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MA9A2 Wheeled Modular Armoured Vehicle

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Anemos Major
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MA9A2 Wheeled Modular Armoured Vehicle

Postby Anemos Major » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:19 pm

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MA9A2 WMAV Prototype Vehicle 01, Directorate of Technological Development (Ministry of War)



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"What's better than a soldier who does his job well? A soldier who does every job well."
-Second Marshal Alentyr Imranei, 1972



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MA9A2 WMAV APC, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 APC
Name: MA9A2 Armoured Personnel Carrier

Key Data:
Crew: 2 (Commander, Driver) + 10
Cost: 2.2 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 2.4m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 19t ( w/ RWS)

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on Remote Weapons System (powered, 2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 34.21hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 WMAV (Wheeled Modular Armoured Vehicle) family is a series of 8x8 wheeled vehicles developed under the auspices of the Anemonian Project Fiensietyr to create an indigenous series of armoured vehicles capable of filling a large number of roles effectively and efficiently, employing a highly modular armour and equipment layout to allow for the creation of multiple role specific variants with minimal modification. With eighteen variants of the vehicle in service with the Imperial Armed Forces of Anemos Major (APC, IFV, ATGM, VLATGM, MGS, SPGM, MLRS, SHORADS, RV, CBRNRV, CV, BCR, MEV, LMV, FOV, EV, ARV, MLV), of which thirteen are currently offered for export, the MA9A2 is a highly protected and portable high mobility vehicle, serving as both the mainstay of the Anemonian Mechanised Forces and in a support role for the Armoured, combining the sophistication of Anemonian technological prowess with the practicality of Anemonian experience to create a highly capable series of combat vehicles designed to achievement battlefield flexibility across a wide number of areas, and dominance within each of them.


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With the retirement of the MA8A5 Tracked Armoured Personnel Carrier after some thirty long years of service, and its replacement by the VAB family of armoured vehicles following the 1994 military reforms that were to bring about far-reaching changes within the Anemonian military establishment, the last indigenous personnel carrier to be used by the Anemonian Crown Army for nearly twenty years passed from service ingloriously, obsolescent and disliked. A notoriously faulty vehicle, its retirement was a matter of virtual necessity for the Crown Army; with the introduction of the VAB the Crown Army was provided with an effective solution for its personnel carrying and multirole armoured needs that was to persist for nearly two decades.

However, as was the case with much of the materiel procured during this period, the VAB's fatal flaw lay in the fact that its development and production were both overseas affairs. With the self-sufficiency focal resurgence observed within the military-industrial complex in the early years of the 21st century, the decade following the 1994 military reforms was one which saw a subsequent shift towards the adoption of indigenously procured equipment. As funding rises continued to grow, movements towards the replacement of the 1994 vintage equipment by domestic alternatives began to grow in significance and influence, the result of which was the issuing of initially developmental, then productive contracts by the Imperial Office of War, and the Crown Army's roster of armoured vehicles was no exception. As early as 2001, significant political pressure was being placed on the Army's HT9 tank development program to ensure the creation of a domestically developed and produced vehicle, with vast subsidisation in play to ensure a domestically favourable result in the initial stage competition. With an RFI issued in 2003 by the Crown Army concerning the development of a lightweight wheeled armoured vehicle for personnel carrying purposes, the same trend seemed set to force the VAB into retirement a decade after its adoption. Though the aim of the program was simply to create a domestically developed and produced alternative to the VAB, and though it would eventually result in the relatively new vehicle's early retirement, the development of the MA9 program beyond its original aims would result in the extension of the program by some five years beyond its originally envisaged schedule and the creation of an entire family of vehicles far more innovative and flexible in its design than the original RFI called for.

The first vehicle of the MA9 family was a straightforward affair; a straight copy of the VAB in concept, and produced by Arsenal Fierei IECpl in a low profile program with the sole purpose of replacing foreign materiel with virtually identical domestic alternatives. MA9 in its initial form, formally known as IMA9 to reflect the vehicle's position as a prototype, was a stretched 8x development of the VAB, retaining the vehicle's base structure while incorporating a larger 450hp powerplant to compensate for its added weight. An unambitious vehicle which was to be developed within two years as a means of removing the VAB, IMA9 was forced through a rapid developmental process with the aim of pushing it into production by late 2006 for distribution to front-line forces, roughly matching the projected fielding schedule of what was then known as the HT9A6. Initial testing indicated a number of faults with the new powerplant, which in turn pushed the initial production of the vehicle behind schedule; as a result, the MA9's design was finalised by February 2006 and by then, the procurement environment had changed radically.

In January 2006, following field testing of the HT9A6 in Asakura, the decision was taken to redevelop the tank in its entirety in an alternate direction to remedy some significant issues observed in the performance efficiency of the tank's 140mm ETC main armament in combat. This decision was accompanied by a general review of the many programs precipitated by the funding rises of the new century, performed by more scrutinising eyes whose focus lay more in materiel efficiency than simple domestic economic concerns; many were quickly scrapped due to clear cost inefficiency issues. This swathe of procurement reviews and cancellations was significant enough to reach less prioritised programs such as the then MA9 WAPC, and where many were cancelled, the Crown Army was more reluctant to halt development of a new generation wheeled APC. A significant portion of the Army staff remained of the view that the adoption of the VAB in 1994, a vehicle of questionable age and utility in a world of tracked and 8x8 vehicles, had been a premature and deeply flawed decision, leading to a semi self-defeating state of affairs within their service which resulted in a branch of the Army upon which much more doctrinal importance had been placed in the aftermath of the 1994 reforms being equipped with substandard vehicles with which to perform their mission. It had become increasingly clear during the procurement review that the MA9 was a stopgap vehicle with very little in terms of practical superiority over the vehicle it was set to replace, but that the VAB required a replacement nonetheless; as a result of this, the decision was taken to redevelop the MA9 similarly to the HT9A6, and this marked the commencement of the MA9 developmental program in its currently recognisable form. From the creation of a domestically produced wheeled APC to provide cosmetic changes in the materiel composition of the Crown Army, the program shifted to the development and production of an entire family of highly ambitious and combat flexible wheeled armoured vehicles capable of going toe-to-toe with the most modern vehicles of its kind on the modern battlefield. Responsibility for the program was taken from Arsenal Fierei's hands and transferred to FOAM, the government-subsidised corporate alliance responsible for the development of the HT9 main battle tank, and the vehicle's evolution into its production form began in earnest.

Over the three year re-developmental period taken by FOAM to create the MA9A2, the vehicle's conceptualisation radically away from its original form. Though the 8x8 layout was maintained, the design of the vehicle shifted from the VAB-inspired construction of the IMA9 towards a vehicle that reflected the design of modern wheeled 8x8s like the Type 96 WAPC or VBCI, both of which had been procured in limited numbers by several exploratory committees within the Crown Army prior to the redefinition of the MA9 program in an effort to develop Anemonian technological and doctrinal expertise in the field of armoured personnel carrying 8x8s. This resulted in a greater weight than the VAB derivative vehicle that the IMA9 had been, which required a larger powerplant; in turn, FOAM turned their attention to the creation of a new, more powerful engine which departed from the MIDR utilised in the VAB in its design. The defining change in the MA9's design, however, was the adoption of a modular construction; not only employing modular armour layouts, the new MA9 employed a flexible rear construction to lower the costs of variant development and production, greatly increasing the potential range of roles which the new MA9 would be able to fill as a vehicle at a far lower cost. These major changes resulted in the creation of the MA9A1 prototype vehicle by 2008, tested by FOAM in battlefield conditions under the auspices of the Imperial Office of War to determine its effectiveness as an item of combat equipment in field service. Overall, the results of the testing were highly favourable; however, like so many armoured vehicles, the MA9A1's chronically underpowered and faultily designed powerplant were its bane. Redevelopment of the engine along different lines by FOAM with an added focus on power resulted in a satisfactory solution to the MA9A1's power-related troubles; the result was the creation of the MA9A2. Produced in a prototype form by FOAM in 2009 and presented to the Imperial Office of War, the MA9A2, already combat tested in a limited capacity, was ratified for service by the Crown Army Materiel Directorate with little delay and production commenced soon afterwards. By early 2010, the Crown Army began to receive the MA9A2 in larger quantities, and it quickly received its baptism of fire on the battlefields of Asakura in the service of frontline Mechanised formations.

In service, the MA9A2's conceptual flexibility proved that its transition into productive reality had been almost wholesale, with very little suggesting that the wide range of roles for which a variety of MA9A2 variants had been constructed were unsatisfactorily filled. As the MA9A2's field service continued, further feedback from troops resulted in the further development of the vehicle on the basis of field experience, such as the addition of a remote weapons system to various vehicles throughout the WMAV family, but the overall result of the MA9A2 program in its own right was clear. An 8x8 family of vehicles more than capable of providing the Anemonian Armed Forces with the combat dominance they required on the many battlefields to which they were deployed, and one of the most impressive vehicles to be born from the Anemonian automotive industry in a rare marriage of expertise between a number of Anemonian world leaders in a range of fields, the MA9A2 is a family of vehicles which covers a wide range of combat and non-combat roles in service and exerts characteristically Anemonian superiority and dominance across all of them. With hundreds of thousands of vehicles already procured by the Imperial Armed Forces, combat tested and trusted by those fortunate enough to utilise it on a day-to-day basis, the MA9A2 has developed from a relatively unambitious domestic production program into one of the finest vehicles of its kind in the modern day, unrivalled in its range of potential uses and its high performance in every case.


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The main armament of the MA9A2 WMAV APC can vary, and the sole restriction is that it be able to fit on the variant of the Ortel Powered Remote Weapons System utilised by the vehicle. Capable of accepting anything up to a 40mm automatic grenade launcher, the station is usually equipped with the MG/H8A3 12.7mm machine gun in service. Capable of 360 degrees rotation, as well as +75, -25 elevation, the Ortel is a fully armoured RWS, utilising IRHA plating on sensitive areas like connections and optical equipment, equipped with optical, target acquisition and ballistic correction capabilities. Interfacing is achieved through a joystick for traversing and a 15-inch touch screen, which is linked in turn to a pair of cameras, one 3CCD daytime camera system and one forward-looking infra-red thermal imaging system. Both equipped with a laser rangefinding system, the gyrostabilised platform is able to offer a high degree of accuracy, even when on the move. Via the touch screen, the user is able to utilise both available optics to designate and ‘lock-on’ to targets, from where the laser rangefinder will feed distance information back to the ballistic computer which, utilising environmental data such as vehicle movement and round performance, will automatically adjust the firing arc to compensate for these. As such, the Ortel is capable of offering a high degree of accuracy, day and night, mobile or not, due to a high degree of environmental awareness and inbuilt ballistic correction capabilities that give it the ability to strike distant targets within seconds. As weapons fired from the Ortel tend to utilise electrical ignition, fire control (firing mode, safe) are all monitored and changed from within the vehicle itself. The primary weapon employed on the Ortel when in service on the WMAV APC is the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 Heavy Machine Gun. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. The weapon itself is normally operated via a trigger located on the weapon’s spade trigger, but one of the differences between the infantry deployed and most vehicle deployed versions of the MG/H8A3 is the fact that they are, in fact, initial electrically ignited weapons (i.e. the initial trigger pull is replaced by electric ignition) to make them compatible with the HT9A7’s co-axial block system and greatly mechanically simplify the Remote Weapon Systems in service with the Anemonian Armed Forces. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets. The RWS is loaded at any one time with 200 rounds of ammunition fed by a box-stored link, with another 2,200 rounds stored within the vehicle in 200 round boxes for rapid reloading.

The use of a remote weapons system in the first place was a highly controversial option due to the additional weight burden posed by the incorporation of an RWS, especially a relatively heavy one like the Ortel; however, the high performance electronic aiming control and gun stabilisation of the Ortel in unison with the MG/H8A3's high performance against a range of unarmoured and lightly armoured targets has largely vindicated this decision, providing the MA9A2 with long range mobile firing capabilities usually associated with vehicles of a much higher weight range in a compact and protected package.


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The passive protection suite of the MA9A2 is separated into two components, its base protective structure and its modular armour addons. The base structure of the MA9A2's armour is considered to be a component part of the MA9A2 vehicle itself, while its modular armour suite, Orlontis, was provided with a separate designation and is treated as an additional component. The utilisation of modular armour layouts with the MA9A2 in lieu of fixed vehicular armour is a key component of the WMAV's ability to thrive across so many different potential roles; with Orlontis, MA9A2 is as capable of acting as a quick response, air-portable base of fire as it is of acting as a heavily armoured direct support vehicle in frontline, armour supporting operations, and this flexibility is matched by the ease of replacement and operability exhibited by the Orlontis modular armour system, making it a very extant and very effective battlefield asset for operators of the MA9A2.

The basic protection suite of the MA9A2 is composed of its basic structural armour and spall liner, which make up the innermost portions of the MA9A2's armour suite. The basic structural armour is designed to combine maximum potential protection with controlled weight to allow the vehicle to exhibit its full air portability when stripped down to its base configuration, thus facilitating the vehicle's transportation and increasing reaction speed. As such, it is constructed of Type 7720. Type 7720 is a Titanium-Aluminium alloy exhibiting the usual properties of similar Titanium alloys in its role as an armouring metal while surpassing others significantly and convincingly; in more concrete terms, the primary characteristics exhibited by Type 7720 that make it so favourable a material are the combination of high stress resistance and toughness for its weight range, as well as corrosion and temperature resistance. The efficiency gains are made clear by the simple fact that Type 7720 is capable of exhibiting field performance of a similar nature to ceramic materials despite standing at roughly 38% the weight of an equivalent volume of rolled homogeneous armour; this combination of extraordinary weight savings coupled with ceramic-level properties makes it an ideal candidate for the structural armouring and composition of the MA9A2. Difficulties exist concerning the workability of titanium alloys without significant capital expenditure; however, as a collection of firms with industrial stakes and operations, FOAM had the added advantage of possessing said capital prior to commencing production, which greatly decreased the potential costs of widespread titanium alloy use. This Type 7720 base structural armouring is further complemented within the vehicle by a sophisticated spall protection liner. The liner itself is composed of 20% glass composition fibreglass, which is in turn backed by Spectra and rubber. This combination of materials expends any energy of incoming projectiles against the fibreglass liner, spreading energy across a wider area; any further cracking at the liner level is then absorbed by the polymer/rubber lining, thus preventing spall-effect projectiles from entering crew and cargo compartments in their entirety. This maximisation of interior safety is of particular importance for a family of vehicles like the MA9A2, which are more often than not responsible for the carrying of infantry; the base armour layout alone provides a degree of interior protection virtually unimaginable on vehicles like the VBL.

However, the cornerstone of the MA9A2's protective qualities lies in Orlontis, its uniquely modular family of armour additions that allow it to operate in a truly flexible fashion both on the battlefield and off, taking the protection of the vehicle from the small arms levels protected against by the base structure up to 35mm + areas and ensuring protection for the MA9A2 against the newer generations of weapons which it would be expected to face on the battlefield, including 30mm cannons in most basic armour configurations (which modern IFV level vehicles have begun to adopt in greater numbers as armour competence amongst extant armoured vehicles steadily increases). Orlontis, as an armour system, covers a wide variety of areas; as well as the frontal, side, top and rear armour suited of the MA9A2, Orlontis also provides optional IED protection and full slat armour options for protection against a wide variety of threats. The basic Orlontis armour layout, that which is expected to protect the vehicle from conventional threats, is generally composed of 'panels' of armour which are installed on various parts of the vehicle, the exact composition of which varies with the threats being faced by the vehicle and its desired weight range. The basic material employed in Orlontis armour plating is, again, Type 7720 Ti-Al alloy, which provides a marginally higher cost but greater efficiency alternative to traditional steel based armour materials like RHA. The Type 7720 employed in Orlontis is utilised as a composite with a similarly high efficiency ceramic, Titanium Diboride (TiB2). Titanium Diboride, explored and developed as an alternative to titanium carbide ceramics and composites during the development of the HT9A6 onwards, is a highly capable ceramic material which provides unrivalled levels of protection against most potential threats. At room remperatire, its hardness is almost three times that of the equivalent volume of fully hardened structural steel. Its melting point is also incredibly high, at 3225°C, and the result is that armour blocks incorporating normal Titanium Diboride tend to be both incredibly impact resistant and capable of withstanding the high heat generation of chemical energy warheads. Chemically, it is also a relatively field-friendly material, insofar as it is more stable than tungsten carbide when in contact with iron, and less prone to oxidation at anything short of extremely high temperatures. The combination of properties described above come together to create a material highly effective when defeating both high performance HE and KE rounds, and TiB2 is used in conjunction with Type 7720 in composite armour blocks to maximise the MA9A2's protection against a wide variety of ballistic threats. Unlike the ceramics utilised in the HT9A7, the TiB2 employed in Orlontis is not nano-treated; this is to reduce its material density, decreasing weight overall. This composite plating is then lined on the surface by an additional level of ballistic protection; a TiB2 based metal composite matrix with a fibreglass spall backing. This metal composite matrix, by being significantly harder than materials used in most ammunition-based applications, is capable of breaking up rounds, including penetrators, and, through the toughness of the metal composite matrix, results in the controlled distribution of kinetic energy absorbed from the round. As the controlled distribution results in the creation of a damage area only marginally larger than the size of the round from which energy has been transferred, with any spall effects absorbed by the fibreglass backing, the external protection is capable of sustaining multiple hits from anything up to the 12.7-14.5mm round range commonly utilised in modern heavy machine-guns. The resultant outer layer of armour protection is significantly lighter than the equivalent volume of RHA, and nonetheless capable of entirely stopping armour piercing small arms fire while significantly wearing down the effectiveness of high performance kinetic penetrators before they reach the armour blocks themselves.

The comprehensive protection provided by the basic Orlontis block, which can be modified in both composition and size, is further augmented by additional options provided by the modular armour suite in its entirety. NERA blocks, though heavy, can be added to the MA9A2. The NERA utilised within the MA9A2 is formed out of panels consisting of a 10mm thick layer of rubber lining sandwiched between two 6mm thick plates of steel (Domex Protect 500). When a projectile hits the NERA panel, resultant outward motion by the two Domex plates increases the effective thickness of the armour in that area, providing increased protection against projectiles. Furthermore, however, the lack of an explosive element means that the NERA utilised within the MA9A2 is both capable of taking multiple hits (to some extent) and causes no resultant collateral damage, as well as being far more resistant to the effects of a tandem charge warhead; both in terms of protection and resultant damage, it is a more desirable form of protection. Orlontis also comprises slat armour, which can be fitted around the vehicle to provide space protection against HEAT rounds by providing the vehicle with an impact and limited proximity fuzed HEAT ordnance premature detonation mechanism, and is composed of thin 'blades' of 5xxx series Aluminium-Manganese alloy fitted together in a structure of the same material to provide protection against incoming fuzed projectiles in a fashion that limits damage to the main vehicle itself. Finally, Orlontis also incorporates a body-on-hull V-hull additional to the MA9A2 which is capable of providing the vehicle with IED and mine resistance via a V-shaped energy redirecting Type 7720 Ti-Al alloy hull addition, protecting crew and components from underside damage.


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To provide active protection to the MA9A2, engineers at FOAM endeavoured to create a lightened and simplified version of the Solothel Networked Vehicle Protection System for use by the WMAV. Labelled Orenthel, this active protection system incorporates a portion of Solothel's soft-kill systems, while refraining from using systems perceived to be overly heavy and nonetheless capable of receiving additional modifications.

The detection system utilised by Orenthel is two-tiered, and aims to achieve the highest possible detection speed with a minimal number of false detects by utilising a range of data from different sources to create an accurate picture of the vehicle's combat environment, and thus maximise the effectiveness of its threat detection and thus prevention and interception. The first tier of the vehicle’s sensor system is a set of laser and IR warning sensors installed around the vehicle. Within each sensor unit, both coarse and fine resolution detection systems are employed to provide a wide degree of coverage to the MA9A2. With overlapping sensor coverage, the system detects lasing and thermal signatures and is able to provide the crew not only with warnings, but informs them of the specific sector in which lasing has been detected, providing the crew with directional threat awareness that then allows for accurate reaction by both the crew and the automated threat response systems. The second tier of the detection system is a millimetre-wavelength radar based on flat panel additions around the vehicle and a single fixed unit to provide the MA9A2 with 360° degrees radar protection, allowing the MA9A2 to not only acquire incoming targets, but their speed, relative distance and profile to create an accurate picture of the projectile. The effectiveness of the system is, again, greatly increased by overlapping search sectors; together with the high performance processors utilised by Orenthel, this allows the overall target acquisition array to utilise its wide selection of sensors to achieve extremely high reaction speeds, greatly increasing the speed and thus effectiveness and success rate of its target interception. The two tiers of the system guarantee the accurate and effective threat detection of a number of different threats at a number of different ranges, and it is this effectiveness that gives Orenthel the ability to surpass and exceed most current active protection systems.

Smoke generation is usually achieved by a number of 80mm grenade units, generally varying from between twelve to twenty-four launchers with a total of anything between twenty-four to forty-eight canisters installed on the vehicle itself, and can be set to be launched via manual ignition or automatic ignition upon sensor reception. The exact parameters can be set in detail; as the different sensor equipment used by Orenthel, and to some extent profile comparison, allow it to identify reception information and categorise it, automatic smoke ignition can be set to occur within limited parameters, such as lasing.

The 80mm grenade launchers themselves are not restricted to a single type of ammunition. In some cases, they can be equipped with 80mm anti-personnel grenades; these utilise hexogen tolite as an explosive base for the directional shattering of a steel casing, resulting in a high-explosive/metal fragmentation based anti-infantry defence mechanism with the directional deployment of the device optimised by direct control by Orenthel itself, which is capable of utilising returns from its IR sensors if necessary to identify and eliminate hostile infantry forces (though this option can be turned off when operating in conjunction with allied infantry).

In terms of smoke, the MA9A2 is provided with two separate types of smoke for operation in close proximity to unarmoured elements, and operation in open areas against hostile forces. This differentiation is necessary due to the nature of the smoke composition used in each grenade. The ‘A’ model, designed with operation in close proximity to non-protected elements in mind, utilises the explosive dispersal of chlorosulfuric acid to spread out an aerosol smoke cloud and reduce the acid concentration of the hydrochloric and sulphuric acid produced as a result of the reaction. To compensate for the resultant reduced effectiveness of the smoke cloud, the smoke composition also contains fine metal coated carbon fibres to act as obscurants in the millimetre wave region, thus allowing Composition A to provide the MA9A2 with adequate protection in a variety of ranges. Composition B differs slightly from Composition A in that, while retaining the explosive dispersal mechanism and the carbon fibre content to act as a radar obscurant, the actual chemical composition of the smoke grenade has been changed to a white phosphorous-based composition. This is due to the pyrophoric qualities of WP; because it burns when put into contact with the air, it creates a short period of IR inhibition through a highly volatile exothermal reaction. Furthermore, the chemical content of Composition B grenades is increased in comparison to A, with the explosive dispersal lessened, due to the fact that it is designed solely for effectiveness and disregards general welfare due to its envisaged area of use; as such, Composition B grenades offer a much higher performance alternative to the MA9A2 when engaging hostile forces in the open field, a quick acting smoke grenade that, through the use of white phosphorous and metal coated carbon fibres and their explosive dispersal, create a quick blanket of thick smoke effective as an obscurant in the visible, infra-red and millimetre-wave spectrums to provide the MA9A2 with full spectrum defence. Of course, both Composition A and B are potentially harmful to those caught within the device’s area of effect upon ignition (without protective equipment in the case of A, and in either case with B), and as such, automatic deployment by Orenthel is an easily alterable option; Orenthel’s control mechanism, displaying flexibility as always, allows the crew to select the parameters within which the smoke canisters are to be deployed, ranging from full automation upon threat detection to complete manual control. As such, the 80mm grenade-based defensive suit utilised by the MA9A2 provides the vehicle's crew with a highly effective set of soft-kill defence mechanisms capable of block the target locks of weapons operators and in-flight munitions, but also allows them to minimise collateral damage via a selection of ammunition and the flexibility of the control system. In addition, unlike the basic Orenthel system employed by the YrC9, the MA9A2 is also equipped with a hard-kill component to its active protection measures; the system consists of a canister-based system employing the vertical launch of ‘grenade’ units. Similar to a grenadeT in appearance, this unit is similar to the anti-personnel 80mm grenades employed by the MA9A2's multipurpose launchers in principle; utilising a composition of hexogen tolite and RDX as its explosive base, these canisters directionally deploy titanium carbide ball bearings to intercept and destroy incoming projectiles. A soft launch mechanism propels the canister at high speed from its launcher, and impulse thrusters allow it to make rapid course corrections in mid-air before engaging and eliminating the target, either destroying it outright or destabilising it to the extent that it is incapable of effectively hitting the vehicle.


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The MA9A2 APC, as an armoured personnel carrier, is primarily designed to ferry troops about the battlefield. As such, when compared to other vehicles within its family, the electronics suite of the APC is relatively rudimentary, limited to the base electronics of the MA9A2, required for its automotive operation, and the sighting systems incorporated on the RWS platform employed by the MA9A2. The two are combined to provide the APC with a nonetheless formidable degree of peripheral circumstantial awareness and those target identification and engagement capabilities required to make the MA9A2 an effective combat platform as far as necessary to fully complement its role as an APC in an efficient manner.

The primary sights employed by the vehicle's commander are the optronics mounted on board the Ortel RWS, composed of one 3CCD daytime camera system and one forward-looking infra-red thermal imaging system, both equipped with a laser rangefinding system for target acquisition purposes. Interfacing is achieved through a joystick for traversing and a 15-inch touch screen, as well as keyboard based control and additional LCD touch screens for command purposes and optics mode selection. Additionally, the commander is provided with a 360 degrees CCD vision block for rapid environmental situational awareness updates and maintenance; the visual feeds can be displayed and cycled through on the commander's panoramic LCD touch screen displays to provide a comprehensive picture of the vehicle's immediate surroundings.

The driver employs two main visual inputs. The first of these is his forward facing 3CCD vision block and FLIR units. Incorporated into the area directly in front of the entry hatch, the driver's forward facing optronic data inputs are presented, like the commander, on three 30cm LCD touch screens placed before the driver's station in a panoramic arrangement to facilitate data acquisition and awareness. The driver employs a standard driving wheel configuration for the purposes of steering the vehicle, for ease of familiarity when in use. The two stage forward facing visual data inputs provide the driver with effective day or night vision in a highly accessible package, facilitating the simple but arduous task of driving the vehicle. Additionally, the driver is provided with four CCD cameras placed at the vehicle's corner's to provide near-complete peripheral vision; this allows for the execution of manoeuvres including rearward movement and turns without physically moving from the driver's station, with the driver able instead to utilise rearward camera feeds to fully control the vehicle from the driver's station.

The MA9A2’s networking system, due to the high quantity of information sharing between the MA9A2 and various organisational structures at both a vertical and horizontal level, is designed to be both high performance on paper and usable in a variety of different manners to ensure that the high specifications of the MA9A2 are not only used independently, but to their full extent when coordinated with other vehicles and, vertically, in conjunction with other assets. The MA9A2’s combat networking suite, labelled SAIC, connects the individual tank to the Anemonian Crown Army’s CombatNet (supporting units up to the battalion level). CombatNet, due to the introduction of the ICS21 program, is a battalion networking system utilises by everything from Mechanised infantrymen to artillery batteries, and is universally employed to facilitate integration into control networks at a higher level (BattleNet, WarNet etc). Rather, instead of utilising completely different software for each combat asset networked into the Crown Army’s C4I structure, CombatNet utilises a combination of base software together with asset-specific modules (for tank units, mechanised infantry, artillery and other assets) to simplify networking logistics while catering to the specific needs of individual combat assets to create a system that is both efficient and effective. At its most basic level, CombatNet is a cartographic display. With rapid updating enabled at the platoon, company and battalion level, this cartographic display is able to show blue force and enemy troop locations and movements as detected by allied assets, operational plans fed down from various levels, as well as status reports and information from various levels to greatly increase the level and quality of group coordination, amalgamating the myriad of information entering the system via a highly capable Geographical Information System.

SAIC is also utilised to manage the MA9A2’s communications suite. The high capacity combat network radio employed by SAIC for limited range communications is a high capacity data radio operating as a frequency-hopping system in the UHF range (225-450 MHz), and supports high data transfer speeds to permit the utilisation of the HCDF connection for rapid and secure voice and data transfer and communications between vehicles for limited distance level coordination. At this level, the MA9A2 is also capable of employing IEEE 802.11 standard encrypted wireless local area networks for inter-vehicle connection. E-WLAN connectivity permits vehicles to achieve high speed, ad-hoc networking supporting secure data, video and voice transfers between individual WMAVs. A chipset incorporated into the computer utilises an encryption algorithm to secure access to Crown Army level WLAN networks, employing COMSEC/NETSEC encryption, meaning that enemy access or viewing of such networks is impossible, especially in the combat environments where the use of such systems is envisaged. For communications and networking at higher speed and longer range, SAIC is also equipped with digital broadband connectivity with satellite and stationary fibre-optic links; though such tactical internet connections allow for theatre-wide secure high speed connection, data transfers and features such as extended inter-formation communication and messaging, not to mention commercial internet interfacing if necessary, and though most Anemonian theatre-wide networking hubs of this kind employ automatic network formation and autonomous organisation, together with interconnection by utilising individual users not only as recipients but as intermediary nodes, to maximise speed (over six time the speed of HCDF connections when transmitting messages, for example), ease of use and efficiency by removing the need for a significant dedicated communications infrastructure, the reliability of such networks on the battlefield is nonetheless susceptible to enemy attack. As such, the MA9A2’s broadband internet connection is more of a ‘bonus’ feature permitted further effectiveness if usable; SAIC, and CombatNet, are designed to operate at maximum efficiency via the HCDF connection alone if necessary.

SAIC is also equipped with a highly effective computer malware detection and elimination system; this dynamic malware protection employs frequent database updates together with a connection to a central control system which both possesses a larger database and analyses the coding of unidentifiable threats to maximise its effectiveness against any threat, known or unknown, which manages to get past the MA9A2’s firewall.

The utilisation of SRAM, depleted boron coating of key computer chip arrays, partially redundant computer systems and error correcting memory arrays allows for system resistance, recovery and redundance against electromagnetic pulses and waves (as well as the metal hull of the vehicle itself), hardening the MA9A2 against such attacks and giving it the capacity to operate effectively in nuclear environments if so required.


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One of the areas in which the MA9A2 departed earliest from its original base design, the VAB, was in its automotive components, starting with the engine but eventually spreading to include the whole vehicle. The MA9A2's increased weight over the VAB already necessitated a powerplant replacement; however, the potential for yet heavier variants, together with the many advances made in military vehicle automotive concepts and practices during the many years following the VAB's initial production meant that a first-class front-line vehicle would require radical shifts away from the antiquated or otherwise obsolescent design of the VAB, with a renewed focus on power in an efficient casing. The MA9A2's automotive components and layout were specifically chosen to balance a combination of technological superiority with practical efficacy; this, together with the initial faults observed in the vehicle's powerplant, meant that this was the area in which field testing results were most relied upon.

The powerplant employed in the MA9A2, the MA.450-1, is a relatively unorthodox V-engine designed to put as much power into a compact area as possible while utilising the turbocharger layout to minimise turbo lag, a phenomenon which would otherwise cause issues for combat vehicles like the WMAV. The engine employs a V8 layout, with eight cylinders in two banks of four arranged in a 'V' along the crankshaft assembly. The slightly larger displacement V8 engine layout, when compared to contemporary V6s as used in many similar vehicles, provides the MA9A2 with a relatively compact but nonetheless powerful housing for its 12L of cylinder capacity. The engine, a diesel engine, utilises air compression to generate power; to further increase the level of power generated by the engine, the MA.450-1 employs a triple turbocharger layout to provide turbocharged air compression at both low and high speeds with minimal turbo lag, providing the MA9A2 with augmented power generation at both low and high speeds and greatly reducing transitional lag. The original turbocharger layout in the MA.450 engine called for the utilisation of variable geometry turbochargers; this method employs vanes and axially sliding walls in the turbine inlet as a means of providing the turbocharger with an electronically controlled variable aspect ratio. This decreased turbo lag by altering the turbocharger's turbine inlet cross section so as to ensure that it remained at optimal levels across the MA9A2's speed ranges; this in turn permitted the use of a twin-turbo engine without the prospect of significant low speed turbo lag, and thus an engine capable of providing both power and practical performance for the MA9A2 as a battlefield vehicle. However, the primary disadvantage of the variable geometry turbocharger, its complexity, meant that the maintenance requirements of the MA.450 were very high despite its comparatively superior performance to its predecessors. With field use establishing that the use of the mechanically complex MA.450 was not a practically feasible option, the MA.450-1 was subsequently developed with the aim of simplifying the engine's construction while more or less retaining the advantages of its predecessor. The electronic air-flow control was maintained; however, instead of employing variable geometry within the turbochargers in order to modify aspect ratio, the MA.450-1 employs a sequential turbocharger layout to secure effective performance at both low and high speeds. The MA.450-1's turbocharger utilises one low-flow turbocharger and a twin-turbo parallel high flow turbocharger acting sequentially to provide the MA.450-1 with both low and high air flow turbochargers; acting in conjunction, the triple-turbo engine provides the MA9A2 with unrivalled power output by greatly increasing engine air compression over levels attainable by conventional turbocharged engines. On the other hand, MA.450-1 minimises turbo lag by ensuring that low air flow turbocharging can be performed by isolating the high air flow twin turbochargers via electronically controlled valves, thus restricting compression and turbine flow depending on the levels required for optimal operation by the engine. Unlike the VG turbocharged MA.450, MA.450-1 does not rely on a complex system of rotating vanes; rather, when the air flow capacity of the first turbocharger is exceeded by optimal level requirements, the valves to the second twin turbochargers are opened to release air flow and compression. The minimisation of turbo lag in this fashion increases the engine's responsiveness greatly, providing the MA9A2 with a relatively mechanically simple but nonetheless highly effective powerplant for operations across roles. The 12L V8 MA.450-1, utilising this triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel, is capable of generating 650hp (484.70kW) at steady state, for an impressive 34.21hp/tonne power-to-weight ratio that ably manages the heavier weight levels of some MA9A2 variants. The engine is placed in front of the crew compartment, at the front of the vehicle, in an isolated compartment. In order to monitor engine compression and valve opening, the MA.450-1 naturally required an electronic control system for powerplant management. This electronic control system was developed to manage the engine in its entirety, rather than turbocharger compression alone; with sensors monitoring the engine's internal conditions, the electronic control system is capable of presenting powerplant status information to the driver rapidly and effectively while performing its compression management tasks. MA.450-1 is complemented by an additional auxiliary power unit (APU) for emergency and low power purposes.

The MA9A2 utilises an eight gear automatic transmission for power transfer. With six forward and two reverse gears, the automatic transmission is placed alongside the engine block at the front of the vehicle in a powerpack layout to minimise the component's logistics burden. The torque converter employed in the transmission removes the need for a manually controlled mechanical clutch, automatically shifting gear ratios as necessary while mobile. The hydrodynamic torque converter operates independently from manual control by the driver, but mechanical restrictions can be placed on the transmission by the driver while in operation to control the range of gears through which the automatic transmission can cycle. These mechanical restrictions are controlled electronically; the electronic component actuation means that the driver is capable of controlling the transmission from the station's panoramic touch screen display; alternately, controls can be imposed via a set of physical buttons to the right of the driver's station. The torque converter and mechanical controls provide the MA9A2 with a combination of hydrodynamic and mechanical conventional braking; additionally, high performance carbon brakes are mounted for sustained and high power mechanical braking if necessary for quick stops or high speed braking. The WMAV's drivetrain can be shifted between four or all-wheel drive, as desired.

The suspension employed by the MA9A2, much like most modern Anemonian vehicles, is hydractive. The suspension operates around the same mechanical principles as a hydropneumatic suspension; the utilisation of an incompressible hydraulic fluid’s transfer within a ‘sphere’ to alter the pressure of nitrogen at the top of the sphere, in theory creating a suspension with an infinite number of potential positions. This theoretically infinite number of positions allows the MA9A2 to shift ride height and characteristics on the basis of circumstantial requirements and and operating environments, lending it a high degree of flexibility particularly important in the multirole doctrinal operating environments the MA9A2 is expected to serve within. Furthermore, in terms of ride characteristics, an uncompressed hydropneumatic suspension is softer than a steel spring, while a compressed one is capable of being harder than a fully contracted spring. This gives the hydraulic suspension the ability to display comfortable and stable ride characteristics in almost any situation, making it the ideal candidate for use within the MA9A2. The introduction of a hydractive system was one that simply increased the already significant inherent advantages of the hydraulic suspension. Sensors within various areas of the tank’s automotive parts feed data concerning speed and conditions to a computer control system. By gauging the nature of the ride conditions, the computer control system is able to modify the allocation and compression of spheres at millisecond speeds so as to alter the suspension to provide the optimal ride conditions under any circumstances, creating a constantly variable suspension of sorts capable of responding on the move to changes in terrain to maximise its effectiveness. Of course, fully automated suspensions are not necessarily the optimal solution considering the individual requirements of individual crews, and as such, a high degree of crew input into the system automation is also employed. It can be returned to ‘manual’ to turn it into a normal hydropneumatic suspension, of course (with a control interface that allows the driver to shift the position of the WMAV minutely and manually), but when in automatic, the ride characteristics can be set to a ‘constant’ preset (balances between handling against comfort), and the hydroactive suspension control systems will respond accordingly to keep the vehicle handling as close to the preset levels as possible across all terrain environments, greatly increasing the flexibility of the MA9A2’s suspension in the hands of the driver. Additionally, MA9A2 employs an electronically controlled and managed tire pressure control system for use from within the vehicle; pressure hoses within the tire, together with senses and pre-collated data, provide the driver with an accurate image of the pressure levels within the MA9A2's eight tires and the ability to modify the tire pressurisation and inflation at will to set levels from within the driver's station. As well as allowing the driver to shift ride height in conjunction with the hydractive suspension, the ability to alter the ride characteristics of the MA9A2 at will provides the driver with unprecedented levels of control over the vehicle and provides it with tracked-level cross country transit capabilities.


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The MA9A2, designed first and foremost as a troop carrying vehicle, is designed to provide embarked personnel with high levels of both comfort and survivability without compromising the combat efficiency of the vehicle. The crew space is relatively confined, designed for compact but comfortable vehicle operation. However, in exchange for the relatively cramped crew spaces, the MA9A2 is able to provide embarked personnel in its APC configuration with a large cargo carrying volume, thus maximising the load bearing potential of the MA9A2 and its utility as an armoured personnel and personnel equipment carrying vehicle.

NBC protection is achieved via fully filtered dry air and climate control managed via an air outlet into the crew compartment. This NBC protection suite can be powered via the engine or the APU, allowing for functionality even when idle, and also serves to maximise crew comfort by allowing for a fully adjustable operating environment (ranging from humidity to temperature). In the event of system failure, the vehicle is also equipped with a smaller secondary NBC protection suite; this system supplies filtered air to individual crew stations, and is also equipped with personal ventilation masks to maximise the distribution of a limited supply of air.

Against fire, the crew and passengers are protected by one mechanism, while the engine is protected by another. Sensors within the crew and cargo (passenger) compartment are able to detect the outbreak of fires, and are connected directly to an automatically actuating pentafluoroethane fire extinguishing system, designed to minimise both crew and component damage while providing rapid fire control to ensure safety. A Halon-1301 based fire extinguishing system is employed within the MA9A2’s fuel tank and engine compartments; again, sensors are able to detect breaches in the fuel tank, and Halon-1301 is employed to neutralise explosive vapours. The tank itself is self-sealing, employing an open-cell polyether safety foam to ensure that fuel tank punctures are quickly dealt with to limit damage to the WMAV.

In terms of seating, as well as limited reclining and an adjustable head-rest, footpads, lower hull plating and a design that allows for minor seat displacement, the crew's seating is also fully mine protected (with shock isolation and redirection) to ensure that under-hull threats are protected against, both in terms of the vehicle but also from the shock to the crew compartment itself. Passenger seats are stowable to maximise troop carrying capacity; however, they are nonetheless shock isolated to provide under-hull explosive protection to the vehicle's passengers.The MA9A2 is fitted with minimum crew amenities for the purposes of semi-extended autonomous operation in adverse environments. As well as a large passenger/cargo compartment capable of stowing rations for consumption by troops, the MA9A2 is fitted with a water tap providing filtered water and a small refrigeration compartment to one side of the vehicle for liquid provision and storage. Additionally, an engine-powered electric hot-plate complements these tools to serve as rudimentary sources of food and water supply provision to crewmen while the vehicle is mobile; this allows for full crew and passenger supply provision under closed NBC protected conditions for a limited period of time if necessary. The electronics system of the MA9A2 is equipped to interface with a wide variety of commercial MP3 players (transmitted over the crew intercoms or over internal and even external loudspeakers, if so inclined) as well as connection to commercial internet via military broadband. In practice, however, the employment of such electronic interfaces during combat operations is greatly frowned upon by Anemonian officers (insofar as they result in concentration losses), resulting in the restriction of their use to peacetime operations.



Enquiries concerning exports and comments should be made via telegram or to the Anemonian State Arms Export Authority.
Last edited by Anemos Major on Tue Aug 07, 2012 6:54 am, edited 7 times in total.

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Anemos Major
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Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:19 pm

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MA9A2 WMAV IFV, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 IFV
Name: MA9A2 Infantry Fighting Vehicle

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver) + 7
Cost: 2.35 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 3.0m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 21.1t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 30mm Arsenal Karonin M.40 automatic cannon (450 rounds)
Co-Axial Armament: 7.7mm MG3R1 (1500 rounds)
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Europa FCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 30.81hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 IFV is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide a degree of infantry carrying capabilities in conjunction with integrated medium calibre support gunnery to create a vehicle capable of directly augmenting and supporting its embarked infantry complement in combat as well as transit, acting as a base of fire as well as a base of operations for Mechanised troops in the field.

The main armament of the MA9A2 IFV is the 30mm M.40 automatic cannon, for which it carries 450 rounds. The M.40 is a long barrelled, explosively bonded bimetallic barrel fitted automatic vehicular cannon designed for both armoured and unarmoured engagements, and utilises an electric operation (whereupon the action and dual belt feed are driven by an integrated electric motor) to increase reliability. The cannon is provided with a total of 450 rounds, including loaded and stored ammunition, within the IFV at any one time when loaded, and this ammunition mix is generally composed of HEIDP and APFSDS in separate links for rapid dual feeding. Where other vehicles have opted to utilise 35mm guns to combat improvements in armour technology, the M.40 is fitted with high performance nitroamine-based propellants to raise APFSDS velocity to 35mm + levels, thus providing the MA9A2 with an alternate and more volume efficient solution.

The co-axial armament of the MA9A2 IFV is the MG3R1 GPMG on a vehicle mounting. The MG3R1 is a 7.7mm, roller delayed blowback general purpose machine-gun derived from the 7.7mm AR3 family of rifles; the lightweight weapon is capable of delivering mechanically alterable RoF automatic high calibre suppressive fire at extended ranges in conjunction with the vehicle's FCS, while provided with a notable 1500 rounds of ammunition when fully loaded in combat.

The IFV is equipped with a number of sensors with which to employ its armaments. The gunner's sensors incorporate a 3CCD frontal camera together with a FLIR device for infra-red observation; similarly, the traversable commander's sights provide 3CCD and FLIR, albeit at lower resolutions respectively, observation and targeting capabilities to the commander's station on the IFV. Additionally, the gunner is provided with an eye-safe pulsed CO2 laser for target rangefinding. These sensory inputs are utilised in conjunction with the Europa Fire Control System employed on the YrT9A2 HIFV, which provides the IFV with high speed, high accuracy firing solutions on the basis of information from sensory inputs largely similar to those of the YrT9A2.

Due to the additional turret, the MA9A2 IFV opts not to carry the full APC complement of infantry. Rather, the crew has been increased to three personnel, with seven troops carried in the troop bay as the vehicle's embarked infantry complement.



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MA9A2 WMAV ATGM, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 ATGM
Name: MA9A2 Anti Tank Guided Missile

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver)
Cost: 2.45 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 3.75m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 23.0t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 2x Arteyr BLOS ATGM in remote operated launcher unit (12x reloads stored under-armour in compartmented racks)
Secondary Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on Remote Weapons System (powered, 2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Temerar FCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 28.26hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 ATGM is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide accurate, beyond line-of-sight anti-tank support fire as part of a Mechanised or Armoured formation, acting as a carrying vehicle for powerful BLOS top-kill anti-tank guided missiles and a potent anti-tank asset in the hands of lighter Anemonian troop formations.

The primary armament of the MA9A2 ATGM is the 2 round-carrying remote operated Arteyr BLOS ATGM launcher, reloaded via rear hatches behind the main launcher unit by the gunner prior to entering engagements. Arteryr, designed in response to the larger tanks and vehicles encountered on the modern battlefield amongst higher-tier militaries, is a 240mm diameter anti-tank missile (fins folded) capable of autonomous non line-of-sight target acquisition and engagement along a top-kill axis (ANLOS). The missile employs a soft launch mechanism to clear the launcher, prior to engaging a solid propellant rocket to carry it to its target; utilising dual feed laser spotting and infra-red imaging target guidance systems, allowing it to be used as an independently targeting missile or against lazed targets, the Arteryr can be pre-programmed to adopt either a direct or indirect (top-kill) flight path engagement pattern depending on the target at hand, and is capable of acting as a highly effective 'bunker-buster' as much as an effective anti-tank guided missile, with a powerful tandem-charge HEAT warhead designed for maximal armour penetration capabilities virtually guaranteeing a practical kill against any main battle tanks along the top axis.

For a secondary armament, the MA9A2 ATGM employs the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 fitted to the Ortel Powered Remote Weapons System. Capable of accepting anything up to a 40mm automatic grenade launcher, the station is usually equipped with the MG/H8A3 12.7mm machine gun in service. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets.

The main armament of the MA9A2 ATGM is used in conjunction with a highly efficient FCS, 'Temerar', designed around an integrated optics package that is part of the vehicle's launcher assembly. The integrated optics package is fitted with 3CCD and FLIR sighting options together with an eye-safe pulsed CO2 laser rangefinder and indicator; designed to acquire targets at extended ranges, the primary purpose of Temerar as an FCS (contrary to most fire control systems) is to direct the Arteryr missile in the general direction of a target, rather than fully managing its passage to one; upon acquiring a target, Temerar cues the target by providing the Arteryr missile seeker with an IR profile of the target, which the IR imaging seeker is then able to identify in flight and engage. When set to autonomous engagement, Temerar utilises the MA9A2's networking capacity to maintain a connection with the Arteryr missile in-flight, providing it with IR profiles of potential targets from a centralised database for autonomous identification and engagement while airborne. Additionally, Temerar is capable of utilising its CO2 laser to directly guide the missile against certain targets, mostly hardened sites or positions with less clear IR profiles.

The MA9A2 ATGM removes its crew compartment to make space for additional ammunition; in addition, a third crewmen has been added to the vehicle to take over gunnery duties.



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MA9A2 WMAV VLATGM, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 VLATGM
Name: MA9A2 Vertical Launch Anti Tank Guided Missile

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver)
Cost: 2.6 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 2.55m (to top of missile bay)
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 24.9t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 12x Arteyr BLOS ATGM in vertical launcher boxes
Secondary Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on Remote Weapons System (powered, 2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Temerar-VLFCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 26.1hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 VLATGM is a variant of the MA9A2 designed for high-intensity BLOS anti-tank engagement, following on from the design basis of its technical predecessor (the MA9A2 ATGM) in its carrying of the Arteryr ATGM, but opting instead to use them in a VL configuration optimised for BLOS and NLOS engagements.

The primary armament of the MA9A2 ATGM is the 24 cell vertical launching ATGM complement installed on the rear of the vehicle. Arteryr, designed in response to the larger tanks and vehicles encountered on the modern battlefield amongst higher-tier militaries, is a 240mm diameter anti-tank missile (fins folded) capable of autonomous non line-of-sight target acquisition and engagement along a top-kill axis (ANLOS). The missile employs a soft launch mechanism to clear the launcher, prior to engaging a solid propellant rocket to carry it to its target; utilising dual feed laser spotting and infra-red imaging target guidance systems, allowing it to be used as an independently targeting missile or against lazed targets, the Arteryr can be pre-programmed to adopt either a direct or indirect (top-kill) flight path engagement pattern depending on the target at hand, and is capable of acting as a highly effective 'bunker-buster' as much as an effective anti-tank guided missile, with a powerful tandem-charge HEAT warhead designed for maximal armour penetration capabilities virtually guaranteeing a practical kill against any main battle tanks along the top axis.

For a secondary armament, the MA9A2 ATGM employs the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 fitted to the Ortel Powered Remote Weapons System. Capable of accepting anything up to a 40mm automatic grenade launcher, the station is usually equipped with the MG/H8A3 12.7mm machine gun in service. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets.

MA9A2 VLATGM, in order to manage its unorthodox weapons carriage and firing method, utilises a modified variant of the MA9A2 ATGM's fire control system (Temerar VLFCS). In practice, Temerar VLFCS does not differ greatly from the base Temerar FCS, with modifications made to cater for the flight and firing pattern of the vertical launched Arteryr as opposed to the horizontally launched one. The optics package, relocated to the right side of the vehicle in an independently traversing sighting module, is fitted with 3CCD and FLIR sighting options together with an eye-safe pulsed CO2 laser rangefinder and indicator; designed to acquire targets at extended ranges, the primary purpose of Temerar VLFCS as an FCS (contrary to most fire control systems) is to direct the Arteryr missile in the general direction of a target, rather than fully managing its passage to one; upon acquiring a target, Temerar cues the target by providing the Arteryr missile seeker with an IR profile of the target, which the IR imaging seeker is then able to identify in flight and engage. When set to autonomous engagement, Temerar utilises the MA9A2's networking capacity to maintain a connection with the Arteryr missile in-flight, providing it with IR profiles of potential targets from a centralised database for autonomous identification and engagement while airborne. Additionally, Temerar is capable of utilising its CO2 laser to directly guide the missile against certain targets, mostly hardened sites or positions with less clear IR profiles.

The MA9A2 ATGM removes its crew compartment to make space for additional ammunition; in addition, a third crewmen has been added to the vehicle to take over gunnery duties.



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MA9A2 WMAV MGS, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 MGS
Name: MA9A2 Mobile Gun System

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver)
Cost: 2.6 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 3.25m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 25.5t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 120mm SC8.65 55 calibre solid propellant low recoil smoothbore cannon (34 rounds)
Co-Axial Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 (1000 rounds)
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Callisto FCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 25.49hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 MGS is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide frontline forces, both Armoured and Mechanised, with a heavy support gunfire vehicle and a lighter alternative to the HT9A7 in this role, bringing an almost unprecedented level of firepower for a vehicle of its class to the battlefield for the purposes of vehicle and position engagement and destruction at extended ranges.

The main armament of the MA9A2 is the 120mm SC8.65 55 calibre solid propellant low recoil smoothbore cannon, a derivative and modification of the SC8.60 120mm smoothbore cannon designed for use on the HT9A7-E1. It is a 120mm solid propellant smoothbore cannon with a length of 55 calibres (6.6m). The weapon's thermal jacket is constructed of 35% glass reinforced polymers, increasing its resistance to external weathering and hard impact, and a bore evacuator along the length of the gun to house and release the gases produced by propellant ignition to prevent their leaking into the cabin when the gun's breech is opened for shell extraction. Unlike the SC8.60, the SC8.65 does not utilise a chromed autofretted steel construction; rather, to accommodate the use of higher peformance propellants, notably the nitroamine based propellants being introduced into service within the Crown Army, the SC8.65 is fitted with an explosively bonded bimetallic barrel designed to achieve levels of durability orders of magnitude over standard chromed, autofretted steel. Recoil control, naturally, plays a large part in the SC8.65's design when fitted on the MA9A2 MGS. A large, slotted muzzle brake is fitted onto the SC8.65 to redirect propellant gases while firing; the diameter of the muzzle brake is such that it refrains from affecting the fin stabilisation of APFSDS rounds, remedying one of the key issues inherent in tank-gun muzzle brakes for smoothbore guns. Four hydraulic retarders within the gun turret itself absorb recoil forces as the gun travels rearward, mitigating the overall recoil felt by the vehicle; finally, the gun is provided with a long travel distance, giving the gun a longer period of time in which to expend energy against the hydraulic retarders following firing. The result is a very low recoil 120mm gun more than capable of being installed in a vehicle like the MA9A2. Autoloading is employed to decrease crew size and increase overall input/output efficiency. A rotary belt bustle is utilised by the MA9A2, and a replaceable belt and feeding mechanism means that simple modification makes the autoloader compatible with a number of ammunition types (theoretically up to 160mm). 26 rounds are stored in the autoloader with an additional 20 for later use, and the same computer control system (virtual memory stored round location retention and barcode identification) allows the autoloader to rapidly select and load rounds through individual selection as opposed to the order in which rounds are placed (as is the case on many modern autoloaders), increasing the effectiveness of the tank's ammunition allocation by allowing a large variety of ammunition to be used in a largely interchangeable manner. The average firing rate of the tank's autoloader is 12 rounds per minute. In terms of rounds, the SC8.65 is equipped with three standard propellant rounds and a single GLATGM in combat use, but this can be expanded to support foreign 120mm launched munitions (and more, depending on the gun selected for use). M07/S (mod.) is an armour piercing fin stabilised discarding sabot round that utilises a combination nitroamine propellant and a tungsten carbide kinetic energy penetrator to outperform the KEPs used in most 120mm rounds today. M07/E is a High Explosive, Dual Purpose round; with a tandem charge, the round is capable of acting as a HEAT shell, but the fragmenting casing also makes it an anti-personnel round if need be. M07/C is an anti-personnel canister round; using propellant to initially launch it clear of the vehicle, an adjustable fuse (utilising a timer based on ballistic calculations to determine the distance it has travelled) is used to detonate the round itself which uses a hexogen tolite packing and tungsten ball bearings to shred any infantry within its explosive radius. The Arkal-E, a gun launched anti-tank missile (GLATGM) employs a soft-launch motor prior to engaging its main propulsive motor to clear it of the gun barrel to reduce barrel wear, and employs three step seeking composed of mm-wavelength radar, passive IR CCD sensors and semi-active laser seeking to acquire and follow its target, using fin stabilisation to keep it on target. A tandem charge warhead with a relatively powerful 'initial' charge gives it the ability to disable roof mounted ERA and some NERA/NxRA protection, making it highly effective against tanks, even with roof protection, out to ~8km.

The co-axial armament of the MA9A2 MGS is the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on a vehicle mounting. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets.

The fire control system employed on the MA9A2 MGS, Callisto, is the same as that employed aboard the HT9A7-E1 main battle tank. Despite its size range, the MA9A2 MGS possesses the full complement of sensors available to the HT9A7-E1 in a slightly more compact package; this, together with the 120mm gun employed in the MA9A2, made Callisto the ideal candidate for fire control management aboard the MA9A2 MGS short of developing a new fire control suite from the ground up. MA9A2 MGS is equipped with a gunner's sighting suite comprised of a 3CCD sensor and a FLIR module for extended range target acquisition, and an independently traversing commander's sight provided with the same optronic provisions. Additionally, the gunner is provided with an eye-safe pulsed CO2 laser for gunnery rangefinding, a vital component of the fire solution generation process. The fire control system is capable of generating split second targeting solutions on the move on the basis of the data inputs provided by the sensory arrays described above.

The cargo compartment on board the MA9A2 MGS is occupied largely by the turret mechanism and stowed 120mm rounds. A third crewman has been added to the vehicle for gunnery control purposes.



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MA9A2 WMAV SPGM, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 SPGM
Name: MA9A2 Self Propelled Gun Mortar

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver)
Cost: 2.5 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 3.33m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 24.2t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 120mm SC44 smoothbore gun mortar (54 rounds)
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Ganymede-L FCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 26.86hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 SPGM is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide MA9A2 operators, particularly the Anemonian mechanised, with an integrated indirect fire support weapon capable of laying down volumes of fire similar to current generation self-propelled howitzer systems in frequency and accuracy while keeping weight and dimension limited to increase system portability and mobility in its support role.

The armament of the MA9A2 SPGM is the 120mm SC.44 smoothbore gun mortar. A high elevation breech-loading mortar gun, the SC.44 is designed to fire rounds along high arcing trajectories at shorter ranges than heavy 155mm guns to lay down fire in patterns similar to military howitzers. The gun itself is constructed of explosively bonded bimetallic tantalum/4150 steel, a barrel construction that allows for the use of higher performance propellants and extended range munitions with less barrel damage. With a smoothbore barrel, the SC.44 does not possess the spin stabilisation of rifled howitzer rounds; the ammunition fired by the SC.44 can either be fired without aiming support, or can be fitted with fins for stabilisation and GPS guidance for further accuracy. The range of rounds fired by the SPGM is large, but revolves mostly around HE-Frag, HE-Frag/mod F (Fuzed, for aerial detonation), smoke rounds and multiple payload cargo rounds for the delivery of submunitions and dispersed explosives. These rounds are loaded into the gun via a fully automated autoloading system, ensuring high rates of fire (sustained RoF of 8 rounds per minute) and simplicity of operation when in combat. Additionally, the full gun stabilisation of the MA9A2 SPGM allows the system to fire accurately on the move to some extent.

This formidable armament is managed by the fire control system of the MA9A2 SPGM, Ganymede-L. This FCS is a modified variant of the Ganymede FCS employed aboard the YrC9 155mm SPH in service with the Crown Army, and relies upon the utilisation of cartographic data and multiple sensors and inbuilt data to provide accurate indirect firing solutions. Ganymede-L utilises sensory inputs to generate an accurate picture of the environmental conditions in which it is operating, ranging from wind speeds to temperatures. This information is then incorporated into the final firing solution, which can be generated in a number of fashions. The first can be done on the basis of input data alone; by calculating and providing target range and bearing to the firing computer, Ganymede-L is capable of firing rounds on the basis of manual inputs alone. More commonly, Ganymede-L employs satellite cartographic and topographic information to generate split second target distance and bearing information; by simply inputting target coordinates into the FCS, Ganymede-L can then calculate the relative positioning and firing solution alone at high speed and engage the target within seconds of receiving the fire mission. Additionally, the FCS is also capable of saving portions of GPS data for reference if necessary. The high firing and targeting speed of the MA9A2 SPGM allows it to perform tasks such as six round multiple simultaneous round impact; it is capable of laying down highly potent artillery fire in a very compact package.

Much like the MGS, the majority of the SPGM's cargo space is taken up by the turret and autoloading assembly. A third crewman has been added to the vehicle for gunnery management duties.



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MA9A2 WMAV MLRS, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 MLRS
Name: MA9A2 Multiple Launch Rocket System

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver)
Cost: 2.4 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 3.59m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 25.1t ( w/ RWS)

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 20x 160mm general purpose rocket launching tube assembly
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Ganymede-L FCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 25.9hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 MLRS is a variant of the MA9A2 designed for long range fire support roles utilising rocket ordnance in lieu of standard shell-based rounds, and mounts a 40 tube rocket launcher assembly directed by a potent fire control system to maximise accuracy and effectiveness. The MA9A2 MLRS is specifically designed to provide disproportionate levels of support firepower to relatively light (in tonnage terms) Mechanised forces in the battlefield, acting as an effective force multiplier for a central arm of the Crown Army.

The primary armament of the MA9A2 MLRS are the 20 160mm general purpose rocket launching tubes organised into an asymmetric array, capable of delivering warheads and submunitions out to ranges approaching and occasionally exceeding 50km with guided munitions. The rocket launching tubes are factory sealed, and are incorporated into the launching array via an electrical connection to the electronic launch control system achieved simply by pushing individual launch tubes into their launch positions and securing them. This greatly facilitates the loading process; though entire 'frame' arrays can be removed to permit complete reloading in a short period of time given the presence of specialist lifting equipment, field crew are also able to reload individual rockets if necessary without said equipment. The 160mm rockets in their base configuration employ HNIW (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane), a high performance low observability solid propellant, as part of a composite modified double base propellant to provide them with superior performance to existing rockets, and utilises folding fin stabilisation to retain accuracy while in flight. Rocket configurations can vary; the main types used are unguided HE-Frag and cluster submunitions rockets for general area destruction and denial as low cost, and satellite cartography guided fuzed HE-Frag and cluster submunitions rockets for more accurate, lower collateral damage strikes at extended range targets. Rocket firing modes can differ; single, ripple and burst fire are the primary rocket firing configurations employed by the MLRS. Stabilising legs are utilised on the rear of the vehicle to limit the effects of felt rocket recoil during sustained fire.

This formidable armament is managed by the fire control system of the MA9A2 MLRS, Ganymede-L. This FCS is a modified variant of the Ganymede FCS employed aboard the YrC9 155mm SPH in service with the Crown Army, also utilised on board the MA9A2 SPGM, and relies upon the utilisation of cartographic data and multiple sensors and inbuilt data to provide accurate indirect firing solutions. Ganymede-L utilises sensory inputs to generate an accurate picture of the environmental conditions in which it is operating, ranging from wind speeds to temperatures. This information is then incorporated into the final firing solution, which can be generated in a number of fashions. The first can be done on the basis of input data alone; by calculating and providing target range and bearing to the firing computer, Ganymede-L is capable of firing rockets on the basis of manual inputs alone. More commonly, Ganymede-L employs satellite cartographic and topographic information to generate split second target distance and bearing information; by simply inputting target coordinates into the FCS, Ganymede-L can then calculate the relative positioning and firing solution alone at high speed and engage the target within seconds of receiving the fire mission. Additionally, the FCS is also capable of saving portions of GPS data for reference if necessary.

Though the MLRS' cargo compartment is not occupied like many of its companion vehicles, Anemonian doctrine largely negates the use of an MLRS with troop carrying capabilities. As such, aside from the third additional crewman added to manage fire control and spare parts, the MLRS' unoccupied space is largely used to store munitions and rations for other vehicles in accompanying formations.
Last edited by Anemos Major on Thu Sep 08, 2016 10:54 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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Anemos Major
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Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:20 pm

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MA9A2 WMAV SHORADS, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei

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MA9A2 WMAV SHORADS without Moretyr SAM launchers


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 SHORADS
Name: MA9A2 Short Range Air Defence System

Key Data:
Crew: 3 (Commander, Gunner, Driver)
Cost: 2.62 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 4.15m (radar deployed)
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 25.4t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 30mm Arsenal Karonin M.47/2 automatic cannon (800 rounds)
Secondary Armament: 8x Moretyr Short Range Surface-to-Air Missile
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Adrasteia FCS
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 25.6hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 SHORADS is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide Mechanised formations in particular with a highly portable short range air defence solution, projecting an effective air defence environment around forces to which it is attached. Based heavily off the HT9A7 IFDE in concept, the MA9A2 fills a similar role in its configuration and formation placement, providing complete and competent air defence to force projection assets.

The main armament of the MA9A2 SHORADS is the 30mm Arsenal Karonin M.47.2 automatic cannon. The 30mm M.47/2 is a high RoF (1000 rpm default) electrically actuated autocannon designed solely for aircraft and projectile engagement; with a long barrel generating high muzzle velocities, and the use of nitroamine combination solid propellants to put more energy behind each fired round, the M.47/2 aims to defeat high speed targets with a combination of high volume of fire and short time-to-target, thus decreasing the window for and probability of misses in its base configuration form. This high rate of fire is compensated for via a combination of explosively bonded bimetallic barrel construction to greatly increase barrel durability during sustained high speed fire, hydraulic retardation within the turret absorbing felt recoil as far as possible, and a pair of stabilisation legs (deployable) fitted behind the MA9A2 SHORADS chassis, acting together to mitigate both the immediate and longer term issues faced by a high speed single-barrel cannon and permitting the effect use of the M.47/2 in its intended role. The M.47/2 draw from the M.35 35mm cannons employed by the HT9A7 IFDE in its choice of ammunition amongst other things; the M.47/2 is equipped with both APFSDS and HEFAB rounds for aircraft engagement, utilising a dual feed sprocket assembly and disintegrated links to rapidly shift from one type of ammunition to another.

In addition to its cannon armament, SHORADS is capable of mounting twelve missiles in two six pod launchers to either side of its turret, and while combination role missiles such as the ADATS have been tested on the vehicle, the primary missile utilised by the platform is the Moretyr Short Range Surface to Air Missile. Moretyr is a high performance short range missile, and is designed to facilitate the rapid and precise interception of aerial targets at short ranges. The control surfaces used by the Moretyr consist of tail and split canard control acting in conjunction with a jet vane; this method increases the manoeuvrability of the Moretyr in flight, making it more capable in low exposure time combat environments, while remedying the lift-related problems associated with pure canard based control systems by using a split canard and mid-wing design that directs air-flow in a fashion that minimises lift loss. Moretyr's propellant composition is one designed to maximise power output while minimising detectability on the visible spectrum; the HNIW (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) propellant composition employed in the Moretyr both offers a 20% energy gain over HMX-based propellants while its ignition characteristics (the lack of a brightly burning flame or smoke trail like many similar purpose propellants) mean that it's use as a missile propellant minimises the SHORADS exposure while in combat. Utilising this high performance, low observability propellant, the missile is capable of delivery to its target rapidly and effectively, making the Moretyr a highly potent force as far as surface-to-air engagement of a wide variety of targets is concerned. From there, the Moretyr delivers the AE-7 SRAAM's 10kg annular blast fragmentation warhead to the target out to ranges of nearly 15,000m; the warhead consists of a fragmenting external casing and a cylindrical continuous rod arrangement that explosively delivers an initial wave of fragmented steel, followed by the fully expanded ring of welded 'continuous rods' that maximise the effectiveness of the Moretyr against aerial targets, effectively cutting apart impacted objects mid-flight. Moretyr utilises a infrared imaging seeker head to deliver the missile to its target. The imaging system consists of a narrow gap semiconductor-based photodetector with a closed circuit cooling system; the semiconductor used, Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe), guarantees high levels of sensitivity (with a relatively uniform level of sensitivity assured by a tightly controlled productive environment) that allow the imaging system to pick out targets from high clutter combat environments (such as those obscured by flares), while the closed circuit cooling system utilises polyalphaolefin (PAO) cooling fluid to keep the HgCdTe element's temperature within operating limits. The infrared imaging data input can be used in two firing modes, LOBL (Lock-On Before Launch) and LOAL (Lock-On After Launch); the former utilises the infra-red profile provided by the SHORADS' fire control system prior to launch and acquires and tracks this target upon being launched from the vehicle, maintaining data transfer between the SHORADS platform and the missile for as long as possible to keep the target template constantly updated. The second option, LOAL, relies upon the partial maintenance of a data transfer environment between the vehicle and the projectile, whereupon the former provides the latter with a databank of potential hostile targets which it can then correlate against the combat environment as seen through its primary data input and, upon detecting a target, move to intercept it. The infrared imaging seeker head of the Moretyr detonates the missile warhead at a fixed distance from its target to ensure optimal fragment dispersal and continuous rod deployment.

The highly efficient armament pairing employed by the MA9A2 SHORADS is managed and directed by a similarly effective fire control system derived directly from that employed by the HT9A7 IFDE. Utilising the same software (hence its possession of the same name, Adrasteia), the SHORADS fire control employs both radar and optronic data inputs to provide it with an accurate image of its air defence environment and acts accordingly on the basis of crew commands. The radar suite of the MA9A2 SHORADS relies upon two base components, the forward mounted Eletyr S08/B tracking radar and the rear mounted S08/A directional radar. Acting in conjunction, the combination of two radars gives the SHORADS the capacity to retain both target and environmental images simultaneously using radars optimised for their respective tasks, increasing the overall effectiveness of the platform in an air defence context. The Eletyr S08/B is an AESA radar employing GaAs MMICs and a closed circuit PAO cooling system to track targets closer to the MA9A2 SHORADS, providing the SHORADS with greater power output than conventional PESAs to detect and track smaller projectiles and the capacity to jump between frequencies, allowing for operation between the C and Ka bands to balance atmospheric disturbance and high resolution searches across that particular frequency range. The AESA tracking radar is mechanically traversed and elevated. Eletyr S08/A is a passive electronically scanned array utilising mechanical rotation, and the combination of Doppler processing, solid state transmission and S-Band operation give the radar a level of long range search efficacy and subclutter visibility unrivalled by most contemporary SHORAD systems. These radar inputs are further complemented by optronics sights located to either side of the tracking radar in mechanically elevating cylindrical assemblies; with a 3CCD camera, FLIR sensor and eye-safe pulsed CO2 laser like most MA9A2 vehicular optronic arrays, the SHORADS is fully equipped to engage targets utilising any one of these targeting measures rapidly and effectively with its formidable selection of weaponry.

The MA9A2 SHORADS lacks a crew compartment due to turret and ammunition space requirements. A third crewman is added to manage fire control duties.



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MA9A2 WMAV RV, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 RV
Name: MA9A2 Reconnaissance Vehicle

Key Data:
Crew: 2 (Commander, Driver) + 5
Cost: 2.28 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 2.4m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 20t ( w/ RWS)

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on Remote Weapons System (powered, 2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Emerant Reconnaissance Optronics Suite
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 32.5hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 RV is a variant of the MA9A2 intended for vanguard reconnaissance in a limited capacity, equipped to traverse adverse terrain to search and detect hostile elements and provide high speed information updates to formation headquarters concerning enemy positions.

Unlike many reconnaissance vehicles, the MA9A2 RV is not equipped with a 25mm range cannon for extended combat. Rather, the MA9A2 RV employs the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 fitted to the Ortel Powered Remote Weapons System. Capable of accepting anything up to a 40mm automatic grenade launcher, the station is usually equipped with the MG/H8A3 12.7mm machine gun in service. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets.

For target searching purposes, the MA9A2 RV employs what is referred to as the Combined Optronic Assembly (COA) located to the right of the Ortel PRWS. The Combined Optronic Assembly incorporated a high resolution 3CCD camera for long range visual observation, a similarly high resolution FLIR system for IR target acquisition, and an eye-safe pulsed CO2 laser for rapid target rangefinding. The COA is then capable of utilising geospatial cartographic systems to obtain the exact coordinates of located objects utilising position-relative rangefinding, and collates all gathered information (numbers, troop types, positions etc) through a combination of automatic and manual input into the Anemonian OFA (Opposing Force Awareness) intelligence report format for rapid provision to higher level commands. In order to accomplish this, the MA9A2 RV is fitted with augmented communications equipment that permit high speed access to Anemonian communications networks via the SAIC combat networking assembly. Provided with priority access to command assets via the Anemonian CombatNet, MA9A2 is able to directly dispose information into the CombatNet network for use by allied forces while on operations. Alternately, OFA reports can be filed via radio communications in the HF/UHF range.

The cargo compartment of the MA9A2 RV, though largely unmodified when compared to the baseline APC, is nonetheless designed to fit a maximum of five personnel (including one attached intelligence specialist). The additional space is devoted to stowage space for infantry deployable reconnaissance and monitoring equipment while on the move, and a single high performance cross-country motorcycle for rapid ramp deployment by reconnaissance troops operating away from the RV when on operations. The MA9A2 RV is also commonly fitted with water propellers in lieu of rear armour to further augment its terrain traversing capabilities, giving it (an amphibious vehicle by design) the ability to ford rivers and aquatic terrain at comparatively high speeds.



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MA9A2 WMAV CBRNRV, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 CBRNRV
Name: MA9A2 CBRN (Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear) Reconnaissance Vehicle

Key Data:
Crew: 2 (Commander, Driver) + 3
Cost: 2.68 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 2.4m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 22t ( w/ RWS)

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on Remote Weapons System (powered, 2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Environmental sampling and analysis equipment
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 29.55hp/tonne


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The MA9A2 CBRNRV is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide Anemonian field forces with accurate environmental information in post CBRN deployed environments, filling a significant role within the Crown Army by providing deployed troops with the capacity to analyse and understand high lethality battlefield threats without exposing troops to the same adverse conditions.

Though the MA9A2 CBRNRV is primarily an environmental research vehicle under military colours, it was also clear than post CBRN environments would most likely be militarily active and highly lethal, considering the nature of most militaries' doctrinal NBC usage. As such, the MA9A2 CBRNRV employs the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 fitted to the Ortel Powered Remote Weapons System. Capable of accepting anything up to a 40mm automatic grenade launcher, the station is usually equipped with the MG/H8A3 12.7mm machine gun in service. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets.

The CBRNRV, in its capacity as a reconnaissance and environmental analysis vehicle, is equipped with a wide variety of sensory equipment designed to provide its users and dependants with battlefield environmental awareness and threat recognition to permit effective action against and within them. The vehicle is equipped with additional visual periscopes to increase peripheral visual awareness while in operations. The sensor block mounted to the right of the Ortel PRWS is the Eletyr CM204 CBRN Infra-Red Imaging System. This system creates a thermal image of monitored space and runs processing software against the imaged ambient radiation to detect the presence of chemical and biological agents, and to discriminate between lethal and non-lethal particles detected by the system. Additionally, the imaging capabilities of IRIS allow it to provide threat dispersal mapping capabilities and accurate readings on the basis of spatial awareness in the systems detection patterns. IRIS, however, is only one component of a far more complex system. A biochemical threat sampling array is also located on the vehicle, utilise to take limited samples of aerial particles and store them in isolation for analysis by vehicle integrated equipment. The collectors are located in the form of funnels and pipes on the surface of the vehicle; from there, collected particles are passed into isolated storage, where they are placed under BC detectors and more specialised study equipment which is not only capable of classifying particles as threatening or otherwise, but broadly identifying the BC threat as well at high speeds in large quantities. These high speed threat detection capabilities are augmented by the incorporation of a mass spectrometry device which allows for slower but more exact threat detection via chemical composition analysis of threats; the possession of both rapid and exact threat identification measures lends the CBRNRV flexibility in its areas of operation. Additionally, the CBRNRV is capable of collecting aerial vapors and passing those through the same threat identification subsystems. The vehicle is also equipped with a rear remote operated manipulator and storage tray for further sampling. CBRNRV is also equipped with a comprehensive meteorological sensor system (for wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity and pressure detection) and a magnetic field detection system to round off the vehicle's awareness in CBRN environments. Additionally, the vehicle is equipped with an integrated radiological sensor fitted to detect and display beta and gamma particle concentration. For field operations, the CBRNRV is equipped with a field deployable BC detection/identification sensor system, a portable radiological sensor, a portable chemical vapor sampling system and two isolated sampling boxes (mounted to the left of the vehicle), as well as pressurised pure oxygen tubes on the back of the vehicle and a field equipment dispenser rack. Additionally, the vehicle's frontal lights have been strengthened and reinforced for lower visibility conditions.

The majority of the MA9A2 CBRNRV's internal space is taken up by specialist equipment and workstations (with items such as portable laptops and colour printers installed for data collation). The CBRN analysis teams deployed in these vehicles generally stand at three men, though more can be deployed for active field sampling purposes.



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MA9A2 WMAV CV, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 CV
Name: MA9A2 Command Vehicle

Key Data:
Crew: 2 (Commander, Driver) + 4
Cost: 2.43 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 2.74m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 22t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 (2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
SAIC Combat Networking (Command)

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 29.55hp/tonne


Image

The MA9A2 CV is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to fill the role of a dedicated tactical command vehicle, and is specially fitted for the dual roles of acting as a tactical decision-making and information control hub. In order to enlarge the working space of tactical level commanders and permit the installation of dedicated interfacing equipment, MA9A2 CV is one of two current vehicles in the MA9A2 family which employ a 'high back' design with a higher passenger area.

For its armament, the MA9A2 utilises a swing-mounted 12.7mm MG/H8A3. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets. The machine gun is covered by a metallic gun-shield offering limited protection to the gunner (in this case the commander); however, the weapon is by no means an implemented of extended combat, with the decision to replace the RWS with a swing mounted MG done on the basis that command vehicles are not expected to participate in combat.

The CV's primary objective is to serve as a tactical command post; in order to accomplish this, two primary sets of equipment have been integrated into the high back MA9A2 vehicular base. The first of these is communications equipment. Equipped with a specialised command variant of the SAIC Combat Networking system in order to accomplish a number of roles, including coordination between the Anemonian CombatNet and BattleNet, the MA9A2 CV is equipped with a wide range of communications interfaces in order to coordinate active and support assets from across the board rapidly and efficiently. In addition to the standard communications interfacing provided by SAIC, including ad-hoc networking, extended network participation, GPS interfacing, combat networking and UHF radio communications, the MA9A2 CV is equipped with secure HF ground-air communications radios, combat networking independent formation position reporting system coordination interfaces, and a rapid effect command level vehicular intercoms system for direct communications to commanded assets. The specialist communications equipment allows the CV to act as a hub for information transfers at the tactical level, and permits commanders to communicate decisions to diverse assets rapidly and effectively under secure conditions from the relatively safety of the command vehicle. Secondly, the MA9A2 is equipped with high quality information interfacing to provide commanders with tactical level visual coordination of the battlefield as understood by the tactical level CombatNet, and higher level BattleNet. This is accomplished via a number of wide-screen panoramic LCD displays, including one centrally mounted interfacing touch screen, displaying the cartographic and numerical distribution of allied and hostile (detected and projected) elements. This combination of information and command relay equipment in the same vehicle on the basis of constantly updated, live information allows tactical level commanders to utilise real time information to make split second decisions and instantly communicate those to field assets, greatly decreasing the difficulty of coordinating disparate military forces and increasing overall force cohesion.

The CV's passenger stowage area has been converted to house specialist command and control equipment, and is generally staffed by four troops in addition to the crew; a commander, an adjutant, and two operating personnel.



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MA9A2 WMAV BCR, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 BCR
Name: MA9A2 Battlefield Control Radar

Key Data:
Crew: 2 (Commander, Driver) + 2
Cost: 2.86 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 2.4m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 18.8t

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Armament: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
Eletyr GC220 BSR AESA Battlefield Surveillance Radar
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 34.57hp/tonne


Image

The MA9A2 BCR is a variant of the MA9A2 designed with the intent to provide Anemonian forces in the field with a rapidly deployable air and land surveillance vehicle with capabilities that would allow it to perform a wide variety of roles traditionally associated with specialist radar arrays. The high performance of the BCR's radar system, together with its relative battlefield mobility, make it a highly valuable field asset for any commander seeking to retain early warning awareness and control over a particular area.

MA9A2 BCR's value as a field asset rests in the high capability Eletyr GC220 Battlefield Surveillance Radar system carried by it. The radar array is carried on top of a vertically elevating platform, which can be deployed to increase radar coverage range, and is housed in a decagonal fibreglass housing for basic protection. The high performance characteristics of the Eletyr GC220 primarily stem from the fact that, unlike most other radar of its kind, the GC220 is an Active Electronically Scanned Array radar utilising multiple transmission and detection elements in a twinpack layout (Gallium Arsenide MMICs) providing comprehensive, electronically steered 360 degrees coverage (cooled by an annealed graphite plate and a closed PAO cooling circuit). The ability of the AESA radar to operate in different frequencies at will, and the utilisation of multiple radar beams to track single or multiple targets quickly and interchangeable allows the AESA radar to cover a wide range of potential uses with little effort, all the while retaining the jam-resistance and low probability of intercept characteristics of an AESA radar array. Furthermore, the twinpack layout utilised in the element distribution across the radar face allows for simple maintenance, making the technically complex AESA GC220 relatively simple to perform maintenance on in the field.

The roles in which the MA9A2 BCR is most often employed include surface and air searches, target illumination, battlefield surveillance, radar identification, counterfire detection (including round tracking), and limited SAR roles. The BCR can also be employed in a fire control capacity.

The cargo area of the MA9A2 BCR is mostly occupied by the signals processing and power generation equipment required for the Eletyr GC220. Two personnel are assigned to signals processing and control in the BCR, bringing the total number of personnel carried up to four.



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MA9A2 WMAV MEV, 2nd Infantry Regiment the City of Anemos Rei Guard Rifles Regiment, on training exercises in Barony Myrstirei


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Designation:
Numerical Designation: MA9A2 MEV
Name: MA9A2 Medical Evacuation Vehicle

Key Data:
Crew: 2 (Commander, Driver) + 2
Cost: 2.42 million NSD

Dimensions:
Length: 7.85m
Height: 3.0m
Width: 3.0m
Weight: 23.5t ( w/ RWS)

Performance:
Maximum Speed: 115km/h road speed
Acceleration: 0 to 32kph in 8.0 seconds
Operational Range: 780km

Armament:
Main Armament: 12.7mm MG/H8A3 on Remote Weapons System (powered, 2400 rounds), interchangeable with other armaments.
Additional: 12x mounted multipurpose grenade launchers, modular systems allow for further options.

Protection:
Passive: Base structural armour (metal-composite matrix outer layer, Type 7720 Titanium-Aluminium alloy, fibreglass/rubber/Spectra spall liner) with Orlontis modular armour addons
Active: Orenthel Active Protection System
Crew Protection: NBC protection (main + auxiliary), pentafluoroethane crew and passenger compartment fire extinguishing, Halon 1301 + foam fuel tank extinguishing and self-sealing suite.

Electronics:
SAIC Combat Networking

Power:
Propulsion: MA.450-1 650hp (484.70kW) 12L V8 triple sequential-parallel turbocharged diesel
Transmission: Automatic (6 forward, 2 reverse).
Suspension: Hydractive
Power/Weight: 27.66hp/tonne


Image

The MA9A2 MEV is a variant of the MA9A2 designed to provide rapid medical evacuation for injured ambulatory and stretcher personnel from the battlefield, and is one of two members of the MA9A2 family which currently employ the 'high back' stowage area layout to increase overall volume and carrying capacity.

Although the MEV is a medical vehicle, the understanding that there are no formal treaties preventing attacks upon medical vehicles in the current global environment and the fact that such vehicles are effectively open targets led to the decision to arm it so as to dissuade potential attacks upon it in hostile battlefield environments. As such, the MA9A2 MEV employs the 12.7mm MG/H8A3 fitted to the Ortel Powered Remote Weapons System. Capable of accepting anything up to a 40mm automatic grenade launcher, the station is usually equipped with the MG/H8A3 12.7mm machine gun in service. The MG/H8A3 is a short-recoil operated rotating bolt machine-gun utilising forced air cooling and forward porting to evacuate heat and propellant gases. With a barrel constructed of cold hammer forged steel, the external receiver of the weapon itself is, as a relatively new weapon, constructed of 30% glass reinforced polymer (making it relatively lightweight while remaining resistant to temperature buildups and sudden shocks), and the need for a replaceable barrel is largely removed through the installation of the highly efficient air cooling system. The ammunition is fed via a disintegrating link (a scaled up version of that utilised in the MG3/MG3R1 series’ 7.7mm ammunition), and the cyclic rate of fire of the weapon is mechanically alterable via the trigger block like the MG3 series, alternating between 450 and 750 rounds per minute as desired. In general, two types of rounds are used with the MG/H8A3 as a component of the HT9A7 MBT; ball ammunition, for use against ‘soft’ targets, while HEIAP is employed for use against harder targets. The medical cross is designed to be removable for the same reason.

The MEV's basic capacity is for four medical litters or six ambulatory personnel, with two medical personnel attached to each vehicle to provide treatment. Unlike many MEVs, the role of commander and chief medic are separated, as the commander is expected to operate the vehicle's main armament as well as command the vehicle. Litters are placed on two bunked foldable racks on either side of the passenger compartment, and a winch is incorporated into the vehicle to lift litters into place. Benches are utilised for ambulatory patients. Each litter rack is provided with monitors (pulse oximeter and blood pressure/saturation monitor) and saline drip stands. The centre of the vehicle is left open for the transit of medical personnel; the area is large enough to set up procedures such as CPR or IV drips, and come with dedicated equipment (removable fixed stands for IV drips while on the move, for example). The compartment is also equipped with semi-automated defibrillators to provide patients with shocking on the basis of simultaneously generated readouts and sterile hand wash dispensers. Additionally, the central area is provided with a stowable table for limited treatment of wounds, and a mixture of climate controlled and non-climate controlled storage lockers are located beyond the patient housing area containing additional equipment. This includes pressure bandages, sterile surgical equipment, sterile hand wash refills, hot and cold kits (with ammonium nitrate ice packs), a breaks kit for inter-call compartment cleaning, morphia autoinjectors, saline solution pouches, a ready CBRN kit (14 atropine and pralidoxime chloride autoinjectors, a container of blister agent neutraliser and a number of 3-part anti-cyanide kits) and O minus blood transfusion pouches (containing erythrocytes and platelets in CPDA solution). The storage lockers are generally divided up into equipment and casualty categories, and are designed to be easily removable and replaceable. This is to allow pre-prepared specialist casualty medical lockers to be installed at short notice to minimise the possibility of additional casualties developing due to a lack of equipment; examples include radiological treatment, or specialist BC threat neutralisation. Additional stretchers can be carried on the side of the vehicle in storage lockers, as well as oxygen and nitrous canisters for emergency use.

The MEV's passenger stowage area is largely devoted to the transport of injured patients and medical equipment. As such, two additional dedicated medical personnel are carried alongside four stretcherborne or six ambulatory personnel.
Last edited by Anemos Major on Tue Aug 07, 2012 7:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Anemos Major
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 12664
Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:21 pm

-reserved-

User avatar
Anemos Major
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 12664
Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:23 pm

-reserved-

User avatar
Mewneta
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 164
Founded: Mar 31, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Mewneta » Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:33 pm

200 mlrses adn 300 atgms
FOR RUSSIA URA! URA!

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Anemos Major
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 12664
Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Thu Apr 19, 2012 1:34 pm

Mewneta wrote:200 mlrses adn 300 atgms


Imperial State Armaments Export Authority
-Imperise Directoratyr Exrecounise dei Armamentyr Etatei-

TO: The Federal Republic of Mewneta
FROM: The Anemonian State Armaments Export Authority

We would be grateful if any queries concerning acquisition could be directed to the central storefront, here.

Thank you very much for your interest, and apologies for any inconvenience caused.
The State Armaments Export Authority.

User avatar
Ivoslavia
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 175
Founded: Jun 19, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Ivoslavia » Wed Jun 20, 2012 3:05 pm

A message from the Flavian/Ivoslavian Defense Bureaux.

Greetings,

My name is Jiosif Magdor, i work at the Defense Dep. in Ivoslavia (A.K.A. United Socialist Republic of Flavia (USRF) ).
We would like to buy your tank called the MA9A2 MGS. We will transfer you the money when you will be ready.

Thanks,
Jiosif Magdor

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Anemos Major
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 12664
Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:09 am

OOC: Page reformatted.

User avatar
Anemos Major
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 12664
Founded: Jun 01, 2008
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Anemos Major » Thu Nov 27, 2014 2:41 am

Coming soon...

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