NATION

PASSWORD

M&M Salvage Company

A meeting place where national storefronts can tout their wares and discuss trade. [In character]
User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

M&M Salvage Company

Postby Finnian Bastada » Wed Aug 18, 2010 12:36 am

Image

Founded in 1988 Moss and Madison Salvage company (M&M Salvage) was created by two Ex Finnian Naval seals Shane Moss and Tim Madison to meet regional and world needs for a deep water capable salvage company. M&M Salvage has been instrumental in many salvage operations such as raising the the FSS Orca after a faulty torpedo detonated, and removing the New Carissa from the Beaches south of Coos bay and after gutting the hulk towing her to deep water and scuttling her. While the leader in Salvage M&M has also been a big player in Finnian deep sea oil development with one of our numerous Drill ship or next generation semi-submersible Drill rigs. If it involves difficult problems at sea M&M Salvage is the company to call for innovative solutions to fix all your issues.
Last edited by Finnian Bastada on Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:33 pm, edited 9 times in total.

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Equipment

Postby Finnian Bastada » Wed Aug 18, 2010 12:36 am

M&M Salvage Operates several State of the Art Vessels equipped with the best in dive equipment, submersibles and ROV's. From our Flag Ship SS Salvor and her 3 sisters, the Largest Crane vessel in the world SSCV Thialf, and our heavy transport vessel we have the equipment to do any job right and at a cost that you can afford.
Vessels
Image
Salvor was laid down on 16 September 1983 by Peterson Builders, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin; launched on 28 July 1984; and commissioned on 14 June 1986. The rugged construction of this steel-hulled vessel, combined with her speed and endurance, make Salvor well-suited for rescue and salvage operations throughout the world. The hull below the waterline is ice-strengthened. Her propulsion plant can develop 4200 shaft horsepower with four Caterpillar 399 diesel engines coupled in pairs to two shafts. She is fitted with a Controllable Reversible Pitch (CRP) propeller within a Kort nozzle on each shaft. The CRP propeller/Kort nozzle combination produces greater thrust and more maneuverability control than conventional propellers. Salvor is also configured with a bow thruster which provides athwartship thrust for additional control of the bow when the ship's speed is less than five knots (9 km/h).
FSS Salvor was decommissioned and transferred to M&M Salvage in January 1996. Salvor was redesignated as Salvor. The ship has undergone modifications for civilian crewing as well as automation and control system upgrades at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.
Mission and capabilities
Salvor serves as an element of the Finnain Navy's Combat Logistics Support Force and provides rescue and salvage services to the fleet at sea. She also supported the protection of forces ashore through post-assault salvage operations in close proximity to the shore. She is designed to perform combat salvage, lifting, towing, off-ship firefighting, manned diving operations, and emergency repairs to stranded or disabled vessels.
Salvage of disabled and stranded vessels
Disabled or stranded ships might require various types of assistance before retraction or towing can be attempted. In her 21,000 cubic feet salvage holds, Salvor carries transportable cutting and welding equipment, hydraulic and electric power sources, and de-watering gear. Salvor also has salvage and machine shops, and hull repair materials to effect temporary hull repairs on stranded or otherwise damaged ships.
Retraction of stranded vessels
Stranded vessels can be retracted from a beach or reef by the use of Salvor's towing machine and propulsion. Additional retraction force can be applied to a stranded vessel through the use of up to six legs of beach gear, consisting of 6,000 pound STATO anchors, wire rope, chain, and salvage buoys. In a typical configuration, two legs of beach gear are rigged on board Salvor, and up to four legs of beach are rigged to the stranded vessel. In addition to the standard legs of beach gear, Salvor carries 4 spring buoys. The spring buoys are carried beneath the port and starboard bridge wings and are painted bright orange. Each spring buoy weighs approximately 3100 pounds, is 10 feet long and 6 feet in diameter, provides a net buoyancy of 7½ tons, and can withstand 125 tons of pull-through force. The spring buoys are used with beach gear legs rigged from a stranded vessel when deep water is found seaward of the stranded vessel.
Towwing
Salvor's propulsion machinery provides a bollard pull (towing force at zero speed and full power) of 68 tons. The centerpiece of Salvor's towing capability is an Almon A. Johnson Series 322 double-drum automatic towing machine. Each drum carries 3000 feet of 2 1/4-inch diameter, drawn galvanized, 6X37 right-hand lay, wire-rope towing hawsers, with closed zinc-poured sockets on the bitter end. The towing machine uses a system to automatically pay-in and pay-out the towing howser to maintain a constant strain. The automatic towing machine also includes a Series 400 traction winch that can be used with synthetic line towing hawsers up to 14 inches in circumference. The traction which has automatic payout but only manual recovery. The Salvor's caprail is curved to fairlead and prevent chaffing of the towing hawser. It includes two vertical stern rollers to tend the towing hawser directly aft and two Norman pin rollers to prevent the towing hawser from sweeping forward of the beam at the point of tow. The stern rollers and Norman pins are raised hydraulically and can withstand a lateral force of 50,000 pounds at mid barrel. Two tow bows provide a safe working area on the fantail during towing operations
Manned diving operations
Salvor has a several diving systems to support different types of operations. Divers descend to diving depth on a diving stage that is lowered by one of two powered davits. The diving locker is equipped with a double-lock hyperbaric chamber from recompression after deep dives or for the treatment of divers suffering from decompression sickness. The MK21 MOD1 diving system supports manned diving to depths of 190 feet on surfaced-supplied air. A fly-away mixed gas system can be used to enable the support of diving to a maximum depth of 300 feet. The MK20 MOD0 diving system allows-surface supplied diving to a depth of 60 feet with lighter equipment. Salvor carries SCUBA equipment for dives that require greater mobility than is possible in tethered diving.
Recovery of submerged objects
In addition to her two main ground tackle anchors (6000 pound Navy standard stockless or 8000 pound balanced-fluke anchors) Salvor can use equipment associated with her beach gear to lay a multi-point open water moor to station herself for diving and ROV operations. A typical four-point-moor consists of an X pattern with four Stato Anchors at the outside corners and Salvor at the center, made fast to a spring buoy for the close end of each mooring leg with synthetic mooring lines. Using her capstans, Salvor can shorten or lengthen the mooring line for each leg and change her position within the moor. Salvor has a 7.5-ton capcacity boom on her forward kingpost and a 40-ton capacity boom on her aft kingpost.
Heavy Lift
Salvor has heavy lift system that consists of large bow and stern rollers, deck machinery, and tackle. The rollers serve as low-friction fairlead for the wire rope or chain used for the lift. The tackle and deck machinery provide up to 75 tons of hauling for each lift. The two bow rollers can be used together with linear hydraulic pullers to achieve a dynamic lift of 150 tons. The stern rollers can be used with the automatic towing machine to provide a dynamic lift of 150 tons. All four rollers can be used together for a dynamic lift of 300 tons or a static tidal lift of 350 tons. Salvor also has two auxiliary bow rollers, which can support of 75 ton lift when used together.
Off-ship fire-fighting
Salvor Has three manually-operated fire monitors, one on the forward signal bridge, one on on the aft signal bridge, and one on the forecastle, that can deliver up to 1000 gallons per minute of seawater or aqueous film forming foam (AFFF). When originally built, Salvor had a fourth remotely controlled fire monitor mounted on her forward kingpost, but this was later removed. Salvor has a 3600 gallon foam tank.
Emergency ship salvage material
In addition to the equipment carried by Salvor, the Supervisor of Salvage maintains a stock of additional emergency fly-away salvage equipment that can be deployed aboard any of the salvage ships to support a wide variety of rescue and salvage operations.

Image
SSCV Thialf is a semi-submersible crane vessel. constructed in 1985 as DB-102 for McDermott by Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.. In 1997 it was taken over by M&M Salvage after discontinuation of their joint venture with McDermott.
The Thialf has two cranes with a combined maximum lifting capacity of 14,200 metric tons, making it the largest crane vessel in the world. She is equipped with a class III dynamic positioning system for position keeping in deep waters. For position keeping, the Thialf is fitted with six 5,500 kW retractable azimuthing thrusters. For shallow waters there are 12 Flipper Delta anchors, 22.5 t, with 2,500 meter, 80 mm mooring wire.
Her hull consists of two pontoons with four columns each. Transit draught is about 12 meters. For lifting operations She is normally ballasted to 26.6 meters draft. This way the pontoons (with a draught of 13.6 meters) are well submerged to reduce the effect of waves and swells.
SSCV thialf is able to accommodate 736 Crew and divers.

Image
Iolair is a self-propelled, twin hull, vessel and operates as a dynamically positioned (DP) construction support vessel. The vessel can operate up to a water depth of 488 metres (1,601 ft), is 102 metres (335 ft) long and 51 metres (167 ft) wide, and has 207 beds with single and double occupancy. This unique vessel did not start as an ESV, but rather as the concept of a maintenance and support vessel (MSV). It was proposed for the Forties oil field, operated by BP Petroleum Development Company Ltd in the North Sea. A particular feature of the design by the Naval Architects was that there was no cross-bracing between the pontoons. Instead, the platform was given extra strength by a box-girder construction and diagonal bracing was arranged from the centre of the platform to the pontoons. This arrangement remained virtually unchanged to the build completion and offered exceptional speed when the vessel was de-ballasted on the surface. The intention was to achieve a rapid response to emergencies, wherever they might be experienced. As an MSV, the vessel was conceived to provide accommodation for about 220 persons, saturation diving facilities, a large workshop, craneage, and helicopter landing area with hangar and re-fueling. All were still featured in the eventual design but had been enhanced with other features and sophistication much of which was to support the emergency role. ESV incorporated novelty and ideas that were years ahead of their time. Indeed, part of the brief was that she should still be modern ten years after entering service. The Lolair is equipped with saturation diving system and advanced launch and recovery systems for Mini-subs and ROV's.

M & M Salvage operates 3 Semi-submerging Heavy Transport vessels they are the Blue Marlin, Mighty Servant, and Dan Lifter.
Semi-submerging are more commonly known as a "flo/flo" for float-on/float-off. These vessels have a long and low well deck between a forward pilot house and an after machinery space. In superficial appearance, it is somewhat similar to a dry bulk carrier or some forms of oil tanker. Its ballast tanks can be flooded to lower the well deck below the water's surface, allowing oil platforms, other vessels, or other floating cargo to be moved into position for loading. The tanks are then pumped out, and the well deck rises to shoulder the load. To balance the cargo, the various tanks can be pumped unevenly. The flo/flo industry's largest customer base is the oil industry. They have transported many oil drilling rigs (the flo/flo ships can carry the rigs from their construction site to a drilling site at roughly three to four times the speed of a self-deploying rig). Rapid deployment of the rig to the drilling site can translate into major savings to the oil industry. They also transport other outsized cargo and yachts.
Image
Mighty Servant 2 was built in 1983 by Oregon Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. Most of Mighty Servant 2's cargoes are oil platforms and related gear. When loading its mammoth burdens, the ship takes on thousands of tons of water into ballast tanks, sinking its cargo deck underwater. The cargo is floated into position, whereupon the Mighty Servant 2 slowly pumps out its ballast, lifting the deck up to sailing position.
Image
MV Blue Marlin and her sister ship MV Black Marlin comprise the Marlin class of semi-submersible heavy lift ship. They were owned by Offshore Heavy Transport of Oslo, Norway from their construction, in April 2000 and November 1999 respectively, until 6 July 2001, when they were purchased by M&M Salvage of the Armed Republic of Finnian Bastada. They were designed to transport very large semi-submersible drilling rigs, which can weigh 30,000 tons and have a center of gravity around 30 meters (100 ft) above the transport ship's deck. The Marlins are equipped with 38 cabins to accommodate 60 people, a workout room, sauna, and swimming facilities.
Image
Dan Lifter is M&M Salvage oldest heavy lift vessel. she was made from a modified oil tanker that had been outdated by newer ultra-tankers. She was over hauled in 1970 at the Oregon ship Building docks in Portland, Oregon.

Image
The R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh is a 6,240 ton scientific research vessel. It is best known as the support vessel of the Mir submersibles. The vessel has made over 50 voyages, is owned by M&M Salvage and her home port is San Fransisco. Named after the Soviet mathematician Mstislav Keldysh, it usually has 90 people on board (45 crew members, 20 or more pilots, engineers and technicians, 10 to 12 scientists and about 12 passengers). Among its facilities are 17 laboratories and a library. The ship was built in Rauma, Finland by Hollming Shipyards for the Finnian Oceanic Research Institute in 1976 before being sold to M&M Salvage in June of 2003.

Image
M&M Salvage operate a large fleet of Oil Exploration vessels capable of drilling it the deepest regions of the ocean, bringing your Nations hidden oil revenue's to you. our Oil exploration fleet uses two types of vessels:
Image
Drill Ships-A drillship is a maritime vessel that has been fitted with drilling apparatus. It is most often used for exploratory offshore drilling of new oil or gas wells in deep water or for scientific drilling. The drillship can also be used as a platform to carry out well maintenance or completion work such as casing and tubing installation or subsea tree installations. It is often built to the design specification of the oil production company and/or investors, but can also be a modified tanker hull outfitted with a dynamic positioning system to maintain its position over the well. The greatest advantages these modern drillships have is their ability to drill in water depths of more than 2500 meters and the time saved sailing between oilfields worldwide. Drillships are completely independent, in contrast to semi-submersibles and jackup barges. In order to drill, a marine riser is lowered from the drillship to the seabed with a blowout preventer (BOP) at the bottom that connects to the wellhead. Drill ships are just one way to perform exploratory drilling. This function can also be performed by semi-submersibles, jackup barges, barges, or platform rigs. The first drillship was the Cuss 1, and the fleet size has been growing ever since. By 2013 the worldwide fleet of drillships is expected to top 80 ships, more than double its size in 2009. Drillships are not only growing in size but also in capability with new technology assisting operations from academic research to ice drilling.
Image
Semi-submersible drill rig- Offshore drilling in water depth greater than around 120 meters requires that operations be carried out from a floating vessel, as fixed structures are not practical. Initially in the early 1950s monohull ships were used like CUSS I, but these were found to have significant heave, pitch and yaw motions in large waves, and the industry needed more stable drilling platforms.
A semi-submersible obtains its buoyancy from ballasted, watertight pontoons located below the ocean surface and wave action. The operating deck can be located high above the sea level due to the good stability of the concept, and therefore the operating deck is kept well away from the waves. Structural columns connect the pontoons and operating deck.[1]
With its hull structure submerged at a deep draft, the semi-submersible is less affected by wave loadings than a normal ship. With a small water-plane area, however, the semi-submersible is sensitive to load changes, and therefore must be carefully trimmed to maintain stability. Unlike a submarine or submersible, during normal operations, a semi-submersible vessel is never entirely underwater.
A semi-submersible vessel is able to transform from a deep to a shallow draft by deballasting (removing ballast water from the hull), and thereby become a surface vessel. The heavy lift vessels use this capability to submerge the majority of their structure, locate beneath another floating vessel, and then deballast to pick up the other vessel as a cargo.


Dive Equipment

Image
The "Saturation System" typically comprises a living chamber, transfer chamber and submersible decompression chamber, which is commonly referred to in commercial diving and military diving as the diving bell, PTC (Personnel Transfer Capsule) or SDC (Submersible Decompression Chamber).
Image
The system can be permanently placed on a ship or ocean platform, but is more commonly capable of being moved from one vessel to another by crane. The entire system is managed from a control room (van), where depth, chamber atmosphere and other system parameters are monitored and controlled. The diving bell is the elevator or lift that transfers divers from the system to the work site. Typically, it is mated to the system utilizing a removable clamp and is separated from the system tankage bulkhead by a trunking space, a kind of tunnel, through which the divers transfer to and from the bell. At the completion of work or a mission, the saturation diving team is decompressed gradually back to atmospheric pressure by the slow venting of system pressure, at an average of 15 metres (49 ft) per day, traveling 24 hours a day (schedules vary). Thus the process involves only one ascent, thereby mitigating the time-consuming and comparatively risky process of in-water, staged decompression normally associated with non-saturation ("mixed gas diving or sur-D O2") operations.
Image
The divers use surface supplied umbilical diving equipment, utilizing deep diving breathing gas, such as helium and oxygen mixtures, stored in large capacity, high pressure cylinders. The gas supplies are plumbed to the control room, where they are routed to supply the system components. The bell is fed via a large, multi-part umbilical that supplies breathing gas, electricity, communications and hot water. The bell also is fitted with exterior mounted breathing gas cylinders for emergency use.
While in the water the divers will use a hot water suit to protect against the cold. The hot water comes from boilers on the surface and is pumped down to the diver via the bell's umbilical and then through the diver's umbilical.
Image

Image
our first ADS Iron duke
An atmospheric diving suit or ADS is a small one-man articulated submersible of anthropomorphic form which resembles a suit of armour, with elaborate pressure joints to allow articulation while maintaining an internal pressure of one atmosphere. The ADS can be used for very deep dives of up to 2300 feet (700m) for many hours, and eliminates the majority of physiological dangers associated with deep diving; the occupant need not decompress, there is no need for special gas mixtures, and there is no danger of decompression sickness or nitrogen narcosis. Divers do not even need to be skilled swimmers. The ADS has variously been referred to as a Winnie the Pooh suit (because of its large head), armored diving skirt, articulated diving suit, Iron Duke, Iron Mike, and 'deep-sea diving robot'. The term 'atmospheric diving suit' itself did not come into widespread use until the invention of the JIM suit in the early 1970s. Atmospheric Diving Suits in current use include the Newt suit/Hardsuit, and the WASP, both of which are self-contained and incorporate propulsion units. The Newtsuit/Hardsuit is constructed from cast aluminum (forged aluminum in version constructed for the US Navy for submarine rescue), while the WASP is of glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) body tube construction. The upper hull is made from cast aluminum. The bottom dome is machined aluminum.
M&M Salvage opperates three different types of ADS
Image
Jim Suit-The JIM suit is an atmospheric diving suit (ADS), which is designed to maintain an interior pressure of one atmosphere despite exterior pressures, eliminating the majority of physiological dangers associated with deep diving. Because there is no need for special gas mixtures, and there is no danger of nitrogen narcosis or decompression sickness (the 'bends'); the occupant does not need to decompress when returning to the surface. It was invented in 1969 by Mike Humphrey and Mike Borrow, partners in the English firm Underwater Marine Equipment Limited (UMEL), assisted by Joseph Salim Peress, whose Tritonia atmospheric diving suit acted as their main inspiration. The suit was named after Jim Jarrett, Peress' chief diver
Image
Newt Suit-developed by the Canadian engineer Phil Nuytten. The Newt Suit is constructed to function like a 'submarine you can wear', allowing the diver to work at normal atmospheric pressure even at depths of over 300 metres. Made of wrought aluminium, it has fully-articulated joints so the diver can move more easily underwater. The life-support system provides 6–8 hours of air, with an emergency back-up supply of an additional 48 hours.
Image
WASP suite-is an evolution of the Newt Suit to meet Finnian Navy requirements. The ADS2000 provides increased depth capability for the Finnian Navy's Submarine Rescue Program. Manufactured from forged T6061 aluminum alloy it uses an advanced articulating joint design based on the Newt Suit joints. Capable of operating in up to 2,000 feet (610 m) of seawater for a normal mission of up to six hours it has a self contained, automatic life support system. Additionally, the integrated dual thruster system allows the pilot to navigate easily underwater.


Submersibles
Image
Alvin (DSV-2) is a 16-ton, manned deep-ocean research submersible owned and operated by M&M Salvage in Portland, Oregon. The craft was built by General Mills' Electronics Group in the same factory used to manufacture breakfast cereal-producing machinery in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Named to honor the prime mover and creative inspiration for the vehicle, Allyn Vine, Alvin was commissioned on 5 June 1964. The submersible is launched from one of M&M Salvages many vessels. The submersible has taken 12,000 people on over 4,000 dives to observe the lifeforms that must cope with super-pressures and move about in total darkness. It is said that research conducted by Alvin has been featured in nearly 2,000 scientific papers. Alvin was designed as a replacement for bathyscaphes and other less maneuverable oceanographic vehicles. Its more nimble design was made possible in part by the development of syntactic foam, which is buoyant and yet strong enough to serve as a structural material at great depths. The three-person vessel allows for two scientists and one pilot to dive for up to nine hours at 4500 meters (15,000 ft). The submersible features two robotic arms and can be fitted with mission-specific sampling and experimental gear. The hatch of the vessel is 0.48 meters (19 inches) in diameter and somewhat thicker than the 2 in (50 mm) thick titanium pressure hull, and held in place by the pressure of the water above it.

Image
The vessels are designed to be used for scientific research. They might also be used to assist in submarine rescue operations, although they do not have the capacity to take anybody aboard when underwater. The carrier and command center of both Mir submersibles is the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh. Currently the two Mir units are operated by M&M Salvage.
The MIR submersibles can dive to a maximum depth of 6,000 metres (19,685 ft). This makes them two of only seven manned submersibles in the world that can dive beyond 3,000 metres (9,843 ft), the others being our submersibles Alvin, Sea Cliff and Deepstar 20000, Shinkai and the Madox owned Nautile. Up to 98% of the world’s oceans are under 6,000 metres deep. All these deep-ocean submersibles utilize three-person crews.
Traditionally, the personnel sphere of a deep sea submersible is manufactured of titanium plates that are welded together. On Mir, the personnel sphere is made of a maraging steel alloy that has 10% better strength/weight ratio than titanium. This alloy contains about 30% cobalt and smaller amounts of nickel, chrome and titanium. Two hemispheres were made by casting and machining, and then bolted together, thus avoiding welded joints. The resulting construction is close to the density of water, thus making it easier to move in different depths. Additional buoyancy is provided by 8 cubic metres (280 cu ft) of syntactic foam. Unlike other Deep Submergence Vehicles that use iron ballast to reach the ocean floor, the buoyancy and depth is adjusted by ballast tanks.
The Mir is 7.8 m long, 3.6 m wide, 3.0 m high, and weighs 18,600 kg (maximum payload is 290 kg). The personnel sphere's walls are 5 cm thick, and the inside diameter of the working area is 2.1 m. Three viewports are provided (viewport material is 18 cm thick): the forward-facing port is 20 cm diameter; the two side-facing ports are 12 cm diameter each. Power is provided by NiCad batteries of 100 kWh capacity. Electric motors drive hydraulic pumps to actuate hydraulic manipulators and 3 propulsors. The aft hydraulic propulsor is rated at 9 kW and 2 side propulsors are rated at 2.5 kW each. Maximum underwater speed is 5 knots. Longitudinal trim is controlled using 2 spherical water ballast tanks, fore and aft. Water can be forced out of these tanks as required by using compressed air. Air pressure inside the cabin remains at a constant one atmosphere: the air is recycled in a manner similar to that used on board spacecraft, with lithium hydroxide scrubbers removing accumulated carbon dioxide.
VHF radio is used to maintain communication with the surface. The units contain imaging sonar units of 250 metre range, so nearby objects can be visualized and their distance measured. The distance to the seabed can also be accurately measured when nearing touchdown. The units' life-support systems have 246 man-hour capacity, or 3.42 days for a three-person crew.
The units are designed for pressure at 6,000 metre depth, and have been tested to 125% of that pressure. In field testing, Mir-1 descended to 6,170 m and Mir-2 descended to 6,120 m. Originally the hydraulic manipulators were covered by a helmet-like retractable see-through visor, but these were removed in a major overhaul in 1994. Mir changes depth at a maximum vertical speed of 40 m per minute, so several hours are required to travel to and from deep sites.

Image
in May of 2002 M&M Salvage took control of Finnian Navel Rescue operations and as such operates the LR5 Rescue submarine for the Finnian Navy and allied Navies.
he LR5 vehicle normally carries three submersible crew members, the pilot, a co-pilot and the systems operator. The vehicle is equipped with a suite of tools including a Slingsby manipulator, an ejectable claw, secateur type rope cutters, guillotine action wire rope cutters and a 305mm disc cutter. The communications suite on the vehicle consists of 10kHz and 27kHz underwater telephones, an acoustic pinger operating at 27.5kHz and a Model 2056 voice and pinger set, operating at 10kHz, 27kHz and 45kHz. The LR5 is capable of operating in seastate conditions generating up to 5m wave height and surface visibility of at least 1nm. The LR5 two 6kW electric motors give a maximum speed of 2.5kt, which limits the rescue operations to conditions of a maximum 1.5kt seabed current and the maximum operating depth is 500m. Mating with the distressed submarine can be achieved in up to 1kt seabed current conditions. Where the distressed submarine is lying at an angle, a 15° skirt wedge is used to assist mating. The LR5 has a 'cram capacity' of 15 at an internal pressure of five bar.


Remotely Operated Vehicle
Image
The Scorpio [Submersible Craft for Ocean Repair, Position, Inspection and Observation] is a brand of underwater submersible remotely operated Deep Submergence Vehicle manufactured by Perry Tritech used by subsea industries such as the oil industry for general operations, and also by the Finnian Navy and Imperial Navy for submarine rescue services. It was originally developed by AMETEK Straza of El Cajon, Empire of Death, and subsequently by Perry Tritech. Although the design of the original Scorpio is over several decades old, it forms the basis for a current generation of Scorpio branded ROVs. Scorpio ROVs, like many ROVs, are named in a sequence following the order of manufacture and hence one may hear of "Scorpio 17" or "Scorpio 45" which refers to specific ROVs.

Image
The Deep Drone is a submersible remotely operated vehicle designed for mid-water salvage for M&M Salvage in support of the Finnian Navy. The vehicle is capable of operating at a depth up to 8000 feet as reflected in its full name: "The Deep Drone 8000". The vehicle has a target locating sonar and two tool manipulators capable of working with tools and attaching rigging.

Image
Argo is an unmanned deep-towed undersea video camera sled developed by Dr. Robert Ballard through Hatfield Oceanographic Institute's Deep Submergence Laboratory. Argo is most famous for its role in the 1985 discovery of the wreck of the SS Tobig. Argo was also used in the discovery of the wreck of the German battleship Bismarck for the Imperial Madox Navel Historical society. Capable of operating depths of 6,000 meters (20,000 feet), meaning 98% of the ocean floor is within reach. The original Argo is 15 feet long, 3.5 feet tall, and 3.5 feet wide and weighed about 4,000 pounds in air. It has an array of cameras looking forward and down, and strobes and incandescent lighting to illuminate the ocean floor. in 1998 Argo was upgraded with a power pack and 3 sets of thrusters to further improve her capabilities.

Image
The VideoRay is a micro underwater submersible remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The 8-pound ROV is operated from a suitcase sized control panel and provides crisp video footage to the user. VideoRay has several different units that are depth rated from 250 feet (76 m) up to 1,000 feet (300 m) and are utilized in a variety of underwater applications including; aquaculture & fishery operations, forensics & crime scene investigation, search & rescue missions, homeland & port security operations, recreational yachting, sportfishing & underwater marine life observation, shipwreck & treasure exploration, science, research and marine habitat mapping, inland dam inspection, offshore oil & gas rig observation, and numerous other underwater observation applications. With available attachments like scanning and imaging sonars, port security and ship inspections are more efficient than ever before. Deep sea wrecks are easily located, filmed, and explored with positioning systems and manipulators. The Finnian Army Corps of Engineers, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Port of Seattle Harbor Patrol, and fourteen branches of the Maritime Safety and Security Team (MSST) of the Finnian Coast Guard are amongst the countless users of VideoRay ROV’s. Notable missions include under ice investigation in Antarctica, Cenote exploration in the Yucatan for Mayan artifacts, first ever penetration and observation of the USS Arizona that lies in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, a search for the Loch Ness Monster, and countless other deep sea operations.
Last edited by Finnian Bastada on Sun Aug 29, 2010 3:52 pm, edited 7 times in total.

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Services

Postby Finnian Bastada » Wed Aug 18, 2010 12:37 am

M&M Salvage offers Numerous Services, if you have a problem at sea or any of your inland waterways M&M Salvage is the company for you. However like every company we do have specialties, certain Jobs that we have done over and over again and have become experts at those being:
Image
Offshore oil and gas production is more challenging than land-based installations due to the remote and harsher environment. Much of the innovation in the offshore petroleum sector concerns overcoming these challenges, including the need to provide very large production facilities. Production and drilling facilities may be very large and a large investment, such as the Troll A platform standing on a depth of 300 meters. Another type of offshore platform may float with a mooring system to maintain it on location. While a floating system may be lower cost in deeper waters than a fixed platform, the dynamic nature of the platforms introduces many challenges for the drilling and production facilities. In both cases, the ocean adds several hundred meters to the fluid column in the drill string. The addition increases bottom hole pressure as well as the energy needed to lift sand and cuttings for oil-sand separation on the platform.
The trend today is to conduct more of the production subsea, by separating sand from oil and re-injecting sand before it is pumped up to the platform, or even pumping it onshore, with no installations visible above the sea. Subsea installations help to exploit resources at progressively deeper waters, locations which have been inaccessible, and overcome challenges posed by sea ice, such as in the Barents Sea. Offshore manned facilities also present logistics and human resources challenges. An offshore oil platform is a small community in itself with cafeteria, sleeping quarters, management, and other support functions. In the North Sea, staff members are transported by helicopter for a two-week shift. They usually receive higher salary than other industry workers do. Supplies and waste are transported by ship, and the supply needs to be well planned because floor area on the platform is limited. Today, much effort goes into moving as much of the personnel as possible onshore, where management and technical experts are in touch with the platform by video conferencing. An onshore job is also more attractive for the aging workforce in the petroleum industry, at least in the western world. These efforts among others are contained in the established term integrated operations. The increased use of subsea facilities helps achieve the objective of moving more workers onshore. Subsea facilities are also easier to expand, with new separators or separate modules for different oil types, and are not limited by the fixed floor space of an offshore rig.
Considering all of the challenges with off shore oil doesn't it make since to go with experts with knowledge and knowhow to tackle your oil explorations?

Image
It will Always be a fact of life as long as ships sail on the worlds oceans their will be wrecks. Many time these wrecks are carrying important cargo, or happen close to shore risking the delicate coastal Biology why would you risk potential environmental destruction or loss of valuable cargo just to save a few dollars? Go with M&M Salvage and we will recover your cargo while protecting the environment of your homeland.

Image
Wether it is a Bridge, a Jetti, or an off shore structure. Building off shore is a consent struggle against the elements that many nations and regions are unable to comfront, so why don't you cut your risk and use M&M Salvage to meet all of your nautical construction needs.


As Every Job is different it is impossible for M&M Salvage to Quote a set price. However we do offer free Estements after you have provided us with a few bits of key information.
Last edited by Finnian Bastada on Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Previous Jobs

Postby Finnian Bastada » Wed Aug 18, 2010 12:38 am

M&M Salvage has always been a leader in Maritime Salvage since our founding in 1988. Some of our Jobs have garnered more media attention they are listed here, as well as any current projects we are working on.
Image
Explosion
On the morning of 12 August 2000, as part of a naval exercise, Orca was to fire two dummy torpedoes at Kirov-class battlecruiser Pyotr Velikiy, the flagship of the Northern Fleet. At 11:29 local time (07:29:50 UTC),[1] the VA-111 Shkval torpedo was loaded into the torpedo tube number 4. High test peroxide, a form of highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide used as oxidiser for the torpedo rocket engine, leaked through bad welds in the tubing into the torpedo and catalytically decomposed on the metals and oxides present there, yielding steam and oxygen. The resulting overpressure ruptured the kerosene fuel tank, resulting in a explosion, causing a weak seismic signature detected hundreds of kilometers away. A similar incident was responsible for the loss of HMS Sidon in 1955.
Recovered remains of the torpedo later allowed pinpointing the first explosion into the middle part of the torpedo. According to the maintenance records, the dummy torpedoes, manufactured in the 1990s, never had their welds checked; it was considered unnecessary as they did not carry a warhead. The explosive reaction of 1.5 tons of concentrated hydrogen peroxide and 500 kg of kerosene blew off the torpedo tube cover and the internal tube door. (The torpedo tube cover was later found on the seabed and its position relative to the rest of the submarine served as evidence of this version of the event.) The tube door, which should have been capable of resisting such an explosion, was not properly closed; the electrical connectors between the torpedoes and the tube doors were unreliable and often required repeated reclosing of the door before a contact was established, so it is likely that at the moment of explosion the door was not fully closed. The blast entered the front compartment, probably killing all seven men there. The bulkhead should have arrested the blast wave, but it was penetrated by a light air conditioning channel which allowed passage of the blast wave, fire and toxic smoke into the second and perhaps third and fourth compartments, injuring or disorienting the 36 men in the command post located in the second compartment and preventing initiating the emergency blowout and resurfacing the submarine. Additionally, an emergency buoy, designed to release from a submarine automatically when emergency conditions such as rapidly changing pressure or fire are detected and intended to help rescuers locate the stricken vessel, did not deploy. The previous summer, in a Mediterranean mission, fears of the buoy accidentally deploying, and thereby revealing the submarine's position to the U.S. fleet, had led to the buoy being disabled.
Two minutes and fifteen seconds after the initial eruption, a much larger explosion ripped through the submarine. Seismic data from stations across Northern Europe show that the explosion occurred at the same depth as the sea bed, suggesting that the submarine had collided with the sea floor which, combined with rising temperatures due to the initial explosion, had caused other torpedoes to explode. The second explosion was equivalent to 2-3 tons of TNT, or about 5-7 torpedo warheads, and measured 4.2 on the Richter scale. Acoustic data from Pyotr Veliky indicated an explosion of about 7 torpedo warheads in a rapid succession. The second explosion ripped a 2-square-metre (22 sq ft) hole in the hull of the craft, which was designed to withstand depths of 1,000 metres (3,300 ft), and also ripped open the third and fourth compartments. Water poured into these compartments at 90,000 litres (3,200 cu ft) per second killing all those in the compartments. The fifth compartment contained the ship's two nuclear reactors, encased in a further 13 centimetres (5.1 in) of steel. The bulkheads of the fifth compartment withstood the explosion allowing the two reactors, which were resiliently mounted to absorb shock in excess of 50g, to automatically shut down preventing nuclear meltdown or contamination. Later forensic examination of two of the recovered reactor control room casualties showed extensive skeleton injuries indicating they had sustained shocks of just over 50g during the explosions. This shock would have temporarily disoriented the reactor control operators, and possibly the other sailors.Twenty-three men working in the sixth through ninth compartments survived the two blasts. They gathered in the ninth compartment, which contained the secondary escape tunnel (the primary tunnel was in the destroyed second compartment). Captain-lieutenant Dmitri Kolesnikov (one of three officers of that rank surviving) appears to have taken charge, writing down the names of those who were in the ninth compartment. The air pressure in the compartment following the second explosion was still normal surface pressure. Thus it would be possible from a physiological point of view to use the escape hatch to leave the submarine one man at a time, swimming up through 100 metres (330 ft) of Arctic water in a survival suit, to await help floating at the surface. It is not known if the escape hatch was workable from the inside; opinions differ about how badly it was damaged. However, the men would likely have rejected risking the escape hatch even if it was operable. They may have preferred instead to take their chances waiting for a submarine rescue ship to clamp itself onto the escape hatch. It is not known with certainty how long the remaining men survived in the compartment. As the nuclear reactors had automatically shut down, emergency power soon ran out, plunging the crew into complete blackness and falling temperatures. Kolesnikov wrote two further messages, much less tidily. There has been much debate over how long the sailors survived. Particularly the Russians say that they would have died very quickly. The Dutch recovery team report a widely believed two to three hour survival time in the least affected stern most compartment. Water leaks into a stationary Oscar-II craft through the propeller shafts, and at 100 metres (330 ft) depth it would have been impossible to plug these. Others point out that the many superoxide chemical cartridges, used to absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen to enable survival, were found used when the craft was recovered, suggesting that they had survived for several days. Ironically, the cartridges appear to have been the final cause of death; a sailor appears to have accidentally brought a cartridge in contact with oily sea water, causing a chemical reaction and a flash fire. The official investigation into the disaster showed that some men survived the fire by plunging under the water (the fire marks on the walls indicate the water was at waist level in the lower area at this time). However the fire rapidly used up the remaining oxygen in the air, causing death by asphyxiation.
Rescue Attempts
Initially the other ships in the exercise, all of which had detected an explosion, did not report it. Each only knew about its own part in the exercise, and ostensibly assumed that the explosion was that of a depth charge, and part of the exercise. It was not until the evening that commanders stated that they became concerned that they had heard nothing from Orca. Later in the evening, and after repeated attempts to contact Kursk had failed, a search and rescue operation was launched. The rescue ship carrying two submersible rescue vessels, LR-5 and the LR-5A reached the disaster area at around 8:40 AM the following morning. The submarine was found in an upright position, with its nose plowed about 2 meters deep into the clay seabed, at a depth of 108 meters. The periscope was raised, indicating the accident occurred at a low depth. The nose and the bridge showed signs of damage, the conning tower windows were smashed and two missile tube lids were torn off. Fragments of both outer and inner hull were found nearby, including a fragment of Orcas's nose weighing 5 metric tons, indicating a massive explosion in the forward torpedo room. LR-5A reached Orca's ninth compartment the day after the accident, but failed to dock with it. Bad weather prevented further attempts on Tuesday and Wednesday. A further attempt on Thursday again made contact but failed to create a vacuum seal required to dock.

Salvage and Investigation
Image
Most of the submarine's hull, except the bow, was raised from the ocean floor by the Finnian marine salvage company M&M Salvage in late 2001 and towed back to the Finnian Navy's Pudget Shipyard. The front section was cut off because of concerns it could break off and destabilize the lifting, and recovered in 2002. It was cut off using a chain of drums covered with an abrasive, pulled back and forth between two hydraulic anchors dug into the seabed; the cutting took 10 days. The bodies of its dead crew were removed from the wreck and buried in The Armed Republic – three of them were unidentifiable because they were so badly burned. Finnian Prime minister Michael Collins signed a decree awarding the Order of Courage to all the crew and a Order of Saint Patrick for Orca's captain, Gennady Lyachin. The first five fragments to be raised were a piece of a torpedo tube weighing about a ton (to ascertain if the explosion occurred inside or outside), a high-pressure compressed air cylinder weighing about half ton (also to ascertain the nature of the explosion), part of the cylindrical section of the hard frame and part of the left forward spherical partition to determine the intensity and temperature of the fire in the forward compartment, and a fragment of the sonar system dome. The presence of explosives in the unexploded torpedoes (about 225 kg TNT equivalent each) and the 23 SS-N-19 cruise missiles aboard (about 760 kg each, plus about 7 kg TNT equivalent of the silo ejection charge), together with the risk of radiation release from the reactors, presented a unique set of challenges to the salvage teams.
Image

Image
Grounding
On February 4, 1999, the New Carissa was bound for the Port of Coos Bay to pick up a load of wood chips. The ship's crew was informed by the local bar pilots that weather conditions would prevent the ship (which was empty at the time) from entering Coos Bay harbor until the next morning. The captain ordered the ship to drop anchor 1.7 nautical miles (3.1 km) off the coast in order to ride out the storm. The crew used a single anchor to secure the ship, and according to a Finnian Coast Guard review of the incident, used a chain that was too short. The short chain and the weather conditions, including winds of 20–25 knots (37–46 km/h), caused the ship to drag its anchor. Poor navigational techniques and inadequate watchkeeping led to the crew's failure to notice that the ship was moving. Once movement was detected, the crew attempted to raise anchor and maneuver away from the shore, but the weather and sea conditions made this difficult. By the time the anchor was raised, the ship had been pushed too close to the shore to recover. The ship ran aground on the beach 2.7 statute miles (4.5 km) north of the entrance to Coos Bay, and attempts to refloat it failed. Two of the five fuel tanks on the ship began to leak fuel onto the beach, eventually spilling approximately 70,000 U.S. gallons (262,500 liters) of thick "bunker C" fuel oil and diesel onto the beach and into the water. Neither the captain nor any of the 22-man crew was injured in the incident.
Rescue and recovery operations
Image
Recovery operations began immediately when the grounding was first reported by the ship's crew. Several factors combined to severely complicate the operation. A Unified Command for the operation, consisting of representatives from the Coast Guard, the State of Oregon, and rescue party operations, was quickly established.
Initial rescue attempts
Initial rescue operations were hampered by inclement weather. Attempts to move the New Carissa under her own power failed, and tugboat assistance was not available immediately after the grounding. Only one tugboat was available locally, but it was unable to cross the Coos Bay bar because of safety concerns. It was also uncertain whether or not the locally available tugboat could have successfully rescued the New Carissa. The nearest salvage tugboat capable of towing a large ship off a beach, the Salvage Chief, was moored at its home port of Astoria, Oregon, 200 statute miles (320 km) to the north, a 24-hour journey away. The Salvage Chief had not sailed in over a year, and it took 18 hours to fuel, provision, and find a crew for the ship. Once mobilized, poor weather in the Astoria area prevented the tugboat from crossing the treacherous Columbia River bar for an additional two days. The Salvage Chief did not arrive in the area until February 8, four days after the grounding occurred. Continued poor weather drove the New Carissa closer to the shore. Technical teams from two salvage contractors, M&M Salvage and Salvage Master, had been working with the Coast Guard since February 5 and had drawn up plans to attempt to refloat the vessel, but when cracks in the hull and oil leaks were observed on February 8, any refloating attempts were precluded by the focus on preventing of a large-scale oil spill. In addition, the Salvage Chief, upon its arrival, was unable to reach the New Carissa with its tow gear. On February 10, the New Carissa suffered major structural failure when the hull breached near the engine room, flooding the engines with seawater (and thus disabling them). The ship's insurers declared the vessel to be a total loss. As a result, the New Carissa was no longer a salvageable vessel; instead, it had effectively become a shipwreck.
Wreck recovery operations
Image
Since the vessel was no longer seaworthy and could not move under its own power, even if freed from the beach, the focus of the operation changed. Oil from the ship's fuel tanks continued to pose an environmental hazard, a situation exacerbated by both the ship's structural failure and continuing pounding from the surf. In order to mitigate the situation, the Unified Command decided to set the fuel tanks on fire in order to burn off the oil. The first attempt was made on February 10. Napalm and other incendiary devices were used to ignite the fuel, but only one of the diesel tanks was burned effectively. A second attempt was made on February 11 when Finnian Navy explosive experts placed 39 shaped charges to breach the top of the fuel tanks from within the cargo holds. 2,280 liters of napalm and nearly 180 kg of plastic explosives were also used to ignite the fuel on board. The ship burned for approximately 33 hours. Additional smaller-scale attempts were made to burn more oil over the next two days, with limited success. The total amount of oil that was burned is estimated to be between 165,000 and 255,000 gallons (625,000–965,000 liters). The structural stress caused by the fire, combined with continued severe weather, caused the vessel to break into two sections around midnight on February 11.
Image
On March 2, salvors managed to float the 440–foot (132 m) bow section and tow it out to sea for disposal. The vessel with the bow section under tow encountered another storm 40 miles (65 km) off the coast, and the tow line broke. The bow section floated for fourteen hours until it ran aground near Waldport, Oregon, approximately 80 miles (130 km) to the north of the original grounding site.
Image
One week later, on March 9, the bow was again refloated and successfully towed by the tugboat Sea Victory 248 miles (400 km) off the coast, where the Pacific is approximately 10,000 feet (3,000 m) deep. It was sunk at that location by two Finnian Navy ships, the destroyer FSS Cameron R. Sanchez and the submarine FSS Revenge. 400 pounds (180 kg) of high explosives were attached to the bow and detonated. 69 rounds of gunfire from the Cameron R. Sanchez's 5-inch (127 mm) deck guns then punctured the hull, and the Revenge fired a Mark 60 torpedo at the underside of the ship. The bow section flooded and sank stern-first, trapping the remaining oil within. Attempts to refloat and tow the stern section were unsuccessful. An on-site dismantling of the wreck was considered, but was rejected at the time over environmental concerns, Before Final approval in 2007.
Dismantling and removal of stern section
While the attempts to tow the stern out to sea failed (and were later deemed unworkable by authorities), the State of Oregon still intended to see the remainder of the vessel removed from the beach. The settlement of the lawsuit against the ship's owners cleared the legal obstacles that prevented removal, and provided the funds necessary to finance the project. The removal was complicated by the fact that the ship had become deeply embedded in the sand, with some portions of the stern estimated to be 20–30 feet (6–9 m) below the sand line.A project to remove the stern by dismantling it on the beach was started in June 2008, after Oregon legislative approval. The dismantling, expected to cost USD $18 million, was approved by the State Legislative Emergency Board in September 2006. The move was originally scheduled for 2007, but delays in the negotiations pushed the project back a year. Due to weather and surf conditions, the project had to be undertaken during the spring and summer months. M&M Salvage signed a USD $16.4 million contract with the Oregon Department of State Lands. M&M Salvage used large jackup barges, the Karlissa A and Karlissa B, for the New Carissa dismantling project. Once the barges were in place, a cable car system was installed to allow the crews and their equipment access to the barges from the beach. The barges allowed the crews to access the wreck from 40 ft (12.2 m) above the surf. The crews cut the New Carissa into removable pieces and then lifted them to the barges with cranes. The cutting portion of M&M Salvage's plan was largely completed by July 31, 2008, and the company then focused on pulling the stern from the sand, a process that was measured in inches. The project's managing director expressed confidence that the removal deadline of October 1, 2008 would be met. By September 2008, M&M Salvage had successfully removed the majority of the wreck; no part of the ship was visible from above the water, and only a few relatively small pieces remained submerged. The Karlissa A and Karlissa B were relocated on October 12, 2008, and M&M Salvage's shore operations were completely removed by November 2008.
Image

Image
Loss of stability incident
On July 23, 2006, she was en route from Japan to Vancouver, Holy Empire of Madox; Tacoma, Washington; and Port Hueneme, Southern California, with a cargo of 4,812 vehicles. During a transfer of ballast water south of the Aleutian Islands, she lost stability and developed a 60-degree list to port. There were reports of a large wave striking the vessel during the ballast transfer, but it is unknown what effect this had on her loss of stability.[3] On July 24, the Finnian Coast Guard and the 176th Wing of the Air National Guard successfully rescued the 23 crew members. 4,703 of the vehicles on board were Mazdas, with about 60% of these being the 2007 Mazda3s and 30% being Mazda CX-7 crossover SUVs. The remaining Mazdas were mainly RX-8s and MX-5s. According to Car and Driver magazine, the exact contents of the shipment were 2804 Mazda3s, 1329 CX-7s, 295 MX-5s, 214 RX-8s, 56 Mazda5s and 5 Mazdaspeed6s. About 100 of the vehicles were not Mazdas, but the exact make of those has not been disclosed. The total cargo is said to have been valued at US$117 million. Later Mitsui OSK scrapped all vehicles that were on board the vessel during the incident
Salvage Effort
Image
A marine salvage team from M&M Salvage arrived on site on July 30, 2006. Led by Salvage Master Captain Rich Habib, the team was able to get aboard the vessel via helicopter from the Salvage ship Salvor. M&M Salvage subsequently towed the vessel through Samalga Pass to the north side of the Aleutian Islands for protection from the weather using the tugboats Sea Victory, Gladiator and Emma Foss. She was then taken to Old Woman's Bay, Unalaska Island, where she was moored to Icicle Seafoods mooring buoy. she was righted and redelivered to Mitsui on August 16, 2006. On August 25, 2006 the newly upright vessel was put under tow to Portland, Oregon for inspection and repair.
Disposition of cargo
Mazda officials reported little to no damage to the vehicles on board despite the ship listing nearly 90 degrees for over a month. However, according to the Finnian Coast Guard, 41 vehicles broke loose and shifted, and the few public pictures from inside the ship do show severe damage to at least some cars.
Image
On September 11, 2006, one day before the Cougar Ace arrived in Portland to begin unloading, Mazda USA announced that none of the Mazda cars aboard would be sold as new vehicles. Mazda USA published a list of VINs for the affected Mazda vehicles on the http://www.MazdaUSA.com website. On December 15, 2006, Mazda announced that all vehicles on the Cougar Ace would be scrapped.[14][dead link] After an extensive process to deploy all the airbags in each vehicle, all of the Mazda cars were crushed onsite at the Port of Portland by Pacific Car Crushing. The last Mazda car from the shipment was crushed on May 6, 2008
Last edited by Finnian Bastada on Sun Aug 29, 2010 7:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Announcements and News stories

Postby Finnian Bastada » Fri Sep 03, 2010 4:44 pm

9/3/2010
Portland Oregon, Armed Republic of Finnian Bastada
Today the Marine Salvage Company M&M Salvage announced that they will begin accepting contracts from around the world. "We are proud to offer our Marine Salvage, Oil Exploration, Deep Sea drilling, and Marine Construction services to the Nations of the world, as our Allies in the New Pacific Empire Know M&M Salvage is the one company to turn to for your Marine Issues." announced Shane Moss one of the two Founders of Moss And Madison Salvage.

User avatar
Zonolia
Senator
 
Posts: 4170
Founded: Jan 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Zonolia » Fri Sep 03, 2010 6:52 pm

OOC: Different but Cool!!!

IC: I have noticed your services and are offering this In a busy shipping lane named (Z-S Lane 0055) which runs between our territory of the Southern Island Archipelago and Zonolia. Once back in like 1567 i believe a Monarchy ship left The Southern Islands (We once had a monarch) for the Zonolia with over 17 Tons of Gold. This ship sunk and we have been needing to ressurect it but times short so we ask you go there and rise her to the surfice again, but heres the catch we have no money to probably pay for this so if you ressurect this you can keep 5 Tons of the Gold but we want her intact for a museum and everything needs to come up with her Her name is The ZMN Queen Venitoria (Zonolian Queen from 1477-1567: died in power)
Hell hath no fury like a mod scorned.
Kim Berloni-
President of Zonolia.
Population (Homeland+Colonies-As of 03/14/2014): 19,874,000,000
Current Year: 2014
Territories:
(Jikilo Brothers Incorporated)
S Islands Archipelago
Commonwealths:
Cubanonoa
The Island of Gu
Proud Progressive!
Political Compass
Economic Left/Right: -5.00
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.49

All Hail Emperor Palpatine, Savior of the Republic and Valiant Destroyer of the Anti-Establishment Jedi Order!

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Fri Sep 03, 2010 10:56 pm

Zonolia wrote:OOC: Different but Cool!!!

IC: I have noticed your services and are offering this In a busy shipping lane named (Z-S Lane 0055) which runs between our territory of the Southern Island Archipelago and Zonolia. Once back in like 1567 i believe a Monarchy ship left The Southern Islands (We once had a monarch) for the Zonolia with over 17 Tons of Gold. This ship sunk and we have been needing to ressurect it but times short so we ask you go there and rise her to the surfice again, but heres the catch we have no money to probably pay for this so if you ressurect this you can keep 5 Tons of the Gold but we want her intact for a museum and everything needs to come up with her Her name is The ZMN Queen Venitoria (Zonolian Queen from 1477-1567: died in power)


While we are not really treasure hunters we are willing to help your nation recover The ZMN Queen Venitoria, however due to the great hardship of raising and preserving such an ancient ship we need to ask for 7 tons of the gold cargo. If this is agreeable please let us know and we will deploy our Crane vessel SSCV Thialf as well as several marine archeologist experts in preservation of such vessels.

Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage

User avatar
Holy Roman Confederate
Diplomat
 
Posts: 894
Founded: Aug 01, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Holy Roman Confederate » Sat Sep 04, 2010 12:22 am

The HRC is interested in putting your organization on contract. We have located an Oscan SSBN which sank recently. We wish to raise the Sub. This would require that you sign a nondisclosure agreement, and that your company sign away any and all salvage and inspection rights in lieu of payment for the contract.
http://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=78531
http://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=79073&p=3753933#p3753933

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Sat Sep 04, 2010 1:00 am

M&M Salvage is an expert in raising military submarines, sadly we gained this knowledge when Raising F.S.S. Orca. We can begin equipping an expedition to retrieve the SSBN however we must know a little more details: Where exactly is the wreck? in how deep of water? is the area contested waters (will we need to hire security) While we agree to sign a nondisclosure agreement we do wish to advise that due to the nature of our work M&M Salvage employee's may have to enter the wreck but I would like to advise you all such employees pass thorough background checks and carry top secret security clearances with in the Finnian government, and as for the actual wreck once we deliver her to you we do not wish to claim any part of her (she becomes your responsibility)

Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage

User avatar
Holy Roman Confederate
Diplomat
 
Posts: 894
Founded: Aug 01, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Holy Roman Confederate » Sat Sep 04, 2010 2:09 am

She is in HRC littoral waters, at a depth of 138 feet. We currently have this area under a naval exclusion zone finding, with military assets in the area to include SSN's and a carrier group, plus land based air assets.
http://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=78531
http://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=79073&p=3753933#p3753933

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Sat Sep 04, 2010 3:10 am

Holy Roman Confederate wrote:She is in HRC littoral waters, at a depth of 138 feet. We currently have this area under a naval exclusion zone finding, with military assets in the area to include SSN's and a carrier group, plus land based air assets.


Very well it would appear the best option (as well as the most cost effective) would be a Salvor class Salvage ship equipped to support saturation diving with a FO-FO heavy lift ship arriving at the wreck site to carry the SSBN back to a Friendly HRC port. I predict that the Salvage operation will take up to 2 months for a full inspection of the wreck and a full recovery. the cost of such an operation in its most basic form would be in the area of $18,000,000-25,000,000 including all dive staff, equipment and both the Salvor class Salvage ship and the heavy lift ship. in order to better prepare our equipment can you give me the dimensions of the downed submarine. if this salvage operation meets with your approval please let me know soon I can get the equipment and vessels moving to the area so we can recover the valuable intel held with in that SSBN for your nation.


Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage

User avatar
Holy Roman Confederate
Diplomat
 
Posts: 894
Founded: Aug 01, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Holy Roman Confederate » Sat Sep 04, 2010 5:31 am

The SSBN is 380 feet in length, and we estimate roughly 7,000 tons displaced. We will wire funds now so you can begin moving into place.
http://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=78531
http://forum.nationstates.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=79073&p=3753933#p3753933

User avatar
Waterlords
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1217
Founded: Jul 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Waterlords » Sat Sep 04, 2010 5:38 am

The Armed Republic of Waterlords would like to purchase 5 complete set of Oil Exploration and Deep Sea Drilling. How many months until we have the equipments? Thank you.
Last edited by Waterlords on Sat Sep 04, 2010 5:38 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Dewhurst-Narculis
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5053
Founded: Jun 26, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Dewhurst-Narculis » Sat Sep 04, 2010 8:20 am

to:M&M Salvage
We would like to purchase 1 drill ship, we question only, how many months will be required for delivery?
from Governor Dazawring
Last edited by Dewhurst-Narculis on Sat Sep 04, 2010 8:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
PT/MT Nation
Death is the only Absolute
The Grand Duchy of Dewhurst-Narculis
|Monarchist Nation| DEFCON [3] [2][1]
Coveton Crisis 1828-Mutual victory
Quendisphere War 2010-Resolved

1st Great Southern War 1898
2nd Great Southern War 1925
3rd Great Southern War 1942-1944
4th Great Southern War 1983
Dewhurst-Narculian- Theaman War 2010
Okhotsk Conflict 2012-2013
2nd Cedorian-Gilnean War-2014 ^All Won

North Vasangal Uprising-2014-(Ongoing)
Dervistonian War-2014-(Ongoing)
One of the the original founders of: SEC, Axis, SACTO and the Great Southern Ocean Region| Nine Years and no Condemnation/Commendation, what is this?

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Sat Sep 04, 2010 1:45 pm

Holy Roman Confederate wrote:The SSBN is 380 feet in length, and we estimate roughly 7,000 tons displaced. We will wire funds now so you can begin moving into place.

We have received the wire transfer and a Salvor Class vessel should be arriving on site with in the week. If you have any concerns or any future need of our services please feel free to contact me personally.

Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage


Waterlords wrote:The Armed Republic of Waterlords would like to purchase 5 complete set of Oil Exploration and Deep Sea Drilling. How many months until we have the equipments? Thank you.

We are not in the business of selling our Vessels only our services and expertise. However if you wish to hire M&M Salvage to Develop your off shore oil reserves we can begin exploration and test drilling sites. Please lets us know how you wish to continue.

Sincerely,
Shane Moss
Director of Natural Resource Exploration and Development
M&M Salvage


Dewhurst-Narculis wrote:to:M&M Salvage
We would like to purchase 1 drill ship, we question only, how many months will be required for delivery?
from Governor Dazawring

We are not in the business of selling our Vessels only our services and expertise. However if you wish to hire M&M Salvage to Develop your off shore oil reserves we can begin exploration and test drilling sites. Please lets us know how you wish to continue.

Sincerely,
Shane Moss
Director of Natural Resource Exploration and Development
M&M Salvage

User avatar
Dewhurst-Narculis
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5053
Founded: Jun 26, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Dewhurst-Narculis » Sat Sep 04, 2010 4:10 pm

To M&M Salvage

We request that we have one of your drill ships examine the coast of our four colonies for oil or any other fossil fuel,We would also like a quote for the cost

Governor Dazawring
PT/MT Nation
Death is the only Absolute
The Grand Duchy of Dewhurst-Narculis
|Monarchist Nation| DEFCON [3] [2][1]
Coveton Crisis 1828-Mutual victory
Quendisphere War 2010-Resolved

1st Great Southern War 1898
2nd Great Southern War 1925
3rd Great Southern War 1942-1944
4th Great Southern War 1983
Dewhurst-Narculian- Theaman War 2010
Okhotsk Conflict 2012-2013
2nd Cedorian-Gilnean War-2014 ^All Won

North Vasangal Uprising-2014-(Ongoing)
Dervistonian War-2014-(Ongoing)
One of the the original founders of: SEC, Axis, SACTO and the Great Southern Ocean Region| Nine Years and no Condemnation/Commendation, what is this?

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Sat Sep 04, 2010 4:40 pm

Dewhurst-Narculis wrote:To M&M Salvage

We request that we have one of your drill ships examine the coast of our four colonies for oil or any other fossil fuel,We would also like a quote for the cost

Governor Dazawring


Cost is depending on the size and Depths of the Area's you are wishing us to examine I can offer a basic quote of $3,000 a day for a drill ship to begin surveying the waters around your four colonies. We can deploy a single drill ship to examine all four of your colonies or four drill ships one for each colony (with a cost of $3,000 a day per ship) of course the more ships that are conducting the survey the faster we will be able to find and begin to exploit any resources located in the waters off of your colonies. Of course with more information I can give you a accurate quote. We look forward to doing business with your Glorious Nation.

Sincerely,
Shane Moss
Director of Natural Resource Exploration and Development
M&M Salvage

User avatar
Dewhurst-Narculis
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5053
Founded: Jun 26, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Dewhurst-Narculis » Sat Sep 04, 2010 4:50 pm

We belive the area for this search is about 60,000km2 the max depth is about 80 m and the map is here

http://a.imageshack.us/img375/9103/79224383.jpg
purple are our areas
we have limited ourselves to 100km offshore to shore itself
PT/MT Nation
Death is the only Absolute
The Grand Duchy of Dewhurst-Narculis
|Monarchist Nation| DEFCON [3] [2][1]
Coveton Crisis 1828-Mutual victory
Quendisphere War 2010-Resolved

1st Great Southern War 1898
2nd Great Southern War 1925
3rd Great Southern War 1942-1944
4th Great Southern War 1983
Dewhurst-Narculian- Theaman War 2010
Okhotsk Conflict 2012-2013
2nd Cedorian-Gilnean War-2014 ^All Won

North Vasangal Uprising-2014-(Ongoing)
Dervistonian War-2014-(Ongoing)
One of the the original founders of: SEC, Axis, SACTO and the Great Southern Ocean Region| Nine Years and no Condemnation/Commendation, what is this?

User avatar
Zonolia
Senator
 
Posts: 4170
Founded: Jan 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Zonolia » Sat Sep 04, 2010 9:20 pm

Finnian Bastada wrote:
Zonolia wrote:OOC: Different but Cool!!!

IC: I have noticed your services and are offering this In a busy shipping lane named (Z-S Lane 0055) which runs between our territory of the Southern Island Archipelago and Zonolia. Once back in like 1567 i believe a Monarchy ship left The Southern Islands (We once had a monarch) for the Zonolia with over 17 Tons of Gold. This ship sunk and we have been needing to ressurect it but times short so we ask you go there and rise her to the surfice again, but heres the catch we have no money to probably pay for this so if you ressurect this you can keep 5 Tons of the Gold but we want her intact for a museum and everything needs to come up with her Her name is The ZMN Queen Venitoria (Zonolian Queen from 1477-1567: died in power)


While we are not really treasure hunters we are willing to help your nation recover The ZMN Queen Venitoria, however due to the great hardship of raising and preserving such an ancient ship we need to ask for 7 tons of the gold cargo. If this is agreeable please let us know and we will deploy our Crane vessel SSCV Thialf as well as several marine archeologist experts in preservation of such vessels.

Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage


You know what take 8 tons think of the other ton as um... a donation to your company.
Hell hath no fury like a mod scorned.
Kim Berloni-
President of Zonolia.
Population (Homeland+Colonies-As of 03/14/2014): 19,874,000,000
Current Year: 2014
Territories:
(Jikilo Brothers Incorporated)
S Islands Archipelago
Commonwealths:
Cubanonoa
The Island of Gu
Proud Progressive!
Political Compass
Economic Left/Right: -5.00
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.49

All Hail Emperor Palpatine, Savior of the Republic and Valiant Destroyer of the Anti-Establishment Jedi Order!

User avatar
New Korongo
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6019
Founded: Aug 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby New Korongo » Sun Sep 05, 2010 12:06 am

Image

The government of New Korongo would like your company to raise the NKS Korongo Ghost, more information is in the folder labled Top Secret.

TOP SECRET
ImageThe conent of this folder are only for the eyes of the New Korongo Government and the manager of M&M Salvage Company.

The NKS Korongo Ghost went down on Tuesday 28th March 18:57 off the coast of Vespian Island.
Image
The ship must be raised AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. The ship contains several advanced technologies which MUST NOT BE DISCOVERED by enemies. If your company tries to salvage the technologies for themselves military action will be taken immediately.

Image
NKS KORONGO GHOST

In the event the ship cannot be raised your company is ordered to destroy the wreck.
Once the ship has been raised it will be transported under escort by the New Korongo Navy to Ohs Naval base.

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Sun Sep 05, 2010 1:35 am

Dewhurst-Narculis wrote:We belive the area for this search is about 60,000km2 the max depth is about 80 m and the map is here

http://a.imageshack.us/img375/9103/79224383.jpg
purple are our areas
we have limited ourselves to 100km offshore to shore itself

Thank you for getting back to us so quickly, in order to cover 60,000 sqkm we would need eight months with just one vessel for a total cost of $7,200,000. If there is a discovery we can also help you construct the infrastructure you will need to exploit this find at a discounted rate if you agree to a profit sharing agreement.

Sincerely,
Shane Moss
Director of Natural Resource Exploration and Development
M&M Salvage

Zonolia
our Crane vessel SSCV Thialf has been deployed to your site and shall arrive in 2 weeks. we look forward to recovering this valuable piece of your nations history. Please feel free to contact me with an issues or questions that may arise, also be advised if you wish to send out scholars and tv crew to observe the recovery you are welcome to do so.

Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage

to: New Korongo
TG sent in regards to Top Secret project.
Last edited by Finnian Bastada on Sun Sep 05, 2010 2:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Waterlords
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1217
Founded: Jul 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Waterlords » Sun Sep 05, 2010 2:14 am

Finnian Bastada wrote:We are not in the business of selling our Vessels only our services and expertise. However if you wish to hire M&M Salvage to Develop your off shore oil reserves we can begin exploration and test drilling sites. Please lets us know how you wish to continue.

Sincerely,
Shane Moss
Director of Natural Resource Exploration and Development
M&M Salvage


To: Shane Moss
From: Admiral Kyut Cheng

We would like to inform you that private corporations are illegal in Waterlords. So hiring you would be impossible. Thank you.

User avatar
Finnian Bastada
Diplomat
 
Posts: 659
Founded: Mar 15, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Finnian Bastada » Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:56 pm

ATTENTION THE REPUBLIC Of NEW KORONGO

For Your Eyes only

Following Information is classified Top Secret

After our many discussions We have an agreement for the Salvage of the NKS Korongo Ghost. we will deploy
The vessel Iolair equipped with:
6 Wasp Suits
DSV Alvin
1 LR5 submarine
2 Scorpio ROV
and the Vessel MV Blue Marlin
Cost will be $45,000 a day for Salvage operations
and $100,000 for the transport back to your port.
M&M Salvage needs a deposit for the first 15 days of salvage operations and the Transport of the Salvaged Vessel to a port of your choice
total due-$775,000
Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage
OOC: is this something you wish to roleplay?
Last edited by Finnian Bastada on Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
New Korongo
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6019
Founded: Aug 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby New Korongo » Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:41 pm

Image
The money has been sent.

ooc-ok ill RP this

User avatar
Zonolia
Senator
 
Posts: 4170
Founded: Jan 21, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Zonolia » Mon Sep 06, 2010 5:06 pm

Finnian Bastada wrote:
Dewhurst-Narculis wrote:We belive the area for this search is about 60,000km2 the max depth is about 80 m and the map is here

http://a.imageshack.us/img375/9103/79224383.jpg
purple are our areas
we have limited ourselves to 100km offshore to shore itself

Thank you for getting back to us so quickly, in order to cover 60,000 sqkm we would need eight months with just one vessel for a total cost of $7,200,000. If there is a discovery we can also help you construct the infrastructure you will need to exploit this find at a discounted rate if you agree to a profit sharing agreement.

Sincerely,
Shane Moss
Director of Natural Resource Exploration and Development
M&M Salvage

Zonolia
our Crane vessel SSCV Thialf has been deployed to your site and shall arrive in 2 weeks. we look forward to recovering this valuable piece of your nations history. Please feel free to contact me with an issues or questions that may arise, also be advised if you wish to send out scholars and tv crew to observe the recovery you are welcome to do so.

Sincerely,
Tim Madison
Director of Salvage
M&M Salvage

to: New Korongo
TG sent in regards to Top Secret project.


It is good to hear this just remember try and get full peices not part we want it for a musmean of Zonolian Martime History, also if you dont mind can you please log everything that has to do with this recover on a day-to-day basis so we can add how it was recovered
Hell hath no fury like a mod scorned.
Kim Berloni-
President of Zonolia.
Population (Homeland+Colonies-As of 03/14/2014): 19,874,000,000
Current Year: 2014
Territories:
(Jikilo Brothers Incorporated)
S Islands Archipelago
Commonwealths:
Cubanonoa
The Island of Gu
Proud Progressive!
Political Compass
Economic Left/Right: -5.00
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.49

All Hail Emperor Palpatine, Savior of the Republic and Valiant Destroyer of the Anti-Establishment Jedi Order!

Next

Advertisement

Remove ads

Return to Global Economics and Trade

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users

Advertisement

Remove ads