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[DRAFT] Mandatory Science Curricula

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Kaschovia
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[DRAFT] Mandatory Science Curricula

Postby Kaschovia » Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:46 am

This is my first resolution draft, but I'd like to learn what I can about the resolution writing trade, so please let me know where this could be improved and or how I can improve my writing/presentation.

I decided to give this one a go because I saw it in the 'Ideas for GA Resolutions thread' and it had not been done yet.

Mandatory Science Curricula

Category: Education and Creativity | Proposed by: Kaschovia

RESPECTING the efforts of GAR #48 Access to Science in Schools to encourage wider availability of science education to all students,

ACKNOWLEDGING the shortcomings of GAR #48 in regard to mandating scientific education at institutions non-specific to the sciences, specifically at a higher education level,

FURTHER ACKNOWLEDGING the freedom of private schools, institutions of higher education, and other types of schools not funded by their government, to teach their own curricula,

NOTING that although some may be in contention with accepted scientific theories, religious teachings and beliefs are equally as important to each individual as scientific teachings,

RECOGNIZING the many crucial skills that a sufficient education in science can provide, such as logic, numeracy, observation, literacy, and critical thinking,

BELIEVING that an effective and enjoyable education is the comprehensive study of a wide variety of subjects and vocations, and that an education in the sciences should be an international right, therefore,

WANTING a resolution that respects the pursuit of the studies offered at non-scientific institutions of higher education, while also ensuring students have access to scientific curricula at lower educational levels,

The World Assembly HEREBY,

DEFINES public schools as educational institutions supported by government funds,

DEFINES peer-reviewed courses as schemes of education containing content, appropriate for the level of education offered, verified by significant evaluation of scientific, academic, or professional work by others of the same competency working in the same field,

MANDATES that public schools must introduce and teach comprehensive, peer-reviewed science courses for students in the stages of education between, but not including, preschool and higher education,

REQUIRES that public schools teach the practical elements of science and the standards of scientific experimentation, in addition to the theoretical elements of science, including currently accepted and previously disproven scientific models.

RESPECTING the efforts of GAR #48 Access to Science in Schools to encourage wider availability of science education to all students,

ACKNOWLEDGING the shortcomings of GAR #48 in regard to mandating scientific education at institutions non-specific to the sciences, specifically at a higher education level,

FURTHER ACKNOWLEDGING the freedom of schools not funded by their respective government to teach their own curricula,

NOTING that although some may be in contention with accepted scientific theories, religious teachings and beliefs are equally as important to each individual as scientific teachings,

RECOGNIZING the many crucial skills that a sufficient education in science can provide, such as logic, numeracy, observation, literacy, and critical thinking,

BELIEVING that an effective and enjoyable education is the comprehensive study of a wide variety of subjects and vocations, therefore,

WANTING a resolution that respects the pursuit of the studies offered at non-scientific institutions of higher education, while also ensuring students have access to scientific curricula at lower educational levels,

The World Assembly HEREBY,

DEFINES public schools as educational institutions supported by government funds and private schools as educational institutions not support by government funds,

MANDATES that public schools must introduce and teach comprehensive, peer-reviewed science courses for post-preschool students not yet in higher education.

REQUIRES that public schools teach the practical elements of science and the standards of scientific experimentation, in addition to the theoretical elements of science, including currently accepted and previously disproven scientific models,

DEMANDS the inclusion of science curricula be made optional for private schools, institutions of higher specialized education, and any other type of nationally approved school not funded by its government.

RESPECTING the efforts of GAR #48 Access to Science in Schools to encourage wider availability of science education to all students,

ACKNOWLEDGING and understanding however, the shortcomings of GAR #48 in regard to mandating scientific education at institutions non-specific to the sciences, specifically at a higher education level,

NOTING that although some may be in contention with popular scientific theories, religious teachings and beliefs are equally as important to each individual as scientific teaching,

BELIEVING that an effective and enjoyable education is the comprehensive study of a wide variety of subjects and vocations, therefore,

AFFIRMING that every student in stages of education before higher education should have access to scientific education as well as religious and or non-scientific education,

LACKING a resolution that respects the pursuit of the studies offered at non-scientific institutions of higher education, while also ensuring students have access to scientific curricula at lower educational levels,

The World Assembly HEREBY,

DEFINES public schools as educational institutions supported by government funds,

MANDATES that public schools must introduce and teach comprehensive, peer-reviewed science courses for post-preschool students not yet in higher education.

REQUIRES that public schools teach the practical elements of science and the standards of scientific experimentation, in addition to the theoretical elements of science, including currently accepted or previously disproven scientific models,

DEMANDS the teaching of the sciences be made optional for institutions of higher education that may not be specific to scientific teaching, such as private schools, graduate schools, or vocational schools.

RESPECTING the efforts of GAR #48 Access to Science in Schools to encourage wider availability of science education to all students,

ACKNOWLEDGING and understanding however, the shortcomings of GAR #48 in regard to mandating scientific education at institutions non-specific to the sciences, specifically at a higher education level,

RESPECTING that although some may be in contention with popular scientific theories, religious teachings and beliefs are equally as important to each individual as scientific teaching,

BELIEVING that an effective and enjoyable education is the comprehensive study of a wide variety of subjects and vocations, therefore,

AFFIRMING that every student in stages of education before higher education should have access to scientific education as well as religious and or non-scientific education,

LACKING a resolution that respects the pursuit of the studies offered at non-scientific institutions, while also ensuring access to scientific curricula during the primary and secondary stages of education,

The World Assembly HEREBY,

DEFINES public schools as educational institutions supported by government funds,

MANDATES that public schools must introduce and teach comprehensive, peer-reviewed science courses for post-preschool students not yet in higher education.

REQUIRES that public schools teach the practical elements of science and the standards of scientific experimentation, in addition to the theoretical elements of science, including currently accepted or previously disproven scientific models,

DEMANDS science education be available at public institutions of higher education offering science education, but be made optional for institutions of higher education that may not be specific to scientific teaching, such as private schools, graduate schools, or vocational schools.

Defining primary education as the first stage of formal education after preschool but prior to secondary education,

Defining secondary education as the second stage of formal education after primary education but prior to higher education,

Defining a public school as an educational institution funded by its national government,

Respecting the efforts of GAR #48 Access to Science in Schools to encourage wider availability of science education to all students,

Acknowledging and understanding however, the shortcomings of GAR #48 in regard to mandating scientific education at institutions non-specific to the sciences, specifically at a higher education level,

Respecting that although some may be in contention with popular scientific theories, religious teachings and beliefs are equally as important to each individual as scientific teaching,

Believing that an effective and enjoyable education is the comprehensive study of a wide variety of subjects and vocations,

Therefore affirming every student in primary and secondary education should have access to scientific education as well as religious and or non-scientific education,

Lacking a resolution that respects the pursuit of the studies offered at non-scientific institutions, while also ensuring access to scientific curricula during the primary and secondary stages of education,

Hereby mandates,

1. Public primary and secondary schools must introduce and teach comprehensive, peer-reviewed science courses for primary and secondary school students.

2. Public primary and secondary schools must teach the elements of practical science and the standards of scientific experimentation, in addition to the theoretical elements of science, such as currently accepted scientific models and propositions, but also how theories have developed or been disproven in the past.

3. Science education must be available at public institutions of higher education offering science education, but is optional for institutions of higher education that may not be specific to scientific teaching, such as private schools, graduate schools, and vocational schools.
Last edited by Kaschovia on Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:49 am, edited 19 times in total.

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Kenmoria
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Postby Kenmoria » Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:09 am

(OOC: I think your definitions of primary education and secondary education are only really applicable to some nations in real life, let alone the diversity of the General Assembly. Some countries may have only one contiguous stage of education after preschool but before higher education, whereas others may have three stages in that period.)
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Kaschovia
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Postby Kaschovia » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:03 pm

Kenmoria wrote:(OOC: I think your definitions of primary education and secondary education are only really applicable to some nations in real life, let alone the diversity of the General Assembly. Some countries may have only one contiguous stage of education after preschool but before higher education, whereas others may have three stages in that period.)

To solve this issue, I have removed all references to primary and secondary education. I believe saying 'post-preschool but not yet in higher education' might be better phrasing. Higher education is already defined by the GA through GAR #158 Promotion Of Intl Education, so all nations share this definition.

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Postby Bananaistan » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:20 pm

"What do you have against home schooled children or private school pupils?

"Section 3 amounts to "if you teach science, you must teach science". Is this really necessary?"

OOC: Welcome to the GA. This is a good first draft. There are some drafts on the topic on the forum. Have a look at these. You might be able change your draft according to those or comments on those, but don't lift text directly. If you use something, paraphrase it for your draft. Note also the repealed GAR#48 and the arguments used to repeal it.
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Kaschovia
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Postby Kaschovia » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:56 pm

Bananaistan wrote:"What do you have against home schooled children or private school pupils?

"Section 3 amounts to "if you teach science, you must teach science". Is this really necessary?"

OOC: Welcome to the GA. This is a good first draft. There are some drafts on the topic on the forum. Have a look at these. You might be able change your draft according to those or comments on those, but don't lift text directly. If you use something, paraphrase it for your draft. Note also the repealed GAR#48 and the arguments used to repeal it.

OOC: Thank you. It's an area of NationStates I have been excited to become more involved in.

"Private schools and home-schools have the right to teach whatever they wish to, so to make it optional is the best course of action. They literally exist to offer a separate course of education for those able to pay for it. They are essentially a business model. Requiring what is essentially a business to teach something that they might not be specialized in is going a little too far in my opinion. As has been mentioned in the repeal resolution, requiring all educational institutions to teach sciences, even when their students may specialize in a different area of study (music, for example), would hinder the natural and focused development of the skills they have accumulated thus far in that field. And so it is only fair the monetary sacrifice of either private schooling or home schooling are balanced with that choice."

"As for Section 3, I have removed the first part, leaving the final clause. That final clause is the important one, as it explicitly states that higher educational institutions be given the option not to HAVE to teach science if they're a specialized school. Thank you for providing me with those previous drafts. I will read through the drafts relevant to this topic and see what changes can be made."
Last edited by Kaschovia on Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Sposteen » Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:06 pm

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"The optionality should only be made for vocational schools for priests. Why should religious schools and private schools be exempt? What is the purpose of only making this work for primary education? This is good so far."

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Kaschovia
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Postby Kaschovia » Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:13 pm

Sposteen wrote:The floating encounter suit hums a low tone.

"The optionality should only be made for vocational schools for priests. Why should religious schools and private schools be exempt? What is the purpose of only making this work for primary education? This is good so far."

Vra'al, Second Sposteen Ambassador to the WA

"Religious schools can be public or private. If a religious school is state funded, then that school will teach science as well as other subjects. If a religious school is private, then the option is there to teach sciences or not."

"The important distinction is this: a private school is a business. That is why it is called a private school. You cannot enforce a business to deliver a product to their client (the student) that the client is not paying for. The customer has the right to buy whatever they'd like. A public school, however, is not a business in the same sense. The state government of the nation in which the public school operates will be funding it, because that is what constitutes a public school. So for public school students, mandatory education in the sciences is the best way forward in promoting scientific career paths and science skills without infringing upon the already existing rights of private schools."
Last edited by Kaschovia on Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Youssath
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Postby Youssath » Fri Oct 11, 2019 6:26 am

"The mandates and clauses for this resolution doesn't particularly look striking or strong to me in general, and your resolution reeks of elements from Kenmoria's resolution on Promoting Natural Sciences in Schools. I would definitely want to support this, but reasonable nation theory (and any reasonable nation) would at least, provide comprehensive teaching of the natural sciences in its curriculum where necessary. If your idea here is to impose a mandatory science curriculum for all member nations with the exclusion to private schools, then I will not support this bill at all - since nations use education to gear up its workforce to specific industries in the economy (for example, a nation with a robust engineering industry would certainly educate to "convince" its workforce to fill up any vacancies within the engineering field), and that this can be a direct violation of National Sovereignty if taken from this perspective."

"As for now, I will stand opposed to the introduction of mandatory science curricula across all member nations. Nations should be free to adjust their curriculum accordingly to better suit their economies and industries they have an economic advantage in."

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Postby Auralia » Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:51 am

This proposal has the same problems as the now-repealed GAR #48. Why is it necessary to micromanage individual schools? Why can't the GA simply require that children receive education in the natural sciences?
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Postby Aclion » Fri Oct 11, 2019 8:16 am

What does it mean that a course is peer reviewed?
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Postby Marxist Germany » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:26 am

Aclion wrote:What does it mean that a course is peer reviewed?

OOC: I echo this statement, peer reviewing only applies to studies, and peer reviewing needs to be defined, as it could range from two primary school teachers to international scientific assosciation.
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Kaschovia
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Postby Kaschovia » Fri Oct 11, 2019 11:34 am

Youssath wrote:"The mandates and clauses for this resolution doesn't particularly look striking or strong to me in general, and your resolution reeks of elements from Kenmoria's resolution on Promoting Natural Sciences in Schools. I would definitely want to support this, but reasonable nation theory (and any reasonable nation) would at least, provide comprehensive teaching of the natural sciences in its curriculum where necessary. If your idea here is to impose a mandatory science curriculum for all member nations with the exclusion to private schools, then I will not support this bill at all - since nations use education to gear up its workforce to specific industries in the economy (for example, a nation with a robust engineering industry would certainly educate to "convince" its workforce to fill up any vacancies within the engineering field), and that this can be a direct violation of National Sovereignty if taken from this perspective."

"As for now, I will stand opposed to the introduction of mandatory science curricula across all member nations. Nations should be free to adjust their curriculum accordingly to better suit their economies and industries they have an economic advantage in."


"I appreciate your feedback. Interestingly, it was only after I had posted the first draft, that I was informed of Kenmoria's resolution. I'd seen the repeal of GAR #48 and wanted to give a replacement resolution a go. It seems we have both taken similar ideas on the topic and wanted legislation on it. That is all."

"We both believe in similar things here, but not the exact same things. My idea is not as simple as you put, 'to impose a mandatory science curriculum for all member nations with the exclusion to private schools', I am clarifying that science should be an integral part of public education specifically for students beyond preschool teaching, but not yet in higher education. Private education is a service offered by businesses charging clients (students) for an alternative path in teaching. That is completely legal. However, because the WA is a collective of nations all working in the direction of progress and betterment of our peoples, it makes perfect sense to enact legislation that achieves those goals in the sense of government funded institutions such as public schools, and not businesses. I do not want to regulate businesses to offer a product that they should have the right to offer or not. In addition to this, I am also referring to institutions of higher education as well as private schools, such as colleges and universities."

Auralia wrote:This proposal has the same problems as the now-repealed GAR #48. Why is it necessary to micromanage individual schools? Why can't the GA simply require that children receive education in the natural sciences?

"What problems, if you could clarify? I understand that GAR #48 was not specific enough in targeting the mandates of the resolution at the schools that actually need mandatory science curricula, which is why I have aimed to properly distinguish which schools should be required to teach the sciences, for the improvement of opportunities for students, and which schools legally have the right not to teach sciences, examples of which I have explained multiple times already in this thread."

"It is necessary, not to micromanage, but to distinguish the different types of education all students are legally entitled to and clarify the right to separate forms of education that come with those types in relation to the overarching theme of mandatory science curricula, because to require all children learn natural sciences is to limit their freedom to a non-public education, which is more restrictive than the legislation I am proposing."

Aclion wrote:What does it mean that a course is peer reviewed?

"Containing content, appropriate for the level of education offered, verified by significant evaluation of scientific, academic, or professional work by others working in the same field. I will include this definition for greater clarity."

Marxist Germany wrote:
Aclion wrote:What does it mean that a course is peer reviewed?

OOC: I echo this statement, peer reviewing only applies to studies, and peer reviewing needs to be defined, as it could range from two primary school teachers to international scientific assosciation.

See my explanation above. The peer-review process is a central principle of science, and has been in use since the 1660s IRL, which is why I will include the definition above for it in hopes that it will properly clarify what is meant by peer-reviewed.

Last edited by Kaschovia on Fri Oct 11, 2019 11:36 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby Great Nortend » Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:28 pm

OOC: What counts are receiving government funding? What if all schools are given some amount of funding? Does that mean all schools are public schools? What if every organisation in a country is given an annual stipend? What is an educational institution? Is a sunday school an educational institution? What if there is an established church which runs these Sunday schools? Are they public schools?
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Postby Kenmoria » Sat Oct 12, 2019 1:21 am

“I’m finding it hard to parse your definition of ‘peer-reviewed’. Could you try re-wording or simplifying it?”
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Postby Kaschovia » Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:13 am

Great Nortend
Great Nortend wrote:OOC: What counts are receiving government funding? What if all schools are given some amount of funding? Does that mean all schools are public schools? What if every organisation in a country is given an annual stipend? What is an educational institution? Is a sunday school an educational institution? What if there is an established church which runs these Sunday schools? Are they public schools?

"Thank you for your questions. I'll try to clarify as best as I can."

What counts [as] receiving government funding?

"Well, it would work differently for each nation, but for sake of simplicicity, being supported by government funds for operations, resources, and other costs to provide an education, counts. I'm not sure how else I can clarify this for you. In the simplest terms, if a school is being supported by government funds in order to provide the education of their students, then it counts as government funding."

What if all schools are given some amount of funding? Does that mean all schools are public schools? What if every organisation in a country is given an annual stipend?

"Allow me to set some parameters initially so you can get a better idea of the target group of this resolution. I am not referring to all schools, I am only referring to schools that offer the stages of education between preschool and higher education, whatever they may be in their respective nation."

[OOC: For a RL example, the UK would have an age bracket of 4 - 16 or 17, the stages of education in the UK are preschool, primary school, secondary school, and Sixth Form/College/Other. It would only be in the primary school and secondary school stages of public schools that are required to teach science curricula. These are the parameters.]

"Now, in terms of the case you have outlined in your question here, the answer is yes. If ALL applicable schools in a nation offering the stages of education between preschool and higher education are being supported by government funding, then all of those schools will teach science curricula because they are public schools. This is due to the very nature and definition of different types of schools. ANY applicable schools that are supported by government funds are public schools, would be included in the mandates I have established in the resolution, offering as many students as possible the chance to be taught in the sciences without infringing upon the rights of private schools."

What is an educational institution?

"It is simply a place where people of different ages gain an education."

Is a sunday school an educational institution?

"I would say so, because I respect the desire to provide an education through the passion of religion, although I have not found any legislation in the GA that answers that question, I am afraid. So for the sake of consistency within the GA, please refer to my answer below."

What if there is an established church which runs these Sunday schools? Are they public schools?

"Like I detailed in my parameters, if the Sunday school is supported by government funds to operate and provide education, it is subject to the mandates of the resolution. Although I would hope that a child is recieving a more... regular education, than on a single day of the week."

Kenmoria
Kenmoria wrote:“I’m finding it hard to parse your definition of ‘peer-reviewed’. Could you try re-wording or simplifying it?”

"I will reword it for you, but the definition I have given is the best I could do, unfortunately, although I am open to suggestions for changes to it."

"Peer-reviewed means subject to the peer-review process. The peer-review process is a procedure through which academic research is evaluated by one or more people with simlar competences as the person who produced the research. That research is then put into a more literate form such as an article in a scientific journal, and then if enough people peer-review it, it becomes generally accepted by the scientific community, at which point it can be taught as fact in schools. This resolution would require these standards for all content being taught as fact in schools. I believe the resolution I have written includes satisfactory mandates for schools to teach sufficient science courses (clause 9), while also allowing for theories that have been disproven (clause 10)."

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Kenmoria
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Postby Kenmoria » Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:36 am

Kaschovia wrote:"I will reword it for you, but the definition I have given is the best I could do, unfortunately, although I am open to suggestions for changes to it."

“Ambassador, I know what ‘peer-reviewed’ means. The current definition you have is much better, thank you.”
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Kenmoria is Laissez-Faire on economy but centre-left on social issues
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Postby Kaschovia » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:02 am

Kenmoria wrote:
Kaschovia wrote:"I will reword it for you, but the definition I have given is the best I could do, unfortunately, although I am open to suggestions for changes to it."

“Ambassador, I know what ‘peer-reviewed’ means. The current definition you have is much better, thank you.”

"I'm sure you do. I simply wanted to expand my explanation for the sake of clarity. I'm glad that we are on the same page."

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Wayneactia
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Postby Wayneactia » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:11 am

"Explain to me why this is even remotely an international issue? Is it not possible that nations can handle this themselves? This is hardly even a national matter. This seems like something that could be handled by local school boards."

Wayne

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Kenmoria
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Postby Kenmoria » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:38 am

Wayneactia wrote:"Explain to me why this is even remotely an international issue? Is it not possible that nations can handle this themselves? This is hardly even a national matter. This seems like something that could be handled by local school boards."

Wayne

“I believe that science education is an international right. Perhaps the preamble could be expanded to emphasise this. However, I do agree that clause 4 might be seen as micromanaging.”
A representative democracy with a parliament of 535 seats
Kenmoria is Laissez-Faire on economy but centre-left on social issues
Located in Europe and border France to the right and Spain below
NS stats and policies are not canon, use the factbooks
Not in the WA despite coincidentally following nearly all resolutions
This is due to a problem with how the WA contradicts democracy
However we do have a WA mission and often participate in drafting
Current ambassador: James Lewitt

For more information, read the factbooks here.

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Postby Great Nortend » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:55 am

"Like I detailed in my parameters, if the Sunday school is supported by government funds to operate and provide education, it is subject to the mandates of the resolution. Although I would hope that a child is recieving a more... regular education, than on a single day of the week."


OOC: So a Sunday school must introduce science lessons? What about a week-end minority language school? That would be bizarre.
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Kaschovia
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Anarchy

Postby Kaschovia » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:05 am

Wayneactia wrote:"Explain to me why this is even remotely an international issue? Is it not possible that nations can handle this themselves? This is hardly even a national matter. This seems like something that could be handled by local school boards."

Wayne

"To you, Ambassador Wayne of Wayneactia, this might not be an international issue. But to many others, the sciences offer a crucial foundation for ensuring the successful educational development of students all over the world. For whatever reasons you may have, perhaps you do not share the urgency in educating people in the sciences as others might have. But, in recent years, anti-science thought has been rapidly rising and spreading throughout civilised society, examples being the anti-vaccination and anti-climate change movements. I do not wish to get into heated debates about those issues, but the existence of those movements is undeniably due to lack of effective education in the sciences, although mistrust in places of authority is another factor. The danger of these false notions comes from a place of misunderstanding and conspiracy, and only serves to regress scientific thought, which is why it is so important that all students are entitled to a proper education in the sciences."

"To teach our children the importance of scientific processes, is also to teach them to question everything, and to come to logical conclusions about the world. I, personally, believe that every child should be taught the sciences during lower education (preschool to higher education), but, I also believe in the freedom of private schools to offer their own curricula to willing clients. My resolution aims to expand the teaching of sciences to the furthest possible reaches without infringing upon the rights of private schools, and other schools, as I have detailed in my resolution."

"In short, science is important, no matter where, or who, you are."

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Kaschovia
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Founded: Apr 09, 2016
Anarchy

Postby Kaschovia » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:12 am

Great Nortend wrote:
"Like I detailed in my parameters, if the Sunday school is supported by government funds to operate and provide education, it is subject to the mandates of the resolution. Although I would hope that a child is recieving a more... regular education, than on a single day of the week."


OOC: So a Sunday school must introduce science lessons? What about a week-end minority language school? That would be bizarre.

OOC: It really depends on the school in question. Sunday schools and week-end minority language schools do not offer a very wide range of courses and subjects (as they are only one or two day classes), so I'm not entirely sure that they'd be a 'school', rather perhaps a class to be taken outside of mainstream schooling.
Kenmoria wrote:
Wayneactia wrote:"Explain to me why this is even remotely an international issue? Is it not possible that nations can handle this themselves? This is hardly even a national matter. This seems like something that could be handled by local school boards."

Wayne

“I believe that science education is an international right. Perhaps the preamble could be expanded to emphasise this. However, I do agree that clause 4 might be seen as micromanaging.”

"I totally agree. Science education should be an international right, but we do need to be aware of the freedoms of private schools to teach their own curricula, passions for science put aside."

"As for clause 4, I just want to ensure that students who are taught in the sciences are taught the most important aspects of science - the ability to experiment, draw conclusions from, and develop/disprove theories from the physical world."


Apologies for the double post here, I wanted to respond to Wayneactia's comment fully.
Last edited by Kaschovia on Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:19 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Bananaistan
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Founded: Apr 20, 2012
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Bananaistan » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:34 pm

Kaschovia wrote:
Wayneactia wrote:"Explain to me why this is even remotely an international issue? Is it not possible that nations can handle this themselves? This is hardly even a national matter. This seems like something that could be handled by local school boards."

Wayne

"To you, Ambassador Wayne of Wayneactia, this might not be an international issue. But to many others, the sciences offer a crucial foundation for ensuring the successful educational development of students all over the world. For whatever reasons you may have, perhaps you do not share the urgency in educating people in the sciences as others might have. But, in recent years, anti-science thought has been rapidly rising and spreading throughout civilised society, examples being the anti-vaccination and anti-climate change movements. I do not wish to get into heated debates about those issues, but the existence of those movements is undeniably due to lack of effective education in the sciences, although mistrust in places of authority is another factor. The danger of these false notions comes from a place of misunderstanding and conspiracy, and only serves to regress scientific thought, which is why it is so important that all students are entitled to a proper education in the sciences."

"To teach our children the importance of scientific processes, is also to teach them to question everything, and to come to logical conclusions about the world. I, personally, believe that every child should be taught the sciences during lower education (preschool to higher education), but, I also believe in the freedom of private schools to offer their own curricula to willing clients. My resolution aims to expand the teaching of sciences to the furthest possible reaches without infringing upon the rights of private schools, and other schools, as I have detailed in my resolution."

"In short, science is important, no matter where, or who, you are."


"It is rather hard to take your "won't-someone-think-of-the-children" pleas seriously when you propose to exempt entire nations and certain schools, and a whole class of children. Forgive me for utterly dismissing your crocodile tears while this remains the case. Either this is important and should apply to everyone, or it's unimportant and not worthy of this assembly's time."
Last edited by Bananaistan on Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Delegation of the People's Republic of Bananaistan to the World Assembly
Head of delegation and the Permanent Representative: Comrade Ambassador Theodorus "Ted" Hornwood
General Assistant and Head of Security: Comrade Watchman Brian of Tarth
There was the Pope and John F. Kennedy and Jack Charlton and the three of them were staring me in the face.

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Kenmoria
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5213
Founded: Jul 03, 2017
Corporate Bordello

Postby Kenmoria » Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:47 am

“If you are continuing with this idea of only affecting public schools, then there’s no need to define a private school, since you only have to define a public one.”
A representative democracy with a parliament of 535 seats
Kenmoria is Laissez-Faire on economy but centre-left on social issues
Located in Europe and border France to the right and Spain below
NS stats and policies are not canon, use the factbooks
Not in the WA despite coincidentally following nearly all resolutions
This is due to a problem with how the WA contradicts democracy
However we do have a WA mission and often participate in drafting
Current ambassador: James Lewitt

For more information, read the factbooks here.

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Kaschovia
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Founded: Apr 09, 2016
Anarchy

Postby Kaschovia » Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:47 am

Bananaistan wrote:
Kaschovia wrote:
"To you, Ambassador Wayne of Wayneactia, this might not be an international issue. But to many others, the sciences offer a crucial foundation for ensuring the successful educational development of students all over the world. For whatever reasons you may have, perhaps you do not share the urgency in educating people in the sciences as others might have. But, in recent years, anti-science thought has been rapidly rising and spreading throughout civilised society, examples being the anti-vaccination and anti-climate change movements. I do not wish to get into heated debates about those issues, but the existence of those movements is undeniably due to lack of effective education in the sciences, although mistrust in places of authority is another factor. The danger of these false notions comes from a place of misunderstanding and conspiracy, and only serves to regress scientific thought, which is why it is so important that all students are entitled to a proper education in the sciences."

"To teach our children the importance of scientific processes, is also to teach them to question everything, and to come to logical conclusions about the world. I, personally, believe that every child should be taught the sciences during lower education (preschool to higher education), but, I also believe in the freedom of private schools to offer their own curricula to willing clients. My resolution aims to expand the teaching of sciences to the furthest possible reaches without infringing upon the rights of private schools, and other schools, as I have detailed in my resolution."

"In short, science is important, no matter where, or who, you are."


"It is rather hard to take your "won't-someone-think-of-the-children" pleas seriously when you propose to exempt entire nations and certain schools, and a whole class of children. Forgive me for utterly dismissing your crocodile tears while this remains the case. Either this is important and should apply to everyone, or it's unimportant and not worthy of this assembly's time."

"Excuse me? Can the Ambassador for Wayneactia not speak for himself?"

"Firstly, that was my opinion. If I wanted to plea for something, I wouldn't have written a resolution putting my ideas forward, so it's absolutely bizzare you see it like that."

"Secondly, I am not proposing to exempt entire nations, certain schools, or a whole class of children, and frankly, I am totally confused as to where that has come from. It is clear to me that you didn't read my response to this exact same question when you asked me earlier. I am making an attempt to ensure that as many students as possible recieve an education in the sciences without infringing upon the rights of certain schools that legally have the choice to teach the sciences, because either they are businesses, or they do not fit between preschool and higher education. How is that in any way exclusive? I am trying to be as inclusive to different schools as possible."

"Thirdly, following your line of reasoning, would the government of Bananaistan legislate that businesses (in this case private schools) should sell certain products (in this case educational courses), because everybody needs to have those products (in this case science education)? Or would the government of Bananaistan like to enforce science education at art schools, or culinary schools, or music schools? Because that's what you're proposing. I am disappointed that you have taken such a black-or-white position on this issue, because it is multi-faceted, and is affected by many factors.

"And lastly, you do not speak for everyone when you say that this issue is not worth the assembly's time because it doesn't meet your personal criterion. This is an assembly, as I am sure you are aware. In future, try not to rely on vitriolic language to disregard the arguments I put forward. It doesn't help anything."

Kenmoria wrote:“If you are continuing with this idea of only affecting public schools, then there’s no need to define a private school, since you only have to define a public one.”

"Thank you for providing genuine, constructive criticism. I will remove the definition, although I have had to explain why they are exempt so many times at this point."

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