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A place to put national factbooks, embassy exchanges, and other information regarding the nations of the world. [In character]
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The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Liberty House NGO| Freedom Index (Now Open!)

Postby The United States of Ibica » Mon Oct 12, 2020 7:59 pm

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About

Liberty House is a Non-Governmental Organization based in Willmington, West Monroe, The United States of Ibica. We are funded entirely by donations, largely consisting of grants from the Ibican federal government. We have prided ourselves as being the watchdogs of civil rights in Ibica for over 50 years, Championing protections of civil and political rights at the state and federal levels. Recently, we have been seeking to move onto the international stage, adding other nations to our rankings, and abandoning subnational rankings. We have a staff of 120 full time professionals assessing the situations of nations, as well as a small editorial staff publishing reports. Liberty House is currently led by Chairman Edmund Patrickson and President Beau Stringer. The Vice President of Analysis is Corey Woodhams, and Chief Editor is Rhiannon Atterberry.
Last edited by The United States of Ibica on Tue Oct 13, 2020 1:22 am, edited 2 times in total.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

User avatar
The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:14 pm

Our Reports

Liberty House publishes both the Freedom in the Multiverse report and the Internet Freedom Report. The Internet Freedom Report obviously focuses on the rights of internet users, while the Freedom in the Multiverse covers broader civil and political freedoms. Nations are assessed based on a set number of questions, and ranked 1-4 (4 being the best) for Freedom in the Multiverse, and 1-5 on Internet Freedom, on each question, with their overall scores being derived from the aggregate of these scores. A score above 85 is considered "Free", a score of 70-85 is "Partly Free", and a score under 70 is considered "Not Free."

Below are the assessments you may fill out and submit to Liberty House if you would like to request your nation receive a ranking.

Freedom in the Multiverse
Code: Select all
[box][blocktext][align=center][size=150][b]Freedom in the Multiverse[/b][/size]
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.[/align]

[b]Nation:[/b]
[b]A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?[/b]
[b]A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?[/b]
[b]A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?[/b]
[b]B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?[/b]
[b]B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?[/b]
[b]B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?[/b]
[b]B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?[/b]
[b]C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?[/b]
[b]C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?[/b]
[b]C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?[/b]
[b]D1. Are there free and independent media?[/b]
[b]D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?[/b]
[b]D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?[/b]
[b]D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?[/b]
[b]E1. Is there freedom of assembly?[/b]
[b]E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?[/b]
[b]E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?[/b]
[b]F1. Is there an independent judiciary?[/b]
[b]F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?[/b]
[b]F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?[/b]
[b]F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?[/b]
[b]G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?[/b]
[b]G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?[/b]
[b]G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?[/b]
[b]G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?[/b]
[/blocktext][/box]


Internet Freedom
Code: Select all
[box][blocktext][align=center][size=150][b]Internet Freedom Report[/b][/size]
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.[/align]

[b]Nation:[/b]
[b]A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections?[/b]
[b]A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?[/b]
[b]A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?[/b]
[b]A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?[/b]
[b]A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?[/b]
[b]B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?[/b]
[b]B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?[/b]
[b]B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?[/b]
[b]B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?[/b]
[b]B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?[/b]
[b]B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?[/b]
[b]B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?[/b]
[b]B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?[/b]
[b]C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?[/b]
[b]C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?[/b]
[b]C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?[/b]
[b]C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?[/b]
[b]C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?[/b]
[b]C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?[/b]
[b]C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?[/b]
[/blocktext][/box]


Note: Due to a high volume of requests, expect delays in scores being updated, as Liberty House has a limited staff.
Last edited by The United States of Ibica on Mon Oct 19, 2020 12:08 pm, edited 10 times in total.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

User avatar
The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:34 pm

Rankings

Freedom in the Multiverse
  1. Coconut Palm Island: 99 Free
  2. The Union of British North America: 99 Free
  3. The United States of Ibica: 98 Free
  4. The Commonwealth of America: 97 Free
  5. Anatoliyanskiy: 96 Free
  6. Skyhooked: 95 Free
  7. Toin: 91 Free
  8. Dunferm: 86 Free
  9. Confederate American SU: 69 Not Free
  10. Zarnicovia Nova: 61 Not Free
  11. Bagong Luzon: 51 Not Free
  12. Atlantea: 49 Not Free
  13. Mordka: 29 Not Free


Internet Freedom Report
  1. Confederate American SU: 100 Free
  2. Coconut Palm Island: 100 Free
  3. Skyhooked: 97 Free
  4. The United States of Ibica: 94 Free
  5. Artheria: 93 Free
  6. The Union of British North America: 91 Free
  7. Zarnicovia Nova: 84 Party Free
  8. Kergstan: 72 Party Free
  9. Bagong Luzon: 55 Not Free
Last edited by The United States of Ibica on Sat Oct 24, 2020 12:22 pm, edited 17 times in total.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

User avatar
The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Tue Oct 13, 2020 7:45 am

Assessments of the United States of Ibica


Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes, 4/4
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes, 4/4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes, 4/4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes, 4/4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes, 4/4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes, 4/4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes, 4/4
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes, 4/4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, 4/4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, 4/4
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes, 4/4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes, 4/4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes, 4/4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes, 4/4
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes, 4/4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes, 4/4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Mostly, while protections for unions exist, many states have "Right-to-Work" laws that undermine the interests of collective bargaining. 3/4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, 4/4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes, 4/4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes, 4/4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes, 4/4
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes, 4/4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes, 4/4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, 4/4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? While this is largely true, there is enough income inequality that the scales are disproportionately tipped toward those born into wealthier families, that the chances of those born into disadvantaged families are deteriorating. 3/4

Aggregate Score: 98/100


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No, 5/5
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No, 5/5
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No, 5/5
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No legal or regulatory obstacles. However, economic conditions usually lead to regional monopolies where only one cable internet provider corners the regional market. 4/5
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? Yes, 5/5
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No, 5/5
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No, 5/5
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No, 5/5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No, 5/5
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No, 5/5
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No, 5/5
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No, 5/5
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No, 5/5
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No, 5/5
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes, but they mainly focus on abuse, child pornagraphy, and threats of violence, 4/5
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Only in extreme cases, 5/5
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No, 5/5
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? While privacy protections are enshrined in law, there are concerns about the intelligence community's collection of communications data, including texts, phone calls, and emails. While it's illegal for anything from this data collection to be used in legal or judicial proceedings, their possession by the government is cause for concern. 2/5
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Only if a court order is issued. Ibican judges are very reluctant to these requests. 4/5
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No, 5/5
Aggregate Score: 94/100
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

User avatar
Skyhooked
Senator
 
Posts: 4073
Founded: Mar 18, 2016
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Skyhooked » Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:31 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Skyhooked
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Well... current overboss was appointed by the Council, but if the people won't like him, they can always start a referendum and vote him out of office.

A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
Yes.

A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
Electoral laws and framework are a chaotic mess, but this is mostly because Skyhooked is an extremely large anarchist community, pretending to be a state.

B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
They can do so.

B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
Depends on the opposition, because people won't just support conservatives for example.

B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Let's just way, our people have guns and guts to defend their opinion, so yes.

B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
All of us have them.

C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Somewhat, because it's the people, who decide.

C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
Our folks won't let officials steal from them, so everytime an official does corruption in the way it hurts the people, he faces dire consequences.

C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
Mostly yes, but there are some classified military operations.

D1. Are there free and independent media?
Yep.

D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
As long as they don't violate laws, so no live human sacrifices or rapes or something like that.

D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
Well, we may whitewash some darker parts of our history in books and glorify better ones, but it's up to teacher and student to interpert and create his own opinion.

D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
Yes.

E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
Yes, just don't start trouble.

E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
Yep, they may operate in Skyhooked!

E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
Trade unions are an important part of Skyhookedian ideology, so yes.

F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
Judges are mostly independent.

F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
Yep, our justice is fair.

F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
Skyhooked is a polite and armed society, where people can either rely on police forces, or just get a gun and defend themselves. Freedom from war? Well, we don't force our folks to fight, army and militia are strictly volunteer.

F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
This is written in our constitution.

G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
Yep, this is SKyhooked dude! Move around as much as ya' want! Heck, there are folks, who are nomads.

G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
Business is a key to rich and prosperoud economy, so the people can start up one anytime.

G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
This is Skyhooked, so social freedoms are all time high!

G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
Not only they got guns, they are also protected from it by constitution.



Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:Skyhooked
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections?
Nah, free and good quality WiFi is one of the things our folks and tourists enjoy.

A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?
Nope. Maybe in the middle of El Baldio Desert or some other forest it might get slow sometimes...

A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?
Nope.

A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?
Nope, there ain't no obstacles.

A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?
No.

B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?
Nyet.

B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?
Nope, we won't let them to do so.

B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?
Nope.

B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?
Self-censorship? Nah, common decency is enough.

B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?
Well, there are certain advertisements, but that's it.

B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?
They don't exist in Skyhooked

B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?
Nope.

B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?
Nope.

C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?
Our constitution, backed up by people's arms and will, doesn't fail to do so.

C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?
No, unless it's something like a cyber attack, engagement in human trafficking or frauds.

C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?
No, as long as they don't break the laws. For example: Such things as online frauds, spreading child porn, or cyber attacks (not counting attacks on child porn, enemy or terrorist sites, because attacking those sites is something commendable, and is rewarded) are pretty much punishable offense.

C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?
Nope.

C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?
No. We don't, unless there is a dire need.

C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?
Highly encouraged in case of dire need, such as a terrorsit attack, large scale human tarfficking operation, or something like that. Of course if provider refuses, he won't be punished for that, we'd just hack our way into it anyway.

C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?
Well... maybe some angry fraud victim could punch the dude, who did the fraud, or a bunch of trigger happy vigilantes could attack human trafficking ring, they managed to discover in dark net, but aside from that, no.
Last edited by Skyhooked on Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:02 am, edited 2 times in total.
Skyhooked is MT/PMT with a few FT elements. Military is factbook only. NS stats are mostly non canon.
If you wanna know more about this haven of sin: https://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=418281&start=1

Our country offers: Alcohol, guns, cigars, weed, gambling, beaches and tons of souvenirs. And our current special: PL-74 Plasma rifle 25% discount!

Refreshing News:
Skyhooked is at war with Octavia, still holding agaisnt endless hordes of robots, vampires and traitors of humanity!/Global Defense Council was formed to help Earth hold agaisnt invasion./Luckily, we survived long enough and forces of Mandate of Humanity have arrived. (https://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=484352)

User avatar
Coconut Palm Island
Envoy
 
Posts: 335
Founded: Feb 16, 2018
Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Coconut Palm Island » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:23 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Coconut Palm Island
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Indirectly-- the Senate is directly elected by the people, and the Senate appoint the Monarch. The Monarch serves until death/resignation, or until the Senate votes, by 3/4 majority, to remove the current Monarch and install another one. The Monarch is not directly elected, but if people don't like the current King, they can vote to give Senate seats to parties looking to replace him.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes-- 30 Senators are elected using proportional representation (i.e. if one party wins only 3% of the vote, but 3% in every district, that party gets 1 of the 30 seats.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes, the Royal Court (similar to US Supreme Court) oversees elections in a nonpartisan manner.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes. We have four established parties (which happen to correspond to the four quadrants of the two-dimensional political spectrum graph), but new parties can theoretically break into the mix. One example of this is the Conservative Party-- a right-authoritarian party designed to be a more sensible alternative to the more extremist Nationalist Party. The Conservative Party recently won representation in the Senate for the first time this year.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes. While the Liberal Democratic Party currently holds 16 of the 30 seats, it is relatively rare for any one party to hold a majority. Thus, coalitions form. Right now, the winning coalition supports the King, but if public support shifted, it would be possible for parties to form a veto-proof coalition to override the King (3/4 needed), or even replace him (3/4 needed again, but this is unlikely unless the Monarch was broadly unpopular).
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Even more than in many other nations, mots people here make political choices based on actual policy platforms. Once a year about a month before the election, each party with more than 1% of public support (as determined by a nonpartisan polling organization) sends out a one-page summary of their platform to every person in the nation (it arrives as several sheets of paper, in one envelope, organized in order of polling ranking). Additionally, every six or so months, one of the Justices from the Royal Court (which is technically partisan, but once a member is appointed, they generally "rise above" politics and feel more able to drift from the "party line") moderates a big debate, with the leader (or another major member) of every party polling above 3%, where each person gets roughly equal speaking time, and the questions are chosen by a bipartisan panel.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes, discrimination based on any of these statuses is illegal.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government Mostly yes. Certain non-controversial policy areas can be delegated to bureaucrats (who work under the Monarch), but are subject to Senate oversight. Further, the Senate has the constitutional right to override any member of the executive branch, and while this is mostly aimed at the Monarch, it also applies to policies of the bureaucrats.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes. Corruption is rare. Our nation was founded in 1972 by people fleeing corrupt and tyrannical states (and, but now, their children and grandchildren), and because most people experienced oppression firsthand they don't engage in it themselves, and citizens are definitely a lot more vigilant. Because the Senate is the only directly elected branch of government, they are given unlimited oversight into the Monarch/executive branch (i.e. can investigate even when no laws have been broken, just to penalize objectively bad decisions) and limited oversight of the judiciary (i.e. only to investigate actual laws being broken).
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, except relating to specific ongoing law enforcement/military/intelligence operations. The Senate's 3/4 override right means that they can vote by 3/4 majority to make any document available to the public.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes. The government also operates some nonpartisan media, but independent media still exists. Additionally, clear steps are taken to differentiate government vs. private programming (on TV, for example, government programming is odd numbers, and private programming is even numbers).
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Complete academic freedom. Citizens undergo civic education, but this isn't brainwashing unless you consider teaching values like fairness, compassion, equal opportunity, etc. to be brainwashing.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes, so long as the assembly is peaceful.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes, although such organizations aren't as common in our nation as in other nations, because of the oversight different branches of government already have over one another.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, except that the Royal Court justices can be recalled by 3/4 of the Senate if they have committed a specific crime or have been found mentally or physically incapacitated (i.e. basically a mechanism to remove a lifetime appointment if they loose their grip on reality or turn out to be taking bribes). Lower court Justices are accountable to the Royal Court.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes, and our justice process emphasizes rehabilitation and restorative justice. Additionally, we have a strong bias toward leniency/presumption of innocence/less severe sentences, as many different public officials all have the ability to pardon people and reduce sentences (but never increase them).
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes. All citizens may join (but participation is optional) the Island's national, but decentralized, militia. The King is the head of the milita, but in emergencies, local branches can break off. The militia usually is activated for natural disasters (hurricane preparation, etc) but can be activated to quell civil unrest/illegitimate force. The emphasis is on making the militia localized, and making every town self-sufficient, but with every person still being accountable to the King and subject to Senate oversight.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes, the Royal Charter includes this in Article I.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes, although this is not specifically mentioned in the Royal Charter, it is considered to be included under the "Right to be autonomous".
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes, but regulations on businesses are fairly strict. Additionally, tax rates for larger corporations are fairly high by national standards, but not so high as to prohibit business by any means.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, citizens enjoy extensive social freedoms. Right now, more than 75% of the Senators, as well as the King, are identified by an independent evaluation group as being "libertarian or very libertarian on social issues, without any consideration of [the Senators' and King's] stances on economic issues."
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes, to the extent that is possible. Obviously, until poverty is 100% eradicated, we can't really say everyone has equal opportunity, but the government does their best to level the playing field.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Although internet was fairly good before, the Connect the Island Act of 2020 nationalizes wireless technology. The entire Island is currently covered by (free) LTE, citizens can purchase free WiFi routers that connect to the Island's internet lines, and we plan to upgrade most areas to 5G by 2023. Additionally, each citizen over 13 is entitled to a free smartphone, smartwatch, and tablet, from a major tech company (you know which one ;) ) as well as repairs/replacement. As the internet is used for things like voting, contacting elected officials, job hunting, and fitness (the smartwatch can be connected with your doctor through the Island's Universal Healthcare database), it is essential that every single citizen be connected.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? See A1, even the most remote parts of the Island have some type of infrastructure. However, some very old and isolated citizens refuse to use technology. Because citizens vote electronically, using a facial identification system, younger people usually help older and isolated citizens cast their votes.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No. The King and a big part of the Senate refused to pass the Connect the Island Act without an unequivocal guarantee that the government won't "weaponize" the internet in any way, or use it for any law enforcement purposes (except to prevent instances of child exploitation).
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? There is only one service provider, the government itself. However, there's no rule against private companies providing internet, it's just that government internet is already of medium-to-high quality, so there wouldn't be much of a customer base if someone did so.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? N/A, the internet is run by the Island government. The Senate set a certain speed standard (so many Kb per second) that every citizen is entitled to; if this happens, or if internet has other issues (i.e. going out for more than 10 minutes per day), they are automatically entitled to a repair, although repairs usually happen before a problem gets below the minimum thresholds set out.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No, except that the King's Royal Guard tries to delete all videos of child exploitation (usually by getting whoever posted it to pull it down in exchanged for a slightly reduced sentence).
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? Because the government runs the process, it is more transparent than if a private corporation ran it.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No. Officials usually only provide interviews with reputable journalists, however, which disincentives publication of any lies/ obviously fake information.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? The online information landscape is very diverse, to the point where there are over 100 different news sources (3 international news corporations, 5 major news networks, 92 smaller blog/opinion type sites) for our small Island's news.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No. In fact, the Island's "Vote!" app allows citizens to see information directly from candidates and political commentators, without the ability for any part of the government to censor them. Basically, any person or party polling at over 1% gets to create a "channel" on the app where they can post videos and text articles.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? Although the Royal Charter doesn't comment on the internet specifically, it does specify the right to "free expression". In Senator Curry v. Governor Kim, a national Senator sued the Governor of a district trying to censoring the internet (this was way back in 2002) and won. Since 2002, courts have recognized the right to free expression applies on the internet.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Only in the case of posting videos of child exploitation, or using the internet to do things that are already illegal (i.e. in District 7 vs. McDonald, the Royal Court upheld that, despite the fact that people have the right to free expression on the internet, it is still illegal to use the internet to plan a murder, McDonald's sentence of 3 years of rehabilitation was upheld).
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Again, see above. Only for child exploitation or using the internet to plan a real-life crime.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No. All traffic on government internet is encrypted so that even the government can't see what it is. The only exception is that they can collect aggregate data (i.e. they can see that 10,000 citizens searched "How to Run for Senator", but they can't see who made those searches).
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No; see above.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? The service providers are the government. But the communication is encrypted and anonymized, so they couldn't use it that way even if they wanted.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No.
The Kingdom of Coconut Palm Island
His Royal Majesty King Alexander
News: Recent investigation has revealed several instances of government corruption in the past 20 years. | King Alexander temporarily closes the nation's beaches after four shark attacks in two days.

User avatar
Zarnicovia nova
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1063
Founded: Jun 03, 2020
Democratic Socialists

Postby Zarnicovia nova » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:37 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? yes except in southern novia
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? yes except in southern novia
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? yes except in southern novia
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? yes
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? yes but very little can be gained as most of the population supports one party
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? yes except in southern novia
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? yes but just as zarnicovia nova passed a law saying that there can not be any laws of the sort still southern novia disagrees.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? yes
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? yes except in southern novia
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? yes except in southern novia
D1. Are there free and independent media? yes except in southern novia
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? in public your not supposed and can be prosecuted for it but it is not enforced and is considered by many a fake law
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? yes
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? yes except in southern novia if you're a minority
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? yes
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? yes
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? yes and those things are enouraged
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? yes except in southern novia
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? yes except in southern novia for minorities and there's a territoist ground in northern brazzila
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? yes except in southern novia
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? yes
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? yes
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? yes
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? yes
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country founded by a religion based off of my and the views of Utah/the Mormons. far-left democracy very powerful.

PROUD MEMBER OF GRAIL
BREACKING NEWS: go tohttps://forum.nationstates.net/viewto ... ed4ec12314 to see BREAKING NEWS

User avatar
Bagong Luzon
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 120
Founded: Jan 30, 2018
Corporate Police State

Postby Bagong Luzon » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:59 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Kingdom of New Luzon
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? No on both counts.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? No.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? No.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Officially yes, so long as each segment of the population abides by the tenets of the Philippine Reaction.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Mostly.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Somewhat.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Mostly yes; there is a strong social inclination toward any form of belief other than nonbelief per the tenets of the Philippine Reaction.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Somewhat.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Somewhat; some topics are sensitive enough to warrant possible surveillance. Knowingly expressing sympathies to communist and fascist regimes, for example, is grounds for a visit from law enforcement.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Limited.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Limited.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Limited.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Not quite.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Officially yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes; insurgencies are suppressed with extreme prejudice.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Officially yes, but unofficially there are rumors of different laws that apply to society's betters.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Mostly.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Somewhat.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Somewhat.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Yes, but this is being remedied.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? The latter, usually for geographical reasons; this is being remedied.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? Yes.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes; full New Filipino ownership is required for service providers.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? Officially no.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Yes.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Yes.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? Probably.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? Possibly.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? Yes.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? Yes.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? Yes.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? Not officially.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? Yes.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? Yes.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Yes.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? Yes, from other actors.
Puppet of the New Visayan Islands, typically used for fluff purposes.

Naturally, this does not represent my actual beliefs.

User avatar
Dunferm
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 18
Founded: Nov 03, 2019
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Dunferm » Tue Oct 13, 2020 11:44 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes, with support of hereditary members of Palriament
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Partly, as a big part of legislature is filled with hereditary members
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes, albeit several radical organisations are forbidden to run for some offices by the law
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Partly, as they have to co-operate with undemocratic parts of government
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? 50/50
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? "Liever Turks dan Paaps" - there are still restrictions on Catholic public worship enshrined in law.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? It's free from political control, albeit the government tries to support some groups.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? yes
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes, but law forbids large-scale unions.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? No, nobility and church prelates are priviliged in certain aspects of law.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, the state does not recognise non-heterosexual polygamous marriages.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes
Adeste fideles laeti triumphantes,
Venite, venite in Bethlehem.
Natum videte regem angelorum.

User avatar
Confederate American SU
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 149
Founded: Aug 29, 2019
New York Times Democracy

Postby Confederate American SU » Tue Oct 13, 2020 6:36 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? There are no representatives, laws are made directly by citizens.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? People are free to organize into political groupings, but a direct democracy is inherently nonpartisan. Politics is more divided by parochial and economic interests than by political parties.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?There is no 'opposition' as parochial and economic interests all have influence in the government. But, elected executives quickly turn over according to the preferences of the majority of their constituents.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Ethnic minorities have no rights, and religion, especially evangelical Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, are heavily restricted. LGBT and women have equal rights.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Citizens of the States and Syndicates determine policies directly.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Certain religious groups like evangelical Christianity, Mormonism, and Islam face repression.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? There is academic freedom, and schools
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes for whites
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes for whites
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes, they have direct influence on the government.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, but it is rather weak in power.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes for whites
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? No
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes for whites
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Property ownership is defined by active use. Absentee ownership and wage labor are illegal.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes for whites
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? For whites, yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? No
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? No
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? No
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No
★★========★★
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★★========★★
★☭Republic of Confederate American States and Syndicates☭★

★No, it is not the Confederate States of America. Please read the Factbook.★


User avatar
America Maior
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 2
Founded: Jul 04, 2020
Anarchy

Commonwealth of America - Freedom Index

Postby America Maior » Wed Oct 14, 2020 3:51 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
    Official: Commonwealth of America; colloquial: America
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?
    Yes.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
    Yes.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
    Yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
    Yes, except for groups and/or parties that aim to abolish democracy, freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution, or the Commonwealth itself. Fortified democratic principles are adhered to in the protection of American freedom. Thus totalitarian parties and extremist groups are banned from participating in electoral processes, as are pro-CSA groups which are considered anti-American and anti-Freedom.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
    Yes. Obstacles to freedom, such as gerrymandering for example, are illegal and thus parties must earn votes legitimately.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?
    Does this include criminalisation of anti-freedom forces from participating in electoral processes? If so, then largely yes but with exceptions.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
    All American citizens, whether born or naturalised, have full political rights and electoral opportunities. Non-citizen residents are granted the majority of rights barring voting and participation in electoral processes.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?
    The President of the Commonwealth of America and their government determines federal policy alongside Congress, the governments of the states and republics (integrated native states, such as Seminole Republic) determine their local policies.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
    Yes. Corruption is considered vile and the American public are not tolerant of it. This is enshrined in law and judicial practice.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
    Yes. Freedom of knowledge is acknowledged and protected by all relevant authorities, including state, republic and federal. The public can obtain almost all information from the government, which courts determine whether such information should be released if it is in the public interest. Inquests into crimes against humanity always end with documents and information released.
D1. Are there free and independent media?
    Yes. Some state governments operate local news media alongside public interest and private media.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
    Yes, however secular laws take precedence over religious doctrine, such as in violations of personal freedoms and animal rights.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
    Yes, besides widely-held and demonstrated beliefs in Jeffersonian democracy and American idealism. Educators are encouraged to remain apolitical or in good faith challenge various sociopolitical positions, especially extremist ones such as Fascism or Segregationism.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
    Yes, one cannot be acted against purely for such speech. Speech with the intent of incitement can be punished by fine, as can support for the CSA.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
    Yes, however extremist groups may be forcibly dissolved and criminalised if they are deemed a threat to freedom, including pro-CSA and similarly anti-American groups.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
    Yes. Humanitarian and watchdog organisations are completely free to pursue their plans and regulate government and military behaviour, for example.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
    Yes, and trade unions along with similar organisations are awarded protections and guaranteed freedom to operate.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
    Yes, the judicial branch is wholly independent of the executive and legislative branches.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
    Yes, violations of this can be punished.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
    Yes. Citizens are protected from unjust or illegitimate force conducted by authorities, war criminals are tried and sentenced accordingly, and American forces are required to abide by ethical and moral standards when abroad, in line with international law.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
    Yes, constitutional amendment explicitly outline the criminality of violating human rights.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
    Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
    Yes, however private businesses that violate human rights and freedoms and prove to be malevolent forces can and are broken up. For example, the corporation Amazon would be fined and broken up for violating worker’s rights and breaking workplace standards.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
    Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
    Yes, worker’s rights and freedom of opportunity are lauded as core American values.
Last edited by America Maior on Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:05 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Commonwealth of America :: “E Pluribus Unum”
An idyllic America where technogaianist-agrarianism is the norm, homogeneity is alien and the pursuit of happiness is achievable.
Sep 27, 2020 AD
| The Grillside Paper :: Boston Police Dep. arrests ethnic Azeri teen after death threats to Armenian classmate were posted online with classmate’s address and phone number. // President Ingram posts video’d message of hope for environmental conservation along with scathing criticism of crimes against nature in Brazil and China. // Black youth icon and Olympian Kemal West granted Presidential Citizens Medal.

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The United States of Ibica
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Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 10:46 am

Skyhooked wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Skyhooked
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Well... current overboss was appointed by the Council, but if the people won't like him, they can always start a referendum and vote him out of office. 3

A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
Yes. 4

A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
Electoral laws and framework are a chaotic mess, but this is mostly because Skyhooked is an extremely large anarchist community, pretending to be a state. 3

B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
They can do so.4

B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
Depends on the opposition, because people won't just support conservatives for example. 4

B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Let's just way, our people have guns and guts to defend their opinion, so yes. 3

B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
All of us have them. 4

C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Somewhat, because it's the people, who decide. 4

C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
Our folks won't let officials steal from them, so everytime an official does corruption in the way it hurts the people, he faces dire consequences. 4

C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
Mostly yes, but there are some classified military operations. 4

D1. Are there free and independent media?
Yep. 4

D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
As long as they don't violate laws, so no live human sacrifices or rapes or something like that. 4

D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
Well, we may whitewash some darker parts of our history in books and glorify better ones, but it's up to teacher and student to interpert and create his own opinion. 3

D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
Yes. 4

E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
Yes, just don't start trouble. 4

E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
Yep, they may operate in Skyhooked! 4

E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
Trade unions are an important part of Skyhookedian ideology, so yes. 4

F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
Judges are mostly independent. 3

F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
Yep, our justice is fair. 4

F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
Skyhooked is a polite and armed society, where people can either rely on police forces, or just get a gun and defend themselves. Freedom from war? Well, we don't force our folks to fight, army and militia are strictly volunteer. 4

F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
This is written in our constitution. 4

G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
Yep, this is SKyhooked dude! Move around as much as ya' want! Heck, there are folks, who are nomads. 4

G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
Business is a key to rich and prosperous economy, so the people can start up one anytime. 4

G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
This is Skyhooked, so social freedoms are all time high! 4

G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
Not only they got guns, they are also protected from it by constitution. 4

Aggregate Score: 95



Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:Skyhooked
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections?
Nah, free and good quality WiFi is one of the things our folks and tourists enjoy. 5

A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?
Nope. Maybe in the middle of El Baldio Desert or some other forest it might get slow sometimes... 5

A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?
Nope. 5

A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?
Nope, there ain't no obstacles. 5

A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?
No. 5

B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?
Nyet. 5

B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?
Nope, we won't let them to do so. 5

B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?
Nope. 5

B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?
Self-censorship? Nah, common decency is enough. 5

B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?
Well, there are certain advertisements, but that's it. 5

B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?
They don't exist in Skyhooked 5

B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?
Nope. 5

B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?
Nope. 5

C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?
Our constitution, backed up by people's arms and will, doesn't fail to do so. 5

C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?
No, unless it's something like a cyber attack, engagement in human trafficking or frauds. 4

C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?
No, as long as they don't break the laws. For example: Such things as online frauds, spreading child porn, or cyber attacks (not counting attacks on child porn, enemy or terrorist sites, because attacking those sites is something commendable, and is rewarded) are pretty much punishable offense. 4

C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?
Nope. 5

C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?
No. We don't, unless there is a dire need. 5

C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?
Highly encouraged in case of dire need, such as a terrorsit attack, large scale human tarfficking operation, or something like that. Of course if provider refuses, he won't be punished for that, we'd just hack our way into it anyway. 4

C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?
Well... maybe some angry fraud victim could punch the dude, who did the fraud, or a bunch of trigger happy vigilantes could attack human trafficking ring, they managed to discover in dark net, but aside from that, no. 5
Aggregate Score: 97


Liberty House has assessed the situation in Skyhoohed, an assigned a Political Freedom score of 95, and an Internet Freedom Score of 97, earning an overall rating of "Free." Many of our concerns come from the local conception that "Skyhooked is an extremely large anarchist community, pretending to be a state." That being considered though, this community pretending to be a state is doing a great job! The only other issues we had was the head of state's lack of independence from the legislature, and that judges do not always act independently. Overall, we see Skyhooked as being a free state on the right track.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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The United States of Ibica
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Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:04 am

Coconut Palm Island wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Coconut Palm Island
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Indirectly-- the Senate is directly elected by the people, and the Senate appoint the Monarch. The Monarch serves until death/resignation, or until the Senate votes, by 3/4 majority, to remove the current Monarch and install another one. The Monarch is not directly elected, but if people don't like the current King, they can vote to give Senate seats to parties looking to replace him. 3
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes-- 30 Senators are elected using proportional representation (i.e. if one party wins only 3% of the vote, but 3% in every district, that party gets 1 of the 30 seats. 4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes, the Royal Court (similar to US Supreme Court) oversees elections in a nonpartisan manner. 4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes. We have four established parties (which happen to correspond to the four quadrants of the two-dimensional political spectrum graph), but new parties can theoretically break into the mix. One example of this is the Conservative Party-- a right-authoritarian party designed to be a more sensible alternative to the more extremist Nationalist Party. The Conservative Party recently won representation in the Senate for the first time this year. 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes. While the Liberal Democratic Party currently holds 16 of the 30 seats, it is relatively rare for any one party to hold a majority. Thus, coalitions form. Right now, the winning coalition supports the King, but if public support shifted, it would be possible for parties to form a veto-proof coalition to override the King (3/4 needed), or even replace him (3/4 needed again, but this is unlikely unless the Monarch was broadly unpopular). 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Even more than in many other nations, mots people here make political choices based on actual policy platforms. Once a year about a month before the election, each party with more than 1% of public support (as determined by a nonpartisan polling organization) sends out a one-page summary of their platform to every person in the nation (it arrives as several sheets of paper, in one envelope, organized in order of polling ranking). Additionally, every six or so months, one of the Justices from the Royal Court (which is technically partisan, but once a member is appointed, they generally "rise above" politics and feel more able to drift from the "party line") moderates a big debate, with the leader (or another major member) of every party polling above 3%, where each person gets roughly equal speaking time, and the questions are chosen by a bipartisan panel. 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes, discrimination based on any of these statuses is illegal. 4
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government Mostly yes. Certain non-controversial policy areas can be delegated to bureaucrats (who work under the Monarch), but are subject to Senate oversight. Further, the Senate has the constitutional right to override any member of the executive branch, and while this is mostly aimed at the Monarch, it also applies to policies of the bureaucrats. 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes. Corruption is rare. Our nation was founded in 1972 by people fleeing corrupt and tyrannical states (and, but now, their children and grandchildren), and because most people experienced oppression firsthand they don't engage in it themselves, and citizens are definitely a lot more vigilant. Because the Senate is the only directly elected branch of government, they are given unlimited oversight into the Monarch/executive branch (i.e. can investigate even when no laws have been broken, just to penalize objectively bad decisions) and limited oversight of the judiciary (i.e. only to investigate actual laws being broken). 4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, except relating to specific ongoing law enforcement/military/intelligence operations. The Senate's 3/4 override right means that they can vote by 3/4 majority to make any document available to the public. 4
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes. The government also operates some nonpartisan media, but independent media still exists. Additionally, clear steps are taken to differentiate government vs. private programming (on TV, for example, government programming is odd numbers, and private programming is even numbers). 4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes. 4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Complete academic freedom. Citizens undergo civic education, but this isn't brainwashing unless you consider teaching values like fairness, compassion, equal opportunity, etc. to be brainwashing. 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes. 4
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes, so long as the assembly is peaceful. 4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes, although such organizations aren't as common in our nation as in other nations, because of the oversight different branches of government already have over one another. 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, except that the Royal Court justices can be recalled by 3/4 of the Senate if they have committed a specific crime or have been found mentally or physically incapacitated (i.e. basically a mechanism to remove a lifetime appointment if they loose their grip on reality or turn out to be taking bribes). Lower court Justices are accountable to the Royal Court. 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes, and our justice process emphasizes rehabilitation and restorative justice. Additionally, we have a strong bias toward leniency/presumption of innocence/less severe sentences, as many different public officials all have the ability to pardon people and reduce sentences (but never increase them). 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes. All citizens may join (but participation is optional) the Island's national, but decentralized, militia. The King is the head of the milita, but in emergencies, local branches can break off. The militia usually is activated for natural disasters (hurricane preparation, etc) but can be activated to quell civil unrest/illegitimate force. The emphasis is on making the militia localized, and making every town self-sufficient, but with every person still being accountable to the King and subject to Senate oversight. 4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes, the Royal Charter includes this in Article I. 4
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes, although this is not specifically mentioned in the Royal Charter, it is considered to be included under the "Right to be autonomous". 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes, but regulations on businesses are fairly strict. Additionally, tax rates for larger corporations are fairly high by national standards, but not so high as to prohibit business by any means. 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, citizens enjoy extensive social freedoms. Right now, more than 75% of the Senators, as well as the King, are identified by an independent evaluation group as being "libertarian or very libertarian on social issues, without any consideration of [the Senators' and King's] stances on economic issues." 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes, to the extent that is possible. Obviously, until poverty is 100% eradicated, we can't really say everyone has equal opportunity, but the government does their best to level the playing field. 4
Aggregate Score: 99


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Although internet was fairly good before, the Connect the Island Act of 2020 nationalizes wireless technology. The entire Island is currently covered by (free) LTE, citizens can purchase free WiFi routers that connect to the Island's internet lines, and we plan to upgrade most areas to 5G by 2023. Additionally, each citizen over 13 is entitled to a free smartphone, smartwatch, and tablet, from a major tech company (you know which one ;) ) as well as repairs/replacement. As the internet is used for things like voting, contacting elected officials, job hunting, and fitness (the smartwatch can be connected with your doctor through the Island's Universal Healthcare database), it is essential that every single citizen be connected. 5
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? See A1, even the most remote parts of the Island have some type of infrastructure. However, some very old and isolated citizens refuse to use technology. Because citizens vote electronically, using a facial identification system, younger people usually help older and isolated citizens cast their votes. 5
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No. The King and a big part of the Senate refused to pass the Connect the Island Act without an unequivocal guarantee that the government won't "weaponize" the internet in any way, or use it for any law enforcement purposes (except to prevent instances of child exploitation). 5
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? There is only one service provider, the government itself. However, there's no rule against private companies providing internet, it's just that government internet is already of medium-to-high quality, so there wouldn't be much of a customer base if someone did so. 5
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? N/A, the internet is run by the Island government. The Senate set a certain speed standard (so many Kb per second) that every citizen is entitled to; if this happens, or if internet has other issues (i.e. going out for more than 10 minutes per day), they are automatically entitled to a repair, although repairs usually happen before a problem gets below the minimum thresholds set out. 5
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No. 5
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No, except that the King's Royal Guard tries to delete all videos of child exploitation (usually by getting whoever posted it to pull it down in exchanged for a slightly reduced sentence). 5
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? Because the government runs the process, it is more transparent than if a private corporation ran it. 5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No. Officials usually only provide interviews with reputable journalists, however, which disincentives publication of any lies/ obviously fake information. 5
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No. 5
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No. 5
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? The online information landscape is very diverse, to the point where there are over 100 different news sources (3 international news corporations, 5 major news networks, 92 smaller blog/opinion type sites) for our small Island's news. 5
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No. In fact, the Island's "Vote!" app allows citizens to see information directly from candidates and political commentators, without the ability for any part of the government to censor them. Basically, any person or party polling at over 1% gets to create a "channel" on the app where they can post videos and text articles. 5
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? Although the Royal Charter doesn't comment on the internet specifically, it does specify the right to "free expression". In Senator Curry v. Governor Kim, a national Senator sued the Governor of a district trying to censoring the internet (this was way back in 2002) and won. Since 2002, courts have recognized the right to free expression applies on the internet. 5
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Only in the case of posting videos of child exploitation, or using the internet to do things that are already illegal (i.e. in District 7 vs. McDonald, the Royal Court upheld that, despite the fact that people have the right to free expression on the internet, it is still illegal to use the internet to plan a murder, McDonald's sentence of 3 years of rehabilitation was upheld). 5
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Again, see above. Only for child exploitation or using the internet to plan a real-life crime. 5
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No. All traffic on government internet is encrypted so that even the government can't see what it is. The only exception is that they can collect aggregate data (i.e. they can see that 10,000 citizens searched "How to Run for Senator", but they can't see who made those searches). 5
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No; see above. 5
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? The service providers are the government. But the communication is encrypted and anonymized, so they couldn't use it that way even if they wanted. 5
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No. 5
Aggregate Score: 100


Liberty House has assessed the situation in Coconut Palm Island and has assigned a Political Freedom Score of 99, and an Internet Freedom Score of 100. Liberty House commends the CPI Government in this achievement, recieving the highest scores ever awarded by Liberty House.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:27 am

Zarnicovia nova wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? yes except in southern novia 1
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? yes except in southern novia 1
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? yes except in southern novia 1
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? yes 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? yes but very little can be gained as most of the population supports one party 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? yes except in southern novia 1
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? yes but just as zarnicovia nova passed a law saying that there can not be any laws of the sort still southern novia disagrees. 1
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? yes 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? yes except in southern novia 1
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? yes except in southern novia 1
D1. Are there free and independent media? yes except in southern novia 1
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? in public your not supposed and can be prosecuted for it but it is not enforced and is considered by many a fake law 1
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? yes 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? yes except in southern novia if you're a minority 1
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? yes 4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? yes 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? yes and those things are enouraged 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? yes 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? yes except in southern novia 1
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? yes except in southern novia for minorities and there's a territoist ground in northern brazzila 1
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? yes except in southern novia 1
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? yes 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? yes 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? yes 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? yes 4
Aggregate Score: 61


Liberty House has assessed the situation in Zarnicovia Nova and has assessed a Political Freedom Score of 61, or not free. Political freedoms are completely non existent in portions of the nation, the public expression of religion is outlawed (Though this policy is not enforced), and citizens cannot count on their government to keep them safe from violence.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

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Posts: 1063
Founded: Jun 03, 2020
Democratic Socialists

Postby Zarnicovia nova » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:39 am

The United States of Ibica wrote:
Zarnicovia nova wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? yes except in southern novia 1
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? yes except in southern novia 1
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? yes except in southern novia 1
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? yes 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? yes but very little can be gained as most of the population supports one party 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? yes except in southern novia 1
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? yes but just as zarnicovia nova passed a law saying that there can not be any laws of the sort still southern novia disagrees. 1
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? yes 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? yes except in southern novia 1
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? yes except in southern novia 1
D1. Are there free and independent media? yes except in southern novia 1
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? in public your not supposed and can be prosecuted for it but it is not enforced and is considered by many a fake law 1
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? yes 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? yes except in southern novia if you're a minority 1
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? yes 4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? yes 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? yes and those things are enouraged 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? yes 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? yes except in southern novia 1
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? yes except in southern novia for minorities and there's a territoist ground in northern brazzila 1
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? yes except in southern novia 1
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? yes 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? yes 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? yes 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? yes 4
Aggregate Score: 61


Liberty House has assessed the situation in Zarnicovia Nova and has assessed a Political Freedom Score of 61, or not free. Political freedoms are completely non existent in portions of the nation, the public expression of religion is outlawed (Though this policy is not enforced), and citizens cannot count on their government to keep them safe from violence.

the region of zarnicovia nova that is john the II town only consists of 3% (7.5% of land 3.12% of population and .12% of GDP) of nation everywhere else is ok. We would like ton request a reesssacccment with this information (pls don't ask why it is only .12% of the GDP we kinda bombed it for being bad and rebelling from the nation)
Last edited by Zarnicovia nova on Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
to make an embassy with zarnicovia nova go to viewtopic.php?f=6&t=490604
if you wanna buy from my shop go to viewtopic.php?f=6&t=490229
Q&A here! viewtopic.php?f=23&t=491532
airport viewtopic.php?f=6&t=491681
country founded by a religion based off of my and the views of Utah/the Mormons. far-left democracy very powerful.

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The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:52 am

Bagong Luzon wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Kingdom of New Luzon
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.1
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.1
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.1
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? No on both counts.1
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? No.1
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? No.1
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Officially yes, so long as each segment of the population abides by the tenets of the Philippine Reaction.2
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Not applicable for absolute monarchies.1
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes.4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Mostly.3
D1. Are there free and independent media? Somewhat.2
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Mostly yes; there is a strong social inclination toward any form of belief other than nonbelief per the tenets of the Philippine Reaction.4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Somewhat.2
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Somewhat; some topics are sensitive enough to warrant possible surveillance. Knowingly expressing sympathies to communist and fascist regimes, for example, is grounds for a visit from law enforcement.1
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Limited.2
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Limited.2
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Limited.2
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Not quite.2
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Officially yes.2
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes; insurgencies are suppressed with extreme prejudice.4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Officially yes, but unofficially there are rumors of different laws that apply to society's betters.3
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Mostly.3
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Somewhat.2
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Somewhat.2
Aggregate Score: 51


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Yes, but this is being remedied. 4
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? The latter, usually for geographical reasons; this is being remedied. 4
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? Yes. 1
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes; full New Filipino ownership is required for service providers. 4
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? Officially no. 3
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Yes. 1
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Yes. 1
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No. 5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? Probably. 3
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? Possibly. 3
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? Yes. 3
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? Yes. 1
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? Yes. 1
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? Not officially. 3
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes. 1
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes. 1
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? Yes. 1
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? Yes. 1
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Yes. 1
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? Yes, from other actors. 3
Aggregate Score: 55


Liberty House has assessed the situation in Bagong Luzon and has assigned a Political Freedom Score of 51, and an Internet Freedom Score of 55, garnering an overall ranking of Not Free. The government of Bagong Luzon systematically suppresses the rights and freedoms of their citizens, and the government is structured in a way to deprive all citizens of representation. Laws are also uneven applied to give advantage to higher class citizens.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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The United States of Ibica
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Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:55 am

Zarnicovia nova wrote:
The United States of Ibica wrote:
Liberty House has assessed the situation in Zarnicovia Nova and has assessed a Political Freedom Score of 61, or not free. Political freedoms are completely non existent in portions of the nation, the public expression of religion is outlawed (Though this policy is not enforced), and citizens cannot count on their government to keep them safe from violence.

the region of zarnicovia nova that is john the II town only consists of 3% (7.5% of land 3.12% of population and .12% of GDP) of nation everywhere else is ok. We would like ton request a reesssacccment with this information (pls don't ask why it is only .12% of the GDP we kinda bombed it for being bad and rebelling from the nation)


The score that Zarincova Nova received is because of the oppression of their citizens, it does not matter that the oppression is focused on only 3% of them. Land and GDP does not affect how a nation scores in personal freedoms in any way shape or form. Their score will not improve until their treatment of their citizens does.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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Zarnicovia nova
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Posts: 1063
Founded: Jun 03, 2020
Democratic Socialists

Postby Zarnicovia nova » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:00 pm

The United States of Ibica wrote:
Zarnicovia nova wrote:the region of zarnicovia nova that is john the II town only consists of 3% (7.5% of land 3.12% of population and .12% of GDP) of nation everywhere else is ok. We would like ton request a reesssacccment with this information (pls don't ask why it is only .12% of the GDP we kinda bombed it for being bad and rebelling from the nation)


The score that Zarincova Nova received is because of the oppression of their citizens, it does not matter that the oppression is focused on only 3% of them. Land and GDP does not affect how a nation scores in personal freedoms in any way shape or form. Their score will not improve until their treatment of their citizens does.

it is not the zarnicovian novan central government that oppressing the citizens of john the II town. The state is attempting to stop it. we do not support any of the actions taken by them but at last they have guns. We don't.
to make an embassy with zarnicovia nova go to viewtopic.php?f=6&t=490604
if you wanna buy from my shop go to viewtopic.php?f=6&t=490229
Q&A here! viewtopic.php?f=23&t=491532
airport viewtopic.php?f=6&t=491681
country founded by a religion based off of my and the views of Utah/the Mormons. far-left democracy very powerful.

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The United Artherian Federation
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1770
Founded: Jun 14, 2017
Father Knows Best State

Postby The United Artherian Federation » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:09 pm

Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Artheria
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? Only when matters of national security deem it necessary, and when minors rights are violated.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No, there are not.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? Yes. Board members are chosen by the Kaiser, and then face retention before the people every five years.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Yes, pornography sites and sites that are terrorist in nature.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? The state has the authority to take down websites that sell illegal goods, host illegal pornography or promote terrorist activites.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? Only when they believe it is necessary to do so.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? Pornography is outlawed.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? Diversity in what way?
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? Freedom of expression is protected.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes. These laws involve illegal pornography and making terrorist threats against life or property.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Only when it involves illegal pornography or organizing terrorist activities.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Only when required by court order, or the Kaisers request.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No. Any such actives often result in heavy criminal charges.

User avatar
The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:30 pm

Dunferm wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes, with support of hereditary members of Palriament. 3
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Partly, as a big part of legislature is filled with hereditary members 2
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes 4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes, albeit several radical organisations are forbidden to run for some offices by the law 2
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes 4
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Partly, as they have to co-operate with undemocratic parts of government 3
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? 50/50 3
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes 3
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes 3
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? "Liever Turks dan Paaps" - there are still restrictions on Catholic public worship enshrined in law. 2
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? It's free from political control, albeit the government tries to support some groups. 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes 4
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? yes 4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes, but law forbids large-scale unions. 3
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes 4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? No, nobility and church prelates are priviliged in certain aspects of law. 2
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, the state does not recognise non-heterosexual polygamous marriages. 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes 4
Aggregate Score: 86


Liberty House has reviewed the situation in Dunferm, and has assigned a Political Freedom Score of 86, just barely classifying as Free. We are concerned about the hereditary nature of their legislature, restrictions on freedom of religion, and the unequal treatment of nobility and some religious figures under law
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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The United States of Ibica
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Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:39 pm

Zarnicovia nova wrote:
The United States of Ibica wrote:
The score that Zarincova Nova received is because of the oppression of their citizens, it does not matter that the oppression is focused on only 3% of them. Land and GDP does not affect how a nation scores in personal freedoms in any way shape or form. Their score will not improve until their treatment of their citizens does.

it is not the zarnicovian novan central government that oppressing the citizens of john the II town. The state is attempting to stop it. we do not support any of the actions taken by them but at last they have guns. We don't.


Had your nation not already scored a 1 on question F3, this information would have actually lowered your score.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

User avatar
Kergstan
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 485
Founded: May 09, 2014
Democratic Socialists

Postby Kergstan » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:46 pm

Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No, IT infrastructure is well developed.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? All citizens have access to internet for free, they can pay for faster or additional services.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? It does have the tool to do so but there haven't been internet blackouts in years.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes, only state-owned service providers are allowed. Foreign firms aren't allowed to invest in this sector.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? There's no need for regulatory bodies as all companies are owned by the state.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Hate speech, severe inhumane treatment, rape are some of the contents that are blocked.
Some foreign news sources are blocked for spreading fake news.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Yes.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? State employees may practice self-censorship.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? Some online sources are, most are independent.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No, but the most visited information sites show the establishment views.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No unless the objective contravenes the law.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? The law protects those rights, the judiciary is not completely independent.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? Yes
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No


Notes : Our government employs almost 100k people who own 10 to 20 accounts they utilize to spread pro-government views and shame or counter-argument anti-government views.
Last edited by Kergstan on Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I DON'T USE NS STATS


SRKNA
PIMARAT Forces in Ratsirana fully operational after deadly terror attack in the country|Kergstan plants flag on Murena Rock claimed by Pohnei

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The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 2:36 pm

Confederate American SU wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes 4
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? There are no representatives, laws are made directly by citizens. 4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes 4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? People are free to organize into political groupings, but a direct democracy is inherently nonpartisan. Politics is more divided by parochial and economic interests than by political parties. 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?There is no 'opposition' as parochial and economic interests all have influence in the government. But, elected executives quickly turn over according to the preferences of the majority of their constituents. 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Ethnic minorities have no rights, and religion, especially evangelical Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, are heavily restricted. LGBT and women have equal rights. 1
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Citizens of the States and Syndicates determine policies directly.4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes 4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes 4
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes 4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Certain religious groups like evangelical Christianity, Mormonism, and Islam face repression. 1
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? There is academic freedom, and schools 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes for whites 1
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes for whites 1
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes, they have direct influence on the government. 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, but it is rather weak in power. 3
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes for whites 1
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? No 1
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes for whites 1
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Property ownership is defined by active use. Absentee ownership and wage labor are illegal. 1
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes for whites 1
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? For whites, yes. 1
Aggregate Score: 69


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No 5
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No 5
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No 5
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No 5
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? No 5
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No 5
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No 5
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No 5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No 5
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No 5
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No 5
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No 5
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No 5
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No 5
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? No 5
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? No 5
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No 5
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No 5
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No 5
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No 5


Liberty House has reviewed the situation in Confederate American SU, and has assessed a Political Freedom Score of 69, but an Internet Freedom Score of 100, being in the odd position of a repressive, racist government, but with no restriction on the internet. We have found the RCAS to be overall Not Free.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 605
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 2:51 pm

America Maior wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
    Official: Commonwealth of America; colloquial: America
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?
    Yes. 4
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
    Yes. 4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
    Yes.4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
    Yes, except for groups and/or parties that aim to abolish democracy, freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution, or the Commonwealth itself. Fortified democratic principles are adhered to in the protection of American freedom. Thus totalitarian parties and extremist groups are banned from participating in electoral processes, as are pro-CSA groups which are considered anti-American and anti-Freedom. 3
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
    Yes. Obstacles to freedom, such as gerrymandering for example, are illegal and thus parties must earn votes legitimately. 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?
    Does this include criminalisation of anti-freedom forces from participating in electoral processes? If so, then largely yes but with exceptions. 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
    All American citizens, whether born or naturalised, have full political rights and electoral opportunities. Non-citizen residents are granted the majority of rights barring voting and participation in electoral processes. 4
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?
    The President of the Commonwealth of America and their government determines federal policy alongside Congress, the governments of the states and republics (integrated native states, such as Seminole Republic) determine their local policies. 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
    Yes. Corruption is considered vile and the American public are not tolerant of it. This is enshrined in law and judicial practice. 4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
    Yes. Freedom of knowledge is acknowledged and protected by all relevant authorities, including state, republic and federal. The public can obtain almost all information from the government, which courts determine whether such information should be released if it is in the public interest. Inquests into crimes against humanity always end with documents and information released. 4
D1. Are there free and independent media?
    Yes. Some state governments operate local news media alongside public interest and private media. 4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
    Yes, however secular laws take precedence over religious doctrine, such as in violations of personal freedoms and animal rights. 4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
    Yes, besides widely-held and demonstrated beliefs in Jeffersonian democracy and American idealism. Educators are encouraged to remain apolitical or in good faith challenge various sociopolitical positions, especially extremist ones such as Fascism or Segregationism. 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
    Yes, one cannot be acted against purely for such speech. Speech with the intent of incitement can be punished by fine, as can support for the CSA. 3
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
    Yes, however extremist groups may be forcibly dissolved and criminalised if they are deemed a threat to freedom, including pro-CSA and similarly anti-American groups. 3
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
    Yes. Humanitarian and watchdog organisations are completely free to pursue their plans and regulate government and military behaviour, for example. 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
    Yes, and trade unions along with similar organisations are awarded protections and guaranteed freedom to operate. 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
    Yes, the judicial branch is wholly independent of the executive and legislative branches. 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
    Yes, violations of this can be punished. 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
    Yes. Citizens are protected from unjust or illegitimate force conducted by authorities, war criminals are tried and sentenced accordingly, and American forces are required to abide by ethical and moral standards when abroad, in line with international law. 4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
    Yes, constitutional amendment explicitly outline the criminality of violating human rights. 4
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
    Yes. 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
    Yes, however private businesses that violate human rights and freedoms and prove to be malevolent forces can and are broken up. For example, the corporation Amazon would be fined and broken up for violating worker’s rights and breaking workplace standards. 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
    Yes. 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
    Yes, worker’s rights and freedom of opportunity are lauded as core American values. 4


Liberty House has reviewed the situation in the Commonwealth of America and assessed a Political Freedom Score of 97, earning a rating of "Free." The only concerns we have are the criminalization of the "thought crimes" of supporting certain political systems or ideologies. While we are completely fine with the idea of preventing those seeking such aims from accomplishing them through constitutional means, we find the criminalisation of merely supporting such and idea concerning.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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Anatoliyanskiy
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Posts: 229
Founded: Jan 19, 2020
Liberal Democratic Socialists

Postby Anatoliyanskiy » Wed Oct 14, 2020 3:03 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes. The last one was in 2020.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes. The last one was in 2020.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes. This is mainly managed by the Department of Electoral Affairs and the Electoral Council, both sub-bodies of the Ministry of the Interior.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes. There are over 15 registered political parties.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes. The opposition currently has 84 seats.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes. Monitors are imposed at all polling stations during election time.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes. All minorities listed are represented in the House of Commons.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes. There are meetings every week.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes. There is a Department of Transparency that operates under the Ministry of Justice.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes. There are religious buildings for all religions practiced in the country.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes, though hate speech against minorities is extensively monitored.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes. In fact, trade unions have large political say and are quite powerful.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, with 11 elected judges who are elected for a 6-year term.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes. There are extensive laws that protect ethnic and cultural minorities.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? To own property, yes. Private businesses are monitored and there is a limit on how many can be formed. If the number of private businesses exceeds this limit, then they are transferred over to the government or state.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, quite extensively.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes. There are many barriers preventing companies from exploiting consumers and workers.
Pro: Environmentalism, Eco-Socialism, Democratic Socialism, Social Democracy,Progressivism, Pro-choice, Pro-LGTBQ+ rights, Immigration, Bernie Sanders, Juan Guaido (Venezuela) ,Secularism, Palestine And Israel, Internationalism, Alter-Globalization.

Anti: Trump, Conservatism, Traditionalism, Bigotry, That weird TERF movement, Fascism, Stalinism, Totalitarianism, Laissez-faire Free-Market, Libertarianism, Bolsonaro, Religious Fundamentalism, Nationalism
We mostly use NS stats.
I'm a Eco-Libertarian Democratic Socialist, or ELDS for short.
Forums that I've posted: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=487988
(this is not a puppet of Penguinya, by the way)

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