instead was this: they moved my extra $500 to another committee:

In the interest of maintaining a reasonably fair financial playing field, individual campaign donations are capped at relatively low amounts. For 2024, federal campaigns can accept up to $6,600 from a single source—$3,300 for the primary and $3,300 for the general election. Anything above that must either be returned to the donor, redesignated to a spouse, or reallocated to a different committee or election.

Trump’s setup hinges on the joint fundraising committees. These committees collect donations on behalf of a group of participating committees and campaigns, then divvy the money up according to allocation terms. The donations are often transferred to the participants in large collective lump sums, with the individual contributors specially marked and identified for tracking purposes.


It's not fully confirmed, but let's be honest, given he was found liable for fraud, he's possibly breaking campaign finance laws. Color me shock. And the best part? It's not even being investigated. The thing is though, it may not be illegal given the lack of clarity of the laws on hand so there's a good chance Trump and his allies are exploiting those laws.
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San Lumen
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Postby San Lumen » Tue Mar 19, 2024 6:24 am

Umeria wrote:
Shrillland wrote:[California] First, we've got Prop 1 on March 5. ... APPROVED

I don't think it has yet; somehow they're still counting votes after two weeks. Currently leading by 0.1%


It should not take this long to count votes. Several other elections are still not decided including the Sacramento mayor election. No one will get 50 percent so a runoff will be held in November.

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Postby Zurkerx » Tue Mar 19, 2024 6:24 am

Jury instructions are usually done at the end of the pretrial motions. Not apparently in Trump's document case, where the judge suggested an openness to some of the defense’s claims that the Presidential Records Act allows Trump or other presidents to declare highly classified documents to be their own personal property, which is clearly not how the Espionage Act or PRA works:

National security law experts say that is not what the law says, or how it has been interpreted over decades by the courts, particularly given the other laws that govern national security secrets.

Cannon asked the prosecutors and defense attorneys to consider two different hypothetical situations, writing: “the parties must engage with the following competing scenarios and offer alternative draft text that assumes each scenario to be a correct formulation of the law.”

In the first scenario, Cannon said, the jury would be allowed to review a former president’s possession of a record and make a factual finding whether “it is personal or presidential using the definitions set forth in the Presidential Records Act,” also known as the PRA.

Confusingly, she added in a footnote that any “separation of powers or immunity concerns shall be included in this discussion if relevant.” Immunity is a topic for judges to decide, not juries, so it was not immediately clear what that language in Cannon’s order meant.

The second scenario Cannon describes is one in which a president “has sole authority under the PRA to categorize records as personal or presidential during his/her presidency. Neither a court nor a jury is permitted to make or review such a categorization decision.”

That second hypothetical would appear to be one in which Trump seemingly could not be convicted under almost any set of facts of improperly possessing classified documents. It was not immediately clear how Cannon envisions a trial potentially based on that premise.


Basically, she appears to be looking at the end of the trial, and looking for grounds to dismiss it once it goes to trial (once a jury is impounded and the case gets dismissed, Prosecutors can't appeal), which is a fear she's doing to help Trump. If I'm Jack Smith, I would to start to consider bringing this before the 11th Circuit Court, and looking to get her removed: because she seems clearly hellbent on bending the law, and making it up as we go along. Plus, the fact she continually is dragging her feet on other more important motions should show what the true intent is.
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Postby HISPIDA » Tue Mar 19, 2024 6:33 am

Hidrandia wrote:Could 2024 be an election were democrats lose the popular vote and win the electoral college.

doubt it.

would be really funny, though.
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Postby Kannap » Tue Mar 19, 2024 6:46 am

San Lumen wrote:
Umeria wrote:I don't think it has yet; somehow they're still counting votes after two weeks. Currently leading by 0.1%


It should not take this long to count votes. Several other elections are still not decided including the Sacramento mayor election. No one will get 50 percent so a runoff will be held in November.


It takes this long to count the votes because the system is working. More people are voting because voting is more accessible via mail-in ballots, but also that elongates the process.
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