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SMJ Heavy Machine Gun [Closed-No posting]

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Common Territories
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SMJ Heavy Machine Gun [Closed-No posting]

Postby Common Territories » Tue Dec 30, 2014 2:29 am

Image
(An SMJ-AP system outside a vehicle.)


Caliber: WA 14.5×114 or 14.5x115 mm.
Weight: 48 kg (gun body + barrel); up to 51 kg with infantry mounts.
Length: 1,850 mm.
Length of barrel: 1,379 mm.
Feeding system: Belt system; 50 round belts or 100 round belts (normal and extra capacity box carriers).
Rate of fire: 600-700 rounds per minute (maximum).
Velocity: 1,008 m/s.
Range: 4,000 meters (maximum effective range).

The SMJ (Schweres Maschinengewehr Johnathan or Heavy Machine Gun Johnathan in english) Heavy Machine Gun is a Commoner designed 14.5×114mm caliber heavy machine gun based on the popular Soviet KPV heavy machine gun. The Soviets built the KPV during the the 1940's as a weapon to counter light vehicles (like armored personnel carriers, light vehicles, and light tanks), defeat defended positions like barriers or bunkers, and combat low flying aircraft like attack planes and helicopters. Commoners were very interested in the design and eventually re-engineered the KPV through a lucrative contract with Wolf Armaments. The SMJ was conceived during the 1950's as a lightweight anti-aircraft platform and vehicle primary armament. Due to its weight and cumbersome construction, plans to use the SMJ as an infantry weapon were nearly abandoned until decades later. Tests conducted by the design team lead by Leroy Johnathan (the weapon's namesake) proved the system's effectiveness as an anti-air weapon - later tests also showed the SMJ's effectiveness in penetrating light vehicle armor, giving Wolf Armaments confidence in the system's abilities as an anti-aircraft and vehicle armament. Once a produced product, the SMJ was first used on a small towed anti-aircraft weapons platform for mobile deployment; the SMJ-MAAG (Mounted Anti-Air Gun) as it was called was a one-to-four barreled 360 degree platform capable of light anti-air operations using turning wheels and standard iron sights. Armored vehicles were the next platform for the SMJ with a standard receiver able to operate on various armored vehicles; these recievers came with a multi-trigger configuration, allowing them to be manned using dual-handles with a trigger(s) system or using an electrical/mechanical trigger system. Aircraft and naval vessels soon saw their own versions being made promptly afterwards.

Modern models of the SMJ are based of its standard model, the SMJ-AP (Armored Platform) - a heavy jacket, shorter receiver version of its much older past version. SMJ-AP's are designed to be used on armored vehicles as their primary armament using an electrical trigger system - although the system could also be mounted on a remote controlled platform on a vehicle as well. Standard models for direct handling use a dual-handle trigger system for tightly controlled operation by the operator. These non-vehicle armament version are often mounted onto armored vehicles, mobile and stationary mounts, and can be rigged into stationary positions. SMJ's are closed bolt weapons that use a short recoil design with gas assistance to rotate the bolt. For enhanced performance, SMJ's use a mixed alloy for its barrel construction with a hard chrome bore for durability improvements. The air cooled barrel can be removed by turning a handle mounted forward of the receiver, allowing a crew to quickly exchange an overheated barrel with a fresh new barrel during combat. Standard engagement ranges for the SMJ are from three to four thousand meters, although bullets retain a lethal force at eight kilometers and can travel up to a ninth kilometer; a two thousand meter vertical height range is the SMJ's effective range against airborne targets. There are three models of the SMJ being produced by Wolf Armaments: the SMJ-AP used by vehicles and infantry forces, the SMJ-MP (Marine Platform) for naval platforms, and SMJ-ABP (Airborne Platform) used on aircraft mounts - the vastly produced MAAG variant has long since ended production, have been modernized, and were placed in storage until sold or needed by reservists. SMJ's play an important role in the TECT Armed Forces as its sole heavy machine gun system and heaviest infantry small arms weapon; its power and long engagement ranges have made the SMJ a favorite weapon system. The standard Commoner designed ammunition can be seen listed bellow as well as the descriptions of each version of the weapon.

AP14: The AP14 is an armor-piercing full metal jacket round with a tungsten-carbide (Tungsten-Cobalt alloy) core. It weighs about sixty-three grams and has a muzzle velocity of one-thousand and three meters per-second. Armor penetration at five-hundred meters is up to forty millimeters of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) at zero degrees. Similar to the Soviet B-32 standard AP round - the AP14 differs by excluding the incendiary aspects for added performance capabilities, choosing to penetrate over any additional damage done by explosives or incendiaries possibly after penetration. AP14 rounds are intended to achieve better results against more well-protected hostile targets, such as tanks or fortified positions that have thicker armoring or depth to their construction material. A tracer variant of the AP14 allows for a two-thousand five-hundred meter burn.

AP14-B: An incendiary variant to the AP14 - the AP14-B offers an incendiary high explosive compartment that is off-timed to explode mere milliseconds on contact rather then directly on contact. This slight delay allows for the bullet to begin digging into a target before exploding - if the bullet fractures to the point of hitting the explosive compartment before the trigger receives the signal to detonate, the explosion will happen at that moment rather then later. Although usually unnoticed, this change in design can cause serious damage to armor by exploding while still penetrating the armor, causing major fracturing and bending to it. If the round penetrates fully without the explosion happening yet, it will directly explode inside the target as part of its intended result. The affect on ground is almost exactly the same as normal explosive tips, as well as heavier armor, which will often explode even faster as penetration is very little to minimal. AP14-B's weigh about sixty-three grams and have a muzzle velocity of nine-hundred and eighty-two meters per-second. Armor penetration at five-hundred meters is up to thirty-two millimeters of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) at zero degrees. The tracer variant for the AP14-B can burn for two-thousand five-hundred meters.

HE14: The HE14 is a high-explosive full metal jacket incendiary bullet that uses an instant action detonation tip. The intention of the bullet is to explode on impact rather then to penetrate, causing shrapnel and force damage. Although not very capable of penetrating most hard armors - HE14 rounds can easily tear apart flesh, light skinned vehicles, and many aircraft build materials. The goal of this round is to explode upon impact, causing an explosion which sends shrapnel along with explosive force to anything nearby; a perfect example of this concept are proximity fuze rounds (although, these explode on proximity and contact) and artillery shells that explode on contact. For ground targets, HE14's blow apart people on direct hits or explode on surrounding surfaces, sending shrapnel and broken debris onto intended targets - they essentially maim their targets to death using shrapnel and explosive force in order to destroy targets, rather then an instant penetration of one projectile. Against aircraft they often penetrate just before exploding depending on the type of aircraft targeted; aircraft are especially at risk of HE14's as exploding incendiary shrapnel can be deadly as shrapnel could shred the air frame or kill pilots. HE14's weigh about fifty-nine grams and has a muzzle velocity of one-thousand and fourteen meters per-second. A tracer variant of allows for a two-thousand five-hundred meter burn.


SMJ-MAAG: The SMJ-MAAG is a mobile anti-air platform designed in the early 1950's. Since its original creation, the MAAG has seen a variety of enhancements that has modernized the system. An electric powered swivel unit speeds up the engagement of the unit; the electric motor also powers a tracking radar unit that guides the guns to fire on target and ahead of targets. The full use of electronics and motors means troops do not have to manually operate or sit on the platform anymore. Similar to other anti-air platforms operated by TECT, a 'Harpoon' FCS is installed on the unit to enhance the system's accuracy by leaps and bounds rather then using iron sights by default (a set of modern sight has been installed in case the electronics fail). The Harpoon FCS is an independent targeting & solution system that utilizes resources attached to it (a Ku Band radar unit in this case, or if other radar units are connected to the unit) to acquire targets and engage them with accurate "ahead" rounds. Although the system has these updates, the system can be operated manually by operators using simply controllers when set to manual. The platform is mounted on a four wheeled mount that is towed and locked down into place using breaks and locking pins. The SMJ-MAAG mounts up-to four barrels for use and can turn a full 360 degrees to engage targets; ammunition is stored on both sides for each set of guns in large box containers holding over four hundred rounds each. MAAG's can fire up to two-thousand eight-hundred rounds a minute onto target; mounts have varied from emplacements, warships, wheeled mounts, and vehicles. Although modernized, SMJ-MAAG's are not widely used due to being outgunned and having a shorter range then modern SPAAG systems that range from twenty to forty millimeter cannons.

SMJ-AP: The SMJ-AP is a vehicle borne variant of the SMJ; its infantry version is often used by infantry with tripods or other mounts where applicable (tripods or on vehicles, for example). Its version for vehicle use uses an electronic trigger system - it is well known for being used on the Puma Wheeled APC and the Bär Heavy APC as their primary or secondary weapons; on many vehicles it can also be a coaxial weapon or a top mounted weapon system. These armored vehicle systems use a connected belt feed line to storage unit that has one long belt rather then normal operating belts of fifty rounds; infantry operators will often use the standard fifty-round or hundred-round belt box of ammunition that attaches to the infantry version's receiver. This is a single barrel variant that can fire at six-to-seven hundred rounds a minute and be used on a variety of platforms.

SMJ-MP: The Marine Platform is a shorter length, short receiver, variant intended for use on naval ships like boats and warships. Used on small naval ships to larger vessels, it is designed to operate on dual or single mount turret units attached often to feed systems or use ammunition boxes. The Marine variant is popular on small fast moving patrol boats and larger naval vessels for its range and power against incoming targets; the often cool waterfront air helps keep the barrel cool from overheating. MP's have a one-thousand two-hundred and fifty millimeter barrel with a short receiver for decreased profile.

SMJ-ABP: The SMJ Airborne Platform is a modified variant of the original SMJ-AP designed for operation on aircraft. The primary differences between other SMJ-ABP and AP are its receiver build and barrel. ABP's barrel features a cover that's better for air cooling, is shorter in length down to one meter, and has a new barrel break that further relieves pressure on the receiver. Its receiver is modified so that it can mount from its roof and its bottom, is slightly shorter, and has a bolt that speeds up the firing action (firing speed is increased). The ABP fires about eight-hundred rounds a minute, features a one meter improved air cooling design, and can be mounted on vehicles or gunner points. ABP's are used on helicopters, attack planes, and other aircraft platforms.

Simunition Conversion
Conversion kits are available for all models of the SMJ HMG; they include a bolt carrier (partly colored blue to distinguish it), blank-firing adapter for firing blanks, and an upper receiver colored blue to distinguish it for its practice use. The standard kit will also include a laser transmitter for laser combat systems to use; such systems would include individual soldiers carrying small laser receivers scattered over their bodies, which detect when the soldier has been illuminated by a firearm's laser. Each laser transmitter would be set to mimic the effective range and potential damage of the weapon on which it is used. Depending on how complex the laser combat system is, trainers can retrieve immediate results and statistics compiled by the system; such examples include readings that give medics a digital readout to determine which first aid method to practice and probability readouts. Using the conversion kit, the SMJ HMG can seamlessly integrate into these laser combat systems.

Export
The SMJ HMG can be purchased on the Wolf Armaments storefront page.

SMJ-AP: $4,500 NSD per unit.
SMJ-MAAG: $15,000 NSD per unit.
SMJ-MP: $4,200 NSD per unit.
SMJ-ABP: $4,100 NSD per unit.
DPR (All variants): $20 Billion NSD.
Last edited by Common Territories on Fri May 29, 2020 4:38 pm, edited 10 times in total.

User avatar
Common Territories
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Posts: 4319
Founded: Nov 08, 2011
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

SMJ Gatling Series

Postby Common Territories » Sat May 02, 2015 2:01 pm

Image
(TMG test model used by designers.)


Caliber: WA 14.5×114 or 14.5x115 mm.
Weight: 68 kg. (includes feeder and transfer unit).
Length: 1,800 mm.
Barrel(s) length: 1,308 mm.
Feeding system: Belt or linkless feed system.
Rate of fire: 1,000 to 3,000 rounds per minute.
Velocity: 995 m/s.
Range: 4,000 meters (maximum effective range).

The SMJ Gatling Series is a series of Gatling style gun systems derived from the SMJ Heavy Machine Gun. Based off similar twenty millimeter, 14.5 millimeter, and 12.7 millimeter Gatling systems created around the world - SMJ Gatlings are produced in four variants that fire the Wolf Armament 14.5×114 mm (WA 14.5 mm) or the more common Russian 14.5×114 mm. The variants are the Turret Mounted Gatling (TMG) that is used with vehicle turrets, the Vehicle Mounted Gatling (VMG) variant that's mounted onto vehicles, the Aircraft Mounted Gatling (AMG) variant that's utilized on hardpoints for many aircraft, and the Seaborne Mounted Gatling (SMG) variant used on warships of varying scale; a fifth variant special made for the TECT Imperial Air Force and Imperial Army is the Prop-Plane Armament Gatling (PPAG), which is designed for the AT-21B (Commoner AT-21 variant) and other propeller driven airplanes. SMJ Gatlings feature a three barrel design that is driven to rotate by a small electric motor; the motor spins the barrel at fast speeds allowing for a fast rate of fire, cooling of the barrels, and steady stream of accurate projectile fire. Ammunition is either stored in a spiral like box that is fed a long single ammunition belt or linkless connector that feeds ammo from a storage device (a large ammunition container, for example). Since the ejection system shoots extra material bellow the gun, both sides of the gun (right & left) can be used to feed the gun ammunition. The firing mechanism ensures that all barrels are engaging in operation, meaning that while one barrel is firing a projectile, the other two are ejecting and reloading at the same time. As a heavy machine gun based gatling system, the concept of firing is by using gradual bursts rather than continuous fire; this firing scheme increases rate of fire and serves for better heat management.

SMJ Gatlings were designed to improve a heavy machine gun platform's rate of fire and give such platforms heavier firepower. As a support platform, helicopter and vehicle mounted units can provide heavy streams of bullets in support of ground units. In the case of vehicle systems, a SMJ Gatling can serve as their primary weapon system. SMJ Gatlings provide a higher rate of fire which increases the SMJ's rate of fire from six-hundred rpm to about three thousand rpm generally.

Turret Mount Gatling (SMJ-TMG): The TMG variant of the SMJ is a large, turret mounted, gatling style gun-cannon that fires the 14.5×114 mm (WA 14.5 mm) or the standard 14.5×114 mm. It is unique for its barrel length and projectile velocity compared to the rest of the series (about 1,200 m/s). The weight of the TMG is seventy-eight kilograms (total with ammo storage and mount systems) and the barrel length remains nearly the same at 1,355 millimeters long – its additional barrel length compared to other variants grant higher accuracy at longer ranges compared to the much shorter non-cannon variants of the Gatling Series. The TMG has become a popular primary armament for armored vehicles with turrets in the TECT Armed Forces, such as the Puma AFV, primarily for its increased rpm and firepower without sacrificing accuracy; with one to two thousand rounds per minute, the TMG is a vast improvement to the standard SMJ which has a six hundred rpm. Operators fire in bursts for best effective use, though experienced crews who are familiar with the system can utilize longer bursts for more lethal effect rather than concentrated shorter bursts. The TMG should not be mistaken for the VMG variant which is also used on armored vehicles; while the TMG is meant for use as a turret armament, the VMG is a vehicle mounted system instead. TMG variants are mounted as primary armaments for armored vehicles as a turret weapon or as a coaxial weapon system where applicable. The ejection port for extra material is shot out the bottom of the system outside the interior of the vehicle.

Vehicle Mounted Gatling (SMJ-VMG): The VMG variant of the SMJ is a smaller, vehicle mounted, gatling style gun that fires the 14.5×114 mm (WA 14.5 mm) or the standard 14.5×114 mm. VMG mounts use a lighter, more compact build design that act as the Gatling series’ standard variant on a number of platforms; VMGs are used on a variable array of platforms including but not limited to armored vehicles, transport vehicles, boats/water vessels, tripod/other ground mounted positions, and some helicopter platforms. To reach the goal of a much lighter system for standard use, the VMG uses a shorter barrel and condensed main body. The barrel length is nine-hundred and twenty-five millimeters long, weighs sixty-five kilograms, and has a one to two thousand rpm. VMGs are intended for wide usage on multiple vehicle systems in order to bolster the firepower of smaller units and vehicles.

Aircraft Mounted Gatling (SMJ-AMG): The AMG variant is a small, aircraft mounted, gatling style gun/gun pod that fires the 14.5×114 mm (WA 14.5 mm) or the standard 14.5×114 mm. The AMG system is similar to the VMG in that it is a lighter, more compact, and design. Where the differences start is the body construction; the compact body rearranges the exterior components and additionally features a pylon latch system on the roof for attaching to hardpoints on aircraft. The bottom mount is used with door gun placements for helicopters as well (rear, side, etc). AMGs share the same length as the VMG but weighs about four kilograms less. At one to four thousand rpm, the AMG significantly fires at a higher rate than other variants – this is to ensure a higher hit rate on ground targets and allow crews to fire a worthy volley of ammunition per gun run. As an aircraft variant, the VMG is used on multiple aircraft including helicopters and Close Air-Support aircraft; its operation can be used as a door gun position, a turret for a helicopter, and as a gun pod used on aircraft. The ammunition container can hold up to six hundred rounds of ammunition for longer fire missions; coupled with high-explosive fragmentation ammunition and accurate aiming mechanisms, strafing runs can do serious damage against infantry positions and vehicles. Strafing runs using armor piercing ammunition against armored vehicles can produce serous damage as well if the angle of impact is right. Air crews and ground troops often call the AMG the "Hummer Pod" as the gatling gun gives off a load distinct humming noise when firing.

Seaborne Mounted Gatling (SMJ-SMG): The SMG variant of the SMJ is a small, boat/sea vessel mounted, variant of the VMG that is often quad-mounted and fires the 14.5×114 mm (WA 14.5 mm) or the standard 14.5×114 mm. The SMG weighs a total of seventy-eight kilograms with the additional operating system, additional ammo storage unit, and second gun system – its length and other features resemble the earlier VMG and AMG. Mounted on vessels ranging from patrol boats to warships, the SMG is designed to eliminate close-in threats such as speed boats and aircraft; intigrated into a ship's defense network, an automated SMG can be manually or automatically operated by crew as a Close-In Weapon System or 'CIWS'. SMG’s share construction and body design with the VMG but differ in their ammunition storage unit - SMG's posses a dual drum system that holds eight hundred rounds total.

Prop-Plane Armament Gatling (SMJ-PPAG): The PPAG variant of the SMJ is a small, aircraft mounted, gatling style gun pod that fires the 14.5×114 mm (WA 14.5 mm) or the standard 14.5×114 mm. This custom designed variant is a modified AMG system that was designed for the AT-21B – a Commoner version of the A-21 prop-plane. The primary features to this custom design are a redesigned body and ammunition storage unit, longer one-thousand and three hundred millimeter barrels, and the retained high-rate of fire from the AMG. The body uses weight reducing features and space management by redesigning key equipment and adding an ejection system (this includes a new ammunition storage unit, feed system, and gun body). Space for the system was limited because the original design was meant for 12.7 millimeter systems, therefore the aircraft manufacturer had to build additional space for the ammunition storage area so that four hundred rounds could be stored in each pod. On the AT-21B, the PPAG is designed to perform high rates of fire (maximum three thousand round per minute) with coupled accuracy enhancement to conduct close air-support or 'CAS' missions. The primary duty of this plane, and its PPAG, is to perform gun runs on enemy positions rather then just training missions. The AT-21B is widely considered the CAS situated variant while the AT-21AN (the original Commoner AT-21 custom variant) is situated for multirole and CAS uses.

Simunition Conversion
Conversion kits are available for all models of the SMJ Gatling; they include a bolt carrier (partly colored blue to distinguish it), blank-firing adapter for firing blanks, and an upper receiver colored blue to distinguish it for its practice use. The standard kit will also include a laser transmitter for laser combat systems to use; such systems would include individual soldiers carrying small laser receivers scattered over their bodies, which detect when the soldier has been illuminated by a firearm's laser. Each laser transmitter would be set to mimic the effective range and potential damage of the weapon on which it is used. Depending on how complex the laser combat system is, trainers can retrieve immediate results and statistics compiled by the system; such examples include readings that give medics a digital readout to determine which first aid method to practice and probability readouts. Using the conversion kit, the SMJ Gatling can seamlessly integrate into these laser combat systems.
Last edited by Common Territories on Tue Apr 18, 2017 1:58 pm, edited 6 times in total.


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