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Risk: The Game of World Domination [OOC/Sign-Ups]

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Vienna Eliot
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Founded: Feb 16, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Risk: The Game of World Domination [OOC/Sign-Ups]

Postby Vienna Eliot » Thu Jul 25, 2019 3:27 pm

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Master Spreadsheet | Game Map
IC Thread Coming Soon


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WHO? The major global superpowers and their armed forces. You'll be controlling one of them.

WHAT? A total war for world domination. The fight doesn't end until there's one army left standing.

WHEN? Modern day. Weapons and strategies are those in use in 2019.

WHERE? Earth. Nowhere on the planet is off limits.

WHY? That's up to you.


RP Rules
1. OP Rights. I reserve the right, as OP, to control this roleplay in order to make it better for everyone participating. That includes enforcing these rules.
2. Real Life Characters. Political leaders should be taken from real life.
3. Posting Frequency. Post regularly. If you can't, let everyone know.
4. Cheating. Please don't cheat: this means no substantively editing posts after you make them, no godmodding, and no metagaming.
5. Respect. Respect other players, respect the roleplay, and follow NS site rules.
6. Background. Everyone has fair game to worldbuild background about the conflict. Just be sure you keep up on what other people have written so that you don't contradict what's already been established.

Sign up to join! Be sure to review the rules below as well. Each starter kit gives an arbitrary gift that includes a base, a thousand soldiers, and some equipment to get started.
Code: Select all
[b]NS Nation:[/b]
[b]IC Nation:[/b]
[b]Important Leaders:[/b]
[b]1st Headquarters Location:[/b]
[b]Starter Kit—Choose one:[/b]
[ ] Army
[ ] Air Force
[ ] Navy


Getting Started
Before you jump in and decide to start declaring war on everyone else, try going through these steps to make sure you survive the first two days.
  1. Orient yourself. Where are you located? Where are your enemies?
  2. Set up supplies. You will last one to two days without supply. This means you should immediately order the creation of several thousand square miles of food and energy production, as well as a few ammunition factories.
  3. Build factories. Build some factories so you can start producing units.
  4. Build units and train soldiers. Your starter kit is just that — units to get you started. Once you've determined what strategy you're going to take toward world domination, it's time to choose which units to build and how many soldiers to train.

In General
Based on the classic board game Risk, this brings the details of a campaign for world domination to life.

This is both a grand strategy game and a detailed battle simulator — what you focus on and what you leave to your officers is up to you. If you want, you can leave any operations to your officers (lieutenants, majors, generals), and they will use their best judgement to passively defend your assets. That said, you can issue orders as specifically as you want and they will be carried out to the best of your force's ability.

There are no turns in this game, making it quasi-real time. It diverges from a pure real time dynamic in that RL days do not equal in-game days (they probably mirror roughly a year each day). The game lasts until one person wins — that is, until there is only one force left standing. Thus, your goal in this game is to wipe out your enemy's resources, assets, and forces.

When you purchase units or train soldiers, information about them will be added to tabs in the master spreadsheet. You can name them for easier referencing if you like. If not, they'll be named things like "Class II rifle-equipped aviator-engineer sergeants with grenades." Likewise, when you dispatch groups of units to do things, you can name those as well.

You have a $150 billion budget. The only way to earn more money is to sell things to other players (fat chance). Costs are described in this cost sheet linked to at the top of this post. Most things in this game are priced according to "class." Classes number one through five and describe the quality of a unit. These are the odds of a unit of a class fighting another unit of a class:


Odds fighting —>Class IClass IIClass IIIClass IVClass V
Class I50.00%33.33%25.00%20.00%16.67%
Class II66.67%50.00%40.00%33.33%28.57%
Class III75.19%59.88%50.00%42.92%37.45%
Class IV80.00%66.67%57.14%50.00%44.44%
Class V83.33%71.43%62.50%55.56%50.00%


Issuing Orders
Issuing any order — from establishing a farm to putting troops on the ground to dispatching an aircraft carrier — should follow two basic steps:
  1. Make the order ICly. Make a post in the IC thread in which the order is issued. Depending on what's being demanded, it might be from the commander-in-chief to launch a nuclear warhead, or it might be a sergeant ordering some riflemen to open fire. Specificity matters here, so be conscious of how specific or ambiguous your characters are.
    • Good: [As part of a larger post.] The major thought carefully as he looked at the map, then spoke. "Arrange a platoon of 30 riflemen, 15 staff sergeants, and two lieutenants. They're to leave from the northwest corner of the base and move down New Hampshire Avenue toward the southern entrance of metro station at Dupont Circle. I want them flanked by two tanks. Then they need to station at the entrance and keep guard."
    • Okay: The major ordered 30 riflemen, 15 staff sergeants, and two lieutenants, with two tanks, to keep guard at the Dupont Circle station.
    • Bad: 45 soldiers and two tanks were ordered to guard the nearby metro station.
  2. Reference the order in the OOC thread. To ensure I don't miss anything, you should both link to the order in the OOC thread and briefly describe what order was made. This post doesn't need to be as specific, but some specificity will help.
    • Good: The "1st Charlie Platoon," consisting of 30 riflemen, 15 sergeants, two lieutenants, and two tanks has been ordered to guard the south entrance of the Dupont Circle metro station.
    • Okay: A unit is guarding the Dupont Circle metro station.
    • Bad: Forgetting to post in the OOC.
  3. Some orders are fundamentally OOC orders. If you're buying or training units, establishing a zone for food or energy production, designating names for ranks or units, or other things that simply don't fit in the IC at the time, just issue them in the OOC thread.
    • Example: The United States designates the State of Wyoming as a food production source.
    • Example: China is training 2,000 new soldiers. All 2,000 are of private rank and are to be armed with a Class II pistol and Class V grenades. Their title is "Grenadier Infantry." 1,000 will be trained and stationed at the Beijing Army Base, and 1,000 will be trained and stationed at the Brisbane HQ.
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Bases and Territory
There is no strict definition of territory in this game. While you may prefer to make your personal borders clear to anyone who might try to attack you, there is nothing on the map to actually designate where your land starts and another force's begins.

What you do have, however, are bases. There are eight types of bases, one general and seven with special purposes, and they can be as large as you like. They are designated on the map as polygons in the color of the commanding force. Bases store units and serve as central commands for operations in nearby areas. They're important for building equipment, training soldiers, and managing logistics. Here are the types of bases and their associated costs:

    Headquarters — These are the central bases for your force throughout the globe. They can do everything that any specialized base can do. (Urban headquarters cannot launch aircraft, and land headquarters cannot launch ships.) They cost $5 billion each.

    Army — Army bases are standard ground force bases. They can train and store soldiers, store ground units, and handle logistics. They cost $1 billion each.

    Air — Air bases are standard air force bases. They can train and store soldiers, store air units, launch and receive air units, store and launch missiles and satellites, and handle logistics. They cost $1 billion each.

    Navy — Navy bases are standard sea force bases. They can train and store soldiers, store sea units, launch and receive sea units, and handle logistics. They cost $1 billion each.

    Expeditionary — Expeditionary bases are small bases for marines and expeditionary units. They can store soldiers, store units, and handle logistics. They cost $250 million each.

    Cyber — Cyber bases are the commands for cyber warfare in and around the base. They can store soldiers and launch cyber attacks. They cost $2.5 billion each.

    Strategic — Strategic bases are the commands for strategic warfare, namely the use of ballistic missiles, in and around the base. They can store soldiers, handle logistics, and store and and launch missiles and satellites. They cost $2.5 billion each.

    Special Operations — Special Operations bases are temporary commands for special operations in the region. They can store soldiers, air units, and sea units, and launch special operations. They cost $250 million each.
In addition to bases, you can (for no cost) order units to patrol an area. This will look the same as a base on the map, but it will be marked differently and feature the unit markers as well as the polygon.


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Soldiers
There are six ranks of soldiers. They are Privates, Sergeants, Warrants, Company, Field, and Generals. Each has a base salary, and for additional money they can be trained as aviators, paratroopers, divers, engineers, and special forces. Note that each aircraft requires at least one aviator, each ship requires sailors numbering its complement (see cost sheet), divers are required for amphibious operations, only military engineers can operate land units (but can't do the work of civilian engineers), and special forces are required for all special operations including paratrooping.

The ranks of soldiers correspond to their skills on the battlefield, but can't necessarily predict the odds of winning a fight. Each of the ranks also carries with them special perks. Sergeants can train local militia, which are temporary soldiers in and around a base or patrol who will fight if you give them arms. Warrants can assume one of the five civilian roles, diminishing the need to hire civilians. And the three officer ranks can lead groups of enlisted soldiers: a Company officer can lead units of Privates; a Field officer can lead units of Privates and Sergeants; and a General can lead units of Privates, Sergeants, and Warrants. Large units without proper leadership are destined to fail.

It is necessary to arm soldiers. Soldiers can be armed with knives, pistols, rifles, carbines, and grenades. These do not have ranks among them — they each are suitable for different scenarios, so diversifying your arsenal can be beneficial. Soldiers can also be equipped with utility gear, for basic survival purposes, body armor, and special gear, for special operations. All weapons and equipment are priced according to class.


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Land, Air, and Naval Units
Land units are vehicles, and must be operated by engineering-trained soldiers. Priced according to class, you can purchase tanks, light utility vehicles, mine-resistant ambush protected units, armored personnel carriers, infantry fighting vehicles, field artillery (good against infantry), mobile artillery (good against other land units), and anti-air artillery (good against aircraft).

Air units are aircraft, and must be operated by aviators. Priced according to class, you can purchase fighters, interceptors, attackers, helicopters, reconnaissance and communications aircraft, electronic warfare aircraft, bombers, anti-submarine aircraft, tankers, and transport and cargo aircraft. Aircraft require headquarters, air bases, or appropriate sea units (aircraft carriers or amphibious ships) to take off from (but aircraft used for special operations can be stored at and launched from special operations bases).

Naval units are sea ships, and must be staffed by the required crew of sailors. Priced according to class, you can purchase aircraft carriers, amphibious ships, submarines, cruisers, destroyers, frigates, corvettes and littoral command ships, patrol ships, cargo ships, and hospital ships. Ships must remain in the water, so they require an appropriate base by a body of war to be stored.

All units require factories for construction.


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Strategic Units and Cyber Warfare
Strategic units are missiles and satellites. Priced according to class, you can purchase cruise missiles, anti-ballistic missiles, anti-satellite missiles, nuclear warheads, and satellites. Most of these are built and shipped to a base. Satellites, however, are shipped to a base and then launched to cover a hemisphere: northwest, northeast, southwest, and southeast, based on the equator and the prime meridian.

Note: You may be tempted to purchase nuclear warheads and wipe your enemy off the map. Be advised that the use of nuclear weapons completely removes regions of the map from play indefinitely.

Cyber warfare requires two elements for its execution. Firstly, you need a cyberattack-competent base on the continent of the attack. Secondly, you need a satellite covering the hemisphere wherein the attack will take place. A cyberattack on a location in Australia, for instance, would require a satellite covering the southeastern hemisphere.


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Civilians and Infrastructure
Military operations still require civilian support on the battlefield — they'll comprise about a quarter of your forces. There are five professions of civilians you must have at each base (and on large ships): administration, logistics, technology, medical, and engineering. Note that each Warrant soldier can assume one civilian specialty in addition to being a soldier.

There must be 1 administration civilian for every 10 soldiers. There must be 1 logistics civilian for every 15 soldiers. There must be 1 technology civilian for every 15 soldiers. There must be 1 medical civilian for every 20 soldiers. There must be 1 engineering for every 20 soldiers. Insufficient civilian support may wreak havoc on your bases in times of crisis.

Infrastructure can play an important role on the battlefield. You may build railroads, roads, tunnels, and trenches for various purposes, and each has an associated cost available on the cost sheet. Likewise, you may also fortify bases to defend them against enemy attack. Note that the development of infrastructure requires all civilian quotas to be met.


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Factories
Factories are required to produce non-soldier units. Factories can be general or specialize, with the same categories as bases plus the option to build factories to produce ammunition. Factories can be built anywhere on land, but they should be defended since they can be destroyed by enemies.

As with units, factories can be built in five classes. The cost of each class is the cost to build a base for the specialization, with general factories utilizing the Headquarters cost of $5 billion per class. Daily factory production is then capped at the cost of the factory.


Supply
The final component to address is perhaps the most important: supply. Your forces must be supplied with food, energy, and ammunition. Without food, they will starve. Without energy, they will be defenseless. Without ammunition, they will be unable to fight. Every base has a daily quota for supply per 5,000 soldiers, rounded up. Thus, a base with 2,500 soldiers must be supplied one quota. A base with 5,001 soldiers must be supplied two quotas. Ships at sea (not docked at a base) must be resupplied every week if they don't dock.

The food quota is $15 million a day. You are responsible for designating land or sea to produce food (anywhere can be used to produce food: you don't need to do any research on where the best place to grow corn is). Food sources can be destroyed by enemies, so they should be protected. 100 square miles of food production yields $1 million of food.

The energy quota is $20 million a day. You are responsible for designating land to produce energy. Energy sources can be destroyed by enemies, so they should be protected. 100 square miles of energy production yields $1 million of energy.

The ammunition quota is $10 million a day. You must build factories to produce ammunition. Any factory can produce ammunition, but factories can also be built that only produce ammunition. Ammunition factories cost $100 million per class and produce $100 million of ammunition per factory class.

If you fail to produce the necessary supply quotas, you can buy supplies from other forces at rates set by them. They may, for example, sell you $1 million of food for $100 million.

Once you have produced or acquired supplies, they must be transported via land, sea, or air to your bases and ships. To do this, you can designate regular supply routes in advance that will be followed daily unless changed. You may also designate the units to be used for shipping (land-based supply routes do not require units to be designated). Since cargo can be attacked, it should be defended in transit.
Last edited by Vienna Eliot on Thu Jul 25, 2019 7:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Vienna Eliot
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Posts: 422
Founded: Feb 16, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Vienna Eliot » Thu Jul 25, 2019 3:28 pm

Reserved. You may now post.

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The World Capitalist Confederation
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Posts: 3490
Founded: Dec 07, 2018
Corporate Police State

Postby The World Capitalist Confederation » Fri Jul 26, 2019 2:21 pm

Is this just a pure 'even strategy' game or will your location actually matter in terms of resources? For example, would it be best to start in, at, Venezuela or Texas for oil or perhaps the Indian subcontinent for food.

Meelducan wrote:He probably wouldn't get an endorsement from Weight Watchers.

New Political RP here!

User avatar
Vienna Eliot
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 422
Founded: Feb 16, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Vienna Eliot » Fri Jul 26, 2019 2:36 pm

The World Capitalist Confederation wrote:Is this just a pure 'even strategy' game or will your location actually matter in terms of resources? For example, would it be best to start in, at, Venezuela or Texas for oil or perhaps the Indian subcontinent for food.

Resources are just assumed to be evenly distributed. So while thematically you might choose to put your energy production in Texas, it doesn't matter mechanically/OOCly where you produce food and energy.

User avatar
The World Capitalist Confederation
Minister
 
Posts: 3490
Founded: Dec 07, 2018
Corporate Police State

Postby The World Capitalist Confederation » Fri Jul 26, 2019 3:11 pm

Vienna Eliot wrote:
The World Capitalist Confederation wrote:Is this just a pure 'even strategy' game or will your location actually matter in terms of resources? For example, would it be best to start in, at, Venezuela or Texas for oil or perhaps the Indian subcontinent for food.

Resources are just assumed to be evenly distributed. So while thematically you might choose to put your energy production in Texas, it doesn't matter mechanically/OOCly where you produce food and energy.

Oh RIP. Count me out then.

Meelducan wrote:He probably wouldn't get an endorsement from Weight Watchers.

New Political RP here!


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