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Sanctor Fiber Vest (MT/NS MT, Closed)

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Pentaga Giudici
Diplomat
 
Posts: 721
Founded: Feb 13, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Sanctor Fiber Vest (MT/NS MT, Closed)

Postby Pentaga Giudici » Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:14 pm

Sanctor Fiber Vest


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Capabilities
Disclaimer: To demonstrate the capabilities of the Santor Fiber Vest, comparisons must be made to other products, of different types, which will be referred to as if a "Brand X".

There are four types of vests currently on the market, which this product is actively competing with: Type K, Type A, Type X, and Type Y.

Type K vests are made from Kevlar, and for lighter applications, the cheaper cousin of the Sanctor, does the sale job for less money. For stronger but still low cost options, the Sanctor Fiber Vest comes in and is available with multiple types of reinforcement. If you are able to afford body armor, the least you can do for yourself is get the ALPA or the "Hometown Hero" Sanctor Fiber Vest (In UHMWPE). You're either going to get more for the same money, or the same for less money.

Type A vests are models such as the Interceptor, Ranger, and Modular Tactical Vest. These are also very generic vests that use technology dating back to 2008, at least, if not a decade earlier in some components. Still, you are likely to be paying around 800 NSD for one of these vests, unless you manage to luck out and get a really cheap one bundled with hard armor, and yes, you can buy a soft armor vest by itself for 800 NSD, people really charge that much. The "Hometown Hero" model of our vest does the same features for less then half the cost, and our "Baseline model" is more protective or lighter, depending on which one you choose, for the same price. On top of that, Type A vests use... Velcro, lots and lots of Velcro, which fails miserably in combat conditions. The baseline model of the Sanctor Fiber Vest uses straps, latches, plastic buckles, and hinges.

Type X vests are charging you between one and two grand, for the same, tired, old UHMWPE and 500D/1000D Cordura. If you get the "Hometown Hero" model, you save at least six or seven hundred dollars. If you get the "Baseline model", you save 100 NSD, AND, get better protection or considerably less weight.

Type Y vests are just that "Why", as in "Why does this exist?". A Type Y vest is a Type X vest with "Dragon-Skin" technology, which leads to Fivs, (which leads to more nightmares for the writer, those who served have a dark sense of humor), or, it involves graphene or another "wonder-material" reinforcing lackluster outdated materials. The application of reinforcing other material has already been proven to be cheaper to do with carbon-nanotubes (organic fullerenes), while the Dauntless writeup in 2008 proved that any inorganic fullerene is " easier and much less expensive to produce, is chemically stable and is dramatically less reactive and less flammable. Not to mention that, "organic fullerenes are also considered to be highly toxic".

An additional problem with "Dragon-Skin" technology is that just looking at it should tell you why it doesn't work. According to one expert "Because the "Scales" have to overlap, you will always end up with more material(and therefore weight) required to protect the same area.".

Finally, "Wonder-Materials" come with a serious question associated with them, besides "Why", and that is "How can you afford this"? The Dauntless Vest costs several thousand dollars, per part, and it's a miracle that a nation like Lyras had the money and resources to make their concept a reality. Imagine if someone in a first world nation sold you a brand new Glock for 81.08 NSD. You would have some questions about where this item came from, right? The writer and Pentagonal Armaments can't be sued for just asking questions to potentional customers.

History
Disclaimer: The entire history of the Sanctor Fiber Vest involves several nations and companies which can't be named for reasons legal, polite, and professional. Firms will have placeholder names instead.

The entire process for the develpment and design of the "Sanctor Fiber Vest", started with the first vest made in Vadia, that wasn't made of silk or nylon, the first serious ballistic fiber vest. In 1983-1984 (Records were lost in a fire, record keepers died in during one of two wars), the PASGT vest and helmet were adopted by the nation of Vadia, just in time for both of the "Han Wars". During both conflicts, the PASGT vest and helmet were turned out in the hundreds of millions and issued to very far, and very wide. Many soldiers, and civilians just trying to not be killed in the endless bombing campaigns of the enemy, found the vest to be comfortable, effective against fragments and handgun loads, and easily acquirable due to the mass production. It is estimated that out of every four Vadia people wounded in both conflicts, two of them would've been killed or maimed without the vest or helmet. The protection that the vest and helmet provided, encouraged and motivated soldiers to be more aggressive, and they used this aggression to take the fight to the enemy. Once the fight was fully taken to the enemy during the Second Han War, the nation of Vadia could finally know peace, even if for a short while. In the aftermath, the PASGT vest became a symbol of Vadian pride and honor, but it had limited replacement with the "Ranger Vest" during the 1990s.

After decades of isolation, healing, civil-war, rebirth, and finally, exposure to the rest of the world again; the people of Vadia were ready for newer and better body armor. Now there was a second nation founded by the people of Vadia, Doppio Giudici, and after the two nations settled their disputes, they founded the "New Timathin Alliance". Around the time that the "NTA" was changed to "Neo-Terran Alliance", both Vadia and Doppio Giudic started inspecting the world marketplace for new technology, new designs, and something they could quickly buy the production rights to. Hastily, in 2012 they bought up the production rights from a firm known as "Hell", for a blue peacekeeping vest, at the tune of tens of millions of NSD.

The vest, now referred to as the "WA Vest", met a lot of the requirements for a replacement to the PASGT vest. It was just as light, had a breathable inner material, a protective collar that could be folded up or down, additional addons for the neck, shoulders, and groin, came with plenty of velcro slots, came with it's own ammo pouches, was protective against blades, and was capable of accepting hard armor plates. One of the issues that came up was that most soldiers wore "Large" hard armor plates, when they used the Ranger Vest and it was widely accepted that many other nations did likewise. The WA Vest was sold with NIJ III plates, but the NTA found itself wanting to use different hard armor plates. However, most of the "Large" size hard armor plates in service around the world, and for sale, didn't fit the "WA Vest". There was also issues with the first few generations of hard armor used by Vadia and the NTA, along with the 'trauma pads' issued with them. Due to these issues, the "WA Vest" was made slightly larger, given more 'padding' on the chest and back, and had the slot for the hard armor plates changed to standard 'large' hard armor plate dimensions. In less then a year the vest and it's users were introduced to "Fourth Generation Warfare", during a series of "brush-fire" conflicts, "police actions", and peacekeeping operations.



This led to the NTA signing lots of paperwork and aligning itself with the International Coalition for Expansion (Actual name), this further led to the NTA being introduced to a second nation, "Mentat". Mentat had a well arranged and capable firm which was working with lots of very effective and cutting edge technology. Thus, in 2013, less then a year after the WA Vest was adopted, it was being replaced by the "Coalition Vest". The Coalition Vest was.. (The writer himself has been issued both vests), issued products from Mentat. The firm sold it's own brand of glasses, which were close to perfect. The firm sold uniforms, close to perfect. Helmets, a little expensive, close to perfect. The Coalition Vest was very adaptable, going from plate carrier to full armored vest, while also being comfortable and having good weight distribution. There was no indications if 1000 denier Cordura (Coalition Vest was made from said material) or Kevlar were better material to make body armor out of, only that Kevlar was cheaper and easier to work with. The product had velcro, zippers, breathable air-pockets, and hugged the body very well; which was a big deal during the crawling, crouching, and climbing of conflicts around the world.

The nation of Mentat had discovered the technology for the hard armor plates in their Coalition Vest and had been heavily motivated because of the nation's military needs, to put heavily work into getting their vest and the hard armor plates within it, ready for military applications. Partially through the process and the testing of the product, it turns out that Mentat was informed by their researchers, reporters, and other nations, about Lyras and Dauntless Armor. Deliberately, to avoid lawsuits or claims of stealing technology, the designers, researchers, and engineers at Mentat deliberately kept themselves in the dark about Dauntless. This came down to be a very fatal problem, as while the Coalition Vest was very well designed, and appeared to have great materials, it wasn't lacking in complications (Outside price and raity) like Dauntless Armor was. The design firm claimed that their use of Dragon Skin technology was fine, that the original designers who they licensed the technology from, had assured them that it worked. On top of that, many independent and small scale military tests didn't indicate any issues. The vest only failed and failed horribly in large scale "US Army" tests. There was also a lot of rumors that the technology was widely adopted by: high level body guards, experienced private military contractors, and intelligence operatives. In fact, Mentat had done a lot of due diligence to 'fix any reported or possible issues' with the technology.

Most of the tests on the original "Dragon Skin" technology involved using cartridges and calibers that could easily be shrugged off by NIJ III plates far and wide, and the host nation for the technology rejected applications that the technology had a NIJ III rating. Back in 2013, less then a year after the Coalition Vest was being sold, the host firm for the technology had lost all of it's lawsuits, didn't have any qualifications that its technology worked at all, and no persons in the host nation or any other nations in a 25,000 mile radius used it either. Mentat's firm that sold the Coalition Vest went bankrupt or stopped selling internationally in 2016, eight months later another nation started selling vests using some of the same technology, without crashing into any copyright problems.

With forty million plus under arms, a success rate of 99.99 means a lot of coffins draped in flags. It was too bad that there were two, count them, two "Lust for Slaves" Wars. Three flags, the flag of the NTA, the flag of the mother country, and the flag of the people the soldier died protecting, were draped over each coffin, if there was a coffin at all. At first, the problem had been rumors, then "Freak Fatal ICE Vest Sydrome" or "FFIVS" (Fivs), then six thousand people were lost. A lot of NTA soldiers died in the fighting, from all kinds of other wounds besides ones that a vest could stop, but enough died due to Fivs that replacement hard armor was rushed out. The writer personally knows a woman, who as far as examination could tell, had died from Fivs. Her body wasn't fully recovered, she died from two .30 caliber rounds, likely AP, hitting her right on the back. A wide number of replacements were proposed and used, but only recently in 2020 has anything progressed further.



In 2020, three major things happened for the NTA (Now known as the Coalition of Human Rights and Ethics). First, the scientific capabilities of the founding members of the alliance rapidly grew, the alliance invested more attention into Lazarus while the region was in a state of Cold War, and the research projects involving body armor obtained additional resources and experts from one or more classified nations. Research into a number possible methods to solve issues with the WA Vest and Coalition Vest were investigated, and research was carefully brought, bribed, and bartered from around the world. At least eight of the most complex and enlightening studies came from DeepDyve, with a number of others coming from other sources. The research, design, and engineering teams actively looked at the writeups of all former and current competitors, talked to people highly skeptical of any advanced technology, and looked into hard/soft armor solutions. There was a lot of thought put into replacing the failed Dragon-Skin armor and the former Boron Carbide ESAPI plates. Multiple times teams mentioned that it wasn't clear if titanium disulfide (TiS2) could be rolled into nano-tubes at an affordable cost, and how effective they would be if they were simply formed normal ceramics or rolled into "micro-tubes" using micrometers instead of nanometers. Many questions came up about how the cost would be anywhere close to where it needed to be, how other companies charged 750 NSD a plate and not 2500-3500 NSD.

Considering these fundamental issues with the hard armor, that project was delayed for ____ days, while the RDE teams focused on the soft armor vest/plate carrier, the replacement or addons for the trauma pad, and any possible replacements for the helmet. Investigations found a lot of data and research involving adding things to kevlar to get better results, but there appeared to be two replacements for kevlar already, which both came up in the Coalition Vest and the helmet issued with it. There was a great deal of concern about soft armor being too 'hard' to be used as soft armor, along with a lot of research smuggled in involving completely incompatible measurement systems. Despite this, at risk of leaking out important data, the RDE team pinned down that as long as a material could be woven and used as a fiber, it was suitable as soft armor. Kevlar could be made hard as a rock, other materials too, and this led to a sigh of relief for the designers. According to one vital source, just because the size of the damage inflicted upon body armor was small, didn't mean the amount of energy absorbed was small. PBO fibers were thrown out as worse then Kevlar in another source. Another study that proved more useful for throwing things out then keeping them in, proved even unwoven materials were better then kevlar for body armor.

Thoughts and experiments came up involving adding stuff to one of the replacements for kevlar, as it was turning out to be increasingly obsolete, till finally the discovery and application of M5-1 Fiber began. It wasn't entirely clear if 500D Cordura or UHMWPE were better, but M-5-1 fiber was conservatively estimated and shown to be 53% stronger then kevlar, when it came down to compressive applications. There was enough research labs and low level companies working on getting M5-1 fiber setup for tooling applications and it almost appeared to be an "open secret" among international researchers on new ballistic protection technology. Despite this Zylon was found to be 1.6 times the tensile strength of kevlar, and it wasn't proven yet that it had less environmental resistance as M5-1. Zylon is also more resistant to wear and tear then UHMWPE, according to more research. Whichever was selected, it was very clear that blunt thoracic trauma was still a very serious injury, which was experienced even by those who survived being shot in the chest because of their vest. It was widely agreed that if a solution could be found for replacing the hard armor, that involved something lighter/thinner, then it would be easy to add more soft armor or a thicker trauma-pad behind the hard armor. Thankfully, the project was able to continue and choose a material, after Zylon/PBO was shown to heavily decay over time, when exposed to heat or humidity, even that which was provided by those wearing it.




After many hard weeks trying to get the project completely figured out, without leaking too many vital secrets, it was decided that the vest portion of the body armor system would be figured out first, and put into production first. With a massive order of 250 million "Baseline Sanctor Fiber Vests", before the final decision on which materials would be used, the decision to quickly finish tooling up all the possible factories, was made. The massive order was so big, that it would likely take over a year to fulfill, and that it would entirely pay for the massive costs of setting up one of the largest body armor production lines in the world. According to math and calculation, the internal civilian and military markets of CoHRE would fulfill future demand after the first year, for at least ten years. Afterwards, the cost of vests and M-5-1 fiber would be so low, that the factories to be retooled for potentially thousands of different products.
Last edited by Pentaga Giudici on Tue Apr 07, 2020 12:20 am, edited 16 times in total.
Pentagonal Armaments
Sometimes you just need something to protect yourself with.


People talking without speaking. People hearing without listening.

I'm surprised too, maybe it's a sign things are looking up.

User avatar
Pentaga Giudici
Diplomat
 
Posts: 721
Founded: Feb 13, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Pentaga Giudici » Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:15 pm

Specifications


Due to gaps between the NIJ standard protection level of "IIIA" and "III", Pentagonal Armaments, CoHRE, and our research partners have had to invent a completely new protection level to define the average "Baseline Sanctor Fiber Vest". Since the NIJ IIIA rating requires multi-hit protection, at least six shots without failure, our rating of IIIB requires the same. To meet the IIIB rating, a vest or piece of armor must stop six rounds of .357 Sig FMJ FN (Flat Nose) bullets traveling at a velocity of ~1822 fps

"Hometown Hero" Sanctor Fiber Vest:

Rating:III
NIJ Stab Rating: 3
Protection Area Neck down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 7.71lbs (3.5 kg)
Interior Space Front: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Back: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Sides: None
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 300 NSD

Baseline Sanctor Fiber Vest:

Rating:IIIB
NIJ Stab Rating: 3
Protection Area Neck down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 7.71lbs (3.5 kg)
Interior Space Front: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Back: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Sides: None
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 750 NSD

Lightweight Sanctor Fiber Vest:

Rating:IIIB
NIJ Stab Rating: 3
Protection Area Neck down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 5.08lbs (2.30kg)
Interior Space Front: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Back: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Sides: None
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 550 NSD

Baseline Sanctor Fiber Plate-Carrier:
(Excuse me, second writer here, wish to inform you that "Baseline Sanctor Fiber Plate-Carrier", comes with two lightweight ballistic panels. It's made from a ballistic material and matrix mixed into a composite. Panel adds a less then a third of a pound, is very slim, and is mostly present for trauma absorption against shotgun loads or large handgun rounds.)

Rating:III
NIJ Stab Rating: 3
Protection Area Neck down to just above the hips/navel, Swimmers Cut (Reduced protection to neck, shoulders, and sides)
Weight: 4 lbs (1.8 kg)
Interior Space Front: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Back: standard market "Large" size hard-armor plate, along with thickness of roughly three standard "trama-pads"
Interior Space Sides: None
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: Yes
Expected Cost: 750 NSD
Last edited by Pentaga Giudici on Sun Mar 29, 2020 7:27 pm, edited 8 times in total.
Pentagonal Armaments
Sometimes you just need something to protect yourself with.


People talking without speaking. People hearing without listening.

I'm surprised too, maybe it's a sign things are looking up.

User avatar
Pentaga Giudici
Diplomat
 
Posts: 721
Founded: Feb 13, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

WiP

Postby Pentaga Giudici » Sun Mar 29, 2020 3:35 pm

Advanced Hard Armor Solutions


Capabilities


We have a number of competitors and we went into some detail about them earlier, but now we are going to focus more on the hard armor plates. We are comparing 10 by 12 inches (25.4 by 30.48 centimeters) plates, which some manufactures place as "Large" and others as "Medium".

III Ceramic/SAPI Plates, go back at least as far as May of 2005, however there was the "Ranger Vest" in the 1990s which had a plate of it's own. Today there are still manufacturers of NIJ Level III Ceramic Plates and "SAPI" style Ceramic plates as well. For a plate of such construction, sized at "Large" with dimensions of 10 by 12 inches (25.4 by 30.48 centimeters), the weight of a plate goes from 2.09 kg (4.6 lb) to 2.5 kg (5.51 lb). Even then, a lot of NIJ III rated plates can stop 7.62x51mm M80 'ball' ammo, and certainly standard military spec 7.62x39mm AK ammo; but fail against civilian or old mil-spec ammo for 5.56. Any random nation with old M16s or even random civilians, could punch right though many of these plates on the first shot. They are also frequently 3/4" (1.905cm) thick.

UHMWPE Plates, are constantly offered to civilians or police officers, but almost never used by any military seriously. Despite being "Ultralight" and weighing only 1.5kg (3.3 lb), they are 1.3 inch (3.30cm) thick and can't stop the above threats.

We offer a Ceramic/M5-1 Fiber Composite Plate, which weights just 1.93 kg (4.35 lb) and is 1.1 inches (2.8 cm) thick. This means that what we are offering is lighter then the above two options, more protective then the above two options, and thinner then the UHMWPE plates. On top of that, our plates are rated to take eight, not six M80 rounds. We also have our plates shaped with multiple curves, to make them more comfortable to wear and a closer fit. We have seen the plates endure up to 20 shots of M80 ball ammo, during testing, but we legally can't state that as a capability, as it was a one time occurrence.



IV Ceramic/ESAPI Plates, are taken very seriously by military forces, but there are also cheaper and heavier version sold to civilians as well. The civilian versions can be shockingly cheap, but weight as heavy as 3.49 kg (8.3 lb). If you dig around and pay 600 NSD a plate, maybe you can get a civilian version that weighs 3.3 kg (7.2 lb). Meanwhile, the military grade stuff keeps appearing to cost 1020 NSD for the civilian consumer, to finally have something at 2.8 kg (6.25 lb) in weight. Even back when this technology was revealed in 2008 and many militaries were getting wholesale prices for the ESAPI plates, they were running at 600 NSD a pop. The plates are typically 1 inch (2.54 cm) thick. They are also typically not multi-hit rated, but rarely can they endure more then six hits of M2 AP 30-06. When a user survives being hit with M2 AP 30-06, or even a AP 7.62x54mm, they often have bruising and soreness for years or decades afterwards.

We offer a Enhanced Ceramic/M5-1 Fiber Composite Plate, which is 430 NSD to you, the customer, and has the exact same weight as a mil-spec ESAPI plate. We charge 430 NSD for a plate, which is 60% of the $720.88 NSD you would be paying for an ESAPI plate today. The only possible downside to our plate, is that it's 1.1 inches (2.8 cm) thick instead of 1 inch (2.54 cm) thick. That extra thickness is reinforcement and padding in the back, which is introduced to increase the ability for the plate to take more hits, AND make it possible for a brave user to get considerably reduced injury from being shot. Combined with any of our Sanctor Fiber Vests, this combo, makes it possible to reduce serious bruising to the ribs to just temporary bruising to the skin. After the first shot of M2 AP 30-06 or equivalent, the chance of brusing to the ribs increases for each additional shot, but the plate remains seven hit rated.

We offer a "Spec Ops" Ceramic/M5-1 Fiber Composite Plate as well, which offers the same protection and capabilities, at just 2.13kg (4.5 lb). Name thickness, same size, it just costs more and is less of a budget option.



XSAPI, was a tested and rejected plate concept, which was looked into by the military of a number of nations, as a possible solution for M993 7.62 NATO. They were reported to weight between half a pound (0.23 kg) to a full pound (0.45 kg) more then mil-spec ESAPI plates. The M933 7.62x51mm NATO round weighed 126.6 grains, went around 2867 fps, and was a bullet almost entirely made of hardened steel. Many nations found the plates to both be too heavy, and to only useful if the enemy somehow was mass issuing ammunition that was rare and expensive, especially for fourth generation warfare. Despite this, a number of peer to peer conflicts (which was a return to "Third Generation" or "Lightning" warfare), have seen the need for a "XSAPI Comparable" armor solution.

"Y" Plates, are exactly what was mentioned towards the top of this page, back in the vest section. To go into further detail, however, not only can you be spending 750 NSD a plate for something that is leaning on "Dragon-Skin" technology, and thus going to be prone to catastric problems like "Fiv"s, but you can be caught spending 1000 to 1,500 NSD a plate for suspiously cheap suspiciously 'advanced' materials that somehow don't seem to deliver much. Even if the materials were real, the design arrangement was sound, and the product did everything it was reported to do; it's still an overly complicated, expensive product. What about weight? Is the product going to be heavier or lighter? Is the product going to be thicker or thinner? What about backface deformation? What about longterm injuries? What about lifelong cronic pain to soldiers, warriors, war-fighters, and heroes?

We offer the "Constantia" TiS2 nanotube/Boron Carbide/M-5-1 Fiber Composite Plate, which, when paired with a Baseline Sanctor Fiber Vest or Lightweight Sanctor Fiber Vest, becomes the Arbitrator Vest Combo Solution. This plate has the exact same, or lower weight then the XSAPI plate, but we go one step further. Our two solutions to replace ESAPI, both stop M993, three times, with the first hit causing only a few months of brusing and pain. If that is the case, you likely are wondering what our "Constantia" plate is capable of, since it weighs about as much as a XSAPI plate on the low end and is 10% thicker.


Research History


One of the most promising, but very conservative findings during the world-wide scouring for information, research, and data; was fueled by additional funding coming from the expansion of CoHRE membership. It was discovered that ceramic plates had an issue where they were temporary not in the "crystal state" that made them so strong and durable, with this problem mostly caused by high speed gunshots, specially above 900 meters (2952 ft) per second. During these high speed impacts, ceramic plates would appear to behave like a liquid and solid at a same time, changing the exact structure of the molecules and rearranging the atoms. What makes ceramic plates so strong is that each atom is bonded to a number of other atoms, much like diamonds, and if the arrangement is compromised, so is the strength and durability. This was further confirmed on page 75 of another very solid source. Considering that Boron Carbide performed poorly against 55 grain or lighter bullets traveling as fast as 3,260 fps out of a 20 inch barrel, these findings fit into what was suspected and understood. It was considered that NIJ III plates were rated to survive at least a minimum of six hits for the ammo and caliber they were rated to stop, and if Silicon could help the plate endure more damage from high speed hits, that perhaps plates could be "eight hit rated".

After all of this thinking and another meeting, it was decided that a Boron Carbide solution would be made at between NIJ III and IV ratings, along with beyond IV. Many members of the research, design, and engineering team were almost certain that with proper reinforcement, plates that couldn't stop common M193 or 55 grain .223/5.56 could be made to do so. Plates that were rated to only stop six hits of a specific kind of ammo, could stop eight. This was a big deal because these were the two largest flaws with III plates, which stopped them from seeing serious military use after IV plates came out. III plates had been vulnerable to too many common threats, despite being cheaper and lighter then other solutions. A few fringe members of the team stated and made their case, that despite Titanium Disulfide being expensive when made into nanotubes, the nanotubes could indeed be used to reinforce armor, and used in a very minimal amount. Due to the work of other firms and their current calculations, it was expected that even if a third of two ceramic plates was Titanium Disulfide (TiS2) nanotubes, it would cost six to seven thousand NSD for both the plates. There was also argument and debate, between taking the "Dauntless approach" and shoving nanotubes in front of Boron Carbide, or taking a "Reinforcement Approach" like was being proposed by firms producing Carbon-based nanotubes. Whichever approach was chosen, three kilograms of TiS2 would need to get below 1400 NSD, or any TiS2/Coron Carbide plate would price out most potential users.

There was data and statements made that Carbon-based nanotubes could be produced cheaper then 200 NSD a kilogram, but it remained to be see if that was true, and if this meant anything for TiS2 production. At this point, it seemed yet again, that the Arbitrator Vest Combo Solution might not really be possible and affordale, despite all of the funding, research, and work in the last 12 years. There was a lightly larger glimmer of hope, a little flame rather then a flicker, when page 82-85 of one of the hardest sources to read revealed something very important. A lot of the strength and weakness of ballistic fibers and ceramics was due to imperfections, and these imperfections lessened the smaller the fibers or layers were. Even UHMWPE fibers, were showing noticeable improvements when freed of some defects, and worked on a smaller scale. This had very fascinating applications for UHMWPE, M-5-1 Fiber, along with a number of ceramic plates. Could Boron Carbide be taken down to the nanometer level? Could TiS2 do an amazing job without being nanotubes, but being worked on nanometer layers? Research and discover was showing that even a slight improvement in strength on each individual fiber or layer, could mean serious improve on the plate, vest or helmet as a whole. Page 77 also indicated that many, many body armor manufacturers likely had a drop in quality for their product, caused by desperate attempts to replace military purpose powders made by military purpose facilities, with commercial factories or powders.



There was five whole days without any kind of progress at all, till one researcher woke up with their head rested on Page 85 of a source. Blinking and rubbing their eyes, they looked down and noticed that indeed a few labs had reported that UHMWPE had reached a tensile strength of 7GPa in a lab. Narrowing their eyes, they lifted back and looked at their notes, noticing that Spectra 1000 was reported to have a maximum tensile strength of 3.4 GPa. M5-1 fiber exceeded 4 GPa easily, and if UHMWPE could be pushed to a later point, then certainly M5-1 could, and indeed many tests on M-5 fiber had been done with inferior quality of fiber as well. Since the factories were being setup in a number of nations to produce M5-1 fiber anyways, it wouldn't be too hard to make a hard armor plate out of it. Attempts had been made in the past to make hard armor out of UHMWPE before, but it had always faired poorly against M855 out of a 20 inch barrel, and such ammo/barrel combos are very very common. Over a long day, the design, research, and engineering team almost hit a slump, as they couldn't figure out for certain if they could produce a lightweight plate that could handle the pressures of war. That was till someone asked two very important questions: "Is there a UHMWPE/Ceramic Combo plate that is lighter then a Ceramic Plate, and under 400 NSD?" and "Has someone tried to make a UHMWPE plate that is IV rated, and thus capable of handling all 5.56?"

The answers were "Yes" and "Yes", and so the design specifications were quickly drawn, and the factories would soon be put to work. During the "high" or "ecstasy" of having finally made serious progress in hard armor, further data had come in. Two things were made very clear to the research, design, and engineering team. First, no nation had ever paid more then 3,700 NSD for a plate of Dauntless, and that was factoring in the profits Dauntless made, that wasn't the cost of materials and work. Second, the factories that had produced the previous "Coalition/ICE Vest", had ran at moderate production for 3 years and were preserved since then. The plates that produced in an incorrect shape and style, but they had a reasonable composition, which was a mixture of TiS2 nanotubes, nanometer layers, and micrometer layers. A lot of phone calls happened, a lot of math was done, and there was a great deal of discussion. Assuming that the Dauntless plate was half or more nanotubes, that meant between 2 pounds or 1/2 inch boron-carbide equivalent was nanotubes, per plate. They could could reinforce a IV plate with just 1/4th the number of nanotubes in a Dauntless plate, and this could possibly cost as low as 900 NSD.

There was the easy capabilities to exceed IV, sitting there this whole time, within composite hard armor. It was surprising that one of the largest and grandest arms dealers hadn't cranked out such plates in their millions, as small companies had made tens of thousands and they worked very well for over two years. Not only that, but M-5-1 Fiber had been neglected for years, perhaps decades, while the ability to enhance Boron Carbide with silicon and smaller manufactured layers with less flaws, had been available for at least three months now. If the previous technology of over two years had made it easy for a IV plate to be five hit rated, they could easily squeeze it up to seven or even eight hits with new materials. On top of that, it was competitive to offer a 1366 NSD plate, and they could produce a TiS2 nanotube/Boron Carbide/M-5-1 Fiber composite hard plate for just 1200 NSD if they produced in massive numbers, according to their calculations. They could easily even make plates as light as 2.13kg (4.5 lb) each, and sell them for 1600 each.

10% on 10% on 10% is 33.1% less Back face deformation
Last edited by Pentaga Giudici on Tue Apr 07, 2020 4:04 pm, edited 18 times in total.
Pentagonal Armaments
Sometimes you just need something to protect yourself with.


People talking without speaking. People hearing without listening.

I'm surprised too, maybe it's a sign things are looking up.

User avatar
Pentaga Giudici
Diplomat
 
Posts: 721
Founded: Feb 13, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Pentaga Giudici » Wed Apr 01, 2020 3:49 pm

Specifications


Due to gaps between the NIJ standard protection level of "IIII" and "IV", Pentagonal Armaments, CoHRE, and our research partners have had to invent a completely new protection level to define the requirements for modern hard armor plates. Since the NIJ III rating requires multi-hit protection, at least six shots without failure, our rating of III+B requires the same. To meet the III+B rating, a vest or piece of armor must stop six rounds of M855 moving at 3000 fps. An identical plate must also be capable of stopping six rounds of M193 moving at 3300 fps.

Our IV+B rating, means that a plate is rated, with the proper vest, to stop 126.6 grain M933 Hard-Steel AP 7.62x51mm NATO moving at 2867 fps, three times. This rating also means the plate, with the proper vest, is rated to stop seven rounds of M2 AP 30-06, along with one round of .338 Remington Ultra Magnum.

Ceramic/M5-1 Fiber Composite Plate:

Rating:III+B
Protection Area Collarbone down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 1.93 kg (4.35 lb), [Each]
Thickness: 1.1 inches (2.8 cm) thick
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 400 NSD

Enhanced Ceramic/M5-1 Fiber Composite Plate:

Rating:IV (7 hit rated), IV+B (3 hit rated)
Protection Area Collarbone down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 2.8 kg (6.25 lb), [Each]
Thickness: 1.1 inches (2.8 cm) thick
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 430 NSD

"Spec Ops" Ceramic/M5-1 Fiber Composite Plate:

Rating:IV (7 hit rated) IV+B (3 hit rated)
Protection Area Collarbone down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 2.13kg (4.5 lb), [Each]
Thickness: 1.1 inches (2.8 cm) thick
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 750 NSD

"Constantia" TiS2 nanotube/Boron Carbide/M-5-1 Fiber Composite Plate:

Rating:IV (7 hit rated) [Testing is showing it stopping .338 Laputa, but backface deformation is a concern. .338 Remington Ultra Magnum appears within acceptable limits] IV+B (3 hit rated)
Protection Area Collarbone down to just above the hips/navel.
Weight: 2.08kg (6.8 lbs), [Each]
Thickness: 1.1 inches (2.8 cm) thick
Fits Under Jacket/Tuxedo Suit?: No
Expected Cost: 1200 NSD
Last edited by Pentaga Giudici on Tue Apr 07, 2020 4:10 pm, edited 7 times in total.
Pentagonal Armaments
Sometimes you just need something to protect yourself with.


People talking without speaking. People hearing without listening.

I'm surprised too, maybe it's a sign things are looking up.

User avatar
Pentaga Giudici
Diplomat
 
Posts: 721
Founded: Feb 13, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Pentaga Giudici » Mon Apr 06, 2020 11:53 pm

This is a closed thread, post at the storefront
Pentagonal Armaments
Sometimes you just need something to protect yourself with.


People talking without speaking. People hearing without listening.

I'm surprised too, maybe it's a sign things are looking up.


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