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The Will of the Sun God

Where nations come together and discuss matters of varying degrees of importance. [In character]
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Lord Atum
Diplomat
 
Posts: 725
Founded: Jul 26, 2004
Corporate Police State

The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Thu Apr 30, 2009 2:46 pm

Atum, the ‘Lord of Totality,’ the first and greatest of the gods, the deceitful despot of a hundred worlds, stood behind a golden pedestal with dozens of slot-in crystals and large keypads, one of three in the room, the other, manned by Thoth, his most trusted follower, and the third, empty, a computer terminal without the function crystals. He slotted a green crystal, hexagonal, six inches high and one wide, into place before him, and looked at the two hawk helmed guards at the far side of the room. “Bring him,” he said.

They turned, stepping out of the golden room, for a moment, and then returned, holding a young man between them. Atum pointed a white-gloved hand towards the centre of the three computers, “Stand there,” he said, and the hawk-guards thrust him forward. He took his place with a dubious look.

Atum looked at the human, a farmer, he thought, by trade, no surprise, from behind an elaborate mask that seemed to be constantly in motion, under a white hood, trimmed with ornate symbols of the religions devoted to him. “Thoth. Power the device…”

The other goa’uld pulled down a switch on the other panel, “Active. Self-test complete.”

Atum nodded, “You. Step forwards…”

The human hesitantly stepped forwards, and for a moment Atum wondered if they’d just pulled him from the streets, or if he was a criminal of some sort. On the grey wall, a break in the chamber’s decoration, a large object appeared, as though emerging from the stone. It looked like a strange, ribbed, alien barnacle, two feet wide, at exactly head level. The man hesitated, and Atum pointed at it, “Forwards…” he said.

With a startled and fearful glance, he stepped forwards, and the structure on the wall flexed outwards, grasping his head as he tried to recoil. He screamed, struggling frantically as light from within burnt its way into his held-open eyes. Atum nodded to himself in satisfaction as the device retracted, letting its victim fall hard onto the floor.

“We should probably put a couch in front of these head-suckers…” he said, his jocular tone making up for the lack of an expression upon his face, he turned to the guards, “check him.”

One briefly inspected the man, “He lives, Lord…” he said, in goa’uld.

“Good,” Atum said, satisfied, “The chalice, there. A small drop should restore consciousness…”
__ __ __


“You planned this…”

He was back on Kheb, being hectored by a dark haired woman dressed in white, an unpleasant experience that happened to him from time to time. Others, absorbed in games and books, lounged in the sunlight of the monastery, paying them no attention.

“What?” Atum said.

“You just happen to be completing your research on education and modification,” she sneered, “as your expedition is about to reach a distant system filled with your worshippers, and an advanced technology base.”

“I haven’t a clue what you’re talking about…”

“Your ‘Heart of Light’ power module expedition. You’re using it as an excuse to flaunt The Rules, and make your petty little empire…”

“…better,” Atum said.

She glowered at him, “permanent.”

“Better. Better for everyone in it.”

“You’re stalling independent cultural development…”

He laughed, “So speaks the voice of one who has never known hunger or disease… That notion is such a pernicious folly.”

She stared at him, “Coming from you…”

“Who has done just that, for countless millennia. If you can find a breach of your Rules, so be it. Otherwise, you are wasting my time…”
__ __ __


Atum found himself back in place, and looked at the human as he came around, “You!” he snapped, “reset that terminal and link it through to trans-orbital hyperspace scan satellites.”

The man rose, and did precisely so, a little unfamiliarly, but nonetheless effectively. When he’d been brought in, he’d barely known the essentials of reading. Now, however, he appeared quite proficient with the computer.

“Define inertia…” Atum said, for something less practical and more basic.

“Inertia is…” the man hesitated, “the property of matter by which it remains in uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force. Inertia is the property by which a body not acted upon by a force moves at a constant velocity, covering equal distances in equal times, along a straight path.”

Across the room, Thoth frowned, “How do you derive momentum?”

“The total momentum of an object is the product of mass and acceleration.”

“Send a signal faster than light…”

“Phased transmission of radio waves through a subspace charged volume with intensity greater than twelve arins per cubic centimetre, modulated by a spherical shell of impregnated naquadah to generate a”

“That will be sufficient,” Atum said, “Guards… Take him to the chamberlain. Inform him that this man is to be sent to Hoktau for long-term observation, oh, and granted whatever boon he may wish for.

“And alert my barque to prepare for my arrival.”
__ __ __


Sia felt the cool hands of his favoured slave upon his shoulders as he rose, already kneading his flesh in anticipation of the day. “Good morning my lord…” outside the window, the flaring incandescence of hyperspace swished by.

“Important day today,” he said, caressing her slim hand, she had been a gift from Atum, his father. She was a slave-girl from a group captured from somewhere called ‘Kajal’ who had foolishly wandered into Atum’s realm. The exoticism of that made her immensely valuable, “we should arrive in the Optis system today. Twenty thousand light years,” he said, standing up, “and the best part of a month. With any luck, our pilot will have worked out the stellar drift correctly, and we can get to work,” he rose, wrapping a heavy linen kilt that ran to his ankles around himself, and setting about dressing.

He waved a hand, and a cloak shot toward him, wrapping itself around his shoulders. He was very much the first of his kind among the goa’uld, his host had been not found, but synthesised, on Tartarus, with substantial ‘improvements’ over the common human, and no independent personality to speak of. Instead of having any independent thinking capacity, its brain was entirely devoted to generating telekinetic and similar abilities. Sia, the spirit and fruit of Atum’s Wisdom, thought of himself as the future.

Soon they would arrive in the system known as Optis, a former domain of his father, who had charged him with retrieving a long-lost artefact there, that they now knew to be a power source of ancient origin and incredible ability. Probably a technology related to the Eyes of the Goa’uld, ancient artefacts that powered his father’s flagship.
__ __ __


That ship was currently in orbit of Mnewer, as a set of transporter rings brought its owner up from the planet far below, flashing down, and re-materialising Thoth, Atum and two of the heavily armoured kull warriors. The sound of great clamps locking escort ships into place echoed through the ship. Goa’uld vessels became strategically faster, the larger they were, and though Atum had since constructed a still-faster battle-cruiser class along a similar principle, this vessel was the opus of Ptah, a great ship capable of carrying a small fleet through hyperspace at a stunning speed. With the additional power sources Atum had brought to it, it was even faster.

He strode onto the vessel’s command deck, his guards taking up a place behind him. It had been made larger, its original pel’tak being too small for Atum’s taste. Now, it had three thrones, one for himself, the largest and most elaborate, one, on his right, for his consort, and one on his left, most frequently used by Thoth, or the ship’s commander.

He sat in the command throne of the Barque of Millions of Years, relaxing a little, “Are our escorts secure?” he asked, of the vessel’s commander, a senior jaffa named Rekhmire.

“Yes, Lord,” he replied promptly.

“Then make course for the planet Rindamla, take us there, at maximum speed.”

“As you command. Course laid in, engaging hyperdrive engines, estimated time until arrival. Five hours.”

Atum nodded, almost to himself, “Good. Have a company of jaffa prepared to land when we arrive.

Thoth looked at Atum, “The outpost at Rindamla has been disused for millennia. The world is barren. There is nothing there.”

“It was used in the Trial of Ra. What I want is likely there.”

“Which is?”

“Goa’uld who will not be missed…” outside the windows of the command deck, space gave way to the familiar brightness. He rose, “I shall be in my chambers.”
__ __ __


Sia stood upon the bridge of Morrigan’s ship as it re-entered real space. They had no recent information on Optis, and so emerged from hyperspace several astronomical units away. That as much as he had expected, and Sia was unsurprised by this, but what did come as a surprise was when the ship’s display immediately switched to a long range scan.

There were vessels in the system - hundreds of them - thousands - tens of thousands. More than he had ever seen, more, even, than his father’s memory had ever seen, that he knew of.

The ship’s commander ordered that some of the objects be scanned in more detail, and Sia was relieved to see that most were primitive, propelled by rocketry, or even generating gravity by rotation.

“I do not think it wise to remain here too long,” the ship’s commander said, glaring at him. She resented his presence, he was a new figure, and though she far outranked him, he operated directly upon the orders of Atum, and thus she was constrained to consult him for her orders

“I agree,” Sia said, “jump out to four light years, and have the launch bay prepare a tel’tak with a cloaking capacity for me.”
__ __ __


Atum drifted, formless, thinking upon his history, which was far beyond that which any of his fellows but Thoth, and now Sia, knew. The meditation chamber was dark, flooded with the finest frankincense burning behind the walls, and the artefact through which he usually took physical form.

He was thinking upon the thousands of years of his life. He had many names, Atum, Tem, Temu, Nefertum. Once, he had been Amun – Amun-Kem-Atef, first and primordial goa’uld, honoured and reviled by many names, including, in the time of Ra, the title ‘Apep’ an ironic and dismissive name, conflating him – by Apophis’ design, it seemed – with the serpent god. He had ruled the species in the ancient past, until the chief of his warlords, Anubis, had betrayed him, forcing him into insanity, and eventually, declaring him destroyed. Though some of Atum’s former supporters had in fact arranged for the destruction of the ship he was on, he had landed on a distant world. But his host, then an alien creature, had been too grievously damaged to survive.

For thousands of years he had endured on that distant world. More than long enough to reflect on the flaws of his race’s parasitic society. He longed to return to potency and power, and eventually, he had done so. But while he had the megalomania of his fellows, he had long worked towards another goal. As soon as his conquest of the goa’uld was underway, he had declared an end to the callous destruction of the countless excess symbiotes that had for millennia been the terror of every newborn member of the species – the parasitic snakes that were their true forms – produced each year. Instead, he had sent them to a world called Sorana. For fifty years he had done this. Casting away two million symbiotes per year; his armies were greater than that, but not all were granted the honour of carrying symbiotes; jaffa could function adequately without as long as they had never been given one.

Soon, every design he had developed since coming to power would be fulfilled. He had as the ancient ‘ascended’ meddler had accused him of ‘planned’ it. And it would be glorious. Soon he would have a triumph that would change the face of his species, his empire, and eternally set him beyond all rivals.

His anticipation was immeasurable.
__ __ __


Sia listened as the ship’s hyperdrive rumbled, and glanced back at its descent pods, wondering if Morrigan had just given him a vessel likely to explode. That didn’t happen, thankfully, he dropped into real-space, reaching forward to activate the ship’s cloaking device, hopefully rendering it immune to the planet’s sensors.

He angled the small courier and cargo ship downwards, scanning for notable energy and naquadah sources.
__ __ __


The hot, dry surface Rindamla was scoured by fast winds and grit-storms. The horus guard were thankful for their helmets, pressure-sealed as they were, though they were barely able to see in the storm, it had not dissuaded Atum, who walked as unaffected by the sand howling around his white robe as though it were a calm, tranquil day on the shores of Mnewer.

The stargate here was inaccessible – though Atum could probably have restored it to operation – because this world was one of thirteen, linked together, in a test of his former master – whom Atum had entered the service of upon his return, all the while waiting for an opportunity to break away and begin his conquest – to test supplicants who wished for minor positions in his court. That, and it had also been created for simple cruelty.

It was a test on a time limit – on each world, was some puzzle, and the supplicant had a limited time before he was trapped, with devices within the body that would activate if they left the world – if they failed, then they would be trapped on the world of their failure as the modified stargates locked them out, to, on this world, the closest to Atum’s domain, die of dehydration.

He pointed at fallen rocks, “There…” the naquadah in the decayed body calling to him; or at least, that was his justification, in truth, he’d known what he would find here for decades, the knowledge of his current form was vast, though he was forbidden to obviously use it: he knew exactly what Sia would find, and what he would find here, but he was forbidden to obviously act upon that knowledge, “unearth it.”

The guards scrambled to obey, and in a short time, they had revealed a desiccated corpse; there were few microorganisms even, on Rimdamla, to break the remains down. Atum crouched, his robe brushing the hard-packed dirt, and breaking open the dried hand of the remains, taking a small message recorder from it. Curiously, he activated the device, giving an image of the victim, when he lived. The voice that went with it, weak, from damage done to the device.

Sidhe, beloved. I speak to you from where I shall now never leave. Misfortune has struck me down and my Trial is at an end. I engaged this Trial with all my confidence, certain its reward would bring all that I hoped to bestow upon you, give you the richness in life your devotion and love has given me through the long years of our bond…

“Never did I regret undertaking this glorious Trial, but with my dying breath shall I regret not being by your side every day of the life you will live without me
,” they dying man broke off, coughing wretchedly, and his eyes glowed the deep gold of an ancient or dying symbiote.

He paused it, feigning surprise. He knew of such feelings, and indeed, they were very much what he hoped for in the future. The goa’uld were a warped race; he had realised so long ago, perverted by the power they had attained by parasitic attainment of knowledge, the intimate but total control of others that went with it, and passed down by genetic memory. Continuous battles for domination were the end result of that, and a vested interest among the species in keeping the numbers down, wasting talent, and countless lives. Their own kind had suffered more from their rule than any other species. They were rare and individually powerful enough not to form a society; not to ever learn the value of those outside themselves; those, like this dead goa’uld before him, who did so even to a small degree were exceptional. It was a perpetual loop of species wide failure that would go on forever.

“You!” he said, pointing at the nearest guard, “Bring a bier.”

It was one he would break.
__ __ __


Sia walked the hallways of the city, shielded in a cloak of invisibility. It was prosperous, advanced, and clearly on a war footing. It was faintly disturbing. Then, he recognised the flag. He listened to the speech. These humans had come far, but nonetheless, they still revered the god of their ancestors. Nefertum.

He had to restrain the urge to laugh. He must soon return to his father. This was beyond a simple expedition to find some artefact now, but first…
__ __ __


The facility on the moon called Sorana was huge, manned by especially fanatical jaffa priests and warriors, and constructed by a handful of goa’uld under the oversight of Ma’at, wife of Thoth, orbiting a gas giant, near the prosperous world of Aafoh, where Ma’at dwelt. Extracted surgically from the desiccated host, the symbiote of the goa’uld Atum had retrieved from Rimdama writhed in its tank, living once more through the power of the sarcophagus on board the Barque of Millions of Years. The chamber, one of hundreds, contained three reclining glass cases, with machinery in them. A more sophisticated model of the device used in crafting the expendable kull warriors, a concept Atum had taken from the research of his ancient enemy, when he had last tried to hunt him down. The formation was complete, a flash of light followed, imbuing the un-living construct of carbon hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen with sudden, mindless life, and the case hinged upwards, revealing a perfect host, like Sia’s (though this one, of course, did not possess the same telekinetic abilities, Atum did not want such a thing to become too widespread, for it would only exacerbate the social problems of the species), based upon cloned material garnered from the remains, but in younger, perfect condition. Atum waved to the priestess-warrior in charge of the chamber, and she reached into the tank, gently lifting the goa’uld from it, and passing it to Atum, who in turn, pressed the wet creature against the skin of its new host.

At that moment, the doors opened, to admit Sia, who bowed, “Father. I have returned,” it was far simpler to return than to go, the Aafoh star-gate, and the one aboard Morrigan’s ship being quite operational, “I have important news. The world of Optis has developed an advanced civilisation, which nonetheless considers you a divine creator,” he held out a book, labelled in goa’uld-derived text, ‘The Book of Nefertum.’ Atum took it, leafing through the text, looking at the goa’uld, beside him, the first test of the new process, that had now blended with its new host, and was looking almost comically confused.

All was just as he had planned.

It was time to begin.
__ __ __


There were many beautiful worlds in the domain of Atum, but in many ways his favourite was Cidri. The entire planet and its moons had a population of eight million, completely devoted to keeping it an inviting environment in which the elite of the domain could indulge in any pursuit. These ranged from active hunting of any of a thousand types of game, some bred and modified bred specifically to pose a terrifying challenge, to sensuous, stupefacient and sexual indulgences. There had been an art of abusing and slaying the population that induced a terrifying horror among the world’s population. Since Atum’s return, he hat forbidden it utterly, and the inhabitants’ love of their diety was as high as could anywhere be expected.

A pair of angels, with elaborate, sweeping wings, knelt before a couch on which lay a woman with eight, illuminated, gossamer thin, wings on her dress, and an elaborate head-dress. The wings were partially folded back on themselves to allow their wearer to lie full length on the divan. She lightly caressed the blonde hair of the male of the two slaves; she’d taken both of them from Shezmu, a now-demoted retainer who had purchased them in some foreign climb. They looked spectacular, and so she’d kept them. Feathers and wings were part of her iconography anyway, so she felt they suited her image. In her other hand, the great System Lady Ma’at held a lotus blossom in a custom-made golden holder and diamond counter-weighted stem. The holder was insulated against heat, as the plant was very slowly burning, engineered to have a relaxing, congenial effect on one who breathed in its smouldering smoke. Whenever one was exhausted, a servant swiftly brought her a replacement.

The most trusted of Atum’s underlings were languidly taking counsel. Aside from Ma’at, and her husband Thoth, the Divine Consort, clad in an elaborate white dress, and Atum himself, a number of their inferiors had been invited. Lounging on Thoth’s couch with him were his ‘concubines’ Seshat and Nehmetawy, both of whom were much like Ma’at, but far junior in both Atum’s and Thoth’s reckoning, and inferior in talent. She resented neither, she and her husband had chosen both of them for their talent in select academic areas many millennia ago. Sia, one of the first creations of the new science of goa’uld hosts, was also present, attended to by a slave almost – though not quite, she noted with satisfaction – as exotic as her own. Servants trained and groomed since early childhood for this chamber, and forbidden from speaking to any save those arriving with the God or bearing his seal of authority, waited patiently to fulfil the slightest wish. Along with them, waited fully a dozen Kull warriors.

“Did you know there was an attempt on my life several days ago?” Atum mused, “I was beginning to think they’d given up…”

“The Tok’ra or other rebels?” Thoth asked.

“I think not, disaffected among our own is more likely.”

“Well, it should come as no surprise. There are many who think they deserve to be part of a small population of false gods still. They rather dislike the idea of every one of their offspring being given a host. Competition scares those of minimal talent,” Ma’at said.

“Do we know who?” Amanda, Atum’s consort asked. She was a cause of much resentment, too. There were more attempts to assassinate her than there were Atum himself. The court resented the attention he gave to a mere human, albeit one whose defection had almost single-handedly won great territories that contributed to their prosperity. Any of those who felt they had the right charm entertained notions of replacing, or perhaps possessing (precautions had been taken here) her.

An eagle soared by overhead, and Atum, half-sitting on his couch, watched it, “No. It was as I reviewed troops before a landed ha’tak.”

“I thought,” Nehmetawy said, “that the standard procedure was to lock down all guns capable of traversing to be a threat…”

“Indeed,” Atum said, seeming approving, “they were more intelligent than that. They opened fire with one of the light dorsal guns, on another landed ha’tak. Which would have returned fire at maximum power and probably killed everyone I was with, even though it wouldn’t have slain me. Fortunately, some quick-thinking jaffa on the targeted ship shut it down.”

“Was a culprit caught?” Sia asked.

“Ah, here is where it becomes interesting. A maintenance crew was working on the gun, but even under nish’ta, and a few other normal interrogation techniques, they claimed innocence.”

“Then they are well conditioned,” Sheshat said.

“I would have known that. I haven’t time to investigate fully. So if anyone has any suggestions…”

Ma’at smiled, “Actually, here’s an idea… It’ll give us a field test, too…”
__ __ __


Arakon was still getting used to having a physical body. Seven years of tormented anti-childhood had paid off, and he had been lucky enough to be implanted. Of course, he currently had… nothing. Well, not entirely true. He had clothes on his back, courtesy of the tailors of the facility at Sorana, and a ribbon-device on his hand, but that was it. Rankless, he would be able to use his species as a means to gain shelter and necessities, but that was it, for now. The luxury of living out his ancestral memories was, for now, beyond him.

He was less than an hour into his adulthood – astonished by the comfort and ease with which he could control this host – and he was journeying from the Aafoh stargate, a structure on a hill, overlooking a picturesque town, surrounded by a large, elaborate, wooden henge, to Edfu. He was accompanied by three others, just like him, indeed, he’d had the first choice of the six bodies they’d been offered.

The stargate activated, and he stepped through to Edfu, a blurring impression of speed as he passed through, to inhale the air of the dusty region where the stargate was erected.

In the decades since his mother had last seen this world, the great obelisk that stood near the stargate had risen a little, the tiny hieroglyphics carved on its faces listing every one of the soldiers of Edfu who had perished in Atum’s service since he had conquered the world. Each block was slotted under the others as the whole structure was lifted by a cargo ship, and another moved in under it. Each block represented roughly a thousand names. Two more had been added, the total now twenty in all. The lowest block was, however, barely half inscribed. A mason was at work with a micro-laser imprinting another name.

A priest stepped up to them, from the large brazier that symbolised the world’s devotion to the sun god, where several priests and brides of Atum attended to it, refilling it with oil.

“Can I help you, travellers?” he asked.

“You can,” Arakon said, letting his eyes glow for a moment, to clarify his status. The stargate shut down behind them, and immediately began dialling again, as a column of hundreds of jaffa warriors began to troop up towards the portal’s raised platform, “Could you direct me to the Lord of Hosts’ palace?”
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

User avatar
Lord Atum
Diplomat
 
Posts: 725
Founded: Jul 26, 2004
Corporate Police State

Snakes on a city ship!

Postby Lord Atum » Fri Jun 05, 2009 3:07 pm

Edfu’s streets were crowded, the planet was one of the most populous, hundreds of millions of jaffa lived here, and the most apt of them became the strong backbone of Atum’s legions, while others supplied priests, healers, and countless other vocations. Such a thing was taking place even now.

They passed a large square, where hundreds of children, ranging in age from twelve to fifteen or so, of both genders, were milling around, both with and without parents. Around the area, dozens of training academies seemed to be advertising, demonstrating intar stunning-weapons, or pieces of goa’uld technology here and there, trying to out-compete their neighbors in making their legion or sisterhood or profession seem the most interesting.

There were some military units that didn’t follow such open hiring practices, of course. The Seker and Setesh Guards went out of their way to seek out children on all worlds of suitable temperaments, and the three legions Atum had personally founded in recent years all recruited veterans of proven character.

The professional training of jaffa of all stripes tended to take about eight years, much the same for both priests and priestesses to warriors, so they were generally recruited at the onset of puberty.

Melna, another of the group with Arakon, batted his shoulder playfully, “That one looks like you!” she said.

Arakon studied the jaffa boy, hefting a red-pommelled staff taller than he was, given to him by a soldier in one of the units answering to lord Yu, it seemed.

“He does not!” Arakon said, watching with a smirk as the young boy swung the weapon around.

“He really does,” she said, “If I didn’t know better, I’d think he was your son!”

The boy promptly activated the weapon and shot one of his fellows with a stunning, but harmless, red blast.

“Acts like you too,” Ritan, another of his group, who’d chosen a light skinned host, said.

“What? Me? I’m the soul of kindness and brotherly love!” Arakon said, as they walked on, to the wide, high bridge that spanned the planetary capital’s main river.

“You keep your love to yourself, brother,” Helmand, the fourth of their number, said. “Horus may be infamous for that kind of thing, but I’ll have you know I’m purely into females!”

__ __ __


The Temple of the Blue Lotus was a spectacular place, Sia decided. Inside its colonnaded silvery walls were vast lakes of the titular flower, surrounded by flat topped silvery buildings that made up the central religious structures of the Bedrosian people, which had pride of place, of course, in their capital city. This outer courtyard was one of the most popular areas, with thousands of people gathered around its great lake for meditation and to cast small coins into it for good luck. One superstition seemed to be that one was granted some kind of boon by skipping stones across the lake far enough – either that or the children dragged there by their parents made a game of it. He wasn’t entirely sure.

At one end of the area, an enormous seated statue made of pure gold dominated the area, shimmering slightly under a shield that protected it from terrorist attack. It was before this Sia stood, examining the depiction of his father for a time. As far as he remembered, none of his father’s hosts had been quite so good looking – this was in every way a masterwork.

He turned away from it and began to walk on the lake. He was invisible, cloaked from view and sensor, but his walking upon the water raised invisible ripples that were swiftly noticed by the children nearby.

He’d spent quite some time planning this, but nonetheless, there was a chance he was about to get shot, as he held himself telekinetically upon the surface of the water, and with a thought, deactivated the cloaking device – a little showmanship, perhaps, but useful. He made his voice powerfully resonant, and began to speak.

“People of Bedrosia, I am Sia, the herald of Nefertum!” he said loudly, making his voice as resonant as possible, as a number of temple guard took aim at him. He concentrated upon generating a protective shield – not an energy shield, these people had these, more highly developed than the goa’uld, in some respects, but one of kinetic force to intercept the charged blasts that flew toward him.

He waved a hand and drew the rifles from them, casting them into the water.

And he’d drawn the better missionary task. His brother Hu was now trying to win over their rivals on the other continent.

__ __ __


Arakon was suitably impressed by the yacht deck of Horus Bedhet’s ship, a vast open space comprising throne rooms, bathing areas, and many other features, opened up at the top to allow Edfu’s natural sunlight to steam in from high vertical windows.

The group of new goa’uld were sitting at one of the tables in this space while Melna briefed him upon their mission from Ma’at.

The Lord of Hosts, as Horus Bedhet was called, was the chief official in charge of training the jaffa legions of Edfu, and the commander of his fleet. There was a less-than-cordial rivalry between him and Geb, Atum’s Warlord, as to the matter of whom actually was superior in the service of Atum. Their power was very similar, though Geb’s fleet was equipped with superior hyperdrives, while Horus controlled the training of the army – within reason, at least.

Horus himself was a large, bald man, impressively violent looking, currently sitting in golden armour, on an equally brutal looking throne, a pair of his Horus Guard, particularly imposing examples, behind him, framing him like

“And you see, we were told to start our investigation on the ship in question,” Melna said, “in order to determine what happened.”

Horus was bristling with the insinuation that his people might not have investigated competently. Nonetheless, he didn’t want to seem obstructive. Geb would doubtless capitalize on such a thing immediately. “Very well,” he said, nodding, leaning back reluctantly.

__ __ __


The ha’tak was deserted. Atum himself had ordered everyone on board taken into custody, and they were the first to be granted access. It was rather eerie, the corridors long and deserted, standing empty, the fires gone out and the lights in power conservation mode.

“This is it,” Melna said, as they found a control panel built into the wall. This was the gunnery terminal from which the shot intended to assassinate Atum had been fired. Helmand and Ritan were in gunnery control, examining the computers there for records of untoward activities.

The gun was mounted in a revolving sphere about five meters across, set down into the ship’s hull, almost invisible from the outside. In this octagonal room, they could access it from a bulge in the floor that was railed off, if they wished. On the walls several panels displayed its statistics, target data, and allowed it to be aimed manually. Normally this room would be empty and sealed off as the gun was automatic, this area was solely for maintenance.

Ritan sat cross legged on the floor – no one had bothered to install seats in here, and slotted the control crystals from one of the walls, one by one into a group of testing and diagnostic kits she’d brought with her. Arakon, meanwhile, was, after a brief scan for skin-prints and genetic material of the room, beginning the rather more complex task of checking the weapon itself for tampering.

He tapped a code into the command console, and the buried orb in the centre of the room swivelled around, its slick, oiled surface slipping around in its mounting, until the weapon’s recessed emitter head was vertical. Each of these was a little like a staff weapon, but built into a spherical shape, nonetheless, the emitter shape remained fairly constant. Arakon instructed the device to open the weapon’s firing cover, a curved plate of steel several inches thick, which slid across. There was a howling hiss as air rushed into the vacuum inside the gun’s armoured sphere. The next control was to make it eject the business end, which telescoped several feet up into the air, locking into a bracket on the ceiling.

“Found anything?” he asked Ritan, and she shook her head. “Wonderful,” Arakon said, inputting another command, that caused a ladder to descend into the gun itself, where yet more control hardware was located; thankfully the maintenance system was entirely separate, or they’d have had to have checked that too. A small curved walkway extended to the ladder, and Arakon opened the railing around the gun section, and clambered across to the ladder.

The interior was mostly bone-dry, as he’d have expected, except for the central column and recoil bracings, which were powerful piston-like struts, heavily lubricated. Unlike whatever they used on the outside, whatever oil was used to do this, actually stank, close up.

__ __ __


The Kull Warriors stepped through Morrigan’s stargate, rippling indigo cloaks slung over their shoulders, with ominous, skull-leering clasps on their breasts. The group spread out, stamping into position to watch Morrigan’s guards, as Atum’s gleaming, hawk-headed Palace Guard followed, shining blue eyes in their low, unique helmets glimmering as they looked around, staff weapons at ease.

A moment later, Atum himself, wrapped in light blue and white robes, his face an expressionless blue-jade mask in an elaborate headdress, emerged from the stargate. As one, all present kneeled before him, and his jackal-helmed First Prime.

“Rise, Morrigan, you have done well.”

__ __ __


Bakhetem Perin frowned at the security around the institute of theological research. Not just doubted, but with whole platoons marching down the corridors. She’d not seen anything like that since the enemy landings ten years ago.

“What’s going on?” she asked one of the few guards whose face she recognized.

The man frowned. “Some joker who claims to be the herald of Nefertum came by.”

“So?” she asked. “We get about fifty of those here each year.”

“Well, usually they don’t stop stun blasts with a wave of their hands, fly around without any anti-gravs, or disappear in flashes of light.”

“I… see…” she said, “didn’t make the morning news I see.”

“You’ve not seen the crowds by the main gate, I don’t think it needed to be announced,” the guard leaned in, “supposedly, the Optricans had a visit too. Only they didn’t stop shooting, and got a few of their people hospitalized from it.”

__ __ __


“So, we’ve been at this for… what, an hour?” Arakon asked. “Time for a break?”

He’d been working on the gun, climbing in and out and fetching control circuits from it, getting progressively greasier and more annoyed with whoever was responsible for this.

“Better than that,” Ritan said, “I think I’ve found it…”

“In other words,” Arakon’s voice echoed up from the service hatch of the weapon, “I needn’t have bothered?”

“Oh, stop moaning. Come look at this!”

He climbed out of the sphere, and leaned on its side, watching as she ran the programming crystal through it. “See, just here, when the gun should power down and lock onto external control, it’s been changed to load a training package into the targeting computer, while making the gun activate.”

“So when the gun is locked off as if a visiting dignitary is there, it fires on the nearest ship, which retaliates with its dorsal guns, the whole area gets blown to Seker,” Arakon said, “Nasty.”

“There’s bad news, though.”

“Go on…” he said, skeptically.

“There’s no manufacturing imprint on this. Though there’s only a few thousand places that could make one like this, we may have to search each one for the molecular traces of its production…”

__ __ __


The inner chamber of the oldest active temple in the world was where Atum chose to appear. Half ruined, unlike the temple of the Blue Lotus, this was far from the same grandeur, built of stone, and long looted for the goa’uld technology that had been left in it.

Nonetheless, it was the only one he remembered, from so long ago.

The sanctum was only occupied by a solitary priest as Atum arrived, transported from the cloaked vessel in orbit, alone, and ascended the steps to a long unused stone throne, seating himself with a flourish.

“Blasphemer! Get off of there!” the man shouted.

Now this is an inauspicious start… he thought to himself.

__ __ __


“Sia,” Atum said.

The planet Optis was at war, below.

Of course, it had been at war for centuries. But now there was a difference. Now, the kull warriors of Atum fought in the war. Entire battalions of tireless, unstoppable super-soldiers were making rapid progress, supported by the soldiers of Bedrosia, their traditional enemy was falling.

Atum had tried to convert both groups of humans; the truth as he’d explained it was simple enough.

He had said they both had elements of the truth; the book of Nefertum, which spoke of his creation of the universe, and which was the holiest text of the Bedrosians, was truth. But he had just as surely created life on other worlds, and many of his servants were the aliens that the Optricans knew of.

The Optrican reply had been to engage his vessel with long range laser satellites in orbit of the system’s star.

Now, he would simply have to reunite the planet at the point of a plasma repeater, and accept the instability that would result. No doubt, ten years from now, there would be a major revolt…

“My Lord…” Sia said, distracting him from his contemplation of the view.

“You have the Heart of Light?”

Sia nodded, waving one of the kull warriors forwards, who revealed a glowing, yellow cylinder, swathed in black silk.

“Then you may return to Edfu,” he said, “and depart for the Lost City at your leisure.”

__ __ __


Arakon frowned as his group was practically shoved out of the area around the Edfu stargate by a raven guard, carrying one of the new generation of sleek weapons acquired from Atum’s latest territory.

“Cheeky bastard,” Melna said, looking around as the stargate disengaged behind them. The entire area had been altered, power cables trailing into the stargate, large vehicles clustered around the portal. There were hundreds of warriors, a whole squad of the ominous kull warriors, priests, handmaidens, the practical, dark brown and silver clothes of these Bedrosians, and even a red-robed slave woman attending the director of this cirucus, a tall, slender goa’uld.

__ __ __


Sia watched as the inconvenient arrivals were hurried out of the area around the stargate, and strode up to the modified dialling device. He’d done this before, but now he would go. He would go to the stars of another galaxy – to the so-called Lost City of the Ancients, with unknown wonders. Perhaps they would even find living Ancients somewhere in that galaxy, to learn the secrets of.

He pressed the buttons on the dialing device one after another, six, seven, and then an eighth. The stargate hummed with the power it drew from the nearest mother-ship, and then opened. He pushed through to the front, to pass through the gateway with the kull warriors, with the same familiar surge of disorientation, extended, more powerful.

It was terrifically cold, but he stepped out into the dark chamber beyond.

He walked across the gate chamber, his elaborate, man-like helm illuminating the area in false colour. Lights began to illuminate on the stairs at the far side.

One of the things he had inherited from his father was his knowledge in the Ancients’ languages.

He swiftly translated in his mind.

We hold these as the truth: a hearty welcome to those of other worlds visiting our home for the first time. Welcome again to those returning. You have been gone too long and your absence has weighed heavily on our souls. We are whole again now that you are among us and we celebrate your being here again.

As we leave for distant worlds we pledge to respect the lands of our neighbors and to act with integrity as ambassadors of our people in peacetime. Travelers with open hearts will always be welcome here. Refugees from tyranny may seek shelter under our roof and know that our people will lay down their lives to protect the weak and the just.

Let this be our pledge to those inhabitants of this world, and all we may ever know: we will always strive to come in peace as we go in peace and you will be welcome on our shores forevermore.


Interesting, if rather naive – but then, when you had the power the Ancients had, you could probably afford to be naive. Perhaps even he could.

__ __ __


Sia watched as the facility began powering up, a huge city ship, almost the size of Atum’s citadel ship. They had found the drone they had sent when they discovered the lost city’s address, and installed their power supply, and, if the readings they had were right, they had done so just in time to prevent the shields collapsing and flooding parts of the city.

He took the communications device, and spoke into it. “Edfu. This is… Atlantis, we are in place…”

As the stargate disconnected, Sia was, for now, quite unaware of another signal leaving the city…
Last edited by Lord Atum on Fri Jun 05, 2009 3:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Fri Jun 05, 2009 11:01 pm

"Huh," Chuck said.

"Huh?" Calmenius repeated at the next console over. "What's up, Chuck?"

"We're receiving a subspace transmission," Chuck explained, aiming a momentary glare at his fellow technician and plotting to kill whoever had taught him that phrase. "From Atlantis."

"From... us." Calmenius frowned and started keying instructions into his own controls. "We're not transmitting anything. Nor is anything else on the planet."

"I know," Chuck said. "I think I've seen this before, too. It looks like the automatic recall order that the city sent out the first time we plugged a new ZPM in."

"I'm familiar with the protocol." Calmenius studied the display some more. "You know, we can't triangulate the source, but if you look at the direction that it's coming...."

"Yeah, I know. Plus the ID's showing as Atlantis for sure... this is going to be a bit awkward, isn't it?"

"Indeed. I suppose we should let the command staff know."




The High Council of Atlantis was not what it had once been, but then, neither was Lantean society in general. Even the city itself had been moved from the place it had stayed for nearly a hundred thousand years. Rather than sitting in an ocean it was instead in what could generously be called a large lake, beyond with a massive city-scape of high towers spread in all directions. The ecumenopolis that covered most of the planet's main continents was empty but for a few people here and there, the previous inhabitants having been... temporarily removed pending a thorough examination of their base programming. Even Atlantis itself was largely empty, barring the fifty-five thousand people who rattled around a city meant for ten times that many inhabitants.

In the control tower, the new Council and its top advisors. It was a descendant of the ad hoc administrative committee formed a year and a half prior, when an agreement for co-habitation between the five races had been hammered out. In theory, it was elected, although that had largely been a confirmation of the status quo. No one had the time or energy for election campaigns, not when there was a civilization to rebuild and an entire new universe to explore.

"Thank you all for coming," said High Councilor Aemilianus. He was the oldest man in the room, and oddly enough the only native to this strange universe. He, along with a few hundred others, had been rescued from the hulk of the starship <em>Aurora</em> as one of the first acts of the new Lanteans. "It appears that when we made the decision to delay an attempt to explore this universe's Atlantis analogue, we may have been in error. Someone appears to have entered the city and powered it up."

"Told you something like this would happen," Supreme Commander Mitchell said.

"The city should have been secure and safe for another fifty or more years," snapped Councilor Helia. "There was no need to waste manpower on it at this time."

Mitchell tipped his head in acknowledgement and asked, "I thought it could only be dialed from the Milky Way?"

"That is true, it should have been locked to Avalon addresses only," Aemilianus said. "But despite the lack of any Lantean remnants yet found in that galaxy, it appears to have happened."

"It's possible our exploration teams just haven't spotted them yet. It's a big galaxy, Lorne and his men have a lot of area to cover."

"In any case, we should obviously take steps to determine who it is that has taken possession of the city. Obviously, with the gate shield our best option might to be send a reconaisance team by ship. How are repairs on <em>Hippafaralcus</em> and <em>Neoptolemus</em> coming?"

Hermiod, the Asgard Councilor of Industry, scowled. "Repairs continue, however neither ship is ready for a battle. I estimate that it will be several weeks before even one ship is ready."

"We could send one of the new frigates," Mitchell suggested. "Most of 'em are in the Milky Way, but we have a couple to spare."

"I'm not sure that would be wise," Councilor of State Weir said, leaning forward. "Sending a ship might be seen as an aggressive move, and they might have brought weapons as well as a ZPM. We can't risk an incident if we can avoid one."

"I agree," said Councilor of Welfare Vulpes, a Nox. "If they know about the Wraith, they might attack first and ask questions never."

"Okay, so we send a probe through the gate and see what happens," Mitchell said. "If that doesn't work, we can open up comms or send one of the battleships once they're done."

"That is my preferred course of action as well," Aemelianus said. "Unless anyone has objections? No? Supreme Commander, please have your men do so at your earliest convenience."




A short time later - perhaps six hours after Sia and his expedition arrived in the city - a probes was waiting on the gateroom floor. Itwas an unassuming tracked robot, roughly waist-high and festooned with sensors and a pair of manipulator arms. The gate was dialed to Atlantis - clearly, some sort of name differention would soon be needed - and when the connection was established the probe ventured forward through the event horizon. Behind it a second probe waited, this one a floating frizbee-sized saucer that was equipment with more advanced systems, including a phase cloak. It would wait until after the first probe had sent something back, just in case it went splat.
Last edited by Atlantis Exsilio on Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:00 pm

“…In the hope that one day our kind would eventually return.”

This had taken on a more sinister turn with the addition of a siege against this city, and thousands of human worlds ‘fed upon.’ He had briefly wondered why the Ancients had created humans in their image, but then, he decided it was obvious. They liked to be worshipped, which humans were excellent for. Certainly they’d provided no defense for humans on the Tau’ri thousands of years ago.

“We require more information about their enemy,” Sia said to the ibis guard accessing the hologram system, who looked sarcastically at him for a moment, “see what you can get.”

He was very much in demand, as many of the city’s systems were apparently keyed so that only the Ancients could operate them. However, Sia was talented in manipulating electronic devices, and could bypass this.

He could hear the stargate being activated, nearby, and abandoned the room.

The stargate area was crowded with gear, and parked Bedrosian shuttles, as well as dozens of crates still packing the floors. A pair of kull warriors stood on either side of the re-designed stargate, and dozens upon dozens of jaffa stood guard, while others had been dispatched to begin searching the city.

Despite the disorder, the area was beginning to resemble the gate-room on Mnewer, both old style staff weapons, and new, sleeker weapons pointed at the gate as it activated, along with transphase eradication rods, and a pair of heavy staff cannons pointed at it, too. The kull warriors ducked into cover from their positions, and took aim as a sizeable metal object rolled out from the stargate.

Sia cocked his head to the side. The thing looked positively crude, and didn’t seem to have any obvious armament, though he activated his personal shield as he walked toward it, leaning on his staff.

“Are you a machine life form?” he asked in Ancient, quite dubiously as he examined the thing.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:16 pm

"Well, that's not good," Mitchell said as they watched the footage sent back from the probe. Big Goa'uld banners, Jaffa all over the place, even some damned Kull warriors here and there. They had even set up some heavy weapons emplacements covering the gate.

"Those are Jaffa, are they not?" Aemelianus asked.

"Probably belonging to Anubis, given those Kull." Mitchell shook his head. "We hadn't seen any in the Milky Way yet, but I guess that just goes to show how screwed up this universe is. Chuck, send the other probe through."

The second probe rose to the very top of the gate and slipped through. The first probe, meanwhile, sat there placidly, one obvious camera turning to face Sia. It was hardly the only visual sensor it had, but then, half the point of the device's design was to look considerably less advanced than it actually was.

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:46 pm

As far as their wielders were concerned, the transphase eradication rod had two functions. The first was to make invisible objects visible. The second was to eradicate them. In actuality, it was by far the most effective goa’uld smallarm; it functioned by introducing a fluctuation in already-phase-shifted matter, dissipating it on a thousand frequencies, in an intangible explosion.

Sia looked up at the hovering drone above him, as it was revealed by flying into the fields projected by the eradication rods over the stargate, appearing slightly translucent, and barked a command. A moment later, the flying probe exploded from within, though its debris remained intangible (a fact that annoyed the goa’uld, they’d have loved to get their hands on Reetou small-arms, but had never encountered them un-phased)

“As that bears no resemblance to you, I’m assuming this is a probe. I am Sia, commander of this base. If you are capable of replying, tell me to whom I speak.”
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:58 pm

"Well, so much for that," Mitchell muttered.

"Turn on the probe's speaker," Aemelianus ordered. When it was active, he said, "You may call me Aemelianus. You are not Lantean or Alteran, so I must wonder by what right you claim to be commander of a Lantean city."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:16 pm

Lantean, he assumed, was the term for Ancients when they’d lived here. He had no idea what an Alteran was.

His eyes glowed dangerously for a moment, “I am Sia, son of Atum, who has appointed me ruler of this city. We are the inheritors of its builders, and given what we know, I expect you are their enemies. Be warned; the people you defeated before were peaceful and unprepared. We are neither. We have returned to claim our inheritance, and liberate the children of the Lanteans from you,” he didn’t bother wondering quite who they were yet. If they were weak enough to be defeated, that was good, if they were not, bluffing was also good.

“You challenge us at your peril.” He added, with a flare for the dramatic that would have made his father proud, and lifted his right hand, the one not wrapped in a golden glove-like weapon, lifting the probe from the ground with it. He twirled it, causing the probe to spin one hundred and eighty degrees, and then used the weapon on his other hand to fire it backwards through the stargate, and presumably to destruction, at considerable speed.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:43 pm

"Supreme Commander?" Aemelianus said, looking at the blank screen.

"Yeah?"

"Are Goa'uld supposed to be able to do that?"

"No, they're really not." Mitchell said, sounding rather annoyed. "I'm really kinda wishing we had some symbiote poison right about now. Although... it shouldn't be hard to whip up some nerve gas. I bet there's all sorts of nasty stuff the guys down in the chemistry labs already have on hand."

Aemelianus stared at Mitchell for a moment, then said firmly, "We are not firing chemical weapons through the gate. For all we know, they might not be Goa'uld. Perhaps they are Tok'ra, or Free Jaffa."

"Yeah, right. They're already lying their asses off."

"They claim to be here to help the humans."

"Yeah, by enslaving them." Mitchell eyed the gate speculatively. "Maybe if we send through a big bomb, something large enough to take out stargate operations but leave the rest of the city intact. The telekinesis thing would make that a little hard, though."

"Commander...."

"Or we could park a jumper right there and fire a load of drone through."

"We're going to talk to them," Aemelianus said. "Sergeant, please activate the Asgard holographic communications device."

A few moments later, two men appeared in the control room of Sia's Atlantis. Despite being holograms, they appeared completely solid thanks to Asgard technology, which also made it possible for Aemelianus and Mitchell to see and hear the other side. Oddly enough, they appeared not directly in front of the gate, but rather between Sia and several of the Jaffa, including one of the heavy weapons.

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:59 pm

Sia’s first notice of the appearance of the holograms was when one of his men shot him in the back. Now that was unexpected, and he staggered forward, the kinetic energy of the blast yanking the hand with the shield generator on it forwards. Fortunately, it was designed to compensate for that. Half a dozen other shots blasted around the gate room, making small scoring marks upon the walls.

“Cease fire!” he shouted, this time in goa’uld, turning around, “this may be a distraction… I wish the ancients had bothered to install a shield…”

At this point, a shield promptly appeared on the stargate, as the ibis guard manning the dialing device noticed a button clearly marked ‘shield’ sitting in front of him. It was all Sia could do to avoid sighing audibly, glad only that they didn’t speak goa’uld, so that he would seem to have ordered it raised. Of course, unknown to him, it was likely being translated.

He raised an eyebrow at the pair of holograms before him. “Well, you appear… Lantean…” he said, returning to the local language, though he was rather unimpressed with their clothes; the hologram had been shiny, these were positively drab, “But that hardly proves anything. Which one of you is this Aemelianus?” he said, walking through the hologram, and sitting on the steps, quite informally, between a pair of staffa cannons, which snapped shut a moment later.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sat Jun 06, 2009 11:28 pm

"I am High Councilor Aemelianus," the Lantean replied.

"Supreme Commander Cameron Mitchell," Mitchell added at his side.

"We are, in fact, Lanteans," Aemelianus continued. "Or as I believe we are more commonly called, Ancients." At that Mitchell gave him a momentary annoyed glance but remained silent. "Of course, you have no reason to believe us, especially since you appear to know of our enemy, no doubt from the recordings left in this city." He smiled slightly. "You say that you are the... inheritors of those of us who returned to Earth? We thought all of them had long since ascended, but then, we ourselves only recently were revived from a long period of stasis. Your arrival activated certain automatic systems and allowed us to dial in."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sun Jun 07, 2009 3:42 am

A jaffa warrior walked down the steps, sitting a step up from Sia, half-lounging on a staff weapon. He leaned down to whisper something into Sia’s ear.

“Interesting,” Sia mused, then looked back up at Mitchell, “This is Torman of Magtireth,” he added, by way of explanation. At this range, they would notice a wide variety of different symbols on the heads – and in some cases none, as in Torman’s example – of the various jaffa near the stargate. “Anyway, let us presume you are who you claim to be, though Torman tells me Cameron is a common name on his world, and not very Ancient-y...” he said testing the word out.

“As for those that returned to the planet Earth,” he wondered if they were responsible for the fractal mess it now was, “they had little to do with us. Our civilization was already quite technologically developed. The older Ancients cultures are those we have learnt more from.

“In any case, if as you say, you have been in stasis, I do not think there could be many of you. According to the information here, a general evacuation was ordered. I assume you were trapped for some reason; cut off from retreat. An outpost whose stargate was destroyed perhaps? Or a ship?

“Perhaps we can come to a mutually beneficial arrangement; obviously you have expertise our expedition could use, in turn, we have an almost unlimited pool of manpower you will doubtless need if you plan to prosper in what is most likely a hostile galaxy now.”
Last edited by Lord Atum on Sun Jun 07, 2009 6:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:27 am

"You'd be amazed at how often we've found that some names are variations on our own," Mitchell said flatly. "And the exact nature of our presence here isn't really any of your concern."

"There's no need to be so rude, Commander," Aemelianus chided. "You'll have to excuse him, as our military commander his job is to be paranoid. It is possible we could come to some sort of arrangement. Perhaps you could tell us more about your civilization and how you yourself came to Atlantis?"

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:54 am

Sia looked thoughtful, “Well, let’s see. We are a culture consisting of several dozen races, but primarily humans and human derivatives. Until recently my own kind ruled over others absolutely, until my father decided to bring this to an end, which necessitated a short war of unification some fifty three years ago,” he seemed a little apologetic, but nonetheless thought it worth mentioning – he was pitching military ability here, after all. “I myself am more representative of recent generations, though.” He didn’t mention that his powers were entirely uncommon, “Some years ago, we discovered, while continuing exploration of the ruins in our home galaxy, references to a City of the Ancients that had been made ‘Lost.’ We were able to determine its location, and send a probe through. Eventually, we discovered that its power source was identical to one known as the Heart of Light we had held for some time, and so this expedition was sent to uncover what happened here.

“I could say more, but I don’t think this is the time or place for saying more I should report this contact to my superiors…”
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:11 am

"Interesting," Aemelianus said. "And your father is... Atum?"

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:41 am

“That is correct. Well, technically, I am a clone of him as he was about forty years ago, without many of his more stressing genetic memories,” Sia got a curious look from some of the jaffa with him. He certainly had no desire to talk about the matter of Atum’s ‘godhood’ here and now.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sun Jun 07, 2009 1:17 pm

"Interesting," Mitchell said. He sighed and crossed his arms. "We've got a bit of a problem here, namely that we really can't believe a word you say, and I suppose you can't really believe us either. You don't know if we're really Ancients, we know that you're a bunch of parasitic snakes with delusions of godhood and a habit of enslaving planets - it's not a very good basis for a trusting relationship."

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Lord Atum
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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Sun Jun 07, 2009 3:51 pm

There were sniggers, and even outright laughter from the sizeable audience in the gate-room.

“Delusions of godhood?” Sia asked, laughing, holding up a hand in a vain attempt to quell the laughter. “I see you have knowledge of… the old goa’uld way of doing things. I assure you, I am not a god, nor is any other parasitic snake. Nor, for that matter, are we parasitic, per se, these days. Our current generation of hosts are genetically engineered without higher brain functions, upon the command of Atum.” That process was only beginning in earnest now, but he had no desire to point that out, “now that technology to avoid that little biological necessity is available. If you don’t believe me, I’m sure we can send someone for you to test. Provided he’s returned intact, of course…”
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Atlantis Exsilio
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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:19 pm

Mitchell looked surprised at that statement, and a little bit suspicious as well. Aemelianus was more interested by the idea.

"That is quite a change from previous Goa'uld standards, particularly with regard to the hosts," Aemelianus said. "I see no particular reason that we could not receive some sort of diplomatic envoy. After all, our people do not seem to be in direct conflict at the moment."

"We'd have to arrange for a neutral point of exchange," Mitchell put in reluctantly. He shrugged. "I'm sure you understand the necessity, given that some of our people have direct person knowledge of the tendency of other Goa'uld system lords to include bioweapons or explosives in envoys, prisoners, random children..."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Mon Jun 08, 2009 4:51 am

The goa’uld stood up, electing to say nothing regarding that last comment, because if nothing else, it was true. Sia had already considered the value of implanted weapons in this case, and decided against them. “Then there are two things I require. Your own location, and that of a suitable transfer point. The former is a necessity if we are to send an emissary to you, after all, we are not entirely sure about your intentions either”

__ __ __


The palace of Edfu was a work in progress; Horus had given himself the task of outdoing the Palace of Annu, or the Heavenly Golden Palace of Emperor Yu the Great. So far, he seemed well on course for that goal. At almost a kilometre high, the pyramid-shaped palace was being constructed without a clear picture of what would actually fill some areas, but it was being built rather like an immobile mother-ship, crouched high on a bluff around an entire city of workers had been built. Much of the planet was high, rocky, mountains and ravines, and it was in temple-academies there that the warriors of Atum trained.

Arakon watched the palace building site with interest from the rail of the boat as they sailed upriver, sails of their skiff snapping in the wind. Of course, it would have been much faster to go by transport rings but Melna had insisted they charter something a little more picturesque.

They had, she’d pointed out, been traipsing around the empire by stargate, ring and tel’tak for weeks. They’d gotten through about a hundred of the potential sites they had to look through, and found nothing. Thankfully, Ma’at was as patient as she was inscrutable, and had yet to demand any progress from them, though they’d asked for more investigators, they’d not heard back from her.

__ __ __


Ma’at was not presently at Aafoh, and so had not received many of the messages directed to her. Rather, she was on the world of Hoktau, where another prong of Atum’s great work was underway. In time, it was hoped that Hoktau would become the template for all of the Hundred Worlds, but for now, it was far from complete.

From her position, she could see the building work; much of the settlements of Hoktau had been constructed of high-technology materials at the behest of Atum, and it looked, for now, very much like a scattering of metallic buildings, linked by acres of tents and shanty buildings. Here and there, Tel’taks were landed, their pointed apices looking very much like the tents.

For now, she was without her two ‘Roanian’ heralds, but found she missed their presence for a reason she couldn’t quite discern. Rising, she greeted Sheshat with an affectionate grasp of the wrist, “Sheshat,” she said, casually, gesturing to one of the nearby couches. The area they stood on overlooked one of the many cities being established on Hoktau, from the peak of a landed pyramid-ship, which was even now being unloaded, its cargo of food and other supplies being distributed. “Come, tell me of the progress with the integration of the nanocytes…”
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Atlantis Exsilio
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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:03 am

"One minute, please," Aemelianus said. He vanished, leaving Mitchell standing there and looking somewhat awkward.

After a few moment of tapping his foot, Mitchell asked, "I don't suppose your unification war left Ba'al dead, did it?"

When Aemelianus reappeared, he did so with two strings of glowing characters by his side. "The first set is our location, the second is our proposed transfer point. Will you need time to verify its safety and select an envoy?"

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Mon Jun 08, 2009 2:38 pm

Sia raised an eyebrow for a moment, “Ba’al was an influential leader of the System Lord Collective throughout the early part of the war, and his defeat was one of the turning points of the war. When one of his Lo’taurs, a woman named Shayla, helped Tal’ek First Prime of Geb escape captivity Atum ordered the information she volunteered about Ba’al’s forces be leaked to Sokar, Ba’al’s traditional enemy. Both were weakened in the resulting in-fighting, and Ba’al was wise enough to surrender to Atum before both were conquered by the Atumite Alliance. Sokar was not.

“At present, he retains the rank of System Lord. Of course, if he has been in contact with you and not reported it to my father, this will doubtless change…”

Sia looked at the symbols, “We shall contact you in one day,” he said, obviously implying the affirmative, before turning his gaze upon Mitchell again, waiting for a reply.
Last edited by Lord Atum on Mon Jun 08, 2009 3:18 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Atlantis Exsilio
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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Mon Jun 08, 2009 6:44 pm

Mitchell opened his mouth, closed it, then opened it again to say, "You know, as much as I'd like to see Ba'al in trouble, you'd find out the truth anyways, so no, he hasn't been in contact with us. Our information comes from other sources - Asgard, Nox, Furlings. That sort of thing."

"We shall await your contact," Aemelianus said, giving Mitchell an odd look. "We have a defensive shield, so please do not send a physical messenger. Radio or the city's built-in communications gear will suffice." They both looked off to the side for a moment, then Aemelianus frowned and said, "Hmmm, yes."

"That's probably a good idea, John," Mitchell agreed. He looked at Sia again. "You might want to be careful about poking around. A few things were left behind in the evacuation that might be troublesome. There's a containment vessel in this location," H pointed at the air beside him, waited several seconds, then said, "I said, in this location -" a map of the city appeared, with one room in particular marked out "- that has some kind of weird energy-sucking creature in stasis. You want our advice, just send it home and let it loose. We don't know what it'd do if it chowed down on a ZPM, but we really would rather not find out, and you probably wouldn't either."

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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Lord Atum » Tue Jun 09, 2009 1:49 pm

The stargate disengaged. Sia frowned a little, “Dial Edfu. I want to talk to Atum. I also have a few requests for equipment we may need.”

He looked at where the shield covered the inactive stargate, Toman stood up beside him, “That was… interesting.”

“Yes,” Akhetem said, “Did you see the writing on ‘Mitchell’s’ clothing?”

“No,” Toman asked, “What of it?”

“Well, I’ve only been here for a few hours. But still. It doesn’t look like any kind of ancient I’ve ever seen.”

“You’ve learnt the language?” Toman asked.

“Enhanced brain,” she said chirpily, tapping her long brown hair.

“In any case,” Sia said, “we continue regardless. We need more information. Toman, Torell, Sanan, Alak’C, assemble your teams and prepare yourselves for departure.” Sia watched as the stargate activated again, and stepped through it.

“Salad’ac?” he asked, turning to one of the nearby Horus Guard, wearing a long purple cape, “have you men continue searching the city.”

“Do you want us to investgate…” he made a gesture as if pointing to something in midair, “…That?”

“No. Leave that for now. We don’t know quite what’s going on there. I will handle it when I return.”

With that, he turned and stepped through the shimmering portal.

“Continue clearing this deck! There’s empty rooms downstairs. Anyone not doing anything else, had best be working, or I swear by Atum, I’ll find a punishment!” Salad’ac shouted.

__ __ __


Unknown Planet #1

Naylan frowned, looking at the group in the back of his shuttle, six of them, led by one of the jaffa he was still rather uncertain about, a man named Toman.

The passage through the stargate was strange, too, a curtain of water pressing along through the ship. They’d had to modify the shuttles to ensure they didn’t shut down their drives as this happened.

On the other side of the portal, Naylan guided the craft up from the ground, “No activity on radar,” he said thoughtfully.

“Any signs of life?” Toman asked.

__ __ __


Unknown Planet #4

Sanan watched as the ship cruised into the air on the far side of the stargate, the forward compartment showing the treeline below. “Anything interesting?” he asked.

“Not that I can see,” the pilot said, consulting some… thing… on the control panel. Sanan wasn’t a pilot, didn’t much care for the notion either. Flying was best left to birds, in his opinion – if Atum had wanted men to fly, he would not have provided transport rings. Well, okay, actually, he provided aircraft too, but it still wasn’t for him.

“Wait,” the pilot said, “some kind of emission, dead ahead,” she said, pointing at one of the slim, gold-cased scopes.

“Well, we should probably examine it…”

The pilot, Sina, nodded, “There’s a clearing over there, that looks like a nice site…”

The ship suddenly groaned, shuddering, slamming down through the trees in a fall that tossed its passengers against the forward wall. Sanan picked himself up from the forward section of the passenger compartment.

“Insanity,” he said.

__ __ __


Atlantis

Salad’ac turned the last of the scarabs, lifting the top section from the ark. He and his platoon leaders were gathered around the device. “It cannot deactivate,” he said, “merely be re-set. It has already been activated, with a duration of one day…”

The device was a bomb, of incredible power, enough to destroy this entire city, a thousand megatons. This room, at the base of the city’s central tower, would make sure maximum damage was done.

“This sequence resets it for another day,” he said, demonstrating, “this one,” he showed another, “ten days. Only those of us in this room are aware of this device. Even Sia does not know. Atum himself activated this device, and gave me these instructions. Should we all be killed, this city will be destroyed to prevent any records of our expedition being discovered.” He pulled a crystal from the device and smashed it, “It is now fully activated, and any effort to transport it by stargate or transporter will result in a preemptive detonation. It will also detonate if anyone who is not jaffa attempts to reset it.”

He keyed in the day sequence, pressing a shining orb on the top section of it, resetting it for another day, “We will have the following schedule to reset it…”

__ __ __


Unnamed Planet #1

The doors of the landed shuttle slid open, and Toman looked out on the mist-covered old city. “Impressive,” he said.

“Ruined,” Akhetem said, stepping out with him, “What’s our priority here, anyway?”

“Find out what’s here,” Toman said, frankly.

It was night, but in the light-amplification mode, they could see the mist that clung around the mostly leveled ruins of buildings across a river. Only two buildings really seemed to be still standing. There was little reason to suspect they were occupied, but they looked to be of the same design as the city they’d left.

“Perhaps the local people can tell us something. We did observe a settlement about three miles away…”

Tomann nodded, pulling the chameleon cloak over himself, deploying his helmet.

__ __ __


Unknown Planet #4

Clambering out of the crashed shuttle, Sanan cursed roundly, brushing down his clothes; like all of the exploration teams, he had not bothered to wear the heavy, traditional jaffa armour. “That was… quite unpleasant.”

He reached for his pocket, to find the slim pen-like device that acted as a homing device for the stargate. It did nothing. “Curious…” he said, testing his rifle, taking aim and firing at one of the nearby trees. Nothing happened. “Something has affected our equipment.”

Kadana, his second in command, nodded, “We need to find what is causing this, and disable it.”

“Why?” Sanan asked, “We just need to return to the stargate.”

“Sir, that’s a day’s walk from here, and entails leaving this rather valuable shuttle behind.”

“Irrelevant,” Sanan said, “we should move now.”

“That may be difficult. I think Sina’s unconcious.”

“And we don’t have anyone else to fly the craft anyway,” Sanan said, “we should move as soon as we can.”

“Yes sir. What about the ship?”

“We can’t do anything about,” Sanan said, stopping suddenly, spinning around on the spot and pulling the trigger of his weapon. Of course, nothing happened. Standing there was a young woman, twenties or so, with a bow pointed at him.

__ __ __


Unknown Planet #1

Shapes were moving in the forest, Toman could see the heat of their bodies. The group stopped, and he dropped to one knee and taking aim.

A pair of children ran out from the treeline, and stopped short of them, obviously terrified. One hastily took off a mask of leather, obviously wondering if they should run away. He lowered his gun, but they were obviously still stock still, Akhetem touched the back of Toman’s helmet, and it disappeared back into its collar. “Oh,” he said, “right. It’s just a mask…”

__ __ __


Atlantis

The shield lowered as Sia’s signal was received, and he stepped through the stargate, with another, older looking man, who was looking extremely, disgruntled, followed by several others. “Clear the deck. Equipment coming through!” Sia said, jogging up the stairs, as hovering crates of equipment began to be pushed through by a group that were apparently reinforcements.

Salad’ac nodded cordially to Sia, “I trust our god was pleased with your report?”

“He was indeed,” he said, “You are now talking to Lesser Lord Sia…”

“I am impressed. And all this?”

“Further stargate shields, and a holo-projector similar to the one they were using, which we should get set up first.” Sia said. “As soon as they’re through, we’ll dial up the rendevous site and send a probe through. Now, where to set up the holographic generator… You there!” he called, “Bring it all through that door into the next room!”

__ __ __


Atlantis Exsilio

The stargate’s dialling sequence was familiar enough, but what happened after it engaged would probably have been a surprise. Sia appeared, several hours after the last contact. Seemingly for no other reason than sheer goa’uld ego, to prove he could do the same hologram trick. Of course, a better reason, and that was to look around their location with his own eyes, just as they had his…
Last edited by Lord Atum on Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"While many races in the galaxy, like the Asgard and the Ancients, developed their own technology over many thousands of years, the Goa'uld achieved their current level of technological strength by beating up other races and stealing their toys."

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Atlantis Exsilio
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Re: The Will of the Sun God

Postby Atlantis Exsilio » Tue Jun 09, 2009 3:32 pm

The gateroom of Atlantis (for clearly they were the original Atlantis, their universe being the only one of consequence) was bustling with activity when Sia appeared. As might be imagined, the arrival of the Goa'uld had created quite a bit of concern. The carefully planned schedule for exploring the galaxy was now utterly obsolete, for one thing. For another, it meant that the planned upgrades to the woefully inadequate (not so much for firepower, but for coverage and response time) planetary defense systems were now suddenly in the forefront. The Wraith were still asleep; the Goa'uld, on the other hand, did not have convenient long hibernation periods. Fortunately the biggest potential problem of all, the two somewhat-operational warships that had still existed, had been taken care of. That still left several ZPMs, not to mention a city-ship... but that would all have to wait.

The room itself looked almost identical to the one in Sia's Atlantis, right down to the writing on the steps, the stained glass beind the gate, and the placement of the lights. Only the color of the paint and the presence of a few potted plants near the conference room were different. That was on the surface, at least; several hidden upgrades such as internal shields, pop-out weapons, and a Asgard hammer transporter were concealed in the walls.

There were several guards stationed around the room, all in armor and carrying energy weapons, which were immediately trained on the Goa'uld. In the operations area, a dozen busy technicians including an Asgard barely even looked up from their work. The guards lowered their weapons as Aemelianus and Mitchell excited the office overlooking the gate and came down the steps.

"Good afternoon, Sia," Aemelianus said when the reached the bottom, with Mitchell standing to his right with crossed armed.

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