NATION

PASSWORD

Miscellaneous Worldbuilding Thread

A place to put national factbooks, embassy exchanges, and other information regarding the nations of the world. [In character]

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New Wolvers
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 186
Founded: Mar 26, 2018
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby New Wolvers » Thu Mar 21, 2019 6:26 pm

Does your nation have a Coast Guard? Yes it does
Is it Civillian? Or is it a Paramilitary/Military Agency? It is semi-civilian, as it is a joint cooperation between the LWA and the Police of the state that the water touches.
How many ships does it operate? We are not authorized to reveal such information
What duties does it exercise? It exercizes patrol duties and provides rescue in case of shipwreck incidents, as well as case of lost people in the sea
What is it's Military Capacity? We are not authorized to reveal such information
What Ministry or Department operates it? The ministry of defense operates the coast guard
Is it a Nationalized force, or a regional Force? Is a mixture of both.
I created SCP-4298 and co-created SCP-4110

User avatar
Scramany
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 2
Founded: Mar 18, 2019
Corporate Bordello

Postby Scramany » Thu Mar 21, 2019 6:28 pm

Smallson wrote:
    Does your nation have a Coast Guard?
    Is it Civillian? Or is it a Paramilitary/Military Agency?
    How many ships does it operate?
    What duties does it exercise?
    What is it's Military Capacity?
    What Ministry or Department operates it?
    Is it a Nationalized force, or a regional Force?

yes
military
a couple of small ships for every region
mainly police operations of getaways using boats etc.
its rather small
department of defence
regional

User avatar
Gran Toreno
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 25
Founded: Feb 08, 2019
Liberal Democratic Socialists

How do you think every Nation in Nationstates is Connected?

Postby Gran Toreno » Thu Mar 21, 2019 11:40 pm

So, of course with many people of different types of Nations RPing with each other, and with many Nations going to "War" how do you think all the Nations are connected? Do you think every Nation on Nationstates in on one giant Planet, do you think there are ripples in Dimensions, etc.

Share what you honestly think is the connection.

OP Note: I legit spent a good 30 Minutes figuring out how to word this in a coherent way without making it confusing.
Last edited by Gran Toreno on Thu Mar 21, 2019 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Bruke
Senator
 
Posts: 4366
Founded: Nov 21, 2017
Authoritarian Democracy

Postby Bruke » Thu Mar 21, 2019 11:42 pm

Gran Toreno wrote:So, of course with many people of different types of Nations RPing with each other, and with many Nations going to "War" how do you think all the Nations are connected? Do you think every Nation on Nationstates in on one giant Planet, do you think there are ripples in Dimensions, etc.

Share what you honestly think is the connection.


It has to be dimensions, there are too many inconsistent histories, territorial claims, etc. for every nation to be on one planet. Plus some nations are space-based, so they span multiple planets.

User avatar
Gran Toreno
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 25
Founded: Feb 08, 2019
Liberal Democratic Socialists

Postby Gran Toreno » Thu Mar 21, 2019 11:50 pm

Bruke wrote:
Gran Toreno wrote:So, of course with many people of different types of Nations RPing with each other, and with many Nations going to "War" how do you think all the Nations are connected? Do you think every Nation on Nationstates in on one giant Planet, do you think there are ripples in Dimensions, etc.

Share what you honestly think is the connection.


It has to be dimensions, there are too many inconsistent histories, territorial claims, etc. for every nation to be on one planet. Plus some nations are space-based, so they span multiple planets.


That being said, how would you say these Nations interact with one another between dimensions? Would you say that every Nation has access to a personal Dimension hopping device or what?

User avatar
Silver Commonwealth
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1012
Founded: Aug 16, 2018
Psychotic Dictatorship

Worldbuilding survey 1: Not so humble beginning

Postby Silver Commonwealth » Fri Mar 22, 2019 3:29 am

(Well, I hit the character limit. Going to continue this in the next post. At least now this one is finished.)

I. Questions of Place.


Describe the geography of where your society calls home. ''Silver Commonwealth is an enormous country, located on Earth. Most of its surface is water, like oceans, lakes, seas, rivers, etc. Only about 29% of the Earth consists from land - continents, and islands. The amount of continents is still disputed, but most common definition in SC defines, that there are 7 continents in total - North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Oceania. There are various types of terrain there, and its ecology is diverse - from rich urban territories, and fertile plains, to ice, and sand deserts, and rainforests, along with savannas, and steppes. Overall, it is split in three ''worlds'' - first, second, and third world. ''First'' world are the relatively well-off states, the ''second'' world are the territories of former superstates, which are developing, and ''third'' world is the former disputed zone, which experienced the most hellish warfare possible, and scars can still be felt to this day.''
Describe the climate your society deals with. How severe are their seasons? ''Commonwealth deals with various kinds of climates. Winters can be both severe, or mild, and summers can be either cool, or very hot. Moisture can also range as well - from as low as 20% in deserts, or nearly 100% in the rainforests, which might make temperatures less bearable in some areas, even if it is the same. Here's a list of all SC's climates in Köppen classification: ''
  • Tropical rainforest climate
  • Tropical monsoon climate
  • Tropical wet and dry or savanna climate
  • Arid desert climate
  • Semi-arid (steppe) desert climate
  • Mediterranean hot summer climates
  • Mediterranean warm/cool summer climates
  • Mediterranean cold summer climates
  • Humid subtropical climates
  • Oceanic climate
  • Subtropical Highland climates with uniform rainfall
  • Subpolar oceanic climate
  • Subtropical-Dry Winter
  • Dry winter Subtropical Highland climate
  • Hot summer continental climates
  • Warm summer continental or hemiboreal climates
  • Subarctic or boreal climates
  • Subarctic or boreal climates with severe winters
  • Tundra climate
  • Ice cap climate

What kinds of natural disasters has this society gotten used to? ''Various kinds - from famines, tornadoes, and earthquakes, to tsunamis, as it is a world government, and even before that, it was a very large country already. However, various regions are prepared for different hardships, so the thing, which might be common in one region, might come as a surprise to another region, and take it out defenseless. (For example, while Japanese Isles are used to large tsunamis, they are very rare in British Isles, so they don't have the same level of readiness.)''
What importance (spiritual or cultural) do people ascribe to the geography? ''For indigenous peoples, their land is pretty much sacred. Also, many of the ethnicities, the geography of their homeland is very important to them, as it also symbolizes their nationality, and their region. Many East Asian cultures have important mountains, and landmarks in the myths, and some of them are legendary. Overall, however, there is not much of a cultural, or spiritual importance to geography.''
How do people feel about local landscapes being altered or used for a purpose other than what is traditional? ''There is a mixed opinion on all of this, really. Some consider it a necessary sacrifice in the name of Commonwealth as a whole, if it is a public institution, which is being built, or if it is a resource plant, which can enrich the region. Of course, there are those, who are pissed off about the exploitation of land, and argue, that ''regional governments should more care about their citizens. There is hardly anyone, who likes land being used for governor private means, however.''
What are the most commonly-grown foods? ''One of the most commonly cultivated food cultures are rice, wheat, potatoes, and corn - they all together make up a significant part of the Commonwealth's citizen nutrients, and are also a part of many other, more complex meals. It is speculated, that potatoes and rice might be ''one of the most important future food sources, when humans are going to colonize space''. Rice is mostly grown in Asia, potatoes - in Europe, but wheat is universally grown across the Earth, except in Antarctica, where most of food comes from either hunting, or fishing across the coast.''
What are the most commonly-eaten meats? ''Chicken meat is usually one of the most popular meats, as chickens require way less space, feeding, and overall are a cheaper source of meat. Size of chicken farming has increased a lot since last years. While beef is still popular in SC, particularly in America, and British Isles, it requires a lot of water to produce, and less parts of the body can be used from cattle to produce it, unlike with chicken, from which you can utilize a lot more meat. Pork is also popular, along with mutton. In arctic regions, meat from seals, and fish is commonly served on the table. Polar Bears can also be eaten, but they can contain excessive amounts of vitamins, which might end badly.''
What foods are considered exotic or expensive? ''Truffles are considered a luxury, along with caviar, due of them being pretty rare. Caviar market is controlled by the state, for an example, so it is hard for individuals to start their own business in this field, as government stamps out private competition. Also, healthy food is considered somewhat of a luxury as well - while most of it is still indeed provided from farms, a lot of it goes in junk food - at first, it was created by SC's scientists in order to give workers as much energy as possible for working, while keeping it cheap, but now it has caused issues like overweight, for an example.''
What forms of alcohol are common? Rare? ''Booze is pretty common, both made by government, and homemade. However, in order to make it at house, there needs to be a special permit from the government for that. Wine was a luxury in the past, but now it is mostly seen as a way for middle class to try to show off, and is not considered as special anymore. (Of course, there are still very expensive wines, however.) Many regions have their own alcohol recipes, and those are one of the regional treasures. There is a thing, which is rarer, and more luxury-like - absinthe. It is a strong drink, with anise taste, and was illegal until very recently, and even then, is still illegal in many Commonwealth states. It is also a status symbol, as only Party mostly can afford to drink it.''
Is there usually enough food and water for the population? ''No, even in the more well of Commonwealth states, there are often problems to provide clean food, and water for the people, not even talking about former disputed zone states, where infrastructure has just been started being repaired, and poverty, along with greed, and hunger run rampant. Even if obesity rates are slowly rising, there is still wide malnutrition - according to Commonwealth's data, ''a lot of people don't eat enough for a healthy body''. In the past, however, situation was even worse - hunger, and malnutrition rates rose catastrophically high under previous, inept government leader.''
What is this place's most abundant resource? ''It might sound surprising, but SC's most valuable resource is neither oil, or even coal (although those two are abundant too) - it is actually water, as it is necessary for cooking, drinking, and overall survival of human species. There is plenty of it, and so little at the same time - while most of the Earth's surface is covered by water, most of it is saltwater, so it can't be used for drinking. Freshwater is way fewer in numbers, and in some SC's regions, there is an acute lack of freshwater sources. Some have tried to clean saltwater of from the salt, but such technique is expensive, and salt concentrate, which remains after the process, is often very corrosive, and bad for environment. So, SC seeks other solutions for fresh water.''
What is its most valuable resource? ''As of now, uranium, and thorium ores are one of the most valuable resources, as they are supposed to fuel the nuclear power plants - nuclear power is the future fuel, which is supposed to replace oil, due of it being finite, and overall less efficient, and also more harming to environment. Scientists, and army are ready to pay a lot for new thorium, and uranium ores - both for civilian uses, and for military ones - nukes still play a significant role there, and might get a new purpose, if SC starts to wage war in space.''
What resource is it most lacking? ''Also, an answer, which someone might not expect - Phosphorus. It is essential for a fertilizer, and without it, plants can't grow. It is found only in a handful of SC's regions. Some regions get it from using guano - excrement of seabirds and bats, which contain lots of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium, but it is not enough with only it. SC's scientists have estimated, that unless SC finds more phosphate either on Earth, or in space, it might run out of it in about 50 years, and then a global famine would follow. So, SC's scientists are working for a solution currently.''
How do people travel from one place to another? ''Mostly either by cars, buses, trains, bikes, or bicycles. For longer distances, planes, or ships are used. Recent programs plan to revitalize the use of zeppelins in places, where there is less infrastructure, and most of planes, and ships can't access, due of various reasons. Recently, there have been developments of nuclear-powered cars as well. Usage of horses, and camels is typically seen as ''poor people transport'', although it can be an useful alternative, when you don't want to pay either for fuel, or coolant.''
Are the borders secure? In what way? ''They are usually pretty secure, in a way, that they are heavily guarded, and usually don't less people pass freely from region to region. (SC has no borders with foreign countries, but it has tons of internal borders between regions.) However, due of region governor border conflicts, sometimes they are very dangerous places, especially if conflict escalates in further military intervention.''
How many people live here? ''Exact amount is unknown, due of unreliable statistics data, and large amounts of territory - SC encompasses the entire world, and isn't actually a single country, but a collection of many autonomous governments, with central government controlling large amounts of territory. Infrastructure is also not developed in some places, so it is hard to find an estimate of an area like Saharan desert, or Amazon rainforest. However, researchers have estimated, that there are overall 5 billion people living on SC's Earth - if taking in account all the wars, diseases, famines, and natural disasters, which decimated population, it is a population boom indeed. In future, population might even grow - SC's researchers have estimated, that by 2100, it might even reach 9 million, which would raise a big pressure on the planet.''
Where in this place do they congregate? ''Obviously, a lot of humans live in the large cities, and metropolis - despite the fact, that in SC's timeline, percentage of those living in cities is lower, it is still growing now. Other thing, however, is where those cities are located. A lot of cities are either near arable land, so they could supply themselves with food, or near a major sea, or land trade route, which made them wealthy in process. Cities also were built in places, where valuable resources, and minerals like diamonds, and gold were found. Some also have a major industry, which supplies like Detroit's car industry. Latest variant is risky, because if the valuable resource runs out, or resources are found somewhere else, in larger quantities, and easier to access, people will often abandon the previous city, and it will turn into a ghost town. Same applies, when the industry receives heavy losses, or isn't important for city anymore.''
What part of this place do they avoid? Why? ''Humans tend to avoid living in places with extreme terrain, like sand, and ice deserts, along with rainforests, and mountainous areas - those usually can't support a large human population. So, for the most part, those parts are inhabited only by very few people, and most of them are either indigenous, or adapted to living there. Cities are either located across the coast (so they can be supplied from the sea, or ocean), or in the few oasis there. Antarctica hadn't even got a permanent population until very recently. Places like steppe, and countryside in general tend to have lower population as well, due of the recent trend of population shifting towards large towns, and cities.''
What are the most common domesticated animals here? And what are they domesticated for? ''Cats were domesticated by humans for catching mice from mills at first, so they don't steal grain, but nowadays, they mostly serve simply as companions for humans. Horses were domesticated for their usage as a transport - people riding on horses still are a pretty common sight in SC. Dogs were domesticated for various reasons - rescuing people, herding cattle, participating in dog fights, protecting property, and even participate in war. However, they were also domesticated to be good companions for humans. Sheep were domesticated for their wool, which could be used to make clothing, and other useful things, but cows - for their milk. Bulls were domesticated for meat purposes, just like chicken.''
What are the most common wild animals? How are wild animals treated? ''Bald eagles, lions, wolves, turtles, owls, dolphins - those are few from the most common animals there - listing them all would take very long, due of SC's wast size. Treatment of them all very differs, however - while dolphins are viewed as ''cute'' by most of humans, Bald Eagles are the symbol of the country, and some turtles are even kept as pets, lions, bears, and wolves are rather considered as enemies, and often ruthlessly hunted, bringing their population very low. Of course, humans like large carnivores the least, but the usage of the land, and incursion in animal territories hurts many other species as well.''
Which animals are likely to be pets? Which ones won't be? ''Foxes, and other canid species can likely be pets, along with ocelots, and other felid species. Ducks, parrots, rabbits, and hamsters can also be kept as pets, for an example. However, not all of them can really be pets - for example, who would want to keep a tiger, coyote, or a lion as a pet? Animals like bears, and jackals aren't really the first choice for a pet either. Octopuses, and sharks are unlikely to be pets either - it is more likely, that they will end up on dinner plate.''
What are the most common domesticated plants here? And what are they used for? ''Apple, pear, citron, orange, banana, papaya, and grapefruit plants are used mostly to produce fruits, but almond, hazelnut, and chestnut plants - for nut production. Grapes, blueberries, and strawberries are mostly used as small snacks, but coffee, cola, and tea - for making drinks. Tobacco, cannabis, and opium is used for smoking, but olive plants - for cooking. Legumes are mostly used for cooking as well. There are many more plants around there as well.''
What are the most common wild plants here? What are they used for? ''Stinging needles can be used for making a soup out of them, and cattail also can be used for eating as well. Dandelion can be used for medicine as well, and for tea, or even for eating. Reishi mushroom provides protection from various infections, and skin disorders, while red clover reduces skin inflammation, while yarrow can sometimes stop external bleeding.''


II. Questions of Time.

How far back does this society’s written history go? ''It is presumed to go as far as 3400 BC, when one of the first writing scripts were invented, and 3100 BC, when a writing system arose in Egypt, which used hieroglyphs, and documented life in the country. Most of the writers were ancient Egyptian scribes, and officials, which had to keep an eye on things in the country. As SC considers itself as a pan-human nation, it also considers Egyptian history as its own, despite being founded in America - its predecessor was founded only in late 18th century, despite the European colonizer arrival centuries before - most of the accounts come from European colonizers, as most of the tribal texts have been lost to time, or censored by government. In fact, government keeps a close eye on historical records, and has either falsified, or destroyed them, so a lot of information is not entirely reliable anymore - even for relatively recent events, as government can also twist memory in a way. However, one thing is for certain - its current government was founded somewhere in the 50s.''
How far back do its people believe it goes? ''Most believe, that it goes to the late 18th century, when USA was founded. Back then, SC's rise was very far away. However, they are also sure, that it extends way earlier, when British first started to colonize the North America, and competed with French. However, some also think, that it goes only as far as the foundation date of the SC, because of Party's control over the historical records, making essentially anything before the takeover ambiguous - no matter, if it is just a century, or multiple centuries away.''
How was this society founded? Who founded it and under what circumstances? ''Commonwealth's predecessor was founded as a democratic republic, during unrest against taxation, and colonial rule of the government. It was founded by the First Founding Fathers - a group of people, which, according to SC's government, wrote the first constitution, and were a bastion of republicanism in the sea of monarchies. (Founders of SC itself are often called as Second Founding Fathers, and current constitution - as the Second Constitution) Commonwealth itself, however, was founded during a coup by the military, and by a man, who's real name has been lost to history, due of Party's destroying of records, and now is known only by nickname ''Father America''. It was founded, when three superstates were starting to take their shape, and totalitarianism overall was starting to trample the democratic system across the world. Foundation destroyed the democratic system, which predecessors had practiced for centuries.''
What were the chief powers in the time when this society was founded? ''Nothing is known for sure in SC itself anymore, due of the unreliable records, but for the most part, information suggests, that at first, President's power was limited by elected representatives, but President itself was elected by the people. While they could indeed pass some things on their own, they still needed the approval of the Congress for the most part. However, during the first years after the Coup, president's powers increased drastically, and country turned basically into a republican autocracy, and fascist dictatorship. (Not US republican, as both Republican, and Democrat parties were banned in SC's timeline) However, after seeing, how inept dictator slowly became over the age, more powers were gradually delegated towards the Party itself - now it serves as a congress of a sort. While SC's President still has more powers than a democratically elected President, they aren't as big anymore, and country rather could be described as a ''oligarchic autocracy'' instead.''
If it originated far away from here, how did it get here? ''Current majority of the SC, and its founders - Europeans, weren't always in North America - they came there during the colonization period from 15th to 19th century, eventually colonizing most of the continent. When SC's predecessor broke free from Britain, it continued the colonization, and slowly transformed from a small, young nation, to a standing superpower, stretching from coast to coast. In 50s, it attacked Allies, and occupied British Isles - so, in a way, SC had conquered the lands, from which its ancestors had came. Overall, many people immigrated in SC's heartlands, before SC itself arose, so nowadays its ancestries are complex, and mixed - partially, it has not only British, but also Spanish, German, and Italian ancestry, along with a few French, and Irish ancestries as well.''
What is the worst disaster they believe they've faced? ''During its history, SC has faced many hardships, but perhaps one of the biggest ones was the Great Nuke War back in the 60s - a catastrophic event, where nukes were used for the first time on a global scale. While all three superstates hadn't produced enough nukes back then to wipe out the entire world, and hadn't got powerful enough kiloton warheads, damage still was devastating, and many important cities in western hemisphere, South Africa, and Australia got destroyed. (SC is basically Oceania, but the rest of superstates - Eurasia, and Eastasia.) All sides improved nuclear defenses, and started to produce more nuclear warheads, in order to attempt to deter each side from using it again. Also, war was delegated to only specific areas, in order to avoid complete devastation of the territories. Also, after the other two superstate collapse, there was a period of uncertainty and fear, as chaos was always on the doorstep, and it could sweep the Commonwealth like a tide as well from the disputed zone. SC barely managed to not collapse as well back then.''
What are the major events in this culture's past? ''Before the rise of totalitarian SC, the colonization of western America, and further influence in the Americas politics was one of the major achievements. During WW2, it also played a major role, and it is said, that one of the reasons for SC's rise was a catastrophic failure of some military operation during the war. After Party's takeover, it pretty much imprisoned all supporters of laissez-faire, and socialism, and started to gear its economy towards war. Years later, it would break its alliance with Allies, and invade Canada, along with the rest of the British Commonwealth. Development of the first nuclear weapon also marked a new era, and nuclear arms race, which would eventually escalate into the Great Nuke War. As said before, Reformist era was one of the major events, and another one was change in doctrines - from an isolationist superpower, it transformed into an expansionist power, with goal of unification of the world.''
What was the best thing that ever happened to them? ''Reformist period, which started in the 80s, with Carter becoming the President of SC, brought radical changes to Commonwealth, making it more decentralized, and giving more autonomy to the local peoples, even if it remained authoritarian, and undemocratic. Mass literacy program was also started, to fix the mistakes in SC's education, which were allowed to go on by previous administration. Thanks to the reforms, Commonwealth was also able to survive - some say, that ''if not for the reforms, SC would have collapsed as well back then''. Reformist period also paved a new wave of modernization', including further development of transistor technology, which paved way for rudimentary internet.''
What in their past makes them feel ashamed? ''Due of the decades of nationalistic propaganda, cult of personality, and jingoism, most of Commonwealth's citizens feel hardly ashamed for anything. In fact, negative sides of the history are usually downplayed in SC's education, and not talked about, but those, who point them out, are often called as ''unpatriotic'', and ''traitors''. However, during the reformist period, the horrendous inefficiency of the previous ruling class was exposed, and it, along with ruthless treatment of the British royalists, are one of the things, which SC's Americans are somewhat ashamed about - they often consider British as their brothers, even if they were royalists.''
What in their past makes them proud? ''Commonwealth's rise from a regional power, to one of the major players in the world politics, and turning into a superpower through conquest - an empire spanning the entire Americas, Southern Africa, British Isles, and Oceania. Also, the fact, that it managed to keep ahead in technology, if compared to the rest of superstates, and managed to survive in some form, while other two superstates collapsed. Also, one of the things, that makes SC's citizens proud, is the predecessor state's participation in WW2, by beating back the third reich, along with Allies - even if Allies became the enemy later on, in newer SC's history books, they are taught of being ''both respectable friends and foes'', while reich is usually heavily despised, despite being similar in some ways.''
What are they afraid of happening again? ''Average Commonwealth's citizen wouldn't want, that a second Great Nuke War would happen again - as 90 years since then have passed, and all superstates had produced an impressive amount of nuclear stockpile, and risk of annihilation of all human life became more likely, as superstates now had enough nukes to do so. Even before the collapse, two other superstates still mounted a very large amount of nuclear weapons in their disposal silos. If Second Nuke War would happen again, no SC's region would survive it intact, not even Antarctica. Still, there are risks of individual administrative regions using nukes in regional conflicts, which might cause a domino effect, where every other region launches their nukes as well.''
What are they hoping will happen? Do they think it likely? ''They hope, that Commonwealth will eventually stabilize, and venture outside in space, in order to bring the torch of the republicanism to the rest of the universe as well. They also hope, that SC will find a way, of how to utilize the robot abilities more, triumph over capitalist forces completely, and perhaps even reach immortality. As of now, they don't find it happening in the near future, due of the unstable situation, and lack of technology for space colonization, and more pressing needs on the Earth.''
How strongly are people attached or connected to their heritage? ''Due of government's nationalistic, and jingoist propaganda, people feel very connected, and proud of their heritage. Sometimes it goes into extremes as well. It is not only central government's matter, but the matter of local governments as well, so many other ethnicities, and nationalities (Canadians, Indians, Polish, Spanish, Brazilians, Argentinians, Australians, Chinese, Japanese, Kazakhs, Arabs, etc.) are connected to their heritage as well. While supporting the confederacy in SC is illegal, for an example, the battleflag can be seen to be often used by SC's southern units.''
What do they assume the future will hold? ''A lot of SC's citizens have a fairly positive view on future, mostly thanks to government's attempts of creating an image - new technological inventions, progression towards a world federation, having colonies in space, further automation of the workforce, perhaps even stopping the aging problem! Still, those, who don't have such rose glassed view, usually are way more pessimistic, and rather expect bigger, and growing internal problems in future. Decentralization is eating away resources in the process, and some think, that at this stage, Commonwealth might never be able to leave the Earth. If so, it would be disastrous, as it hasn't got unlimited amount of resources on Earth, and it is eventually going to run out of them at one point, so it needs to do something quickly.''
How has this society changed? Do its current members realize this? ''While technology, and army has indeed changed a lot during the decades, society has for the most part been frozen in time - old 50s social norms, and stereotypes are still around, due of SC's far-right stance in social issues, and society has advanced only in a few spheres, like hobbies, and state-regulated consumerism. Some of the society's members, especially liberal opposition's members, realize, that society has been too traditional, stagnant, and conformist for along time, and have tried to bring in some progress in the reformist wing as well, with little success. In fact, reformist wing remained conservative socially, and there are concerns, that the tendency will continue - main differences between ''conservative, and reformist wing are in approach of government, not social issues, which both deem as ''unimportant''.''
What are the most popular stories about the past? ''One of them is the defeat of the third reich (Which resulted in eventual purge of nazis by SC's timeline's Eurasia), and successful invasion of Britain, where SC assorted its dominance on the world scale. Central American, and South American campaigns are also popular stories, as SC enforced its power, and will there, through pure conquest. In general, there are many films about WW2, 50s, and 80s period in the SC. Fiction about the Great Nuke War's days, or ''when the world burned'', is also a popular subject of the stories. Westerns about the 19th century USA, and early 20s era are very common theme's in SC's movie industry as well, and have won many awards. Of course, stories don't focus only on America - equivalents of previous mentioned stories are there about Britain, and Canada as well, for an example.''
Who in the past is the greatest hero? The worst villain? ''Carter, and his reformists are one of the biggest heroes of SC currently, due of their reforms of the Party, and country as a whole. Carter has a memorial in the capital, and his spirit can be seen floating around sometimes. (Magic, and spirits exist in SC's world) Father America was a hero in the past as well, due of SC's propaganda, but recently his image has been damaged, due of the discoveries of his inept leadership in the past. However, one of the biggest villains is Hayek - his image has been outright demonized in SC's world, as his free market ideas are like antithesis of SC's command economy. He is sometimes used as an example of villain by SC's teachers, even if there are no actual proofs about his villain nature in SC.''
Do people think the present better or worse than the past? ''It is pretty complicated there - of course, from one side, there is nostalgia about the past, and conservative wing in general prefers party before the ''socialist takeover'', as they call the reformist decision to allow some socialists to participate in the SC's government. However, most of the younger generation think, that life currently is better, as due of exposed documents by reformists, it turned out, that life in the first years of SC was very terrible, and that government failed to address the issues after the Great Nuke War, and drained its resources in a perpetual war, as they had a secret treaty. Some of the older generations aren't too fond of life back then either, as repressions often affected their family members as well.''
Do people believe the future will be better or worse than the present or past? ''Most of SC's people, especially Party's members, believe, that future will be indeed better than past - as of now, SC has finally managed to unite Earth under a single (albeit very shaky) world government, and SC has ambitious plans for a world government. That said, many of them are also skeptical of its future, and sees its complete collapse, and devolution in a civil war as more likely scenario. Besides that, the recent re-emerging of spirits, and creatures has started to sew fears about a possible new catastrophe. Also, people from the former disputed zone despise SC for outright taking their land, and not respecting their sovereignty.''


III. Questions of Race and Ethnicity.

What are the chief races in the region? ''SC's government agencies usually split people in three main races: Europeans, Africans, and Asians. Sometimes Mestizos, and Arabs, along with Indians, and some Africans are included as separate entities as well. Government also splits them in sub-races (Nordic, Gaulic, Iranic, Australoid, Mongol, Koreanic, Tibetan, Amazonian, Eskimo, Polynesian, etc). There are also countless nationalities, and other ethnic groups, for which SCPS investigators often have a memo, when there is a need of identifying a criminal. Some of the memos were taken from RNGOC's, and Russian Empire's government archives, in order to make process easier. Typical ''ethnicity card'' looks like this:

  • Age (and date of birth):
  • Name:
  • Photo:
  • Race (and subrace):
  • Ethnicity:
  • Region of birth:


''That said, there is an increasing movement in SC, which fights against racism, and racial segregation, and suggests the abolition of race construct, as there is only one human race - human race. However, it is not an easy task, as racism is deeply ingrained in SC's society, despite becoming a world government. In fact, the opposite has happened - SC has basically turned world into a bunch of separated ghettos, which only interact, when there is a need of research, or a conflict is happening.''

What are the chief ethnic groups of each race in the region? How are they distributed in place? ''Europeans inhabit mostly Europe, Northern, and Southern America, along with Australia, and New Zealand. South Africa has a significant population of Boers, but they still are a minority there, despite the apartheid, which never fell in SC's timeline, due of SC keeping South African government afloat. Mestizos - people of mixed ancestry, mostly inhabit Central America, and Southern America, and a lot more people have native ancestry there. Mestizos are found in North America as well, but in fewer numbers. Descendants from Africans can be found in Americas as well, due of the colonial slave trade. Asians mostly live in Eurasia, although significantly less on the European side of Urals, as more of them can be found in Central Asia, and Siberia, past the Urals. Polynesians inhabit most of Pacific Ocean isles, and can be found in small numbers in New Zealand, and Australia as well. Middle East, and Indian subcontinent is an interesting mix, as ancestry from all races can be found there.''
How do they differ by language, appearance or ancestry? ''Europeans mostly speak in Indoeuropean, and Finno-Ugric languages, and use Latin alphabet, with a few exceptions (Basques, Armenians, etc.). Asians usually speak in Koreanic, Austronesian, Mongolic, Japonic, Sino-Tibetan, and Dravidian languages. In Africa, Afro-Asian, Khoisan, Nilo-Saharan, and Atlantic–Congo languages are the most widely spoken. Indigenous languages are spoken rarely, and are slowly falling out of use, as Spanish, and English languages are crawling in, even if the amount of descendants is larger than speakers. From all groups, European genetic history is the youngest, but African - oldest, with Asians being in the middle. Government agencies usually use things in appearance like eye color, skin color, nose, and face to classify humans, and identify them. Sometimes a language test is put in place, if ethnicity is not known, or is ambiguous - at first, investigator will say a few words in English, and then AI will say some words in other languages spoken in area, in order to see, if interrogated person recognizes them.''
What jobs do the chief ethnicities primarily occupy? Are any groups denied work because of racial or ethnic heritage? ''While situation has improved in this case significantly, there are still big problems in some of the Commonwealth states - for example, in South Africa, most of the highly qualified jobs are shifted in favor of Boers, at the expense of the natives. in SC's America, Europeans often receive higher payments for their work than indigenous peoples, or other ethnic groups. That said, now rarely someone gets their job denied because of ethnic heritage - during wartime, SC desperately needed any workforce, that it could find, and denying possible workforce would hurt production. Still, with the recent rise of automatization of the workforce, concerns have arisen again, as more extensive usage of robots could let the state replace some of the workers with machines, and some governors could potentially use it against ethnic minorities.''
What are typical attitudes of the native (or majority) ethnos to immigrants and other ethnicities? ''There is not much immigration between SC's regions, as there needs to be a travel permit for that, and it is pretty hard for an average citizen to get an one, so for the most part, they are tied to the region, in which they were born. Few visitors are usually very awaited, though, as they often are higher-ups from other regions, and can share information about happenings in other parts of the world, or even show some new gadgets. That said, few people expect visitors to stay in a region for the rest of their life, as permit for that is even harder to get than travel permit. There are also temporary workers, which work for a few months in a region, if there is a big construction project going on, and there is a need for more workers, but once the construction ends, government will send them back to their home regions. Travelers without valid travel permit will be sent back to the region, in which they were born.''
How has any variety of ethnicity in the region changed the society’s culture? ''On a minimal scale? Perhaps. Thing is, that SC has a ''cultural purity'' policy, which prohibits most of interactions of other cultures outside from professional matters and army, which slows down cultural progress quite significantly. Native autonomies basically serve for that purpose - to keep them out from the majority. As SC now is a world government, not only it has greater possibilities to enforce its policy, but it also has a way harder time, and more resources to spend, as enforcement is often left to regional governors, and they each have their own interpretation, and ends, which they want to reach with means.''


XVII. Questions of Death and Burial.

What is their understanding of death and dying? ''Death is typically viewed as a process, from which human transfers to afterlife - either heaven, hell, or any other place in various mythologies. However, some think, that death is simply a natural process, where your body functions will shut off, and after that, there will be nothing, but just black void. As magic, and mythological beings indeed exist in our timeline, both theories might be correct, but no one knows for sure, even if there are constant reports of ''ancestor spirits visiting the citizens from their afterlife. Dying in a battlefield is more heroic in Commonwealth's eyes, of course, and can grant a special place in heaven.''
What does this society do with their corpses? ''In past, it mostly used to either simply bury them, cremate them, or bury them in special rituals, especially between Eastern cultures. Recently, however, a new practice has been spreading - recycling of the dead bodies for nutrients for the soil, and other resources. It originated in SCPS prisons in Arctic and Saharan desert, where supplies of food for prisoners were scarce, and in order to reduce spending for fertilizers, administration started to recycle the bodies instead. Scientists in laboratories improved the method in a few ways, and now wider society has also started to use it. It also marks a new way, and age of thinking - all based on efficiency, leaving spiritual needs as ''unnecessary.''. However, some people still bury their people according to their ancient traditions.''
Do they cremate their dead? Or, how are dead bodies disposed of? ''Yes, cremation is one of the possible options, of how to deal with dead bodies. In fact, some cultures have special cremation traditions - for example, in SC's Iceland, which is ruled by neo-pagans, viking tradition of burning the corpse, and grave offerings on the pyre has recently became popular again. In SC's India, cremation is very popular both between Buddhists, and Hinduists, and it is reinforced by the fact, that Buddha himself might have been cremated. Buddhist monks will be around during cremation process. Although in SC's Christian states, cremation wasn't popular until very recently, as it preferred to bury its dead in ground instead, recently cremation has become pretty widespread again, especially along with the spread of Christian mysticism. Still, in some SC's religions, cremation is not as popular.''
Is the family responsible for the body? ''Depends. If body is a soldier, which has fallen in the battlefield with honor, it is army's responsibility to bury it with military honor, and in army cemetery, no matter, if it is a simple private, army general, or a sailor. However, commoners like workers, and farmers are indeed family's responsibility - their family is expected to bury them with at least minimal requirements - a coffin, or an urn with their ash, a gravestone, and in cemetery. If requirements for some reasons can't be met, local community can make sure, that they are met, or body will be given to the state's institutions instead, which will transform it into a soil fertilizer.''
What part do the priests play? ''In SC's Christian regions, they usually authorize either the burial, or cremation, and will give a speech for the dead, before laying it to rest. They will also hold a mass for the benefit of the deceased, so that the temporal sins may be extinguished in funeral. (If body is turned into a soil fertilizer instead, church doesn't play a big role there anymore - those matters from now on are handled by government, and SCPS instead.) Both Christianity, and Islam have rites for burial. Islamic priests usually will require burial as fast as possible, in order to protect living from any sanitary issues. Burial prayer also is given, and body is shrouded in a white cotton. In Buddhism, death is a time of transitioning to an another rebirth, so living usually participate in acts, which might provide either a more auspicious rebirth, or relief of suffering in departed's new existence. Death rites are one of the few life cycle rituals, where Theravāda monks participate.''
Are there cemeteries at all? ''Of course, there are. In fact, one of the largest ones are dedicated to those, who fell in the wars, in which our country participated, mostly in WW2, WW3, and the ''Perpetual War''. Some of the best performed soldiers even received a memorial, just like our previous leaders. However, design for cemeteries often differs across the SC- for example, Cross in Orthodox regions is different, and in Islamic regions, a crescent is used instead. Other ornaments, and design also are different in places like Japan, and China, and in places like Tibet, dead are usually put in high towers at mountain peaks, so vultures could eat them, as they don't decompose there, due of low temperature, and lack of oxygen in the mountains. (SC is a world government)''
Or, does everyone have a crypt in back with all the relatives in it? ''Well, we do have crypts as well in some places, actually. Most often they are made on their own, but sometimes they can be ordered to be made by special makers. However, all crypts must be registered by government, both those made by the church, and people themselves. Government can enforce, that rule is upheld. Still, due of SC's wast size, it is impossible to 100% enforce government's order everywhere, and sometimes people just bury their dead in ground, if there aren't enough funds for a proper ceremony.''
Do people visit the dead? If so, how often and why? ''Yes, they visit them once in a while. For some, ancestors are very important, so they visit them pretty often, to seek possible guidance from the spirits of them at graveyards. That is mostly common in indigenous communes of Siberia, Australia, Americas, and Europe. For some, dead family members are still huge authorities, and role models, so they keep the busts (sculptures) of their dead at home. However, for some, visiting the dead is more of a practical question, and they simply pay respects to them, especially for dead soldiers. Traditions differ region from region.''

Suicide
What do people in this culture think about suicide? ''It is typically frowned upon, and highly discouraged, as each worker, which commits suicide, is a lost resource, and slows down the Commonwealth's industrial machine. Still, due of conditions there, some choose it as a way out - in fact, according to SC's government secret survey, suicide numbers are actually steadily rising, especially in SC's western hemisphere.''
Is it the greatest sin one can commit? Or is it a sin at all? ''While it is not the greatest sin in SC's eyes (One of the greatest sins are betrayal of the government, and stealing, for an example), it is often considered as cowardly way to escape from problems, and people risk to sully their family for future generations. Survivors of attempted suicide also often experience social stigma from others, which can drive to repeated attempts of suicide.''
Is it the great and last comfort of a tormented soul? ''Unfortunately, often yes. In Commonwealth, we don't pay that much attention for mental health, so many souls pick it as a way to solve their problems. Also, as Commonwealth is a hellhole, such solution might even make sense at times - workers jumping off the roofs, so they wouldn't need to work in SC's hellish factories anymore, for an example.''
Is it worse than murder? ''No, but hardly. Unlike with murder, person takes away their life voluntarily, and it is their own choice. Still, it is considered as selfish, especially when they have a family, for which to look out, and care - how they are going to feel, if you will go away? How they will react to society shunning them? How they will explain that to one of the commissars, or state CEOs?''
Last edited by Silver Commonwealth on Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:52 pm, edited 15 times in total.
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OOC: A slight Latvian freeaboo, slight francophile Center-left economics, kinda conservative socially

Why I have relatively little factbooks? Because those are more cramped together than Khrushchyovkas

Currently in SC's Radio: Bajtárs

To those, who keep making versions of third reich

This nation doesn't represent my views

Myself

F̛̕͡a̸͟í͞t̵͝h́͜,̸͘͠ R̷e̸͜͝p͜͠͠ub͘͜l̨̛í̶c̨͟҉, ͠͡͡a̸͝n҉̸d͜ ̀̕ańt̢i̸͘͜-͢c̵á͏͢҉p̷͏įta͝l̛͘i̷̢s̀m̵̨̛

User avatar
Ngaalxa
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 4
Founded: Mar 13, 2019
Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Ngaalxa » Fri Mar 22, 2019 5:22 am

Cross-dimensional portals leading to a massive airport serving every NS nation ever made.
TINA YOU FAT LARD, EAT THE FOOD!

Our name is pronounced n-HALK-sha, FYI.

Also this nation doesn't reflect my IRL political views. Not by a long shot.

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New Wolvers
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 186
Founded: Mar 26, 2018
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby New Wolvers » Fri Mar 22, 2019 9:52 am

I think it is [DATA EXPUNGED]

That would explain lots of things in my opinion.
I created SCP-4298 and co-created SCP-4110

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Fatatatutti
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 10924
Founded: Jun 02, 2006
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Fatatatutti » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:05 am

The way Fatatatutians look at it (IC and OOC being pretty much the same in Fatatatutti) other nations may be deluded into thinking they're intergalactic empires, etc. but they're really not.

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Revolucionario Cuba
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 16
Founded: Mar 07, 2019
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Revolucionario Cuba » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:06 am

Fatatatutti wrote:The way Fatatatutians look at it (IC and OOC being pretty much the same in Fatatatutti) other nations may be deluded into thinking they're intergalactic empires, etc. but they're really not.

This is the best answer on this thread
I am a Cuba if there was no Fidel. I exist in current time itself. American tourism and big business is welcomed. We will wholeheartedly serve them !
Bowa Sekoa for the win.
This Nation somewhat representsmy irl views

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Christ Triumphant
Attaché
 
Posts: 91
Founded: Nov 07, 2017
Father Knows Best State

Postby Christ Triumphant » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:11 am

I think Stargate should be considered a sort of nodal point at the center of NationStates, and this serves as a all-purpose juncture between nations.

Or else someone should found Wood Between the Worlds -- same idea but from the Narnia universe.

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VoVoDoCo
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1467
Founded: Sep 07, 2017
Anarchy

Postby VoVoDoCo » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:19 am

Our Nations must span over multiple planets and multiple universes.

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LiberNovusAmericae
Minister
 
Posts: 2526
Founded: Mar 10, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby LiberNovusAmericae » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:22 am

VoVoDoCo wrote:Our Nations must span over multiple planets and multiple universes.

This ^^ There are numerous nations that claim the land that is the U.S. in the real world for example, so in order for my nation to exist, it has to be in an alternate reality.
The name of this nation is not grammatically correct Latin.
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For those of you who actually think Cuba is a success. Antifa has terrorists in it. My Political Positions.
Death to Socialism! Death to religion!
Now an "Inoffensive Centrist Democracy". Thanks World Assembly.

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Christian Confederation
Envoy
 
Posts: 347
Founded: Dec 12, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Christian Confederation » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:23 am

Bruke wrote:
Gran Toreno wrote:So, of course with many people of different types of Nations RPing with each other, and with many Nations going to "War" how do you think all the Nations are connected? Do you think every Nation on Nationstates in on one giant Planet, do you think there are ripples in Dimensions, etc.

Share what you honestly think is the connection.


It has to be dimensions, there are too many inconsistent histories, territorial claims, etc. for every nation to be on one planet. Plus some nations are space-based, so they span multiple planets.

That's what I think because it makes since because if we were all on one planet our nation's would be the size of counties or micro nation's.
Founder of the moderate alliance
Open to new members, and embassy's.
My telagram box is always open for productive conversation.
IRL political views center right/ right.

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Wawakanatote
Envoy
 
Posts: 262
Founded: Feb 19, 2012
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Wawakanatote » Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:40 am

What if we are just the historical texts of a society millions of years into the future where the nations have become planets all across a single universe? And what if those planets share their knowledge of their individual world history to be taught in universal schools?
Last edited by Wawakanatote on Fri Mar 22, 2019 10:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
OOC Factbook
Is this even real? - Real question
Pro: Marxism-Leninism
Anti: Capitalism, Fascism
We do not exist under communism, but under the
primary stage of socialist development.
Please adjust accordingly.
Full Nation Name: Supranational Union of Socialist Republics
Government: Federal Intergovernmental Political/Economic Union
Political Leaders: C.Song Liyuan, V.C.Lev Bronshtein
National Anthem: "Hymn of the Union"
"Seek Truth From Facts"- Deng Xiaoping, Chairman of the Central Advisory Commission
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Kenowa
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 4
Founded: Nov 19, 2018
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kenowa » Fri Mar 22, 2019 11:32 am

And if every region is actually an planet and the forum is an intergalatic communication device every leader has access to?
Kenowa's Stats:
Civil Rights: Superb
Political Freedom: Excellent
Economic Freedom: Few
Economy: Frightening

-The Red-Public of Kenowa-
I dont use NSstats, but i base in them
This nation doesnt represents my opinions
(Well, it does mostly, but not fully)
*Socialist
*Southamerican
*Not a copy of Uruguay

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Silver Commonwealth
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1012
Founded: Aug 16, 2018
Psychotic Dictatorship

Worldbuilding survey 2: Enemy worse than writer's block

Postby Silver Commonwealth » Sat Mar 23, 2019 1:32 am

(Continuation from previous post, as I hit the character limit. (And well, I did hit it there twice as well.) Next post.)

VII. Questions of Faith.

Is the culture religious or nonreligious? ''Ohh, it is even very religious - in fact, one of SC's foundation cornerstones is religion. In many of the Commonwealth states, there is a regional state religion, and an official state church. And even in those, who don't, there usually is a high influence of religion in politics. SC is a world government, so there are various religions, and influence of them in various regions differs - Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Animism, Shintonism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and even Neo-Paganism. However, one thing, that those religious leaders have in common, is their distaste against atheism, and atheists - it is a glue, and scapegoat, which keeps them together - priests, mullahs, rabbis, monks, as otherwise they would fall apart from bickering with each other a long time ago.''
What are the major religious groups in the region? ''One of the most popular are Christianity, and other branches of it - Protestantism, Mormonism, Catholicism, Orthodox Christianity, Oriental Christianity, etc. Islam is an another growing religion in SC, and most of its followers are a part of one of two of its main branches - either Sunni Islam, or Shia Islam. Buddhism in SC is also split in three branches - Theravāda, Vajrayāna, and Mahāyāna. Hinduism is popular mostly in the Indian peninsula, but due of its big population, is also one of the most numerous religions. Chinese religions like Daoism, Taoism, and Confucianism also have been growing in size. In SC, there is also often a cult of personality (Or cult of state), which has been mixed with one of the major region religions. Obliteration of the Self is also a very popular thought, originating in RNGOC, and being very closely related to that one in 1984. Followers of it have often be seen praising Mao, and ''God of Asia'' (Wang Jingwei) in front of their portraits, with the Red book, despite Mao being killed by the RNGOC in SC's timeline. Those ideas have quickly spread to Tom's mind as well, and now there are a lot of people praising the first leader with his ''clever citation'' book.''
What are some of their core doctrines, dogmas, beliefs and practices? ''As said, most of the major religions support a view, that there is only a single god, and that church should be visited at least once in a week. Stance on alcohol, and drugs is often similarly negative (ranging from shunning, to outright ban) However, otherwise they have little in common with each other, and have a different world creation story, different spirits of nature, different approach on religious doctrine, and heresy, etc. Still, one of the goals of missionaries is also to establish a form of monotheism for the indigenous peoples. So, in the future, doctrines of the religions might become more similar, if missionaries succeed. Some of officials have also started to practice a ''mysticist form of religion'', and while it retrains base doctrines, it also delves deeper into ''dark world's stuff''.''
What is the overall cosmology and eschatology in religious terms? ''Most of the abrahamic religion followers believe, that universe was created by one God, while those, who have many gods in their religion, usually believe, that it was created in cooperation between various gods, and angels. In some religions, universe is infinite, while in others, it has a beginning, and an end. Structure also differs greatly - for example, in Norse mythology, world is built on a tree, called as Yggdrasil, with human world being in the middle (branches), heaven (Valhalla) being at the top, or upper leafs, and with Niflheim being at the bottom (roots), which is a place for all those, which haven't died in the battlefield as honorable warriors. Most popular description for apocalypse has similarities with each other, however - a titanical battle between good, and evil, despair before the battle, along with massive natural disasters, and eventual rebirth of the world, after good triumphs over evil. Overall, there are so many cosmology models, and world ending scenarios in SC's wide religion list.''
Is religion a cause of dissatisfaction, dissention or hostility in the region? ''Depends on the region, but in some cases, sadly yes. For example, in Amazon rainforest, there currently is a conflict between indigenous faith, and Christianity, and since the ''end'' of the ''Perpetual War'', South America's Catholic Church has extended its pressure there, with plans of either restructure of the native religious system, or just simply replace it with Catholicism. While there are many natives, who are Catholics already, some of those, who aren't, are hesitant to give up their religion. Even in places like North America, where most of Native Americans have already accepted a ''restructured'' version of their own religion, there are still conflicts between them, and evangelists. Although some regions have more heated religious conflicts than others, no area in SC has completely avoided them, due of increasing zealotry between religious groups, including Natives, who believe, that ''only by standing up, and fighting back they will be able to preserve their faith''.''
Are religious traditions and any scriptures oral or written in nature or a combination? ''As of lately, most of SC's clergy have started to write down their traditions, and scriptures on either a paper, or tablet, due of the fact, that it is easier to preserve traditions and scriptures for future generations, if they are written down - in case, if oral tradition gets stopped, a lot of knowledge eventually vanishes away. Still, some indigenous religious groups keep oral tradition alive, by passing down traditions from parents to children. Most of the neo-Druid groups write down their knowledge, and traditions, though, because in the far past, Druids weren't allowed to write down their knowledge, and older priests passed down knowledge to the new disciples, so scholarship lasted for many years, and traditions were for the most part lost to history, when Romans essentially wiped out Druidism from most of the Gaul, and British lands. (In Ireland, they lasted longer, but even there they met their end, when Christianity arrived. Ironically, monks wrote down some of their knowledge, so some of it has been preserved to this day.)''
Is there a set canon of what consitutes officially sanctioned scripture? ''For all religions (Yes, including indigenous, and neo-pagan ones), there is a set canon. However, until recently, situation was complicated in this case - while major religions had enforced a canon long time ago for them, some other religions hadn't. In this case, missionaries from various religions constructed the canon for those religious groups. While SC's main Chrisitan church recognizes, that some of the currently allowed religious groups by government are basically splinter groups, it is determined to not allow any new group foundations, and divergence from canon, as, according to Archbishop's words, ''The amount of religious groups right now is a perfect number. We don't need more religious splinter groups''.''
How are scriptural / traditional exegesis accomplished and by what hermeneutics? ''Usually holy texts like Bible, Quran, and Torah are interpreted by leaders of the church, and in some cases - by monks, and priests themselves. In various indigenous communities in Pacific Ocean, and North America, with animist, and totemist religions, texts are usually interpreted by Shamans, or passed down through oral tradition. Exegesis also involves not only textual criticism, but also research of the background of text, and author, and classification of literary genes, and analysis of grammatical and syntactical features in the texts. Of course, hermeneutics, and exegesis are most often used in theology, but they are also widely used in history, and law studies as well.''
What is the role of myth within the religion? ''Myths usually serve as tellers of stories, and advice for life, and how to act. They also tell various important events about religion's, and world's foundation. As there are many religions, and ethnicities around the world, there are various stories, and a lot of them are different, but there are some elements, which are common in almost all ethnicity myths - myth about the creation of the world, Goddess/God of Sun, and Goddess/God of Moon. That said, the interpretations of them are often very different, and have often led to heated debates between various religious groups, which version is ''correct''. So, in some ways, in order for zealots in government to not tear each other apart, they focus their distaste on atheism - hate against the ''other'' is like a glue for SC's fragile government.''
Is there a formal creed or set of credal statements that define the faith? ''Yes. For example, trinity is a doctrine in Christianity, which imagines God as a singular being, which is made up from three personalities - God Father, Jesus, and Holy Spirit. Yuga is an era in four-age cycle, which consists from Satya Yuga, Treta Yuga, Dwapara Yuga, and Kali Yuga, with first being the ''golden age'', and the last being an ''age of darkness''. In Buddhism, there are ''four noble truths'', which are truths or realities for ''spiritually gifted ones''. First of them is suffering, and inability to satisfy the needs, other is craving, and attachment, cessation can be attained by eliminating ''all craving, desire, and attachment'', and in finale - Noble Eightfold Path, which is the mean of ending this dukkha (suffering). There are many other doctrines as well.''
What are typical symbols used in the religion and their meanings? ''There are many religions, and so there are many symbols. Christian cross also symbolizes not only religion, but crucifixion of Jesus Christ. (Some of them also use fish as a symbol, however.) Star and Crescent originally was a symbol of sky gods by Central Asian, and Siberian Turkic peoples, but now it is closely associated with Islam. Om is a mantra, which means Brahman - the supreme god in Hinduism. Wheel of Dharma represents the perfection of teachings of Buddha, and hub symbolizes discipline. Khanda, which is a Sikh symbol, has three swords, from which double edged sword represents belief in a single God, while others represent his authority, and that ''he has no beginning or end''. Yin and Yang is commonly used in Asian philosophies, and symbolizes a perfect, harmonic balance. Menorah is a symbol used in Judaism - it is a nine branched candelabrum, used in celebration of Hanukkah. Totem represents a group of people - either a family, clan, tribe, or a nation.''
What ritual objects are used in the religion (relics, talismans, medals, charms, etc)? ''Talismans are important in SC's shamanism, and rune stones are used by neo-pagan groups in SC, particularly by old Norse believer groups. Pentacle is used in occultist/spiritualist rituals, mostly in order to contact with Wendigo, and other mystical beings, which run SC behind the scenes. Relics like skulls, and particular crosses are usually used by both major religions, and indigenous faiths - there are plenty of them, but each cultures have different relics, and different interpretations. Figurines, and dolls are used mostly for voodoo magic. There are just too many to list em' all.''
What religious officials are there? Is there a formal clergy? How are they organised? ''Depends on the religion, but for the most part, all religious groups have officials of some kind, even indigenous pagan groups - SC's compulsory ''modernization'' of indigenous religions made them to change their approach as well, in order to keep their religion alive. Most of the Abrahamic religions (Except Judaism) have a specific set of clergy, along with Sikhism, and Buddhism. In late years, native faiths like animism, and totemism have tried to imitate major religion clergy system as well, as their churches become more involved in the regional matters. Of course, in various denominations of the same religion, the structure of the clergy, number, and ranks differ.''
Are there monks, saints, faqirs, nuns, prophets, apostles, disciples, preachers, friars, shamans, martyrs, mystics, seers, vates, sages, ascetics, religious heroes, saviours, redeemers, etc? ''Of course there are, all of them! As SC is a world government, all of those people can be found both in real life, and mythology. That said, some of them are unique to a particular region. Monks are typically associated with various Buddhist groups in SC, faqirs - with Islam, and nuns - with Christianity. Shamans are stereotypical associations with indigenous faiths, and folk religions, while mystics - either with occult art practice, or a strain of Christianity, or any other Abrahamic religion. Most of other mentioned people are way more universal across the cultures - for example, both Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and even Indigenous religions have prophets, apostles, ascetics, and martyrs. Sages are more philosophical field in a way.''
What do people believe happens to them after death? How, if at all, can they influence this? ''There are differences between interpretations in various religions, but overall, there are two dominating models - ''reincarnation'', and ''heaven and hell''. Reincarnation is a concept, which states, that after biological death, soul will start a new life. It is most popular between Indian, and East Asian religions, and was popular in ancient world as well. However, most of abrahamic religions reject this model, instead using ''hell and heaven'' - with heaven being the place, where souls of good people go, and where angels dwell, but hell - a place of torment, extreme temperature, and nightmare, where bad souls go. However, hell can also be ''neutral'' - then it is just a graveyard of dead souls. However, a third belief, which has started to take hold, is entirely different - that after death, there is nothing, and that death is just a biological process. Overall, people believe, that by doing good things, they can get in heaven, or reincarnate into a human being. (Bad souls usually reincarnate in an animal's body)''
What happens to those who disagree with the majority on questions of religion? ''Those, who disagree on overall religious SC's stance, are usually ridiculed, and shunned at best in some of the more reformist SC's regions, but more often than not it ends with an arrest, fine, or even death sentence, as many SC's religious leaders don't take it kindly, when someone objects to their religion, or their power in the religious structures. There are plenty of SC's territories, which could be basically described as theocracies - both Christian, Islamist, Buddhist, or even Neo-Pagan theocracies. One of the few things, on which those theocracy leaders agree on, is their distaste against atheists.''
Are there any particular places considered special or holy? What are they like? ''There are various holy places in SC, for various religions - For followers of RNGOC's confucianism, Temple of Confucius is a sacred site. For Muslims, sacred city is Mecca, as Muḥammad was born there, and Kaaba - one of the most sacred buildings. Nazareth is a sacred city for Christians, as it was a Jesus hometown. Char Dham is a set of four pilgrimage sites in India, and sacred for Hinduists. For neo-druids, Stonehenge is a holy center, where they often make ceremonies. In Taoism, Wudang Mountains are one of the "Four Sacred Mountains of Taoism", and a popular destination. Mahabodhi Temple is an important pilgrimage site for SC's Buddhists.''
Is there a set religious calendar? What are the most popular rituals or festivals? ''There is a calendar made by the government, which keeps a list of all religious holidays across the world, and generally can be used by any religious group followers, including neo-pagans, and folk religion followers. One of the most popular religious festivals in SC are Chinese New Year, Easter, Christmas, Ramadan, and Navratri festival, along with Holi festival. Of course, there are many other religious events, but they are typically celebrated in only a handful, or even only one of the regions.''
Are there liturgical, meditative, and contemplative aspects to the religion? ''Yes, of course. In fact, all three aspects can be found in SC's religions - meditative, and contemplative aspects are perhaps most well known in Buddhism. For liturgical aspects, Buddhist liturgy mostly consists from chanting, or reciting sutra, or passages from a sutras, manthras, and several gathas. In Islam, Salāt is a is the practice of physical and compulsory prayer in Islam. In Christianity, term ''liturgy'' usually refers to to a standardised order of events observed during a religious service, be it a sacramental service or a service of public prayer. In Catholicism, liturgy is the participation of people in the work of God, which is primarily the saving work of Jesus Christ. The liturgist may read announcements, scriptures, and calls to worship.''
What is the basic structure of the religion (unitary, dualistic, etc)? ''Highly depends on the religion. Dualistic cosmology is in basis of Christianity, Hinduism, Chinese, and Indigenous philosophies. Yin and yang are a part of ontological dualism, and are divided in overarching categories. It is discussed in both Taoism, and Confucianism. Moral dualism is a part of Christianity, and it describes a conflict between two polar opposites - benevolence, and malevolence. Those moral opposites can exist in a religion, where there is only one god, multiple gods, or even no gods. Duotheism, however, implies, that there are at least two gods, which are opposites. Hinduism theorizes of an existence of two separate realities - the first one being the reality of Shiva, or Vishnu - the absolute god himself, while everything else exists in second, separate reality. Unlike in some other interpretations, Shiva, or Vishnu himself, and is believed to control the universe.''
What is the basic theology of the religion (i.e., monotheistic, polytheistic, henotheistc etc)? "SC has many religions, and some of them are polytheist, but some - monotheist. However, two of the SC's major religions - Christianity, and Islam (One from which is Commonwealth's founder state's religion), are both monotheist, and put emphasis on a single god. So, overall monotheism dominates SC's politics. However, Buddhism, and Hinduism are close runner-ups, which are polytheistic. There are also other groups like Zoroastrians in SC's Iran. Folk religions are for the most part polytheistic, but lack the international political influence, unlike monotheist regions."
What do people have to offer to their Deity or deities? ''And again, this depends on religion. Offering sacrifices to deities was once more common in past, but now this is regularly practiced only between neo-pagans, and indigenous religion shamans. However, an usual pick for sacrifice is an animal like goat, or bull, as it is considered an ''universal'' gift for the gods. In places, where livestock is way less significant, usually a sea animal like whale, or a bird is offered for sacrifice. Mostly only the bones of the sacrifice animal are burned, but meat itself is served on the table. However, vegetables, and fruits also can be considered as offerings, along with melee weapons. In general, anything, that person views as valuable, can be offered to deities. However, some things are just too valuable to sacrifice to deities, like laser guns, for an example.''
What do people want from their Deity or deities? How do they try and get it? ''Wishes can be various - from simply good health for them, and their family, or even a victory in the battle, where odds are seemingly against the SC. Some people also want to know, how long they will live, or what will be their economical situation in future. However, the amount of sacrifices for a fulfilled wish also differ greatly, depending, on how big impact it has - sometimes it is enough with just a few fruits, but sometimes spirits, and gods demand way more than that, and can even make it dangerous. Usually deities can be summoned by a ritual, but it should be kept in mind, that summon methods differ across the world. However, one should not wish for a too valuable wish, as others might grow jealous of them, and SCPS could be interested in taking it away as well.''
Are there differing denominations or sects of the religion? ''As mentioned before, yes, there are various denominations. In Christianity alone, for an example, there are quite a few major Christian groups alongside with Catholic Church - Anabaptism, Restorationism, Protestantism, Anglicanism, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian Church, and Eastern Orthodox, along with a few minor ones, like Mormonism. Most of the sects are declared as ''illegal'' by government, as it accepts only ''state churche's'', which it can also directly tax, and control politically. Same applies for other major religions as well, and even indigenous faiths - in late years, SC has persecuted many natives for ''not following the standards, which it sets for official churches*.''
How do their religious practices differ from their neighbours? ''Well, theoretically we don't have ''neighbors'', as we are a world government. However, as there are many religions in the world, their practices indeed differ from each other. For example, while Hinduism has many gods, Christianity has only one. (Although there are angels as well) Shamans usually don't have big buildings similar to churches, or mosques - they either operate on an open field, or in a simple building like horse stable. Some religions still extensively use sacrifice (Not human, though), while others usually find other ways to appease their gods.''
Are issues such as orthodoxy, heterodoxy, heresy and apostasy keys in the religious life? ''Yes, those still play a lot of role in religious life, as society in SC's world could be described as ''frozen in time'' by some. In fact, SC has attempted to force its main religious model, and structure of the church (Christianity) to the rest of religions. In general, apostasy is shunned, as abandoning the ''father religion'' is typically seen as a betrayal of the region's religious values. Heresy is punished severely in most of SC's world - punishments can range from just fines, to even death penalty. Orthodoxy, however, is put on pedestal, due of SC's conservatism. Those rules even have been started to be applied to native religious communities.''
What gender, ethnic, national or racial issues exist within the religion? ''Ohh, helluva lot, actually! Most of the religious communities are patriarchal, so there is a big issue with gender equality in SC currently, as old stereotypes from 50s are still around. Also, despite SC's attempts to portray itself as ''at least kinda stable country, in which religions can live together under one roof, if split in various autonomies'', in reality, ethnic, and religious violence is still a big issue there, especially with border regions - regional governors often use the excuse of ''crusade'' against the ''other'' in order to justify their border war, while in reality they usually want some of the resources from neighbors, which they can't get in other ways. In fact, tensions in middle east are even worse, as various ultranationalist groups each want a piece of the funding for their region.''
Is ecumenism engaged in, or are other traditions treated as adversaries or enemies? ''There have been attempts from SC's Protestants, and its central government to ease conflicts, and politically unite both Orthodox Christians, Catholics, Copts, Nestorians, Mormons, and other Christian groups. There have been talks with leaders of Catholic Church, Orthodox Church, and other leaders. (Vatican isn't an independent country anymore in SC's timeline, just like San Marino, and Monaco, Liechtenstein, and Andorra) Still, it has proved to be extremely difficult to reconcile internal tensions, especially due of SC's anti-catholic campaigns in the past, and internal conflicts from other governors - for example, in Europe between Catholics, and Anglicans. Also, each group wants a piece from power pie as well. Some Prelates are concerned, that ''Christian groups are fighting more with each other, than their actual foes''.''
What is the most commonly broken religious rule? ''For SC's Christians, one of the most common broken rules is refusing the usage alcohol - while it is illegal in many regions, and not only Christian ones, there are still underground alcohol production facilities, and people still get drunk in secret. Not making others, or themselves to work at Sabbath is also often broken, as SC's society has started to become faster, and most of state companies can't afford breaks from work anymore, and so can't workers as well. So, many CEOs try to organize celebration of Sabbath during work break instead. In the end, while tithing is a law enforced by state, some still don't donate the 10% of their income to church, due of SC's draconic tax laws. Some other rules are often broken as well, especially ''don't kill'' rule - as SC has been at war pretty much since its existence, it is very hard to follow this rule, unless you want to work behind the lines.''
What is the least-violated religious rule? ''One of them is divorce - SC defines a marriage as a ''contract between man and woman'', and it is for the most part a permanent one - divorce process is so tied with bureaucracy, that many rather bear the toxic relations, instead of going through the bogging paperwork. Also, absistence of intimate relationships before marriage is also practiced, due of SC's strict puritan laws. Hindu law also is for the most part followed, and other religious laws across the world are enforced as well, because most of the world is if not an outright theocracy, then at least highly religious.''
How are such infractions punished? Is it possible to expel a community member? ''Punishments are usually carried out, when taking in account the severity of the infraction - similarly to SC's approach to other, non-religious crimes. However, person can be expelled from a religious community, and while it doesn't result in revoking the citizenship (It can be revoked for crimes like treason, though, and then such a person is basically ''outside the law'', as it doesn't protect them anymore), it will result in being shunned outside from most of the religious communities, because various church leaders often have an intercommunion between each other, so a leader of an another community can easily spot the person in database, and decide if to either let them come, or reject them.''
How can an outsider join the religious community? ''Usually religious conversations, or attempts to join an another religion outside birth region are prohibited, as SC views religion as an ''important part of each group's national identity'', and in Tom's opinion, conversion to other religion would ''taint'' a person's blood and heritage. Religion of a person is usually chosen from birth (With baptists being one of the exceptions), and it stays with them for the rest of their life. Also, joining an another religious community might be interpreted as ''cultural appropriation'' as well. So, there is a situation, when it is easier for person to become an atheist (As much as ''easy'' it is in SC, anyways), instead of joining an another religious community.''
Does the religion send out missionaries? What role(s) do they play? ''Yes, we do send out missionaries. However, as of now, they don't serve the role of converting anymore, as SC has maintained a stable grip of its largest religions, so by now they rather are an assistance in rebuilding efforts, and ''civilization'' of the indigenous groups - some of which haven't been contacted by SC before. They also rather seek to change the patterns, and structures of indigenous religions, in order for them to reflect the big religion church system as well. Those results have been mixed - some have accepted it, while some aren't so sure, if it actually is good. In fact, some of those missionaries have negotiated the annexation of tribal lands, and removing chiefs from power, instead replacing those structures with a similar jacobin totalitarianism. It should be kept in mind, that not only SC's Christian church sends out missionaries - various other religions like Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism also send out their own missionaries.''
What factions exist within the dominant religious institutions? How do they compete? ''Specifics might differ, when talking about different religions, but usually there are three main factions - zealots, conservatives, and reformists. Conservatives seek to uphold religious values as they are, and fight against atheism, yet aren't quite as radical as the zealots. They prefer stability, so they will typically back any party, which is in power. Reformists seek to advance, and slowly change stance of religious leaders in various things - socially, SC's world has been basically regressive since the 50s, when the road for three superstates was paved. That said, reformists in SC's world would be religious conservatives in OTL world. Zealots typically feel, that ''not enough is being done, to enforce the religion's power'', and often seek region transformation to outright theocracy. In regions, which are theocratic, zealots typically devolve to conservatives later on, as they achieve their goals, and there is no need for radical activism anymore. Surprisingly, all three groups value scientific research, due of Tomist ''religious science'' model, and luddites are typically ridiculed there.''
Are the differing groups a result of schismatism or mutual and cooperative separation? ''Depends on both regional situation, and religion, really. For example, Eastern Orthodoxy is a result of East–West Schism, where communion between East, and West churches was broken in 11th century. Ecumenical Patriarch, and Pope went in conflict with each other. Protestantism is a result of Reformation as well, which broke Christianity in part again. Various groups like Calvinists, and Anglicans were created in separation as well. In Islam, perhaps the most well known schism is split between Shia, and Sunni Muslim groups, which has resulted in various bloody conflicts. In Buddhism, original teachings also split in three various schools - Vajrayāna, Theravāda, and Mahāyāna. However, if compared to previous schisms, this one was rather peaceful. Still, there have been various other variations of Buddhism, and some of them are more warlike, and violent, if compared to Buddhism's core principles.''
Are there monastic groups? What do they do and how are they organized? How do you join one? ''There are plenty of monastic groups - they play an important role in Christianity (Both Protestant, Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox), Buddhism, Hinduism and in Jainism as well. On contrast, monastic groups are criticized in Zoroastrianism, and Islam, and monasticism is minimally practiced in Judaism. There are a few monastic groups in other religions as well. Usually monastic orders spend life in relative isolation from modern world, and practice asceticism, being devoted to religion. However, some monastic groups (For example, in SC's Tibet) take a more direct approach in regional politics - in fact, Tibetan monastic orders even serve as an army recruitment force, and are tasked with defense of the country. Of course, no one launches crusades anymore, but order militaries are kept in case of unrest, and self-defense. In order to join a monastic group, usual requirement is being at least 16 years old, and a follower of the religion, which monastic order practices. Monastic orders also participate in welfare programs, and development of infrastructure, for an example.''
Are there cult groups within the religious community? "Well, there are quite a few, and various groups are located in all continents, and even in Antarctica, some of the settlers are cultists, which have started to form a cult across the previously non-discovered spirits, and mythological beings of Antarctica, even if Administration of Antarctica upholds somewhat pragmatic policy. Some of those cults are very influential - for example, Southern China is ran by Yiguandao, which split off from Blueshirts Society during RNGOC's times already. SC's Korea's ideology could be described as an extreme mix of cult of personality with Buddhism - something similar to juche. There are some cults in western world too, particularly cult around leaders, but those cults, which are not approved by government, are usually hunted down by SCPS."
How are those who follow different faiths treated? ''Those, who follow religions other than Christianity (SC's main religion), are kinda tolerated, but only when they live in the regions, which SC's government designated them, as overall it doesn't like religious mixing, and wants to keep other faiths out of ''Christian'' regions. Overall, SC's core territories still consider themselves a ''Christian Nation''. Difference, however, is, that it is a world government, so theoretically it has more chances to enforce that system, but from other side, expenses also grow. So, most often they leave the enforcement to regional governors, which not always do, what the Tom wants. However, there are a handful of faiths, and cults, which government views as a threat to its power - those are usually suppressed mercilessly.''
What relationship do religious and political leaders have? ''As religion plays a high role in SC's society, it is only logical, that various churches would have a strong influence over regions. Influence forms wary - from simply having a strong voice in Party's matters, but not control over the government, to being an outright theocracy, where the line of Leader of Church, and Leader of State/Region has blurred. In either case, governments often pass pro-religious acts, which are supposed to hurt atheism, and secular thought. Various religious groups also participate in various charity programs, in order to gain the support from lower classes - albeit cut off from political processes, it is still important to keep them satisfied, as lower class revolt would be catastrophic for SC. However, for regions, where religious leaders aren't the ruling government, there is also often tension between leadership of the church, and state - there have also even been purges of disloyal priests/mullahs/monks out from the churches in past, carried out by government.''
What superstitions are common? What kinds of supernatural events or beings do people fear? ''There are plenty of superstitions in SC's world, and we can cover only a few of them. But there you go - For an example, in SC's Serbia, spilling water behind someone's back is believed to bring good luck, but in SC's Portugal, some believe, that walking backwards lets devil know where you are, and where you go. In China, number ''4'' is generally considered an ''unlucky'' number, while in Egypt, it is usually considered unlucky to open, and close scissors, if you don't actually use them. Throwing coins in the fountains is also considered as an attempt to appease the spirits, and gods. Usually many mischievous spirits are feared the most, as they can not only bring bad luck, but even kill people. Also, just like superstitions, there are plenty of supernatural elements, which people fear, but one of them is the coming of an apocalypse - a battle, where the ultimate battle of evil vs good will happen. There are many apocalypse interpretations, and different end date, but myth of apocalypse is found in almost every culture.''
What kinds of supernatural or other-natural beings exist in this religion (angels, demons, devi, asuras, spirits, ghosts, sprites, etc)? ''There are many religions around there, but perhaps the most significant supernatural being is Wendigo - a symbol of greed, and gluttony, which always seeks for more blood, and victims, and can never be satisfied. He has been also pulling the puppet strings of most major events in SC, including its rise in the first place, as he predicted, that it would create ''the largest chaos, and blood possible'', as he feeds the best in times of despair. At first just a fictional beast in Algonquin mythology, he has recently shown himself, and the rest of spirits to humanity, verifying, that he is real, and that spirits are slowly taking control. Now, he is mentioned in all religions across the world. There are other significant spirits, and beings (basically every being from every mythology) as well, but they are for the most part evil. Legend goes, that ''in the darkest hour, good spirits will return, and fight the ultimate battle against evil. Humans will only be able to look in their fight, as power armor is nothing, if compared to Zeus thunder.''
How are dreams and visions encompassed by the religion? ''Visions usually have more clarity than dreams, and they are known to emerge from human spiritual traditions. Visions are often said to be prophecies as well. All types of visions aren't the same - some are intellectual visions, where human receives a special knowledge, some are imaginary visions, where nothing is seen or heard by common sense, but same impression could be produced by imagination. Others are corporeal - where a supernatural being (for example, a spirit, or mythological being) transforms in front of the person. In some ways, all of them are related to human inner thoughts. Traditionally, visions have been important for tribal shamans to contact with spirits, and have often interpreted as signs to action of a sort - some spiritual, some physical. For example, Mormonism - a strain of Christianity in SC, was created after a couple of visions, which their founder saw. They ended up being important players in SC's Rockies politics.''
How is religious action expressed (spontaneous or ritual liturgy, song, dance, music, ritual action, sex, miracle plays, etc)? ''And once again, this one depends on religion. Buddhist meditation music is one of the examples. Miracle plays mostly focus on representation of bible stories, along with antiphonal song as a background. Rituals are common in both indigenous communities, where often pagan religions are practiced, and in monotheist religions as well - in fact, Catholic Mass, is one of the most popular rituals in SC. Rituals include not only worship rites, and sacraments, but also rites of passage, presidential inaugurations, marriages, veteran parades, oaths of allegiance, purification rites, etc. Indigenous religious dances, and songs are preserving traditions, which were widespread in ancient world. Anastenaria is a fire-walking ritual performed by Christians in Bulgaria, and Northern Greece. Circle dance is used in Islamic Haḍra dances, and Sufi whirling is a physically active meditation form. Various Hinduist dances are performed either in Hinduist temples, or near them, as a religious art.''

Magic
How is magic integrated into society? ''It is usually considered a suppressed art, with magic users being more widespread in the past, but eventually being suppressed by SC's government, which maintains a strong monopoly on any advanced magic. While often ridiculing it in public, it itself takes it very seriously - development of magic rifles shows that. It is unknown, who gave magic first to the humans - was it always there, or only arose over time? In either case, some of the spirits have always existed there. It is rumored, that some groups in government secretly appease them in magic rituals, in order to make their troops perform better, even if they follow Christianity for most of the time. Other significant magic keepers are indigenous shamans, and oracles - remnants of the magic institution, which got curtailed over the centuries. Some of them work with government, but some are declared as ''very dangerous'' towards it, and are hunted.''
Who can work magic? Is anyone disallowed from working magic? ''Theoretically, anyone can practice it, but in practice, it is limited to army generals, priests, shamans, and Party members. Criminals are also not allowed to use magic, because it can be potentially dangerous. Also, most of the spells are barely useful in SC's modern world, when technology can provide a better alternative. Various neo-pagans, and occultists have tried to practice some of it, but they can't reach full potential without support from local government. Any citizen, who has a higher level than a priest, mage corp soldier, or a Party's member, is usually examined, and held with suspicion. Despite that, various SC's persons want to continue development of magic, and training new mages, in order to ''push its limits'' to weaponry.''
How are works of magic accomplished? ''Usually either through various spells, wands, or magic rituals. Despite the stereotype, wands are actually used the least, and often are also ranged weapons of sort. Rituals can take some time to prepare, and resources, so spells are most often used. Most of them work in Latin, so it is recommended to learn it in the process, even if it is considered a ''dead language''. Spells are also useful for people with less skill, as anyone can practice them, while rituals can often be prepared only by professional shamans, who know, what they are doing, because there are so many things, that can go wrong, while contacting with the spirits, and then it can be even dangerous for health, and life.''
What kind of preparation or study is required before undertaking a magical work? ''It is usually required to understand at least basics of it, and practice - simple spells might be easy, as every SC's human has a talent of sort, but developing them further is way harder - no wonder, why so many people fall out later, and only learn simple spells - it can take years to practice. No wonder, why government mostly limits it to officials, army's members, and indigenous peoples - it considers them as ''more skillful'' with it. There are 50 levels of magic masters in total, but only a few have reached the highest level. Most of shamans are somewhere in the middle, along with generals, and regular soldier mage corps are a bit lower. Most of common populace is either inept at it (0 level), or at very basic first levels, and might not even know about their abilities.''


X. Questions of Marriage.

How is a marriage defined? How is a marriage contracted? ''It is defined as a personal union between an one man, and one woman, which lasts until death parts them. It can be contracted at either a church, mosque, or a temple, accompanied by Priests, as for the most part, only church can legitimize a marriage, and any marriages without church's approval, or without participation of priests, will not be recognized, and will be simply called as friendships. It applies for all SC's regions. Same-sex marriage, however, is not recognized in SC, and is illegal, and there is still a big social stigma around it. Many church leaders have stated, that they will ''veto any proposal of the legalization''.'' ''
What is the term of a marriage contract? ''Most commonly they are known as ''premarital agreements'', ''prenups'', or "prenuptial agreements'', although there isn't an one common term for that, and it can vary from region to region - it is one of the few things, which regional governments surprisingly don't regulate in SC, for now.''
What gifts are considered appropriate or inappropriate for a wedding? ''Alcohol is usually considered an inappropriate gift for a wedding, as it not only can lead to conflicts at wedding day, while being drunk, but is also seen as a cheap gift - nothing too much thought, and effort was put in. Also, in most of SC's states, there are alcohol regulatory laws of some sort, and in some places, it is even illegal to consume alcohol. So, it is better to avoid giving such a gift. Knives also are better to not be given in SC, as there is a superstition, that could possibly lead to hatred later on. However, home-made, custom things, whenever they are little talismans, or things like chair from wood, are usually appreciated in SC. Photos from other regions are also a wanted gift, as they show at least some part of other people's lives, even if it is very little.''
How are marriages celebrated? "Depending on couple's wealth, and social status, they can be either very extravagant (For SC's standards), with musicians, feast, activities, military comrades, etc, to very short, and prude celebrations, usually in a small family circle. Traditions also depend on region - for example, SC's American, Chinese, Arab, and African marriages are very different. However, local governments also set limits, in order to avoid " excessive draining of resources" - various marriages had to be changed, due of SC's draconic laws."
What is considered too great a difference in age for a couple? "Usually, an age difference, which exceeds 10-20 years, is considered as a too big gap. 30 years old marrying a 60 years old is definitely too big gap for that. While technically not banned, those couples are typically shunned, and there are a lot of stereotypes about that - for example, a youngster marrying an old, rich man. That said, marriages before reaching 18 years are not allowed."
Do relationships allow multiple partners? "For the most part, polygamy, or polyandry is illegal, and church recognizes only one partner. That is one of the places, where SC tries to make regions follow an one custom. However, secret partners are still popular, despite punishment risk, and in some regions, cultural traditions can theoretically permit having more than one partner. Still, Tom works on stomping that out."
In what ways is a marriage considered broken? "Usually it is considered as " broken", when couple doesn't live together anymore, and they don't raise children together anymore. It is also considered broken, when couple officially signs a contract of breaking the marriage. Keep in mind, that even if there isn't love anymore, marriage doesn't count as broken, unless any other of the requirements above have appeared as well. Also, there's a high pressure to keep marriage, so such a decision is always hard."
How can a marriage be terminated? ''While it is theoretically possible to terminate a marriage in SC, in practice, marriages can almost never be broken, due of the complex legal processes, and society's pressure. Also, church encourages permanent marriage, and it is not unusual, that it would deny divorce requests, making divorce practically illegal, just like having multiple spouses. So, young people are usually advised to pick their partners wisely, as more often than not they will be forced to live with them for the rest of their life, and if they turn out to bed, it would be terrible. For the most part, marriages are also decided by the families, not lovers themselves, so they can either not approve of healthy relationship, or exactly opposite - move forward a toxic one.''
Last edited by Silver Commonwealth on Wed Apr 10, 2019 5:45 am, edited 65 times in total.
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OOC: A slight Latvian freeaboo, slight francophile Center-left economics, kinda conservative socially

Why I have relatively little factbooks? Because those are more cramped together than Khrushchyovkas

Currently in SC's Radio: Bajtárs

To those, who keep making versions of third reich

This nation doesn't represent my views

Myself

F̛̕͡a̸͟í͞t̵͝h́͜,̸͘͠ R̷e̸͜͝p͜͠͠ub͘͜l̨̛í̶c̨͟҉, ͠͡͡a̸͝n҉̸d͜ ̀̕ańt̢i̸͘͜-͢c̵á͏͢҉p̷͏įta͝l̛͘i̷̢s̀m̵̨̛

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New Udonia
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Founded: Sep 06, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Worldbuilding Survey (Part 2 of 2)

Postby New Udonia » Sat Mar 23, 2019 5:39 am

XIII. Questions of Education.

Describe the education of the society’s people: formal schooling, apprenticeship, etc. Education is usually based upon formal schooling which is itself composed of a wide mosaic of educational curriculums and systems.
If education is mainly by apprenticeship, how is this accomplished? N/A
Is education compulsory / offered to everyone? What is the cost of education? All citizens have the right to access basic (K-12) education, although it is encouraged to seek private education opportunities. Private education can range from affordable to expensive, it all depends on the individual institution.
Between which ages does education happen? Basic education on average is completed during the age range of 4-18.
How are year groups and academic years arranged? Traditional year and age groups are as follows.
Education Introduction - Year 0 (age 4)
Level 1 Elementary - Year 1 (age 5)
Level 2 Elementary - Year 2 (age 6)
Level 3 Elementary - Year 3 (age 7)
Level 4 Elementary - Year 4 (age 8)
Level 5 Elementary - Year 5 (age 9)
Level 1 Advanced - Year 6 (age 10)
Level 2 Advanced - Year 7 (age 11)
Level 3 Advanced - Year 8 (age 12)
Education Culmination - Year 9 (age 13)
Occupation Introduction - Year 10 (age 14)
Occupation Field - Year 11 (age 15)
Occupation Career - Year 12 (age 16)
Occupation Profession - Year 13 (age 17)
Occupation Training - Year 14 (age 18)
How are curricula arranged? What courses are typically offered? Elementary education trains students in the basics of communication and science, effectively "educating" them. Advanced education trains students in citizenship and self-sustainability, with courses ranging from legal codes to culinary skills. Occupation education assists students in finding a field, choosing a career, and picking a profession. In addition, occupation education trains students in order to prepare them for their profession.
What degrees or diplomas are offered by schools? If a student passes advanced education, they will receive an Advanced Education diploma. They may pursue occupational degrees or enter the workforce by the time of their education culmination (age 13 on average).
What do schools / colleges / universities look like? Federal schools aren't constructed with the grandeur of certain private institutions.
What are the classrooms like? What is a typical class size Depending on the institution and level, class sizes vary. All government supported institutions can not violate the maximum of 30 students per classroom for K-12 institutions.
Who is in charge of education in the country, and in each individual school? The Secretary of Education heads the Department of Education. The majority of institutions are privately owned, while federal institutions are managed by district authorities.
Does this society have its own language? Its own writing system? Each district is expected to educate its children in its respective national language and the official language, effectively producing a nation of bilingual citizens.
How common is literacy? How is literacy viewed? Literacy is highly common as it is completed within the first years of elementary education.
What form and value are books?
Who teaches others? How do they teach? Teachers and professors teach students through example, proven to be the most effective form of teaching.
Who decides who learns to read or write? Parents and guardians are guaranteed the right to determine their offspring's educative future in accordance with Article 11 of the Constitution.
Who teaches professions, like carpenter or scribe? Professions which don't require an occupational degree are usually passed down through familial relations.
Are foreigners ever brought in to teach new skills? Who does that? Supra-nationalism is encouraged, although all individuals participating in the New Udonian education system must either hold New Udonian citizenship or be exempted through treaty, such as the Realm of Yohannes.


XIV. Questions of Technology.

Are philosophy and science unified, or do they exist as separate and independent disciplines? Science is philosophy as it is always changing its ideals and rules. Philosophy is considered a scientific discipline.
What devices and technologies are available for people? Slightly advanced with advancements in quantum/dna computing and artificial intelligence.
Are such devices taken for granted? If not, how many are appreciated? Most individuals appreciate the technologies, especially in such incidents as the 2068 "zombification" epidemic.
How do people envision a difficult or impossible task that could be made easier by using some kind of device or futuristic technology? The majority sees technology as a tool, something which has the power to be used for both good and evil.
How is knowledge distributed? Is it kept unknown to the common people, or is available for all? Knowledge is distributed freely with advancements in open education and other initiatives undertaken by partnerships between the Department of Education and the Department of Technology.

Architecture
What major architectural styles are present? What do they look like? Modernist and Bauhaus architecture permeate New Udonian society.
The federal building for the Department of Records is shown below.
Image
How does this vary over time and between places in the region?
While federal infrastructure is mainly composed of Modernist and Bauhaus, district infrastructure is influenced directly by cultural aspects.
What major elements are present? How are they pieced together? Solar panels are a large feature in New Udonian architecture, with their use as roof tiling.
What are houses like inside and out? Ultramodern, usually lots of glass and concrete.
What are palaces and castles like? Sacrificing grandeur for security.
How tall is the tallest building? How big is the biggest building? The tallest building is the Yaling Administrative Building at 600 m. The Vsevolodian underground complex of Bogomolov could technically be considered the biggest building at an estimated 3 - 5 million square meters, although its natural caverns allow for easy expansion.
What materials are used in typical construction? Do any materials have to be imported? Concrete and glass are popular favorites, with cement composites gaining traction. No, most building materials don't need to be imported from outside the Federation, unless the object is something so luxurious it lacks development in the homeland.
How are buildings constructed? Are there machines or is work done by hand? Buildings are constructed using prefabricated technologies, with the assistance of AI. Technology, such as in the form of exosuits, are used by the construction personnel on the largest and most daring projects.
What are some famous landmarks in the region? Why are they famous? Are they famous internationally? New Udonia City is famous for being labeled both an eyesore and a beautiful landscape by different high-level critics and international citizens.


XV. Questions of Transportation and Communications.

How do people get from place to place? Does this vary at all in different places? Traveling across the nation (cross-district travel) is usually left to airplanes. Traveling within districts usually falls on land vehicles while urban centers are developed to support the use of trains.
Do people make long journeys? If so, what are they like? Certain districts have vast stretches of territory, so there are those who routinely travel across such wilderness as the Limbani Sea and the Irmgardian forests.
Is there a public transport system? Who uses it? How much does it cost? Public transportation is more abundant in urban areas. Anyone wishing to not use their own vehicle. Depending on the locale, prices can range from ➰10 - ➰40.
What are the roads like? How do they vary from place to place? Roads are extensive, although they are usually paved in most areas. Urban areas are experimenting with new road technologies, and rural areas still use over a million miles of unpaved roads.
Do individuals or families own and use their own vehicles? You are more likely to own a vehicle if you live in a rural or local area, urban dwellers are less likely to own a vehicle.
How safe and clean is the typical transport system? Very safe and very clean. The use of maglev transportation driven by solar power has led to a "perfect" train system in New Udonia City.
What major fuels are used? Solar, hydrogen, and other technologies are common in high-income areas. Gasoline and coal are prevalent in rural and local areas which can't afford an upgrade.
Apart from face to face, how do people communicate with each other? People can communicate through phone, text, and video chat; although less individuals are opting for phone use when offered the chance to text.
Is there a postal service? How fast is it? How much does it cost to use? What restrictions are there on packet delivery? Does the post operate internationally? How likely is it that an article sent in the post will reach its intended destination? The Postal Service is dependent upon private industry. It is very fast, dependent on what class of delivery was purchased. Virtually none, except no dangerous substances which may harm transport employees or illegal materials. Some delivery companies offer international service. Highly likely, as companies which don't remedy errors tend to collapse under free market competition.
What technical or mechanical means of communications exist? Telephone lines and internet communications are prevalent. The telegram is virtually nonexistent although certain underground organizations are rumored to use it.


XVI. Questions of Economics.


What is the local economy based on? Each district has specific industries which are massive in comparison to others. Socorran shipping and Xiulani manufacturing are international powerhouses.
How is commerce engaged in? Commerce can be engaged in either through face-to-face or virtual business meetings. International communications allow New Udonian products to be advertised on foreign shores.
If levied, how are taxes collected? What are such revenues used for? How does taxation affect the people? There are two primary taxes within the Federation, the income tax and the sales tax. The property tax and the death tax were abolished. Income tax is based upon income reported, which is based upon the national electronic currency's monitoring. In order to avoid income taxes, an individual can simply avoid using the national electronic currency, although it may not be very profitable or convenient. Sales tax is gathered from sold merchandise which is commercially marketed. Basically any merchandise which is advertised through public means or through public communications is able to have a sales tax levied on it. This effectively avoids embarrassing incidents such as taxing lemonade stands (as long as they aren't using commercial marketing). Taxation is used to fund the governments operations, especially universal healthcare for its citizens. Individuals may complain of high income tax rates, however any individual is able to renounce his or her citizenship and avoid paying the income tax (the sales tax will still apply). However, only citizens are allowed to access free healthcare and state education, not to mention other services, so it is a difficult choice for many citizens to make.
What do people expect from their government in return for the taxes paid? People expect to have their persons and property protected. If the government fails to do so, the government owes the people retribution, so most government bureaucrats strive for efficiency and transparency.

Money
What is the local currency like? How is it subdivided? What is it based on (metal, labour, fiat)? The Click (➰) is an electronic blockchain currency with zero sub-units. The currency is based on resources stockpiled by the Central Bank of New Udonia.
Is currency issued by a central authority or by some decentralised means? Currency is issued by the Central Bank of New Udonia.
How does it compare to other neighbouring currencies? ➰4 ~ $1
How has the value of the currency changed or fluctuated recently? The currency value is stable, with virtually no fluctuation in purchasing power.
How are coins and notes produced? How common are forgeries? Forgeries are virtually impossible, unless an individual doesn't think about how the currency is transferred.
How is wealth distributed? Pretty evenly, as the free market prevents economic misalignment in favor of a certain organization over others.
Is there a public banking system? The Central Bank of New Udonia is the largest and publicly owned bank within the Federation.
Who uses it? What benefits does it bring? At what cost? The Central Bank is quite popular as all of its assets have physical resources stockpiled in order to give their currency legitimate worth.
Is there a large gap between the wealth of the rich and poor? What expectations do each group have from the other? There is a considerable gap, however because citizens have access to universal health care regardless of wealth, anyone has the ability to move up the ladder as long as they are willing to work for it.
What constitutes "poverty" in this society? Poverty would be equivalent to living paycheck to paycheck or lower.


XVII. Questions of Death and Burial.

What is their understanding of death and dying? The moment an individual's heart stops beating, they are considered dead. However, they may be revived, so heart failure for over an hour is usually understood to represent death. Brain damage is not considered a cause of death, as there are cases of successful brain regeneration.
What does this society do with their corpses? Although cultural and local customs differ, cremation is the most popular form of disposal.
Do they cremate their dead? Or, how are dead bodies disposed of? Cremation is popular, so is burial by sea...
Is the family responsible for the body? Yes, if no family members are available, the state will step up.
What part do the priests play? Depends on the religion, although usually they perform a ceremony.
Are there cemeteries at all? Depends on the district, there is the massive graves from the disasters which some even consider to be haunted.
Or, does everyone have a crypt in back with all the relatives in it? Depends on the district.
Do people visit the dead? If so, how often and why? The majority of New Udonia believes in the afterlife, so theoretically to visit the dead would require your death. Individuals are known to speak to the dead, as there is a growing movement that believes in the dead protectively watching over them.

Suicide
What do people in this culture think about suicide? The majority believes suicide to be a the act of one who has lost all hope.
Is it the greatest sin one can commit? Or is it a sin at all? Depends on the religion, although the majority see suicide as a disgraceful act if successful.
Is it the great and last comfort of a tormented soul? The Church of Uranus would attempt to convince you of this.
Is it worse than murder? No, as you aren't taking two lives.


XVIII. Questions of Government.

What is the form of government? How is it structured? The government is a Constitutional Federation organized according to the Constitution.
What are some of the most fundamental policies of the government? The Federation's role as federal is to enforce Articles 8+ of the Constitution.
What is the political status of minority communities? Minority communities are protected under relevant Articles of the Constitution.
How is government chosen? Local and district government is dependent upon specific statutes. The federal leadership, the Federal Chamber, is chosen by direct election, granted to those with citizenship.
What is the country’s general foreign policy? Global assistance should be mutually beneficial, one sided policies only increase hostilities. The Federation is also known to subtly press for adoption of its Constitution's Articles on human rights (8+).
Who decides whether someone has broken a law? How? The Department of Courts handles logistics on convicting and sentencing criminals through court cases. Judges decide whether an individual has broken a law, juries are given the ability to decide on the sentence.
What kinds of punishments are meted out? By whom? Why? The Department of Justice's Bureau of Prisons handles incarceration and other sentences.
How are new laws created or old ones changed? Through the Department of Legislation. The Bureau of Legislation involves representative influenced legislation while the Bureau of Referendums gives citizens the ability to influence legislation.
Is there some form of clemency or pardon? What is involved? An individual may be pardoned by their crimes by a district head or federal head.
Who has the right to give orders, and why? Everything is detailed in the Constitution, however each member of the Federal Chamber controls a sector of federal government.
What titles do various officials have? The Federal Chamber is composed of the President, the Prime Minister, the Warden, and the Marshal.
How are the rules different for officials as opposed to the common person? There are no differences in rules, in accordance with Article 8.
How do government officials dress? Depends on the role, although formal business clothing is preferred.
Is the law written down? Who interprets it? The law is written down and registered with the Department of Records. The law is not "interpreted" as it is written very clearly.
Once accused, what recourse does someone have? Legal representation is usually a good start. Admittance to guilt is usually a good way to decrease charges.
Is torture allowed? What kinds? Is capital punishment allowed? Torture is banned. Capital punishment is also banned, alongside corporal punishment.
How are criminals executed? N/A
Who cannot rise to positions of leadership? Non-citizens.
Is bribery allowed? Under what circumstances? Bribery isn't illegal, unless it involves breaking the law. Giving "tips" is accepted across the Federation as a form of free market enterprise.
What makes someone a bad ruler in this society? What can be done about it? A bad ruler would ignore the Constitution. The Federal Chamber has safeguards, including the AI watchdog which was built and raised on the Constitution.
What are the most common or dangerous forms of criminal? The Galton Foundation has virtually no respect for human life, while the acts of the Sei Dorianos are quite despicable.

City Watch & Sheriffs
Is there a civilian police force, or is law enforcement the province of the military? Law enforcement is part of the Martial sector of government, however the military (Department of Armed Forces) is separate from the Department of Emergency Services and the Bureau of Police Service.
Is the police force a nationalized one, or are there multiple regional forces? The police is nationalized with a presence in every urban area. Local areas are able to generate their own police forces, however their authority is subject to the nationalized forces.
How militant or vigilante are they? Are they usually or ever armed? All members of the Bureau of Police Service are armed, although it depends on the relevant task force in question.
What is the extent of their authority? Can they shoot you? Can they use magic? Can they torture or otherwise force a confession? Can they use telepathy? Police officers are allowed to detain and arrest an individual if they possess a warrant to do so. Arresting someone for probable cause is risky, as the officer takes full blame if there is no evidence to be located. Officers are authorized to shoot any individual who fails to surrender. (Unarmed individuals usually feel the taser or the baton before the bullet.)
Are there individuals or groups who are above the law? No individuals or organizations are above the law.
Is there a secret police? No.
What is the role of police informants, if any? Informants are important to the success of the police, however willing informants are quite common as there is a considerable reward for information leading to the arrest of a T6 member.

XIX. Questions of Warfare.

Does the country have an armed force? What types? What size? The Department of Armed Forces. Contains three bureaus: Bureau of the Army, Bureau of the Navy, and Bureau of the Air Force. The bureaus are quite expansive with each one containing three active divisions / formations / squadrons at all times. Each Bureau also has three reserve divisions / formations / squadrons which are ready to assist the active divisions during combat.
How do the armed forces compare with others in the region or world? The armed forces are slightly stronger than contemporary militarizes as they use exosuits and artificial intelligence to their advantage.
Who declares war? War may be declared by the Federal Chamber.
Who has the power to declare conditions of peace? Peace may be declared by the Federal Chamber.
How are treaties negotiated? Treaties may be negotiated by the Federal Chamber.
What happens to prisoners taken in battle? Prisoners taken in battle are usually contained in prisoner camps, which are regulated by the relevant military branch. Prisoners may not be tortured or killed, however they do not necessarily need to be evacuated if it is too much of a hassle.
What weapons are favored by the various armed forces? The Bureau of the Army prefers the "M4" series. The Bureau of the Navy prefers the "HK" series. The Bureau of the Air Force prefers railguns.
What form of warfare does this society use? Maneuver warfare is favored as it costs the least amount of lives.
How do battles in the airs or waters or underworlds differ from surface warfare? Battles in the air and sea involve patrolling a "safezone" in order to allow other forces to move through the area with minimum risk. Surface warfare is usually based upon defeating the enemy by "cutting off the head".
Who are the Elite warriors? What distinguishes them? The Department of Homeland Security's Bureau of Special Operations carry out the "elite" tasks. These tasks usually involve hostage rescue and assassination of enemy leadership.
How does someone get command of troops? By completing successful operations, is usually the best way to be promoted. Virtually all of New Udonia's military leaders are in the field in order to guarantee mission success.
Where do the loyalties of military units lie? Military units are loyal to the Federation, the Marshal of the Federation, and the Federal Chamber.
Are there professional soldiers? Do they make up the bulk of the military? The majority of soldiers are professional soldiers as conscription was abolished.
What is campaign or camp life like? Difficult, however the military stresses routine cycling of troops in order to allow them to refresh.
What ethical or moral codes do warriors adhere to? Warriors are never allowed to engage in torture (including rape). Warriors are allowed to eliminate armed individuals and also eliminate unarmed individuals if they fail to surrender.
How are battle injuries treated? Battle injuries are treated by medical specialists, usually within every military squad. Wounded soldiers are evacuated to the closest secure FOB where they are treated.
How long do wars typically last? Wars typically last weeks, as New Udonia likes to end wars quickly.
Has this society ever attacked another? What was the nature of that war? What would make this society go to war? New Udonia, after becoming a Federation, has engaged the Federal State of Columbia in battle before, leading to their cold war. Columbian forces, failing to respect New Udonian airspace, lost multiple pilots after the mobilization of the Bureau of Aerodefense. The Federal State of Columbia was attempting to assault an island nation, one which would become New Udonian territory after the clash. New Udonia will go to war if its citizens are ever attacked, or if its allies are on the "just" side of a war.
Has there ever been a civil war or a revolution? After the Federation's founding, there is a civil war brewing within the District of Socorro. The Socorran Liberation Front is wishing for "independence" from the district, however instead of using legal methods such as the Bureau of Referendums, they rely on violent efforts.
What do soldiers do when there's no war? Soldiers secure borders.
Are there any current tensions / wars / embargoes etc with any other nations? New Udonia is part of two cold wars and one brewing revolution.
Cold war with the Federal State of Columbia.
Cold war with the Socialist Republic of Katashi.
Revolution brewing within the district of Socorro.
Who are the country’s enemies? Who is winning the war? See above.
What defenses are available to cities? The Department of Homeland Security's Bureau of Civil Defense and Bureau of Aerodefense assist citizens in eliminating threats to the homeland.
Last edited by New Udonia on Sat Mar 23, 2019 6:42 am, edited 3 times in total.
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. - MLKJ
News: The New Udonian Weekly

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Ru-
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Posts: 1060
Founded: Aug 01, 2016
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Ru- » Sat Mar 23, 2019 2:44 pm

Gran Toreno wrote:So, of course with many people of different types of Nations RPing with each other, and with many Nations going to "War" how do you think all the Nations are connected? Do you think every Nation on Nationstates in on one giant Planet, do you think there are ripples in Dimensions, etc.

Share what you honestly think is the connection.

OP Note: I legit spent a good 30 Minutes figuring out how to word this in a coherent way without making it confusing.


I just try not to think about it too much. It's most difficult with alternate history nations, since I made every real life nation part of my personal canon. (mostly cause it's fun to imagine how Ru might react to things I see on the news) I find it's easiest to work with nations that don't necessarily place themselves on earth, since they can be anywhere including on my nation's own planet for all I know.
Last edited by Ru- on Sat Mar 23, 2019 2:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
A civilization with an over 3,000 year history of lizard people killing each other and enslaving everyone else. Now they've finally calmed down and formed a modern westernized constitutional monarchy. (long live King Yoshio!)
Still with Her.

----> King Yoshio Q&A Thread! <----
(please help keep it alive if you can. lol )

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Welskerland
Diplomat
 
Posts: 855
Founded: Aug 06, 2014
Ex-Nation

Postby Welskerland » Sat Mar 23, 2019 3:28 pm

Gran Toreno wrote:So, of course with many people of different types of Nations RPing with each other, and with many Nations going to "War" how do you think all the Nations are connected? Do you think every Nation on Nationstates in on one giant Planet, do you think there are ripples in Dimensions, etc.

Share what you honestly think is the connection.

OP Note: I legit spent a good 30 Minutes figuring out how to word this in a coherent way without making it confusing.


I never had a set connection, I just RP when it is convenient, and the other nations are considered canon with Welskerland during those interactions. Perhaps they just fade in and out of existence when needed.
Embassy Program

This nation does reflect my IRL views unless something is more interesting to differ from what I believe otherwise. For example, Welskerland is a constitutional monarchy, while I prefer a republic IRL.

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Silver Commonwealth
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Posts: 1012
Founded: Aug 16, 2018
Psychotic Dictatorship

Worldbuilding survey 3: Character limit strikes back!

Postby Silver Commonwealth » Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:41 am

(Reserving this in case of future expansion. Previous part.)

IV. Questions of Family.

How many spouses may a man or woman have? ''Usually only one, due of SC's strict Christian laws in its main territories - both polygamy, and polyandry are banned. Also, it is not so easy to divorce as well, and marriages are often tied together only by the government's law. That said, both polyandry, and polygamy exist in some other SC's regions, but government looks toward to stomp this out as well, as it is one of the few things, in which it wants to change all other society thinking.''
Who decides on a marriage?
Can a marriage end in divorce? How?
Who usually takes custody of children if a marriage ends for some reason? ''If marriage ends, usually one of the parents takes custody of the children. If that is not an option either. grandparents, and others can take children in custody. In other cases, where there isn't available any from previous mentioned options, older siblings can take their younger siblings in custody, if they are 18 years old, or older. However, both state's CEOs, clergy, and government itself often tend to take children in their custody - either raise them to be clergy, soldiers, or factory workers as well. Some have raised the concerns of well being of those children, but Tom brushes off all complaints with one phrase - ''They are a good resource''.''
How are families named? ''At first, naming child might not seem like a big deal, but SC actually has quite a few set of requirements for family names. For example, name, and surname/s must represent the ethnicity/nationality of the family member, so names and surnames, which are different from the ''expected'' ethnicity name for a child, are usually not accepted. Using numbers in name, and using nicknames as official names are not allowed as well. Also, names must be able to be pronounced, in order to get approved by SC's government registers. However, usual naming traditions are very old, and indicate membership of the family, or an another group. Kids can also be named after a some characteristic, nature object, or animal, for example - Akira means ''Clean'' in Japanese, but Hibiki - ''sound'', or ''echo''. ''Bao'' in Chinese means ''Gem'', but Chao - ''Excellent''. ''Macdonald'' in Scottish means ''Son of Dòmhnall''. German ''Albert'' consists from adal (''noble''), and beraht (''bright''). There are other examples of this in other languages.''
What happens to orphans? ''Some of the luckiest ones are adopted by other couples, as government laws in many regions require families to have at least a few children, and those couples, who can't have children for various reasons, often can adopt those, who have lost their parents. However, most often they end up as workers either on a state farm, or in a factory. Some of them even get drafted in the army. There is not much choice there either - army, or living on the streets, until someone hires you as a worker. In new Commonwealth states, situation is even more bleak, as they are used as a cheap workforce, in order to save money from paying to adult workers, and most of them often will not get any serious education afterwards.''
How are boy and girl children treated differently?
What, if anything, is considered a good marriage gift?
What inanimate or sexless things are considered male or female?
Does this society connect the ideas of marriage with love? "Ohh, pretty much. While some communities still have "the free love" practice, their numbers are shrinking, and SC's core concepts on love are replacing them. While Clergy do recognize the fact, that you can like someone without marriage, serious relationships, and romance require marriage. (One night dates don't count, and they are shunned, especially when one of the partners has a spouse already, as it then is seen as breaking the marriage contract.)"
How big are families, typically?
What constitutes a household? How many people live in one household? How many generations?
Are girls or boys preferred and why?
How common is domestic violence? Is it understood to be a problem, or a normal aspect of family life?
If it is seen as problematic, what is being done about it?


V. Questions of Customs and Social Life.

What colors are associated with power? With virtue? With death? ''Dark red usually symbolizes leadership along with dark blue, gold - with prestige, but purple - with luxury. Black color is associated with power as well, but it is also associated with death at the same time. In some lands, white is also a sorrow color. Orange is usually associated with sunshine, and tropics, while green - with fertility, growth, and harmony. Yellow is associated with intellect, and energy, but white - with purity, goodness, and innocence. It should be kept in mind, however, that in various lands, color meanings might significantly differ, depending on cultural traditions.''
If two men get into a fight, how is this supposed to be resolved?
If two women get into a fight, how should that be resolved?
How do people demonstrate grief?
Who inherits property? Titles? Position?
What are the most popular games? How important are they?
When and how does someone go from child to adult?
How much free time do people usually get?
What do they spend this time doing?
Is society segregated in any way?
What social classes or divisions exist in this society?
If so, can people move from one class to another? Are there any benefits to being of one class over another?
Is there any discrimination against minority groups (racial, ethnic, religious) in this society?
How independent or codependent are individuals?
What are the typical roles of women and men? What are the expectations of children?
Does the government play a large part in people’s lives? "Of course. It is a prime example of totalitarianism in extremes, as it controls every aspect of its citizen lifes - either obviously oppressive, or more subtle instead. Due of its decentralized model, it usually enforces totalitarianism through other rulers - this system is called as "Integral Totalitarianism". It is basically 1984-esque in a way, and libertarians, along with anarchists, or simply those, who don't support government's enormous power, are persecuted. At the same time, decentralization makes it very fragile, as governors tend to feud with each other."
Does religion play a large part in people’s lives?

Food
Describe how daily food is obtained.
What type of foods are most popular?
What are typical dishes and specialties of the region?
What type of food is the locality or region famous for?
What cutlery, if any, do people use for cooking and eating?
How is the table arranged?
How do people sit when eating? Is there any arrangement by age or dignity of diners?
How many and when are the main mealtimes?
Are there restaurants, popinas, street vendors or other places where food may be bought in public? "Yes, the amount of them has increased a lot only in the late years, though - about 20-15 years ago, there weren't that many of them. Some of them can pass as "small family businesses", so private sector is a bit higher there. However, competition with state owned restaurants, and fast food restaurants is still harsh, and small, provate businesses aren't allowed to grow "too big" - otherwise, state might shut them down any day. Still, those places, where food can be bought in public, are slowly becoming popular everywhere - even in former disputed zone, and Antarctica."
Is there a significant risk of food poisoning? How many cases lead to death? Is there understood to be a link between food and poisoning or illness? ''Food poisoning is a serious issue in SC, and not only in the newer achieved territories of former disputed zone - there have even been reported quite a few cases of food poisoning from more wealthy regions like British Isles, Canada, USA, New Zealand, Mexico, etc. Although, in terms of that, wealthy states have greatly improved the quality of their food, and healthcare - amount of fatalities from food poisoning has been decreased significantly since last 20 years in more developed regions. However, in poorer regions, with problems of hygiene, sanitation, and availability of clear water, food poisoning cases are more lethal, and usually more numerous as well. In some of those regions, hunger is also a big problem, as food supplies are scarce, and those themselves are often bad quality. Link between those things is well documented, but in most of cases, SC's doctors can just hand out antibiotics.''
How much does a typical meal cost, if bought and not grown at home?
Clothing and Fashion What kind of clothes do people wear? How does this vary by season, ethnicity, age, profession, etc?
How do the genders dress: what differences are there between mens and womens clothing and accessories?
How is clothing made, in small shops or larger factories?
How much does typical clothing cost?
How important is fashion to people? How does this vary by individual? "People have always wanted, that their national costumes look fashionable, because they are an important symbol as well. However, overall importance of fashion has been decreased significantly during the countless wars in SC's world, and more people rather prefer practical, than fashionable clothing. Still, upper classes can afford more, so they can also afford more fashionable clothing, as some designers want to turn it more fancier, even if it is supposed to be practical. Some individuals also want to stick out on overall grey mass."
What kinds of jewelry do people wear? And when?

Entertainments
Does the culture have outlets for dramatic arts (theater, puppetry, cinematography)?
What other major forms of entertainment are there?
Is the populace literate and numerate? ''On average, world is estimated to have about 80% literacy rate, at least according to Party's data. However, Party isn't the most trustworthy source, so the real number might be even significantly lower. One thing is for certain, however - there are big problems with literacy, especially in newer Commonwealth States, which are still developing industrially, and recovering from the scars of chaos, and disputed zone's war. As expected, highest literacy rates are in the more developed western hemisphere, along with parts of South Africa, British Isles, and Australia, along with a few neighboring territories. However, even there, illiteracy was once a great issue, which stagnated SC's advance in general.As for numeracy, people typically are very well versed in base equations, but there is a staggering lack of math specialists, and understanding of advanced math, which is the reason, why excellent mathematicians, along with scientists, are part of the elites of SC's society. Also, similarly to literacy, there are less mathematicians from the newer Commonwealth States, because school system was basically destroyed during the chaos in disputed zone, and other superstate territory, and in some places, indigenous cultures even took teaching in their own. However, in future, many new powerhouses are estimated to emerge from newer states.''
Do people read for pleasure? If so, what do they read?
How much do books, magazines, broadsheets and the like cost?
Is there a public library system? Who uses it?
Who are popular authors and poets?
Who are some of the more famous characters from literature?
How has this changed over time?


VIII. Questions of Labour.

Describe any kind of division of labour, such as into physical versus mental versus spiritual.
Is there any especial prestige attached to some category of labour or a particular job? "Serving in military, or being an any kind of militarist is usually a very prestige thing in SC, due of its militarist culture - a lot of the current SC's politicians have served in army at some point, and military generals have a say in both local councils, and main one. Numbers of people enlisting are still high, especially in newest SC's regions, where structures are still being rebuilt. Construction workers, and doctors also have a bit of a prestige, as although they might not always receive high payment, are regarded as "vital for society", as they keep it connected, and ensure, that a health disaster like under the previous Party's generation doesn't happen again."
What jobs are considered mucky or are particularly depreciated?
What professions or activities are considered masculine?
What professions or activities are viewed as feminine?
What are usual working hours? Are there days of rest or holidays?
How does this differ between different jobs?
What jobs have few workers and why?
What are typical wages for various jobs?
How does work affect lifestyle and health?
What sorts of jobs are preferred by which people? Are some jobs denied to certain groups?
What are the ethical oaths or codes that govern various jobs? Is there a difference in ethics between manual and mental or spiritual work?


IX. Questions of Art.

What are the favorite art forms?
What are the least-favorite?
How respected are artists?
Do artists require official or unofficial protection or patronage?
What kinds of trouble are artists in particular likely to find themselves in? "Usually, they are likely to get in trouble about things, which involve government - either it finds some of the artworks to be "anti-revolutionary", one of the government officials criticize it too much, government doesn't like the political/personal background of the artist, or it simply sues them for breaking some sort of law. If artist works for a religious, or ethnic community, then they might get in conflict with either the leader of the community, local police, or even army. In either case, there will be heavy fines at best, and prison at worst."
How might a very successful artist live?
What forms of theatre does your society have?
How naturalistic or stylized is your society's art?
What shapes are most common in your society's arts, like embroidery or architecture?
Which artforms get the most and least respect?
What form does censorship take?
Who may not be an artist? ''Theoretically, anyone can draw, and be an ''artist'' for some local group - like neighborhood, town community, or in workplace. However, in order to be a skilled artist, and more importantly - exhibit your work to wider audiences, there are way more requirements for that. At first, artist must have actually completed the college, or a full course with one of the guild's artist specialists, or other artists.''
What qualities equal "beauty" in this society?
What makes a man or woman especially beautiful?
How do people react to tattoos? Piercings? Facial hair? Cosmetics?

Entertainment
Do people enjoy looking at art? Does this vary among communities? "For the most part, people do enjoy looking at art, even in communities, where it is viewed more as a hobby, than a skill being taught in school -it helps to get Party's messge across through propaganda. However, not all art is enjoyed, or viewed in good light - for example, various forms of Socialist Realism for a long time were the only allowed forms of art, and while futurist architecture managed to become popular there, the art style didn't - futurist artists were usually persecuted, along with modern art painters. Even now, SC hasn't liberalized much in terms of art."
Do people enjoy doing art? Does this vary? ''Well, as you might imagine, this depends. Most people have drawn at least a little in their lifes, even if it is not with proper colors, molbert, or other artist tools. That said, in schools, art grades not always are good, and not all people pursue to be professional artists -when it comes to art classes, not everyone has a good talent, or willpower for dedication to art. Of course, there are those, who don't enjoy drawing, but for the most part, skills are just not excellent.''
Is there any calligraphy? Who does it? ''Although calligraphy has lost some of its positions to typography (They are different, but a calligrapher can practice both), it still is widely around in form of religious art (Especially in Islam), logos, maps, graphic design, birth and death certificates, and in entertainment industry as well. Historically, there have been various cultural forms of calligraphy - Arabic, Chinese, Georgian, Indian, Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Persian, Tibetan, Western, etc. Pens, and brushes are typically used for calligraphy (Qalam, fountain pen, quill, ballpoint pen, etc.), and most often used materials are various forms of paper, and parchment. In some regions, calligraphy is an art, that is taught in some schools, and there have been movements of reviving the calligraphy in the western part of SC, partly funded by the Party, as it can also help to get its message across. Calligraphy is taught by some guilds as well, and families. Various SC's computer programs provide symbols for calligraphy as well. Still, calligraphy is perhaps not the most popular form of graphics design, and there is a shortage of good specialists in it.''
Does your culture have a distinct (or not so) musical style? What is it like? ''For the most part, the dominant genres of 50s are the current popular ones as well - blues, country music, classical pop, rock and roll, folk music, jazz, etc, as modern music has a hard time there. In fact, hip-hop, and rap is one of the few more modern genres, which have succeeded in SC's world. Through SC's conquest, those music styles have spread across the world as well. Still, traditional music is very popular, especially between indigenous groups, and governments - Māori music, Sami music, Uyghur music, Berber music, Ainu music, indigenous American music, etc. SC as a whole has hundreds, if not thousands of different musical styles, each with their common elements, and distinguishing features. While performances still often take place on open field, or in a pub, grand music halls are slowly becoming more popular as well - for example, the largest music hall in SC's world currently is located in Quebec City. Another popular music genre is political, and marching songs - almost every region has a ruling party of some kind, so it finds important to spread its message through songs, and give a general anthem of itself. Same goes for army - almost every region has its own army of a sort, and its regional marches are wildly popular in SC.''
How do people listen to music (in a theater, at home, on the street, mechanical)? ''Street musicians are pretty popular - they are either professionals, which are allowed to perform by state, or those, who earn their living in such a way. Musicians in local communities, where radio, or any other way of listening to music is not available, are very valuable, and people often sing along with them. That said, theaters are still one of the most popular ways of enjoying music, and their performances are widely attended - in fact, new theaters are being built in former parts of disputed zone as well. Radio is an another popular way to listen to music as well, and while music sharing services, along with SC's internet, are still pretty young, they are increasingly popular, especially in SC's western hemisphere.''
Does music influence people's behaviour? ''A lot of people have said to have experienced a ''nationalistic feeling'' after listening to some of the music, and some of them have even enlisted voluntarily in SC's army. It is because SC often employs subliminal messages in its songs - along with usual themes of love, money, crime, and nature, there are often bits of propaganda. Some people also listen to folk, or marching music at workplace, in order to be ''more productive'', or while doing an exercise. Traditional music usually has less of government influence in terms of propaganda, and it is usually sang as a way to bond with the rest of the community, or even the nation as a whole. Of course, music is often used for simply relaxing as well - those tunes are often produced by automated programs. In dances, it can also help to speed up the rhythm. And in the end, it is also a source of emotional power as well, of course. SC's scientists even have carried out tons of research about influence of music on people's minds, in search for new interrogation methods.''
Does this culture have a typical dance form? What is it like? ''Well, we have various dance styles, there's that. For example, Tango is a popular Argentinian dance, and is also pretty difficult to master. It is the most popular in Latin American regions of SC, although has slowly become popular across the rest of SC.''
Who goes to see such entertainments? ''Typically those, who can afford it, and those, who enjoy it - it should be kept in mind, that while prices might seem ''cheaper'' in SC (Especially in newer regions), purchasing power of citizens, and wages are usually lower as well, and it also applies for theater visits as well. That said, everyone, who has a pair of instruments (even improvised ones), can play music, and sing in a bar, or in their local village. That said, better, professional instruments usually require more expenses to obtain, and keep in a good shape, and usually only professional musicians enjoy a good payment - bards, and local singers often earn little, even if they are important in passing down the traditions, and historical events. Nowadays, it is not enough with only musical talent in SC.''
Last edited by Silver Commonwealth on Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:02 am, edited 26 times in total.
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Psychotic Dictatorship

Worldbuilding survey 4: Light at the end of the tunnel?

Postby Silver Commonwealth » Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:45 am

(Finished at last. Wew, that took some time.)

XI. Questions of Health.

What is the average life expectancy? How does this differ between different regions, races or ethnicities? ''Overall, SC's average life expectancy as a whole is 70, with 72 for females, and 68 for males. There are noticeable differences between SC's regions - more developed Western hemisphere, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and British Isles, along with Iceland, have overall higher lifespans, because of better development. In past, it was significantly lower, due of industrial pollution, smog on levels of London's Great Smog, and terrible living conditions, along with lack of food. However, situation has improved now a bit, although it is still not good either. In disputed zone, however, mortality rates are still high, and life expectancy is low, because of lack of doctors, and treatments there, along with widespread diseases. Years of chaos, which followed after collapse of two superstates, left a dent on lifespan there as well, along with life quality. However, reconstruction process there might be easier, due of better infrastructure. Also, according to SC's government data, ''indigenous peoples have a way higher risk of dying from rising heart diseases, due of drastic change in lifestyle''. So, while some risks have decreased, others are rising, an average lifespan might start to fall again.''
What access do people have to clean drinking water (at home or in public)? ''Depending on the region, access to clean water might be both self-evident, and a valuable gift. For example, in some regions, there are regular droughts, and shortages of water, and lack of clean water sources - salt water is not useful for drinking, and most of the regions don't have enough funding for machines, which would purify seawater from salt concentration, as they are expensive. In places like Greenland, there are plenty of icebergs, which contain fresh water, which can be boiled, and used for drinking it. In fact, while water covers about 2/3 of the earth, only a small part of it is actually safe to use for cooking, and consuming. Due of the growing population of former disputed zone, shortages of the water might become even worse in future. SC's Ministry of Environment has already warned, that ''SC might be in a front of water crisis''.''
What access do people have to proper sanitation (at home or in public)? ''Urban areas usually have a pretty good sanitation system, but that is a case only for the more developed Western hemisphere's, South Africa's, Australia's, New Zealand's, and British Island cities. ''Third world'', and ''Second World'' cities like Mumbai, Wuhan, Cairo, and Tashkent, often lack good sanitation systems, as a large portion of them consist from slums, which are basically lairs of infection. In rural areas, people typically need to improvise with their sanitation systems, although there are some set up by government as well. Overall, there are significant problems in SC with sanitation as well, just like with water. Still, in some places, sanitation is even extremely well done - futuristic buildings, with space age technology. That would be the sight, which SC would want to paint the entire world with.''
Do houses or public buildings have plumbing? Cold and warm water? ''And again, it depends on the city, region, and overall status of the family. Most houses in more developed western hemisphere have access to both cold, and warm water, and also have plumbing. However, even in the western hemisphere, some houses don't have an access to it. (Especially in South America) In continental Europe, East Asia, Central Asia, and Siberia, plumbing systems are more outdated, and rusty, and sometimes, hot water isn't available. It is particularly problematic in the north, due of the low temperatures there. Water often tends to freeze in pipes, and deform them. Situation is the most severe in most parts of Africa (Except southern part), Arabia, India, and Southeast Asia, due of them being a part of disputed zone, as war was responsible for destruction of most of plumbing, and water sources. Prices for water access there tend to be pretty high.''
Describe any public or private bathing or latrine facilities. ''Design of toilets, and bathing facilities varies across the world, and they have quite a long history, but most common design for public facilities is similar across the world - various cabins, with a sink, and a trashbin. In private facilities, shower, and cabins are usually a part of a single room. Public toilets are usually either unisex, or split by two genders. (LGTBQ+ rights aren't exactly a paramount in SC) Sometimes, they are also split by ethnicity, depending, on what policies region has. However, in some Commonwealth States, public toilets are pretty much absent, and it has started to become a massive sanitation problem. Sometimes, ''toilets'' are just holes in the ground, but ''bathrooms'' - an old bath. Some people also have bath houses, which are considered as ''more exclusive''.''
How is healthcare delivered in this society; what are its foundations? ''For the most part, SC supports an universal health care. However, this model got implemented only relatively recently, during the late stage of reformist wing reforms. Before that, most of the healthcare was left to private sector's hands - one of the few things, which collectivization from the pre-reformist leaders didn't touch. Also, a lot of people still choose to pay more about better quality of health care, as there have been complaints about the ''lacking quality of universal health care'', and ''not enough payment for all the stress'' from doctors themselves. Outside from more developed regions, situation is even more sad - universal healthcare model hasn't been implemented fully yet, and sometimes shamans even take some of the doctor roles.''
Are there hospitals or sanitaria where many forms of health care are concentrated; or are practitioners more diffuse within the community? ''Some of the more remote villages or communities in places like New Guinea, and Native reservations, role of health care is left to local doctors, and shamans - while their methods may not entirely be verified by conventional medicine, people there often have no other alternative, when they need healthcare. For rural towns, and more developed communities, there are either mobile hospitals, or small, stationary ones. Although they can offer a bit stronger medicine than tribal shamans, or doctors, their medicine is still weaker, than compared to the hospitals in larger cities - there is at least one large hospital in every major city. Often, complicated operations can be performed only there. Also, smaller hospitals in more remote places often have supply shortages, and sometimes even need to be closed, until a supply with new medicine arrives.''
Do people have access to any form of medical aid for emergencies or for less urgent problems? ''Yes, they can contact either one of the local hospitals, or Ministry of Health for emergency supplies - they are often either free, or cost very little. For less urgent problems, there are a few pharmacy stores as well, but they will often require payment. However, it should be kept in mind, that abuse of free emergency supplies (For example, using emergency supplies for less urgent problems, or even using some of the medicine as means of intoxication, etc.) can result in punishment - either fines, or even a period of arrest, if offense is repetitive. For the same reason, Ministry of Health, and hospitals often are reluctant to give free medicine supplies to citizens. In fact, in order to get them, person has to come to either closest ministry's department, or hospital, sign a contract, and confirm their identity with either ID card, or passport, to be sure, that the person, who requests supplies, is actually the person, who needs them.''
What kinds of ailments or injuries are treatable in the locality using available supplies and expertise? ''Depends on the region, really. Western hemisphere has some of the best healthcare available in SC's world, so, with enough supplies, it can treat basically any ailments, or injuries locally. In practice, however, supply shortage is not unusual, especially in places like South, and Central America - those are less developed, and sometimes their citizens are treated in SC's Canada's hospitals instead. Healthcare in British Isles, Australia, and New Zealand is also generally considered good, along with South Africa. However, in former disputed zone, complex operations can't really be performed, due of lack of medicine supplies, and experience. Although heartlands of former two superstates had a healthcare system, and doctors as well, a lot of its equipment is outdated for SC's standards, but doctor qualifications - lesser worth. While most of operations can be performed there as well, in some cases, treatment still should be sought in places with more supplies in west. Local natives can treat some ailments as well, but more often than not it still requires modern medicine.''
What does typical healthcare cost? ''Theoretically, in some parts of SC, healthcare is funded by the state, and is for free. However, doctors might still charge money for very complex operations - sums could go possibly even in millions, depending on the case. Still, in less developed parts of SC (Especially in the former disputed zone), people usually have to pay for more treatments, as doctors need funds for their equipment, due of critical deficit of materials - for example, in SC's Chad, there are too few doctors for all of the populace. In former two superstate territories, State's funded healthcare model is currently being restored, and is starting to look similar to the model in western hemisphere, while still charging a bit more money for operations.''
How do this societys doctors try to treat wounds and sickness? ''For wounds, preferred method is bandages - they are pretty cheap, can be produced from various materials, and can stop bleeding effectively. In fact, primitive bandages are used even by the most backwater SC's regions. Training with bandages is obligatory course for SC's medicine students. However, for massive wounds, bandages might not prove to be effective - in such a case, other means are sought, or person is simply put down by euthanasia, if there are not enough supplies of advanced medicine. Cybernetics are considered as ''last straw option'', when all other methods fail, as they still are highly experimental. For sicknesses, doctors usually hand out antibiotics, pills, medical syrup, or sometimes even just hot tea (For mild sicknesses like common cold). For serious sicknesses, however, more advanced medicine is sought.''
Which medical assumtions of this society are wrong? ''There are many superstitions about treating illnesses, or broken bones - for example, it is believed by some, that ''rhino's horn can help fighting against cancer'', even if it is not true, as it mostly consists from keratin - a substance, which can be found in human nails as well. Medical superstitions aren't uncommon even in Megastates, and are widespread in all of SC, especially in Africa, and Asia. However, as those are superstitions, they sometimes don't get counted as ''medical assumptions'' by SC's doctors. In conventional medicine, most of assumptions are correct. However, there are still various medical hypothesis, which need verification, and some of them have been proven wrong."
Do people seek care on an as-needed or emergency basis; or is health care seen as a preventative endeavour. ''It depends on people, honestly. SC has 5 billion people - some of them have different approach to healthcare. Some of them follow their health a lot, and often seek it as a preemptive measure. Some others, however, don't care as much, and seek medical help only after symptoms have already been starting to appear. While it is prohibited in some factories to come to work, if someone has a contagious sickness, some still work, risking with the health of other workers as well. However, in some cases, you just can't wait, and you need to seek medical help as fast as possible - one of those cases is rabies virus. It has a long incubation period, and when symptoms appear, person is basically doomed at that point. So it is important to get treatment. However, a lot of people still die from lack of treatment in less developed areas.''
How often do people see their doctor, dentist or other healthcare provider? ''It is recommended by SC's doctors to visit their dentist every six months. As for doctor check-ups, it is recommended for elderly, and children to visit their annual check-ups, but for healthy adults - only once in every two, or three years. SC once tried to pass a law, which would make attending dentist every six months a mandatory task. However, as it soon turned out, it was too hard to enforce even for SC, as for some regions, healthcare is at horrendous state, and people can't visit their dentists, because they simply don't have an one, due of the lack of the medical personnel. For the same reason, SC's plan to make doctor attendance compulsory also failed, and now it only tries to strictly encourage citizens to attend them. If government thinks, that an important person needs to attend a doctor/dentist, it can arrange that.''
Is a distinction made between physical and nonphysical ailments? "Yes, SC's doctors often distinguish them from each other. Physical ailments are taken more seriously, as SC's knowledge about anatomy, and physical body is more extensive, and generally is treated better, as if body is in a bad shape, "person can't work, and it makes a dent in the budget", according to some State's CEOs words. However, nonphysical ailments, just like depression, are sometimes dismissed, and treated worse, as SC's nonphysical knowledge is worse. Most often, "treatment" will involve only a couple of nerve calming medicine, and painkillers."
What happens to those suffering from extreme mental illness? Spiritual illness? Other? ''Those, which are classified as ''mentally ill'', usually aren't in that good position in society, as treatment of psychological illnesses is usually a neglected part in SC's medicine, unlike with physical issues, and some of those illnesses, like depression, for an example, sometimes aren't taken seriously at all. It can be hard for those, who suffer from mental illnesses, to find a job in SC, and they usually are outcasts of society, and can't become leaders of SC. Supporters of eugenics in SC don't view them in favorable light, of course. That said, there are rumors, that some of SC's leaders might be secretly mentally ill, due of their weird episodes, and phrases in public. That wouldn't be too surprising, as SC's policies sometimes are outright diabolical, with little rationality.''
How do people react to physical deformity (both congenital and acquired)? ''Depends on severity of the deformity, but usually people have a slight discomfort from looking at it. Some of them don't bother people that much, while some (especially extreme deformations) concern them a lot more - in fact, some turn away in disgust from them. In past, some of the humans with deformations were held sacred as a ''gift from the gods'', and they usually became prophets. That was a very long time ago, however, and now people with deformities are typically seen as ''spoilages'' of the work, as they typically can't work with the same capacity as normal people, so they generate less revenue for State's companies. However, for some, deformity has helped to create an image around them.''


XIII. Questions of Education.

Describe the education of the society’s people: formal schooling, apprenticeship, etc. ''For the most part, education is based on formal schooling - elementary school, high school, then college. However, in some cases, students can join a vocational school (Technicum, institute, etc.) after finishing high school, if they want to further develop skills for a some particular, special job - a thing, which distinguishes them from usual colleges. In some of the newer Commonwealth regions like India, Arabia, Indochina, or Central Africa, either guilds can offer to school student in a particular field for a few years, or families can even take teaching a job like fishing, and working on an oil field in their own hands. However, that is a popular practice only in the poorest Commonwealth states, as in more developed ones, it is seen as a ''sentence to unskilled labor''.''
If education is mainly by apprenticeship, how is this accomplished? ''As said before, apprenticeship is not the main form of education, but such a variant is entirely viable. However, although guilds cover some of the expenses, students have to pay a lot more, than they would for formal education in usual college. (That said, SC's school system is more similar to China's, and during college, Party decides, which students are ''smart enough'' to eventually become Party's members, and which are more fit for ''prole'' category) Also, if student is schooled in a job by family, or pursues distance education, responsibility for marks lies entirely on the student/student's family, not teachers, or school's/guild's director.''
Is education compulsory / offered to everyone? What is the cost of education? ''Education in elementary, and high school is compulsory, and for the most part funded by government, although some extended subjects require a bit of a payment as well. While college is optional on paper, it is pretty much required to attend by SC's new laws, as there usually the future specialists of SC will learn more advanced techniques, and those also offer better job choices. Those with only elementary, or high school education most often end up as proles in factories, farms, or other unskilled laborers. While it is not impossible to survive in such a way in SC, such a life is way more painful, challenging, and unforgiving, as bills for electricity, water, and food often aren't cheap.''
Between which ages does education happen? ''Elementary school usually starts either when kid is 7, or 6. Before that, there is preschool, and kindergarten education. However, depending on SC's region, school years might start earlier, or even the opposite - later. Elementary school usually lasts until the 9th grade, and after that, there is high school, which usually lasts from 10th, to 12th grade. After that, university years might depend on the subject, that student is learning, but it is usually 5 years.''
How are year groups and academic years arranged? ''As usual, arrangements might significantly differ between the regions, but standard arrangement of pre-school, elementary, and high school is as follows:

  • Year R - Age 5-6
  • Year 1 - Age 6-7
  • Year 2 - Age 7-8
  • Year 3 - Age 8-9
  • Year 4 - Age 9-10
  • Year 5 - Age 10-11
  • Year 6 - Age 11-12
  • Year 7 - Age 12-13
  • Year 8 - Age 13-14
  • Year 9 - Age 14-15
  • Year 10 - Age 15-16
  • Year 11 - Age 16-17
  • Year 12 - Age 17-18
''

How are curricula arranged? What courses are typically offered? ''Along with the basic courses like maths, English, biology, physics, literature, history, music, economics, and others, there are also some extra classes, like studying political philosophies, or pankration classes, where students learn martial arts. Such classes start as early as in elementary school, and become only harder later on. One of the most favorite philosophies between students are Hegelian dialectics, and - surprisingly - socialist thought. Another growing sector is IT studies, and programming - due of the improvements in computing, and transistor technology, SC has managed to create a rudimentary internet, so new specialists are highly valuable. As always, depending on the region, there are some subjects taught differently, some new subjects, and local language is taught alongside with English.''
What degrees or diplomas are offered by schools? ''After completing studies in college, students can be awarded with bachelor's, master’s or doctorates degree, alongside other academic certificates and professional degrees. Graduate Diploma can be received after completing Bachelor's degree, Associate Degree is an equivalent of an Advanced Diploma. Of course, this system differs from region to region, as per usual.''
What do schools / colleges / universities look like? ''In more developed states, they often look similar to khrushchyovka apartments - bland, concrete boxes, or buildings made out of red/white bricks. However, sometimes schools are located in poor quality barracks, or even at tent camps - particularly in deserts, where nomads are educated. Maximum standards for classes are 30 seats per one room, but they also often are way more filled, exceeding the limit. Minimal requirements for schools at poorer states are way laxer, of course.''
What are the classrooms like? What is a typical class size "As said before, each has about 30 seats at maximum. However, there is also a minimal tresshold, of how short, or long clasrooms can be. Also, shape of the class is also regulated by laws sometimes. Tent classrooms usually have a place for 15 people at most, but most of tents can fit in way less."
Who is in charge of education in the country, and in each individual school? "Ministry of Education, and its regional branches are in charge of the school system, and responsible for it. It also has an obligation to check, if education in guilds, and households meets the standards of SC. In each individual school, teacher unions, and directors are in charge, often directly tied to government, so it has a better view on the schools."
Does this society have its own language? Its own writing system? ''Of course, it does. There are many writing systems on SC's Earth, and even more languages. However, the most often used font internationally is the Latin script, which is primarily used in most of Indoeuropean languages, but is also used in a few Asian languages as well (For example, Filipino, and Vietnamese language, albeit heavily modified). Chinese hieroglyphs are the second most popular script, along with Arabic script. That said, there are plans by Tom for the eventual ''latinization'' of the other language alphabets. However, some scripts (Like Kanji, for an example) can be quite hard, if not impossible to convert into romanized versions, so SC plans to eventually just ''wipe them off''. SC for the most part teaches only English, and native language for average citizens, so a lot of them can't understand other languages, and international communication is dominantly in English.''
How common is literacy? How is literacy viewed? ''In some of the better off Commonwealth states, literacy percentage is way higher, and just a bit lower than OTL levels. On average arithmetical, however, Commonwealth's literacy ratio is about 80%, or even lower, due of the new Commonwealth state poor literacy ratio - during the disputed zone war, already bad literacy ratios worsened, and while a bit better in former two superstate territories, situation there is not that good either. Still, literacy is viewed as extremely important, as illiterate workers are way less productive. In fact, due of terrible literacy ratios before reformist period, importance of it has been ingrained deeply in SC, even if some of its methods could be considered as too... extreme.''
What form and value are books? "Although tablets, and computers do indeed exist there, they aren't near as advanced as OTL tablets and computers, and they aren't good enough to replace books yet, so books are basically essential for now, especially in poorer, "third world" regions - without them, school, and education system wouldn't be able to function. Sometimes, there aren't even enough books for every student there, and some books are made out either of papyrus, or bamboo paper. However, computers have been recently used more and more as assistants in learning process, so there are legitimate concerns about book future..."
Who teaches others? How do they teach? ''For the most part, teachers, and professors teach in formal schools, and colleges. However, if vocational, or distance education is chosen, students are educated by guild members, experts on a particular field, or even by parents themselves. Most of the formal schools utilize memorizing as their main way of teaching, although there are doubts, of how truly effective it is. Most of guild members, and parents, however, prefer to use teaching by example, although some of them also use memorization as well. In some cases, local elders pass down knowledge to the students - it also counts as a part of ''education''.''
Who decides who learns to read or write? "Those matters are often managed by the government, leaving parents, and children very little choice. They can also turn down any applications for studying, and effect future career. In some of the regions, elitism is more than common - regional governors focus on only a very few, talented students, while leaving others in the shadow, which can grow resentment."
Who teaches professions, like carpenter or scribe? ''Those professions are usually either covered in extended housekeeping courses, or as a family professions, inherited from family to family. Those are usually classified as different from ''unskilled labor'' like janitor, or bartender, yet aren't considered on the same league as programming, and nuclear physician, for an example, State has way less options there, and it leaves most of the work for families, as it wants to avoid private company involvement as much as possible. Despite that, some of those professions are endangered, as automation is slowly replacing them - specialized robots can produce tables en masse."
Are foreigners ever brought in to teach new skills? Who does that? ''Very rarely, if at any time foreigners are brought in to teach new skills, as regional education systems are required to push their professors, and students to learn those skills on their own instead, with materials being provided - regional nationalism runs deep there. Another reason for that is regional governor concerns about influx of foreigners in their personal dictatorships, and potential of them staying there after their professional work there would be done, as they could potentially bring in an unrest on large scale. That said, SC's regional institutes, schools, and colleges often cooperate with each other, sharing technology projects, experimental modules, research results, or simply latest news in the science world.''


XIV. Questions of Technology.

Are philosophy and science unified, or do they exist as separate and independent disciplines? ''There are some people in SC (And between the Party's members as well), who think, that both science, and philosophy are deeply connected. They recommend to teach them in one course, unifying them both. One of their arguments is also the fact, that ancient Greeks were both philosophers, and scientists at the same time. However, as of now, SC's education system, and professors prefer to split science, and philosophy as separate disciplines. Still, some regions have already started to teach them as an one course.''
What devices and technologies are available for people? ''Since the 50s, there have been invented many new technologies, and some of them have succeeded, but some - failed. However, one of the most notable technologies is internet itself - although rudimentary, if compared to OTL internet, and under heavy supervision of the government, similarly to North Korea, it is still an example of how far Commonwealth has got with its technologies. Another example is stem cell research, which is beneficial in medicine, as it can help improve lifespan, and even prevent death. Also, new, better TVs are used, with digital TV slowly replacing the box TVs, although they are still persistent, along with radios.''
Are such devices taken for granted? If not, how many are appreciated? ''For the most part, citizens appreciate development of technologies, as every new technology. in society's opinion, is ''a step further from times of scarcity, hunger, and misery in the 60s''. However, for the most part, society is more conservative in social issues, so it will actively resist any technology, which could bring progressivism in, or undermine the cornerstones of society. For example, a new variant of laser gun, or TV in general is viewed as positive towards society, but something, that tackles problems like discrimination, is viewed way more negatively. Overall, there is also a pretty noticeable resistance towards internet, especially from newspapers, and older populace. However, newer regions have also showed the fastest growth - despite being so disadvantaged, if compared to more well-off Commonwealth states, you can only go up, if you start off so low.''
How do people envision a difficult or impossible task that could be made easier by using some kind of device or futuristic technology? ''One of the most commonly envisions is an antidote against aging, and achieving of immortality - until very recently, those kinds of thoughts bordered pseudoscience. However, if aging is considered as an illness, instead of an inevitable, natural process, there could be counter measures for it. Due of increasing quality of life, average lifespan has risen significantly already, especially in more developed states, but scientists hope to increase lifespan even more with technology help, and borderline transhumanism. Another thing is making radiation decay process easier - there have been experiments, where radioactive isotope decay process has been tried to be fastened by freezing them in a chamber in about -260 °C temperature, making the cleansing of radiation way easier. Another thing is colonization of planets like Mars - although still mostly a science fiction part, SC's space agency hopes to develop new engine with better technologies, which could carry rockets further.''
How is knowledge distributed? Is it kept unknown to the common people, or is available for all? ''Depends on the type of knowledge, really. Basic stuff, and things, which might be useful for future jobs, are usually explained to the proles, but advanced tier knowledge is almost always reserved for those, who were clever enough in SC's colleges, and passed the tests. For example, magical knowledge is not given to every single person, as SC only wants professionals to practice it. So, only shamans, mysticists, priests, and occultists have access to magical knowledge. Ohh, and those, who pass the secret exams, or are schooled by previous mentioned people. Knowledge about experimental WMDs, and advanced weapons also isn't shared with common people, as SC views it as ''unwise''. Despite that, there have been still attempts to leak information, especially from Commonwealth states, where central government has less control. However, regional governors have harsh punishments for any attempted leaks.''

Architecture
What major architectural styles are present? What do they look like? ''There are many architectural styles in SC, due of the various cultures living there, and ideological thoughts. So, we are going to list only the ten from all of them.

  • Futurism - An architecture style, which originated from Italy in 20th century, which is characterized by strong chromaticism, long dynamic lines, suggesting speed, motion, urgency and lyricism - a part of the Futurist movement. Futurism's glorification of the machine age, violence, and war also was put into architecture designs as well. Although futurism was promoted in SC, and a lot of buildings (especially government ones) were built in futurist style, recently it has slowly been losing its positions to the resurgence of national romanticist architecture.
  • Art Deco - First appeared in France just before WW1. It combined rich materials, and craftsmanship with modern style. It represented progress, luxury, and glamour in its time. It was influenced by cubism. After WW2, Art Deco became significantly less popular, as futurism, and brutalism took its place. However, recently, similarly to national romanticist architecture, Art Deco has regained popularity, and now it symbolizes the Old World, and ''good old days''. Party says, that it was the one, who invented Art Deco, but it is a lie, as Art Deco was popular way before Party even rose to power.
  • Brutalism - An architectural style, which originated in Europe, and is characterized by simple, block structures, with primary material being concrete, although some of them are made out of brick. Those buildings historically have been polarizing. Although buildings in those style can be found all across the SC, those are especially iconic to the Eurasian landscape. Their style also symbolized the power of government, as brutalism was used a lot in constructing governmental buildings.
  • Empire style - A second phase of neoclassicism, which originated in First French Empire, and was supposed to symbolize Napoleonic power. Its golden era was from 1800s until late 1820s, and nowadays those objects are very popular for sightseeing, and some have even been turned in government residences. One of the most well known examples of Empire style buildings are Arc de Triomphe in Paris. It was also based on the elements on Roman Empire.
  • National Romantic style - An architecture style, which originated in Nordic countries, in 19th-20th century. Designers turned to medieval architecture, or prehistorical events, to create a more modern building, but with style, which would fit the character of the people. Back then, it was a reaction to rapid industrialization. Despite losing its popularity in mid 20th century, and rise of futurism, and brutalism, it regained the interest during reformist period, and currently it has experienced in surge of popularity, as plans for new national romanticist buildings are underway.
  • High-tech architecture - One of the most recent SC's architectural styles, which incorporates technology, and high-tech industry into a building's design. It could be considered as a revamped version of modernism. Similarly to brutalism, those buildings reveal the structure of both inside, and outside, but with more emphasis on steel skeletal structure instead. Sometimes, ''structural'' steel is used only for aesthetics. It could be also considered as an evolved version, and competitor of 30s Futurism, and Brutalism.
  • Hokkien architecture - The architecture of Hoklo people - a Han Chinese group, which has been dominant in the region of Fujian, and Taiwan. While overall having many similarities with other Han Chinese buildings, there are a few distinctive architectural elements for Hokkien architecture - for example, Swallowtail roof is a thing, that is rarely seen in other Han architecture styles.
  • Planned community - An any community, which was carefully planned since its creation, and often is constructed on previously undeveloped land. Those are the most common in Britain, and some of the newly built capitals can be classified as ''planned communities''. During European colonization of Americas, planned communities were utilized by building cities either on fresh ground, or ruins of previous native villages.
  • Navajo Hogan - As name suggests, it is primary type of house for Navajo people in Rockies. It can be round, cone-shaped, multi-sided, or square, and can have timber, or stone walls. Those houses are typically considered as pioneers of energy efficient buildings. Due of revitalization attempts, modernized hogans are popular in Navajo autonomy.
  • Dzong architecture - A pretty distinctive type of fortress, mostly found in Bhutan, and Tibet. It has a massive architecture, with towering exterior walls surrounding a complex of buildings like temples, and administrative offices. Some of them are used as governmental residences, and largest even have cities around them.''
How does this vary over time and between places in the region? "In the Western world's major cities, modernist, brutalist, futurist, and bauhaus architecture is pretty popular. However, in the countryside, architecture influences are directly cultural - from small ranches, to even Indigenous people buildings. Still, even in countryside, most of population is concentrated in towns, and villages - houses scattered around a wide territory are rare now. Even Yurts now are closer to each other in the steppe, creating "villages". In disputed zone's cities, a large part of buildings are slums."
What major elements are present? How are they pieced together? ''While not a part of architecture design, and rather a decorative element, flags, and banners are very common for SC's houses - many houses have at least one flag near them, due of the overall nationalistic vibes. Those can be both regional, and international SC's flags. A lot of the houses have various ornaments, engravings, and various cultural elements both inside, and outside, along with the used materials. Usually, there are small gardens as well - mostly for providing extra food, alongside with government rations, which can sometimes be quite poor.''
What are houses like inside and out? ''Depends on the type of house, really. There are too many to list them all. Modernist, and bauhaus houses, however, often have way less decoration, and look more practical. Some of them are designed with maximum efficiency in mind, sacrificing aesthetics. So, those houses are often called as ''glass stained domes''. Brutalist architecture is even more bland from outside - basically a blockhouse, usually grey, or red in color. However, traditional wooden houses are usually more comfy, and decorated. There are often pedestals in the main room, where pictures of the dead ancestors are located. Blockhouses are more decorated from inside as well - even living in the urban jungles hasn't stopped people from decorating their dwellings with ornaments.''
What are palaces and castles like? ''Most of the castles nowadays are used as tourist objects, museums, or simply have been conserved for future generations. Most commonly known castles are medieval styled ones - although they look big, and grand, it is actually pretty narrow there, and they more served as administrative centers. Of course, there are late age fortifications as well - their walls are thicker, and the castles themselves - shorter. In those castles, there were mostly only soldiers - they didn't fulfill administration needs anymore. Some of the palaces have been redesigned to be the residences of regional governors, or influential persons - most often built in baroque style, from 17th, to 19th century. However, some of the palaces rather look like brutalist blockhouses, and were built to reflect the ruling ideologies of the country.''
How tall is the tallest building? How big is the biggest building? ''As Burj Khalifa tower was never built in SC's timeline, due of constant warfare in disputed zone, Shanghai Tower is the tallest building in SC, being about 632 m tall. However, due of more resources going for war, and weapons, construction of it was delayed by RNGOC, and after its collapse, it was abandoned to fall apart, and to be picked on by scavengers. Still, in Arabian region, there are currently plans of a new skyscraper, which might exceed Shanghai tower's height. However, biggest building in terms of usable volume is located in other part of the world - in United Megastates. Boeing Everett Factory (13,385,378 m³) is one of the major jet building places in SC, and has been in active usage since WW3, Great Nuke War, and Disputed Zone War. From there, jets have been delivered to various airfields across the world.''
What materials are used in typical construction? Do any materials have to be imported? ''Cement, concrete, glass, marble, wood, and reinforced concrete are one of the most typically used materials for SC's buildings, depending on the region. Clay is used for bricks, and some of the houses are specifically designed for being energy-efficient. Bamboo is also an effective material. Modernization has highly affected choice of materials - even yurts, and wigwams are mostly made out of canvas now, rather than leather. In Antarctica, there are two various materials used - snow (For igloos), and carbon steel (Research stations, and Antarctican towns). SC doesn't need to import anything, as it is a world government, and can construct basically anything, that it wants. However, on regional scale, imports are necessary, especially if building is an important object like highly advanced military center - usually project is funded by various Commonwealth states. For example, Rockies can't fund any of the research centers in their territory on their own, so they are an international investment product.''
How are buildings constructed? Are there machines or is work done by hand? ''A mix of both in ways - in more advanced SC's states, robots are assistants in constructing buildings with human workers. They also participate in building complex buildings, and buildings in harsh climates like Antarctica, Arctic, and Saharan desert. In future, robots will also be heavily involved in construction of the moon, and mars bases, which will be made out of moon dust for the most part, mixed with other construction materials. However, there are few, if any places, which are entirely built by robots (Even robot city Sector-1 is basically rebuilt Norilsk), and in poorer regions, regional companies, and governors often simply can't afford robots for building, so human workers are going to be essential for a long time.''
What are some famous landmarks in the region? Why are they famous? Are they famous internationally? "One of them is the Statue of Liberty, (Or the statue of Independence in SC's timeline), which is not only one of the most well known objects in Megastates, but also in the rest of the world. Over time, its original meaning was twisted, in order to symbolize SC's ideology - Tomism. Juche tower in SC's Korea, and Kremlin are also very popular objects, due of one's historical importance, and another one being a symbol of SC's ideologies once again. Buckingham palace is also a major landmark, as it is the new HQ for European Federation's government, and serves as an example, of how drastically SC can change buildings - once beautiful castle has been turned into a brutalist monstrosity inside. Overall, there are many famous landmarks on SC's Earth."


XV. Questions of Transportation and Communications.

How do people get from place to place? Does this vary at all in different places? ''In their own region, a bicycle, or a bike is usually enough for short travel. For longer travels, there is usually an extensive public transport system, with somewhat-fast trains. Cars are way less visible on streets, simply because of lack of income for the people to buy a car, and government campaign for public transport. However, amount of cars has steadily risen in the late years of Commonwealth, and with invention of nuclear engine, cars might become popular again. In regions with terrible infrastructure, the best means of transport are usually animals - horses, or camels, as they can easily cross the dirt paths, and roads in bad quality. In Island regions, travels with small canoe boats, and rafts are popular as well, as large ships are most often used for ocean, and sea travel, not for travelling through island archipelagos.''
Do people make long journeys? If so, what are they like? ''Typically journeys aren't that long - just from one side of the region to other. It is because long distance travels with either ship, or plane are pretty expensive for common citizens, and money is often needed for other things for common populace. Most often, long journeys can be afforded by either elites of the society, or Party's members. Soldiers can also travel quite far, if they are dislocated to a new sector. However, this form of travel might not be the most comfortable one, and you don't always get dislocated in far-away places - sometimes you are simply sent to other region in the Commonwealth state, or even other base in your own region. People from newer Commonwealth states can't afford travel for the most part, due of terrible economical situation there.''
Is there a public transport system? Who uses it? How much does it cost? ''Yes - it is a result of an extensive program in the 90s, which overall focused on development on the public transport. So, in the result, at least parts of western hemisphere, British Isles, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand have a good public transport. In more developed SC's territories, public transport is used by most of the populace, as it is typically viewed as a cheaper alternative to private cars. However, in places like Indochina, and former disputed zones, public transport is often the only efficient way, how to travel relatively long distances, even if some of the buses, and trains are vastly outdated, along with rails, and driving time - overall slow. (Sometimes, it is just 20 km/h). In some of the poorer regions, state companies use this situation, in order to raise high prices - citizens often have no other choice for travel, as fuel is even more expensive there. However, in more developed states, prices are cheaper, as otherwise private cars could be viewed as more cheaper alternative instead, and state's revenue would go down.''
What are the roads like? How do they vary from place to place? ''In places like Canada, USA, and Britain, some of the roads are actually pretty decent for SC's standards, especially in cities. However, outside cities, road quality often gets worse, especially in places, where they are literally just tracks in the ground. Worst situation with the roads is in Antarctica - for the most part, it is devoid from any serious infrastructure, and its ''roads'' are just paths in snow, which have to be maintained extensively. Experimental road in Halley Town has said to be already experiencing damage, due of Antarctica's extreme climate, for which roads are hard to fit. Roads in former disputed zone are close runner-ups - they range from severely damaged highways at best, and just dirt tracks at worst. Even at cities in disputed zone, infrastructure isn't that good either. Continental Europe, and parts of Eurasia under two former superstates had a bit better road network, but it is nothing stellar either.''
Do individuals or families own and use their own vehicles? ''Yes, some families do have their own means of transport. However, unlike someone might expect, bikes, and bicycles can be found more often in the garages, than cars. Reason for that is the expensive prices of cars. Things like buses usually aren't property of the families, but state instead, so they can't be used for personal use, but only as a part of the job - otherwise there will be a punishment. Some have been loaned new, experimental cars by the science institutes as props, in order to test the cars in traffic. However, those cars usually need to be given back to the institutes, after testing period is over. If car has been severely damaged during test period, heavy fines can be applied. Some of the trucks, and cars used in poorer regions, use harmful fuels to environment, and are severely outdated.''
How safe and clean is the typical transport system? ''In rural areas, some of the trains, and buses are outdated, and use more fossil fuels. Same is true in developing regions as well. So, in some cases, transport isn't that clean. In some of the well-off cities, however, nuclear powered vehicles are used, making transport there a bit more green. Still, the estimated emissions from the vehicles, and cars are quit high, and plans to curtail them are already underway. Some of the cars, and trains are also very outdated, so there are indeed safety risks, when travelling in them. Some of the cars can also break down in extreme conditions, and without extra water, you couldn't last long in the desert, or rainforest, for that matter.''
What major fuels are used? ''One of the most common used fuels are still fossil fuels (Diesel, natural gas), despite their overall impact on environment, because SC hasn't researched more efficient alternative to them yet. However, nuclear fuel has made greater advances in research over the past years, and might eventually replace the fossil fuels - there are already experimental nuclear powered cars, buses. and even tanks. Green energies like solar power, or biodiesel, are typically less used, as SC hasn't researched them enough yet, in order to make them an efficient fuel. In some Commonwealth states, even coal, wood, and steam is used to power the vehicles (Korea, and Pacific Isles, for an example), if there is a total lack of fossil fuels, but this is not an effective alternative to fuel, of course. If anything, bicycles, and other means of transportation, which don't require fuel, are more popular there. There are also experiments with hydrogen, methanol, and ethanol as potential fuels.''
Apart from face to face, how do people communicate with each other? ''For now, the most common other mean of communication is sending letters - in physical form, of course. However, e-mails, and chatting in the rudimentary internet have become increasingly popular, due of the continuing rise of price for letters, and postal services. Another alternative are phone calls. However, they aren't that cheap either, especially long-distance calling. Besides that, smartphones are still just an experimental technology - older, nokia-like models are way more common, and stationary phones aren't quite ''dead'' yet, actually. Walkie-talkies can also be used, but mostly on short diapasons, due of difference in signals.''
Is there a postal service? How fast is it? How much does it cost to use? What restrictions are there on packet delivery? Does the post operate internationally? How likely is it that an article sent in the post will reach its intended destination? ''Postal service is under state's (or rather regional governor control) control, and it effectively regulates the whole market - no private postal services are allowed to exist. Depending on situation, postal service can be both very quick, and effective, or very slow, but most often it is considered as the best option, as sometimes people simply have no other choice to deliver their messages, and goods. There are quite a few restrictions on deliveries - no drugs, no unregistered ammunition, and weapons, no explosives, no illegal literature, no illegal alcohol, etc. Postal service, and couriers have rights to check, what is inside the package. And yes, it operates internationally - it has branches across the world, and ensures, that things are delivered even in deepest rainforest, or as unforgiving place as Antarctica, which also has its base there. Although overall packages tend to reach their destination, despite SC's best efforts, they still sometimes don't get delivered at time, and there have been complaints about lost packages, especially in regions with bad infrastructure. Couriers can also be attacked by raiders, or bandits, so there is a need for better security.''
What technical or mechanical means of communications exist? ''Telephone lines, and internet cables are very common - wireless internet is just a concept as of now in SC. However, internet isn't available everywhere, just like telephone services, as it can be tricky to put cables in some places, and war has delayed most attempts of establishing a phone, and internet connection - only recently some attempts towards this direction have been made. Internet services are also quite slow, especially in developing regions - if anything, horse postal service is considered more effective, especially in places like Arabia, and Central Asia. Postal service couriers usually deliver packages, and telegrams.''
Last edited by Silver Commonwealth on Wed Apr 10, 2019 1:04 am, edited 36 times in total.
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Psychotic Dictatorship

Worldbuilding survey (Finale): The last hill to cross

Postby Silver Commonwealth » Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:48 am

(Finished at last. Another part done.)

[''Government has decided to leave XII section out from the survey, as it considers it a ''too delicate'' matter to be discussed.'']

VI. Questions of Manners.

Who speaks first at a formal gathering? ''Usually either the person, who has a higher rank in a particular field (Army general, for an example, if gathering is between military's members, or main CEO, if it is a megacorp director gathering, or Archbishop, when it is a church gathering), or the oldest person in the group, if it is simply a household, or public gathering. Owner of the household also often speaks first, and only after they have finished, others can ask questions, or start to talk on their own. Interrupting a person, who is older than you, or at higher rank than you (For example, pastor interrupting a bishop, lieutenant interrupting a General of the Army, or teenager interrupting an elder), is typically seen as very rude.''
What kinds of gifts are considered appropriate or in extremely bad taste? ''It depends on the region, and situation, but usually giving a gift, when a person has a big need for it, or it looks good on the overall background, is considered as ''appropriate''. However, when the gift is either outright insulting, not polite in the situation, or unlucky, due of the superstitions in the region, it is typically seen as a gift in bad taste, and the receiver has a right to be mad, and can refuse to accept it. It is way harder, however, if it is a gift from an important person like army general.''
How do younger adults address their elders? ''Usually by either ''Mrs.'', or ''Ms.'', + their name - an usual honorific. (Or -san in Japanese, for an example.) Alternatively, both shortened variants (''Grandpa'', ''Grandma''), and full ones can be used. (''Grandfather'', Grandmother.) People can also address them simply by their name, but usually that is seen as a sign of rudeness, so it is not really recommended to do, especially in the more conservative regions. Overall, honoring the elderly is a thing, which government teaches from very young age already.''
When is it rude to laugh at something funny? ''Mostly when the situation puts a person in embarrassing position - it might be funny for others, but might not be funny for person itself. Another situation is, when some person has died, and people are mourning - even if the other situation might be funny, it is expected not to laugh, when funeral is happening, and people are grieving. (In some places like Bali, though, people usually laugh in funerals, instead of being sad, as it is believed to help fight off depression, which might come after the funeral.) Another case is when there is a formal event, and people are expected to be serious.''
What kinds of questions cannot be asked in public? In private? At all? ''Usually most of the matters, that can't be talked about in public (like body functions, or personal issues), can be talked about in private. Still, there are things, about which it is better to not talk about either in public, or in private - politics being one of them. Or rather things like the corruption of current officials, or scandals of the past - Party keeps an eye on its populace with extreme surveillance, and punishes any wrong talk, and possible resistance to government.''
What parts of the body are routinely covered? ''Usually most of the torso, legs, and ankles are covered, as short clothing is usually seen as ''unprude'' by most of society, and SC's society is very conservative, to the point of being reactionary, so it is not advised to dress out of accepted code. Depending on the regions, some body parts like face might be covered more often than others, and clothing overall can differ. While it is okay to take off coat, and shirt, if it becomes too hot, being nude overall is frowned upon in SC, and beach costumes often have standards, of how short they can be.''
How private are bodily functions like bathing or defecating? ''Those are very private matters, and should typically be done at places designated for them, and away from public's eye. Talking about those functions in public, outside from health, and biology classes, is also seen as inappropriate, and some of them are even a taboo to talk about. Doing those functions in public usually is seen as very rude, immature, and disrespectful, and can get person to pay fine, or even land them in prison for ''promoting public indecency''.''


XVI. Questions of Economics.


What is the local economy based on? ''Mostly SC as a whole is based on various resources, and production, but specific regions often provide different things. For example, Pacifica is one of the largest power armor manufacturers, but Midwest - basically the breadbasket of the Megastates. Great Lakes, aside from scientific research, also has a thriving vehicle sector, especially for military vehicles. Rockies mostly produce guns, and melee weapons, along with Trinity. Lone Star's primary income source is actually cattle, but there are various heavy industries there as well. Dixie mostly produces iron, and various, robust crops. Outside from Megastates, there are other main sources of regional income - for example, Chad profits from Uranium mining, while Magna Arabia - from oil wells. Due of SC's investments in Namibia, it has become a small technology hub in Southern parts of Africa, and some buildings there are even rumored to be equipped with forcefields.''
How is commerce engaged in? ''If commerce happens between regions, or between capital region, and other region, representatives (usually regional ambassadors, or state CEOs) usually represent the state in the deal, and money goes straight to the state's (or regional) bank, and goods are transferred to either region's (or state's) military, navy, institutes, or anyone else, which was involved in deal as well. Otherwise, there is not much difference between state commerce, and individual commerce. If deal happens between an individual, and state region company, individual is representative of his own side, but a special representative represents company. Loans from state's bank, company, or individual follow a similar pattern.''
If levied, how are taxes collected? What are such revenues used for? How does taxation affect the people? ''Taxes are usually collected by government agents, and policemen, or required to pay in digital form in the nearest bank. Taxation money is used for improving infrastructure, army research projects, science, school system upgrading, public transport, school, and hospital funding, etc. And for bribes, and corporate parties as well. Usually, SC requires large amount of taxes to survive - rare are those times, when government doesn't tax the hell out of something, and citizens usually are left with bare minimum. In former disputed zone territories, and newer Commonwealth states, taxes are sometimes paid in form of gold, animals, and minerals, if there is not enough money. As tax collectors are usually policemen, many citizens have started to view them with disdain in secret, as they not only collect taxes, but sometimes suppress protests, and are typically seen as a symbol of the totalitarian government.''
What do people expect from their government in return for the taxes paid? ''In return, people usually expect, that government will provide at least bare minimum for living, along with protection from criminals, and various gangs, which roam the country, especially in places like Saharan Desert, and Arabia, and overall relative safety, and order. However, people also don't really expect government to hold its promises, due of the history of governments saying one thing, but doing something else instead. People also expect, that money will actually go for Commonwealth's improvement (Better roads, advanced technologies, better healthcare, more factories being built, etc.), not for the personal usage of Party's members for their own needs, as politicians are expected to earn their money by their work. Of course, for disputed zone warlords aligned with government, it is harder to provide those necessities, than for former governors of RNGOC, Russian Empire, or SC's officials. In general, the amount of collected taxes is lower there, due of lower citizen income.''

Money
What is the local currency like? How is it subdivided? What is it based on (metal, labour, fiat)? ''There are many local currencies in SC, but one of them is more powerful than others, and can be used in any Commonwealth state - Commonwealth's Dollar. It looks somewhat similar to American Dollar, yet has a bit different faces, and buildings in it. In some ways, it rather resembles Euro instead, however. It is split in 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500 Commonwealth Dollar banknotes, and in 1, and 2 Commonwealth Dollar coins, along with 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 Commonwealth Cent coins. Symbol is similar to US dollar sign - $, and so is its value. It is based on natural resources around the world, like oil, gold, minerals, and others, and government's guarantees - it is a world government, who ensures, that its dollar is worth the same in Spain, and Arabia.''
Is currency issued by a central authority or by some decentralised means? ''In some ways, by both, actually - while coins themselves are minted by the central government, and banknotes are printed by its bank as well, it distributes surplus banknotes and coins to the regional governors instead, which later put them in circulation in their own regions, often setting exchange rate for local currencies. (Similar to IRL rate) So, in some ways, SC combines both in its system - while currency is made by a central authority, it is distributed by decentralized means instead. (Keep in mind, that in territories controlled by government directly, currency is issued by government itself, and system is centralized, and money counterfeiting is punished directly. In regions, money counterfeiting is punished by local governors instead, so punishments may also vary - from money fines, to even prison.)''
How does it compare to other neighbouring currencies? ''Although it has no neighbor countries, its regions have various currencies, which are used alongside with Commonwealth's dollar. Their value vastly differs - some of them are even more valuable than SC's dollar, but some of them have way less value, and SC's dollar sometimes is used way more often, as it has a higher value. In some regions, where barter is used, situation is a bit more tricky, but usually value is set to the value, which product would have in Commonwealth's dollars. (For example, if a cow is exchanged for Commonwealth's Dollars, and it is worth 3 Commonwealth's dollars, exchange ratio is ''1 cow = 3 Commonwealth Dollars''. Meanwhile, if a gram of gold costs 45 Commonwealth's Dollars, exchange ratio is going to be ''1 gram gold = 45 Commonwealth's dollars'') In some ways, however, barter market is more unstable than monetary market, as value of goods can change rather quickly, depending on circumstances.''
How has the value of the currency changed or fluctuated recently? ''Recently, value of the Commonwealth dollar has boomed a bit, after the discover, and seizing of new resource depots across the world, and asserting the control over them. However, this is already the aftermath of peak after the world unification, when influx of new resources kept flowing for days. For the most part of SC's existence, its economy was geared towards total, and perpetual war, so it might prove hard to switch from war to civilian economy for the first time in many decades. Still, there are many uprisings as well, and underground criminal organizations are still active, so SC is forced to remain partially on war economy even during ''peace''. Still, economists expect, that at near future, an economical recession will begin, after the boom of SC's economy stops, and it succumbs to corruption more and more.''
How are coins and notes produced? How common are forgeries? ''Banknotes are printed in government banks, by special machines, which also put watermarks on banknotes, so a forged banknote could be easier spotted. Coins are minted not so far away either - in another, minting room of the bank, and it is also done by a special machine, which ensures, that amount of metal in coins, and pictures on them would be similar. Forgeries aren't an enormous problem, but the issue is still noticeable - despite the attempts of central bank, and local governors to try to keep an eye on that. Despite the high risk of receiving death penalty, and attempts of anti-forgery measures on both coins, and banknotes, some people still find the opportunity to earn a few bucks as a target enough for risk. In newer Commonwealth States, there is a lack of advanced minting, and printing machines as well, which makes the risk of forgery even higher there. Even then, other regional currencies have a higher risk of forgery than SC's dollar.''
How is wealth distributed? ''Usually through some variant of decentralized command economy. ''Decentralized'' in a sense, that not all of the world's economical planning is done by the central government itself, but other governments of the Commonwealth as well. That said, wealth disparity happens already in the roots of the system - some regions have more resources than others to work with, better infrastructure, more educated, and productive populace, etc. Besides that, some of the regions basically needed to be built from scratch again, as warfare in disputed zone had decimated them. Some regions also have advanced AI programs, similar to Project Cybersyn, but others still have to use less advanced methods, making a bigger mismanagement risk in economy, and distribution of wealth. As government generally throttles any free market ideas, SC isn't able to utilize the benefits of market system, even if international-regional trade still happens.''
Is there a public banking system? ''Of course, there is. Commonwealth's Central National Bank is the largest from all SC's banks, and is responsible for printing, and minting new banknotes, and coins, and distributing them as well. No private banks are allowed there, as government doesn't like competition in this sphere, or any other. However, SC's central bank in Neo Washington can't just cover all of the world on its own, so it has various regional branches - Canadian Commonwealth's Regional Bank, Central American Regional Bank, Chinese Regional Bank, Arabian Regional Bank, African Regional Bank, Turkestan Regional Bank, Australasian Regional Bank, etc. (Antarctica doesn't have a regional bank yet, as it is still more of a territory, despite being a Commonwealth state on paper, so it rather has a National Antartican Vault in Halley Town - only SC's actual town in Antarctica, where most of gold, resources, and money from Antarctica is stored. It is eventually planned to be transformed into a Regional Bank as well.)''
Who uses it? What benefits does it bring? At what cost? ''It is used by most of SC's populace, and is typically considered by its citizens as a ''good alternative to boogeyman of predatory laissez-faire market'', due of government's agenda. Government banks also have an extensive resource stockpile, in order to give a real value to its currency, alongside with its influence on the world.''
Is there a large gap between the wealth of the rich and poor? What expectations do each group have from the other? ''The gap between the rich, and poor is not as big, as someone might expect, but it is rather because of ''shared misery'', not because SC would have good conditions. That said, there is some gap between them, and class system still exists. As the ''rich'' ones in SC are usually the upper class (Party, militarists, clergy, intellectuals, scientists, etc.), they usually expect the lower classes, and lower echelons of the Party to accept them as their rulers, while lower classes usually expect the upper classes to ensure order, and law. Upper classes are also significantly more corrupt, and often lack respect against those below them, so...''
What constitutes "poverty" in this society? ''In SC, poverty is when someone can't provide one, or many of the basic needs for living in society - food, water, shelter, and clothing. Some agencies also include sanitation, education, healthcare, and internet in the list. If worker can't afford shelter, there are usually small houses near factories, which have a small rent price. However, conditions in them aren't also stellar - there have often been complaints about ''lack of space, inedible food, and warmth in the winter''. In SC, someone is considered poor only then, when they can't fulfill one of the conditions for various reasons, so those, who can fulfill them, but only barely, and overall are near critical poverty level, often don't receive government's aid, as they are ''not poor enough'' in its opinion. Overall, the rise of slums in both cities, and countryside has been notable, due of increasing population boom, and new workers from other towns, or large cities, which have been sent to countryside.''


XVIII. Questions of Government.

What is the form of government? How is it structured? ''The Silver Commonwealth is ruled by a totalitarian, autocratic, and oligarchic government, with overall syncretic stance on social, and economical issues. It also has a constitution, but it got established only recently, and it is not a constitution in a traditional sense - it is rather a code of conduct, than anything. Also, SC's government is less of a single entity, but more of a confederacy of various regional branches, and groups, just like SC itself - theoretically a single-party state, but in practice a very wide tent one, with various parties under one umbrella, and tons of regional infighting. It discusses international matters, and decisions in UCN's HQ in New York, while leaving local governing to the various local government councils.''
What are some of the most fundamental policies of the government? ''One of the most vital policies for government is securing law, and order within it - it is so totalitarian, that it takes security, and conformism to an extreme. Second is keeping a well armed, and trained army, as military cult is deeply ingrained in every SC's community. Third policy is suppressing any dissent whenever it appears, because Commonwealth basically is based on reign of terror, and fear, and there is a risk of large rebellions in the next 50 years. However, sometimes government has way too many ideas for policies, too many things to enforce, and keep in check, and way too less funds, so it has to sacrifice funding for some issues, to deal with others. But in the result, it hurts its image as well.''
What is the political status of minority communities? ''There are special regions for them inside the 90 administrative regions of SC, and 14 Commonwealth states. Their Party's member vote in Commonwealth's Presidential elections has the same value as majority, and others would. Their Party's members can even vote in their own President-Governors. However, unlike with administrative region President-Governors, those have less influence internationally, and are basically subordinate to not only President of the Commonwealth as a whole, but to the administrator of their region as well. (President-Governor) There have been also complaints about the level of autonomy of the minority regions, as often their governors bend over to State company (Like POC) needs.''
How is government chosen? ''Common citizens have no say, in how government is chosen - politicians, leaders, and other Party's members are elected in Party's member elections. Regional leader elections happen between only specific, local branch politicians, and local members - generals, scientists, clergy, etc. In the elections of President of the Silver Commonwealth, all Party's members participate, no matter the ethnicity, religion, region, or political alignment. Some regions can already submit votes from distance through special technological voting screen, if members can't arrive in New York.''
What is the country’s general foreign policy? ''In general, it is very expansionist - so much, that it even reaches to a Pan-Human ethos. One of SC's ideological cornerstones is the conquest of the world - one of its main goals. It is supposed to wage war after war, until only it stands as the sole ruler of the world, as ''Commonwealth can't be completed, until all nations are under one roof''. Its policy towards space is no different - it considers the entire Galaxy as its ''rightful land'', and isn't wiling to share it with any other foreign power. In fact, it also wants to get rid from possible aliens as well, and colonize the galaxy in name to humanity - similarly to Imperium of Man. It also staunchly opposes capitalist, democratic, and monarchist nations.''
Who decides whether someone has broken a law? How? ''Usually, the judges (Often they are either soldiers, or police officers), and Ministry of Justice decides, if someone has broken a law. Prosecutor serves as a person, who enforces the decision of Council of Judges. Usually judges behind closed doors decide by vote, if person is guilty, or not. Exceptions are ''kangaroo courts'', where state officials themselves decide, if someone has broken a law even before the trial has actually started - in such case, trial usually turns into a farce.''
What kinds of punishments are meted out? By whom? Why? ''Most common form of punishment is a fine, forced labor, or prison sentence. However, death penalty isn't that uncommon either - mostly for murder, dissenting opinions, or repeated, heavy crimes. SC's prison system mostly serves to punish, or isolate person from society, but in some cases, a path to redemption is promised - through hard labor for many years. While some have indeed achieved their freedom in such way, way more have also not survived, due of lack of food, or are still working there, not getting out. Punishment is carried out by both police, and Ministry of Justice. If convict is a war criminal, army often carries out the punishment.''
How are new laws created or old ones changed? ''Through the Legislation of the Commonwealth. Regional laws are changed similarly, but with regional legislation instead. If a law is changed in a region, the UCN Security Council needs to approve the change afterwards as well. It is the same case with both creating new laws, and throwing away old ones. If UCN council doesn't approve the law change, but regions still decide to pass it, it can send UCN peacekeepers, to enforce its decision. However, it keeps to that as a ''last straw solution'', and prefers diplomatic methods instead. SC might send in agents, to find out, what citizens think about the new laws, but overall it doesn't ask for people's opinions, when it creates new laws, or changes old ones.''
Is there some form of clemency or pardon? What is involved? ''While there is theoretically a possibility for SC to pardon a criminal, or dissenter, in practice, SC's justice system is pretty unforgiving, and few people have actually received a pardon. In fact, there are way more of those, who have either ended their lives on their own, due of the terrible conditions, or have been killed by other convicts. Pardon can be given by either the Prefect of the Region/Commonwealth state, President-Governor of the state, where criminal is located, or by the Supercomputer Tom himself. So far, most of the pardon requests have been denied by either Tom, or Prefects.''
Who has the right to give orders, and why? ''In government, only those, who are at the upper top of the hierarchy, have any permissions to give orders to anyone to do something. For example, only President, or President-Governor, along with the few higher ministers, and army's leaders, have any rights to launch nuclear missiles, or start an invasion. For slightly less important things, like cleaning an one politician's room, situation is the same - only high ranked officers, or the employees have a right to tell janitor to clear the yard. For example, co-workers can tell the janitor to clear yard, and if they want, they can accept, but they don't need to necessarily do it.''
What titles do various officials have? ''Most important titles are ''President'', ''State Secretary'', ''President-Governor'', ''Archbishop'', and ''General of the Army''. Of course, there can be extra governor titles, like ''Raja'', ''Khan'', ''Caudillo'', and ''Chancellor'', for an example, but they are entirely optional. There are some more common, but lower ranked titles as well.''
How are the rules different for officials as opposed to the common person? ''On paper, the rules are same for both the officials, and common people, as government doesn't see them as ''special in any way, to get exceptions, when it comes to rules''. However, in reality, higher classes (Which includes officials, and Party as well) are way more privileged than common people, and can enjoy things like small tax breaks, extra food rations, more internet hours, laxer punishments for crimes, etc. Also, the most notable difference is, that in SC's laws, officials can vote in Party's elections (As being a member of one of the Parties is a requirement for being an official in the first place), but commoners can't. Some have described this as ''Democracy for the Party, totalitarianism for the rest''.''
How do government officials dress? ''Some of them indeed wear extravagant clothing, but it is typically shunned upon nowadays, as expensive clothing, and accessories have been associated with corruption for a long time in SC. So, for the most part, clothing is prude, and standardized - similar to businessman's attire. However, there are a few exceptions to this - in home, outside from public eye, officials can usually dress more freely, and at holidays, and patriotic events, it is considered a good etiquette to be dressed in national costume of the region, as it is viewed as a patriotic gesture. However, it is not allowed to dress in other region costumes, as national costume is way more than just a piece of clothing in SC - it is considered a bearer of the national/ethnic identity as well. Dressing in foreign ethnicity's costume might be seen as ''cultural appropriation''.''
Is the law written down? Who interprets it? "Yes, laws are written down, and are stored in national archive, and in the halls of Ministry of Justice. Overall, laws have a few consistent principles, which are in force in every region, despite the differences over specific, and a set of unique laws for every region. However, even native community's laws are clearly written down, to leave no room for other interpretations, because that could be used by sly criminals, to get away with "different law interpretation"."
Once accused, what recourse does someone have? "In SC's world, accusation for the most part is a serious business, as SC's judges (Often coming from the ranks of army) don't tend to be merciful with the "guilty" verdict. So, the accused one can get an advocate, which is provided for free by the state, and can increase chances of winning in the court, as punishments can be outright absurd even for minuscule crimes. If it is a sham trial, however, then the accused one doesn't have much of a choice anyways. Still, if the accused one is a good advocate himself/has a good advocate, they can still defend themselves very well, and raise doubts in others about the integrity of the courts."
Is torture allowed? What kinds? Is capital punishment allowed? ''Unsurprisingly, both torture, and capital punishment are allowed there. SC isn't the paragon of human rights, but rather the opposite, so various forms of torture are legal there - even those, which might be illegal in other, more democratic countries. There are too many to list, but waterboarding is one of them, for an example, along with usage of electrodes. Ratios of both torture, and executions in SC's prisons are strikingly high. In fact, there have been cases of prisoners dying after interrogation, due of the excessive usage of force from police, and army units - those are not the guys, who should be messed with.''
How are criminals executed? ''There are many methods for that, but one of the most commonly used are two - firing squad, and hanging. Firing squad is viewed as ''brutal, yet effective'', but hanging - as ''cheap'', and also a spectacle for the population, and a warning to potential criminals at the same time. Still, usage of lethal injection has also slowly become popular, as it is viewed as ''more clean alternative'', unlike firing squad, ''which can leave a lot of mess''. In some cases, electric chair is also used. Of course, depending on the region, there might be some special methods of execution, for example the Blood Eagle in most of Scandinavia - a punishment from Viking era, which is used very rarely, and only for very serious crimes, like treason. .''
Who cannot rise to positions of leadership? ''Well, for one, criminals can't rise to leadership, because they are typically viewed as ''too dangerous'' to be in any position of leadership. Even those, who haven't committed any crimes for years, aren't allowed, due of their bad record possibly stirring up controversy. Members of underground, democrat, and communist organizations aren't allowed to rise to power either, as otherwise it could really change the country's political course. Another group of people, who can't lead, are people until 40 - it is the minimal age for leadership over region, and SC as whole. There are exceptions to this in few regions, of course. In the end, people from different regions aren't allowed to become leaders of another region, as leadership is restricted only to the natives of the region. (For example, an Irishman can't be a President-Governor of Spain)''
Is bribery allowed? Under what circumstances? ''Usually, bribery is strictly prohibited in SC, and depending on the region, punishment about bribery might even be death. However, due of SC's politicians being corrupt, people still try to bribe them, as it is often needed to move even simple processes. Also, it is not like, that officials, militarists, clergy, doctors, and scientists themselves would be very clean, when it comes to bribes - them accepting bribes is nothing out of unusual in SC. Of course, if they turn out to be too honest to accept bribes, or later betray you, you are going to have way more than just mere problems, but if you get lucky, bribe would be accepted, and you wouldn't get in trouble.''
What makes someone a bad ruler in this society? What can be done about it? ''Someone, who passes policies, which harm nation way more than help, in general is considered as a bad ruler. Someone, who uses government's money for their own needs, gives bribes left and right, and tries to concentrate way too much autocratic power in one person's hand, is also considered a terrible ruler. They can usually be impeached by the rest of the Party's members in a vote. If vote is not successful, however, and most of party backs them, then they will remain in power. In order to approve deposing the President, there must be at least a 2/3 majority.''
What are the most common or dangerous forms of criminal? ''Frankly, burglars, scammers, and simple thiefs are one of the most common criminals in SC - such crimes happen practically every day in SC's world. They usually aren't too hard to handle for vigilante police groups - government police units save expenses in such a way. Bandits, serial killers, and arsonists are a bit more rare, but also more dangerous - well organized packs of bandits, and raiders can terrorize the territories for years to come. While some of them indeed need raiding to sustain themselves, some of them simply practice it as a ''past-time'' activity, and their primary job is something else. In SC, the most dangerous criminals are terrorists, and leaders of underground groups, as they usually have the resources, to raise chaos in the SC. Usually only special police teams, SCPS, or even army itself deals with those types of criminals."

City Watch & Sheriffs
Is there a civilian police force, or is law enforcement the province of the military? ''Actually, SC utilizes police from both worlds - citizen vigilante police is usually supposed to be used on less serious criminals, and dealing with political opponents. In other words, it handles things, where government's police doesn't necessarily need to get directly involved. However, vigilante police is also controlled by government directly. State's police, however, deals with serial killers, and other serious criminals, dangerous political extremists, organizations, and cartels - matters, which would be too dangerous to leave in hands of vigilantes. Even if vigilantes are kept outside of any dangerous business, government still doesn't fully trust them, so they are armed with way worse weapons than the government police. Some of the vigilantes do have a military/police experience before hand, but some of them are just volunteer civilians, with little, to no experience.''
Is the police force a nationalised one, or are there multiple regional forces? ''It would be both impractical, and impossible for state's police to try to enforce order on the whole world, so having multiple regional forces is almost essential. Police of the government only patrols zones controlled directly by the central government, as the rest of the Commonwealth is left to the local forces. That said, SCPS can also intervene on an international scale, if a situation goes out of hand. Still, calling SCPS should be a last resort, as it usually shows, that regional governors can't deal with their problems on their own, and that is one of the most important things - learning to handle local matters with their own hands. While having a formal authority over the local forces, in practice, local police units are practically independent, and it can lead to some... ugly episodes. In some regions, there have been reports of police units acting like bandits, and extruding money from the locals.''
How militant or vigilante are they? Are they usually or ever armed? ''All police officers in SC are armed - in fact, unarmed police officer is typically seen as ''stupid'', as police can have many problematic elements to deal with - from usual criminals, to underground groups, massive criminal organizations, and even insurgents. In such cases, a gun, melee weapon, and armor of some kind is a necessity. Usually, police is very militant, and tends to use excessive force in arrests, and violence, when suppressing protests. However, that also depends on the region. For example, while SC's British, and Canadian police is ruthless, they are well disciplined, and usually don't go too extreme with their violence. However, police of the Rockies, and various Congolese warlord police officers, for an example, tend to use outright cruel, and disgusting punishments, and can be rightly called ''chaotic evil''.''
What is the extent of their authority? Can they shoot you? Can they use magic? Can they torture or otherwise force a confession? Can they use telepathy? ''Ohh, their extent of authority is very high - police can both shoot you, use dark magic, and harmful spells against you, use telepathy, and definitely are allowed to use torture, or any other method to force out a confession, even if you aren't actually guilty. That said, magic is rarely used by police, as they prefer to focus on physical force instead, and guns. Telepathy is also rarely used, as police can usually use other means to extract influence, and society can react pretty hysterically to extensive usage of magic, and telepathy, so it is better to not use them sometimes.''
Are there individuals or groups who are above the law? ''According to the Ministry of Justice, ''No individual, or organization, no matter their position, or how influential they are, are above the law - Themis rightful sword of justice will judge them equally''. So, theoretically no person, or group is above law, or has special privileges. That said, SC's justice system is vulnerable to corruption, and in reality, those with enough money, and power in the government, can often bribe the judges in their favor, even if punishment for bribes is very harsh. So, in practice, there are some, who are more lucky than others. It is a problem both in international, and local trials, and courts.''
Is there a secret police? ''Of course - there are few totalitarian states, which wouldn't have a secret police. SCPS fills that role, as it is basically a combination of various OTL intelligence services, and special units, and basically keeps order in the world government, by hunting down dissenters. SCPS has many regional branches, which are used for more effective operation strength. In some case, secret police takes the normal police's role as well, and it has its own prisons around the world, and some of them can be described as ''hell on the Earth''. For the most part, security police has normal police uniforms, in order to blend in better. However, some of the higher-ranked officers wear mafiosi-like suits. Of course, not all uniforms, and equipment is equally good - for example, Arabian SCPS agent is quite different from a Canadian SCPS agent, and they both also wield very different weapons.''
What is the role of police informants, if any? ''Usually the role of police informants is to provide information about suspicious persons, organizations, and infiltrate in them - in other words, they search the area, where secret police's, and army's hands don't reach. Police informants can be recruited from basically anyone in the population, which is very useful, as they blend in easier - according to SCPS Director's words, ''everyone flees from cops from far away, but few know, who the informant exactly is''. Informants are rarely sent in missions to foreign countries, as they are trained specifically for infiltrating the SC's own society - it would be harder to do so in a foreign country. Besides that, spies already serve as informants in the foreign countries. Due of the fact, that SC is a world government, the roles were a bit changed - informants work in specific regions, but spies - on international scale, on missions, where even local informants aren't enough.''
XIX. Questions of Warfare.

Does the country have an armed force? What types? What size? ''Yes, SC has quite an enormous army, even. Total numbers are estimated to be about 35 million, but SC would be able to draft a lot more from reserves as well, due of its extremely large population - 5 billion people. That said, size, and numbers not always matter - sometimes it is more important, of how well those units are equipped. In this case, SC has some pretty serious problems, as it simply can't produce advanced equipment for all 35 million soldiers. There are many army variations, as SC is a world government, but there are three general umbrella terms:

  • Elite Units: ''Usually the units with best equipment, and training available in SC (Mostly European, Canadian, Australasian, and American units). Those are often equipped with laser rifles, and power armor, and have received elite level of training. However, there are estimated to be only about 5 million of such soldiers.''
  • Average Units: ''Units, which are relatively well equipped, but don't have as modern weapons, and often receive less training. One example of that are Central, and South American army units. While still formidable foes, not as terrifying as elite units.''
  • Backup Units: ''Armies, which usually are not as well trained, and have worse equipment, It can range from outdated PMT guns, to WW2 weapons, or even melee weapons like machetes, and knifes. While there are experiments with laser swords going on, for SC's warfare, most of the melee weapons are outdated. Those units are mostly common in former disputed zone (Arabian, and African units, along with Indochinese), and former China's warlord states - they often had to utilize whatever they found, and some of it wasn't the best equipment.''
How do the armed forces compare with others in the region or world? "It has no external forces to compare itself to, because Commonwealth is a world government. However, SC does compare its regional units with each other in special reports, in order to set possible future improvements. So far, SC's Megastate units have performed the best, and were the best equipped. As Megastates are a core territory of SC, there is no stronger force than SC in its world, for now."
Who declares war? ''In the past, President could declare a war to a country on their own, with no need from approval of military staff, not even talking about general populace. However, during the reformist period, President's (Or President-Governor's) powers were drastically reduced - now they can't just declare a war on their own, as generals, other military staff, and Party itself needs to approve the declaration of war in a vote. Same applies for border conflicts - military must approve the decision first, before giving green light to engagement in border conflict with an another region. However, if the council votes in favor, President (Or President-Governor) still can declare military campaign with little resistance, as council's decision is the final. And, no one in the council really asks for civilian opinion, before declaring wars, of course.''
Who has the power to declare conditions of peace? ''Usually, declaring both peace, and enforcing its conditions is a serious task, so it is usually the General of Army, who declares conditions of peace. In some cases, that is done by President-Governor themselves. It is also the case, if SC would be the ones receiving peace terms - General of Army would ensure, that they get accepted. In case, if neither General of Army, or leader is available, someone else, who is the highest ranked from army around, can declare conditions.''
How are treaties negotiated? ''Signing a treaty, just like declaring conditions of peace, is a very important task, and only General of Army, along with leaders, and Marshals, can negotiate a treaty. Usually, SC is on the winning side of treaties, so it usually enforces its demands, rather than the other way around. However, SC's victories might not last forever, and at one point, it might end up at the losing side instead - if that would happen, it wouldn't have much to say anyways, as it is taught to SC's officers, that ''bargaining works only from positions of strength''.''
What happens to prisoners taken in battle? ''They usually get sent to the working camps behind the frontlines, and sometimes in extreme environment prisons (Like in Canadian Arctic, or Saharan Desert), where they serve basically as a free workforce. However, they are also used in resource mines, and oil wells across the Commonwealth, and in things like road repairs, factory workforce, etc. However, sometimes army either outright shoots them, or treats them very badly - practice of saving monetary costs by giving less food to prisoners is not uncommon in SC. Soldiers from various cultures also have different opinions on surrender, and treatment of prisoners. Due of SC's extreme hate against aliens, treatment against alien prisoners might be even worse in future, if SC goes to space, because if SC doesn't really care about well-being of humans, it is foolish to expect it to care for prisoners from other species.''
What weapons are favoured by the various armed forces? ''Those, who are the most advanced, and elite troops, typically favor laser rifles, as they often do a bigger damage than rounds, or melee weapons. From melee weapons, they sometimes use steel army knives for stabbing, but currently more funds are going towards a ''lightsaber'' type weapon. Troops from disputed zone typically don't have a favorite weapon in particular, as they have learned to utilize anything, which can be found, due of the resource scarcity in the zone. Although troops from countries like China also have outdated weapons like warlord era guns, and machetes, they also have some PMT weaponry, like poison guns. In ceremonies, however, melee weapons are often used. There are also several weapons, and uniforms, which are unique to a particular ethnicity/region, which diversifies the army. In fact, modernized crossbows with sticky arrows are sometimes used as well by various militaries, as they are quiet, and deadly weapons.''
What form of warfare does this society use? ''SC doesn't limit itself to one form of warfare, that's known for sure. However, one type of warfare, which it definitely isn't using, is conventional warfare, as it isn't afraid to use dirty tactics. Although it hasn't met any aliens yet, it has made clear, that its war towards aliens is a war of extermination, as it is basically the Fanatical Purifiers from Stellaris. There's a list of some types of warfare practiced by SC, or at least considered as an option:''

  • Radiological warfare
  • Total war
  • Hybrid warfare
  • Weather warfare
  • Combined arms
  • Unconventional warfare
  • Asymmetric warfare
  • Submarine warfare
  • Third-generation warfare
How do battles in the airs or waters or underworlds differ from surface warfare? ''SC rarely fights in underground warfare, unless it is required to clear out rebels from the underground tunnels, like Vietcong. However, tunnel battles are typically the part, where SC's numerical advantage is nerfed, as those caves are often narrow, and it can't utilize its numbers as effectively. Flamethrower is essential down there. Air battles are a lot more hectic, and utilize speed, while in naval battles, agility is more important, due of different volumes of air, and water - even the fastest ships, and submarines are way slower than jets. Traditionally, a strong airforce, and navy has been SC's strong side, while it was significantly worse at land warfare. However, recently a lot of new manpower has shifted into SC's army, but at the same time, more outdated jets, and ships have also been seized, which brings down quality overall.''
Who are the Elite warriors? What distinguishes them? ''Power armor soldiers are often considered as ''Elites of them all'' - they are definitely one of the most strongest, and deadliest SC's units. Their armor is a thing, which makes them distinguishable from far away - as name suggests, it is literally powered by nuclear power, and gives a great deal of protection. Their helmet has became a synonym of intimidation already. Those soldiers are a valuable asset to SC's rulers, especially in places like Congo, where they are practically invulnerable, due of lack of weapons, which would harm them - for example, EMP weapons in Congo are a big rarity. Of course, many regions have elite armies (Like Republican Guard for Arabian region, or kamikaze units in Japan, with most of pilots being dissenters, forced to do the task), but those soldiers stand out the most from them all.''
How does someone get command of troops? ''Usually by moving up to the ladders of hierarchy, which can be done by planning a successful military campaign, or excel at army logistics, or put a tactical move during the battlefield. Unlike with some other ranks, General of the Army's rank is not tied to the years spent in army - it matters purely on commander skill. For example, a lieutenant, or officer, which has shown brilliancy in a battle, or leading a small regiment, can become a General of Army way faster, no matter the previous rank. Another test, which is optional, and purely subjective matter, is a chess game with one of the current Generals on Army. While loss, or win will not really change the decision from the military echelons, it is recommended, in order to ''test the tactical skills'' of the newcomer general.''
Where do the loyalties of military units lie? ''Despite the attempts of creating a Pan-Human identity, and allegiance to the Supercomputer Tom himself, more often than not the actual loyalty of units lies in the hands of regional governors, which rule the land under a decentralized system. So, despite the attempts of improving relations with its vassals, central government not always can be sure about the soldier loyalty. Despite some regions being more loyal than others (For example, SC's Canada's soldiers are more loyal than SC's China's soldiers), only soldiers from territories, which government controls directly, are 100% loyal to the government. Some commanders advocate for a more centralized command, as regions make their own internal alliances, and in times of crisis, can turn against the government.''
Are there professional soldiers? Do they make up the bulk of the military? ''Of course there are - some of them are there voluntarily, and receive spec-ops training. However, a vast majority of the soldiers are conscripted, so they are slightly less professional. In fact, a significant part of SC's army consists from African, Chinese, and Arabian warlord armies, which aren't exactly a paragon for a professional military. Still, SC has supplied some of them with power armor, making it a powerful gift in those regions - while it is still expensive even in Megastates, in those lands, it is a symbol of status, as only very influential members can wield it.''
What is campaign or camp life like? ''Very hard - training camps are often called as ''harsher than battlefields themselves'' - psychological abuse is widespread there, especially between higher-ups, and army generals. Some of the exercises are particularly hard - for example, Nepalese gurkhas are required to run up to a steep mountain with a bag full with rocks on their backs. Some generals considered even using real bullets in invasion exercise simulations, instead of fake ones, to ''harden'' the soldiers, but idea was eventually rejected, as using it for privates would be ''a waste of manpower''. Conditions differ from region to region, and from camp to camp, of course.''
What ethical or moral codes do warriors adhere to? ''In past, before WW3, soldiers used to if not adhere to basic morals, and human decency on their own, then at least they were kept in check. However, during WW2, it became clear, how terrible soldiers can be, when they don't follow any code of ethics, or morals. Over time, SC stopped to officially enforce any code of morals, and ''laws of war'', and following them became entirely optional - while some still tried to keep some shards of ethics in their souls, others used the opportunity to unleash the inner cruelty in themselves. Soon, Army command itself stopped following any moral codes, and started to use various inhumane methods. Currently, SC's world is literally soaked in cruelty because of that, and SC's soldiers are infamous for brutally executing those, who resist, or even just disagree with their vision/views.''
How are battle injuries treated? ''Highly depends on the region, where soldiers have been wounded - various materials. Overall, SC's western hospitals are the best in treating injuries. (For SC's standards, that is) While SC's elite units always keep a supply of high-tech medicine, even when overseas, amount of it is still limited, and without it, soldiers would need to resort to more primitive bandages, antibiotics, or even nature medicine like plants. Overall, Antarctica is the worst place, where to get wounded, as medicine there is highly dependent on supplies from other countries - even bandages have to be imported. While Antarctican army crafts some of medical supplies on their own, it isn't much. Wounded in a middle of nowhere is basically a suicide, as soldier could catch an infection, or die from even relatively-light wounds, not even talking about severe limb injuries.''
How long do wars typically last? ''Typically, it takes SC about a few months, or multiple years, to finish its war campaigns, depending on the combatant's strength, territory, technological advance, etc. However, one of the most important wars in SC was dragged on for decades, because of a simple reason - no side wanted to win, as perpetual war would help to bolster propaganda, and keep populace away from rebelling, by creating an ''enemy'' to distract populace with. However, after the other two superstates collapsed, SC eventually had to step in, and stop the war, which had lasted for decades already, and had left most of Africa, Indochina, Arabia, and India in ruins, as they were designed as buffers, in order to avoid ''heartlands'' of the superpowers.''
Has this society ever attacked another? What was the nature of that war? What would make this society go to war? ''Yes, we have. In fact, we have attacked so many, that we have even forgotten some of their names. That's a burden of being a superpower. Since the previous, democratic government was overthrown, we have been at state of war with other countries since our very existence. Some of the higher-ups claim, that war was to ''fulfill a destiny given from the stars, and establish an inevitable, single government, with tons of bloodshed, which would last for centuries''. Other versions, however, think, that it was simply SC's leader greed, and hunger for power, which made them to go to the war. While already brutal, eventually SC's wars turned excessively cruel, after abolishing the Geneva convention.''
Has there ever been a civil war or a revolution? ''Ohh, the SC itself was born out of flames of revolution. Or rather its first version - SC, as it currently is, was instead formed during reformist period in 80s. Before SC's rise in 50s, there also was an one civil war in about 1860s, where North, and South fought against each other (Exact date is unknown, due of Party's falsification of historical records, and overall lack of data from the past historians), and it is said, that predecessor nation itself was born out of a revolution against the colonial government in the late 18th century.''
What do soldiers do when there's no war? ''They usually serve as either assistants of the police in cities, remote towns, or patrol the wast countryside, where there are less people. Some of them also participate in secret missions together with special ops units, and counter-terrorist operations, as SC is still a dangerous place to live in, even during ''peacetime''. However, some of the soldiers get demobilized after the wars end, and return to their jobs at either factories, or somewhere else, if they are conscripts. Some other soldiers are responsible for training of new soldiers in army camps - most often those are experienced veterans.''
Are there any current tensions / wars / embargoes etc with any other nations? ''Currently, there are no wars with any external nations, as SC has established a world government of some kind. However, that doesn't mean, that there is no internal tension - in fact, there is plenty of it there, due of regional governor infighting, which can even potentially manifest to a regional war between governors. Of course, if such a thing would happen, attacker would be kicked out from Commonwealth, embargoed, and all of the Commonwealth would need to go to war with it. However, it rarely is united in those matters, and some might side with the attacker instead.''
Who are the country’s enemies? Whos winning the war? ''As of now, Commonwealth has no external enemies, and currently there is a ''peace'' with outside world, as it would be pointless to fight with the empty universe, huh? However, that doesn't mean, that it doesn't have any enemies - they are just all internal. One of its biggest military enemies are the separatist movements, which aren't content with world government, and wage partisan warfare. While usually victorious on large scale battles, SC still struggles to keep control, especially when it is so spread out. Another of the enemies are the criminal organizations, which were attempted to be destroyed by SC during war similar to ''War of Drugs''. After the failings, SC turned to ''economical war'' against cartels instead.''
What defences are available to cities? ''Usually, every city, and town has at least one army garrison - of course, to larger cities, there are more troops dislocated, but it couldn't be said, that any of the cities are left undefended. Some of them have anti-air defenses, securitron robots, tank divisions, or even anti-missile shields. There have been experiments with force field defenses as of now, which would render the cities basically invulnerable to most of rounds, and perhaps even some biological, and chemical weapons. Villages, however, are often left to be defended on their own by citizens. In disputed zone's cities, due of the high crime rate, and instability, soldiers patrol more often - for example, Arab cavalry can be seen regularly in Arab Peninsula's cities.''


(Conclusion: Writing about entire Earth was kinda hard. Okay, very hard. Both writer's block, and character limit hit me multiple times. For example, listing all of architecture on Earth would be very time consuming. I left most of the things to be imaginable for readers themselves, and encourage their own research of things (Magazines, vooks, internet sources), to get a full picture, as SC's world has elements from ours. For example, I found out about a lot of new things while writing this, especially about architecture.)
Last edited by Silver Commonwealth on Tue Apr 09, 2019 12:56 pm, edited 52 times in total.
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OOC: A slight Latvian freeaboo, slight francophile Center-left economics, kinda conservative socially

Why I have relatively little factbooks? Because those are more cramped together than Khrushchyovkas

Currently in SC's Radio: Bajtárs

To those, who keep making versions of third reich

This nation doesn't represent my views

Myself

F̛̕͡a̸͟í͞t̵͝h́͜,̸͘͠ R̷e̸͜͝p͜͠͠ub͘͜l̨̛í̶c̨͟҉, ͠͡͡a̸͝n҉̸d͜ ̀̕ańt̢i̸͘͜-͢c̵á͏͢҉p̷͏įta͝l̛͘i̷̢s̀m̵̨̛

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Necroviribus
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 20
Founded: Mar 13, 2019
Corrupt Dictatorship

Postby Necroviribus » Wed Mar 27, 2019 6:28 pm

National Animal

Code: Select all
[size=200]National Animal[/size]
[b]What's your nation's national animal?[/b]
[b]Is it a mammal, a reptile, a bird, or what?[/b]
[b]Is it in the real world?[/b]
[b]Is it allowed to be hunted?[/b]
[b]It it near, at, or surpassing human intelligence?[/b]
[b]What does it's flesh taste like?[/b]
[b]How endangered is it?[/b]
[b]Is it magical?[/b]
[b]How was it created? By magic, technology, evolution, or by a god/goddess?
[b]Is it allowed to be used as a pet?
[b]Where does it live?[/b]
[b]If one were to kill someone, what would people do to it?[/b]
[b]What are expensive resources you can get from it?[/b]

User avatar
New Udonia
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 132
Founded: Sep 06, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby New Udonia » Thu Mar 28, 2019 4:04 am

National Animal
What's your nation's national animal? Western Honey Bee.
Is it a mammal, a reptile, a bird, or what? It is a form of eusocial insect.
Is it in the real world? Yes, although slightly different from the New Udonian version.
Is it allowed to be hunted? Yes, although it is considered pointless.
It it near, at, or surpassing human intelligence? No.
What does it's flesh taste like? Some say sugar, others say popcorn.
How endangered is it? It reached an endangered status and almost went extinct during the chaos of the calderas. However the fertile aftermath led to an increase in vegetation which exponentially boosted the growth of the western honey bee.
Is it magical? No.
How was it created? By magic, technology, evolution, or by a god/goddess? N/A
Is it allowed to be used as a pet? Yes, if you wish to do so.
Where does it live? Usually in the wild or areas where fauna is prevalent.
If one were to kill someone, what would people do to it? If a western honey bee attacks a human or large mammal, virtually the insect always die after said attack. Most attacks are not lethal for humans.
What are expensive resources you can get from it? Honey is prized, with several natural and artificial hives constructed across the Federation.
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. - MLKJ
News: The New Udonian Weekly

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