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Euroslavia
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Postby Euroslavia » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:33 pm

Pick your Genre

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Many players are looking to run their own storylines. Rather than store bought, they prefer it from their own fevered imaginations. But, where to get ideas. Some players make it seem natural picking ideas right out of the air while others constantly struggle. Where can you get ideas? First things first: know what genre you want - a fantasy epic with dragons, elves and mighty warriors, a space-opera set in the future, a horror roleplay to send a chill up your spine, or a modern day spy thriller to make your heart race with anticipation?? Once this is established you are ready to start setting up your RP. Are you someone who longs for a good mystery, moving from clue to clue and piecing together what happened? Or would you rather there be a definite confrontation between "right and wrong?" Whatever the case may be, plan on running that type of adventure. Essential to your players enjoying the game is that YOU have to like what you are doing, your energy and enthusiasm will affect the players.

Getting a Storyline Idea

Okay, the genre and style of the RP are decided. Where do we get ideas? Well, there are players who can make up scenarios almost as if they are pulling them out of a hat. What about someone new to the role or someone that needs a little help? The best advice I can give you is: use your experiences. Think back to those roleplays you participated in. You must have some favorites. Do not take plot point for plot point, but modify and change the circumstances. A superhero group in the middle east would have a much different agenda than one in NYC. It made for a darker, richer roleplay. Even using some of the same type of villains worked differently because again, they would have a different reason for doing the vile things they do.

Another idea, is look at some modules to see what they are doing. Use what you like but put your own twist on it. Although some basic ideas will be lifted from someone elses plot, the key points and storyline will still be yours. This might be a better way to start. Doing so, you realize what type of plots intrigue you and your players and are better able to come up with other ideas on your own.

Also, borrow ideas from favorite books, movies or TV shows. Game systems do this, why can't we? Of course, be warned, the whole idea of roleplaying is not to be pigeon-holed so these ideas need to be modified to allow the players free reign to make it their own. I have seen players wanting to create movie characters. These characters are not at proper levels to participate in most games. Either the players are disappointed or a player has someone way too powerful in his group. It's a fine line that a RP-creator draws. Make sure that all players have something to do. That's an important rule to remember... But, most importantly - remember to have fun. So your players will too.

Guidelines and Rules to Specific RP's
Dependent upon the type of quest you are running, you may find it useful or necessary to establish some ground rules, rules of engagement or possible penalties for rule infractions. Discuss these with the people involved with your quest. Make sure that everyone understands them. Write them out and make them available for future reference. This may prevent disaster down the road.

Types of quests within the Roleplay
There is a variety of quest types that even the most novice roleplayer can undertake. Here are some basic examples:

    1. Pursuits: Send players in search of objects or people.
    2. Escort Quests: A caravan takes some items from Point A to Point B or a person becomes sick and a healer is requested from another town. This healer needs an escort from that town to this one as it is not safe for him to travel alone and use of magic/gates will ruin the healing draught needed to cure the sick person.
    3. Mysteries: Who-dunnits are an excellent roleplaying opportunity and a way to involve large casts and adventuring groups.
    4. One-shot events: Start small and get a feel for how to do things on a larger scale. Typical one-shot events are: scavenger hunts, swap meets, market days and guild recruitment/symposiums. Though these shorter quests, you can build contact groups, gather information about what interest the people on your shard and collect ideas for future long-term quests.
    5. Find the X: a) The location of someone or something is given in the form of hints or a riddle. b) An item X is needed for some reason. c) Players are enlisted to help retrieve/find the item. d) A group of X has taken thing Y and person Z wants it back.
    6. Preserve the Peace: a) A person has escaped justice. Players are sought to kill/capture this person. b) A group of X is gathering near point Y. Players are sought to kill/capture the group.

Character Development


"As authors, it is our Duty
To create lovable, enticing Characters
And do horrible, evil things to Them."

by Sharee Rehema


This guide is designed to help people with writer's block, role-players of all levels, and people who are just interested in psychology and philosophy as it applies to fiction. Here you'll find tips, examples, suggestions, general information to aid in creating rounded fictional characters for your stories and/or RPGs, and perhaps even information useful for everyday life.

There are many aspects of character development, and your character could be nearly as deep and complete as anyone you might know in real life. However, there are basic keys to fleshing out a character that can help break through blocks and get you and your creation on their way to a great story.

Being informed is a vital part of all storytelling. Know your stuff so your character and their world makes sense.
♦ Learn the importance of Point of View and Background. Seeing the world through the eyes of others, no matter how different from you they are, makes for a great writer.
Motivation and Alignment: "Good" VS "Evil", what drives your character.
Flaws, Merits and Details: All the little (and major) quirks that make your character more interesting.
Exercises and Inspiration: The tools, games, and tricks to help you find your voice.
Beyond Powergaming: A guide and explanation of role-playing for new gamers.
Recommended Reading: Useful books and Guides.

The characters come before the story. Once you figure them out and set them loose, the story unfolds on its own.
Last edited by Euroslavia on Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:21 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Euroslavia
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Postby Euroslavia » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:34 pm

Non Playable Characters (NPC's) -What's they're really about and more

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As every experienced roleplayer knows, NPCs are the people that populate the world. They are the people on the street and in the shops, the people who have to be rescued, and the informants. In any well-developed story, there will be many of these people and the game depends on them. If these people in your world do not seem real and interesting then neither will the world.

Properly portrayed, NPCs will move the story ahead, establish the background, give characters the essential information you need them to have, prod slower moving characters, create necessary obstacles for the more dangerous and destructive characters, and can even provide a well-needed laugh now and again. In other words, good NPCs invigorate your story.

Despite this essential role, RP-creators barely scratch the surface when it comes to portraying realistic, fun, and integrated NPCs. Why is that? Some people think that creating an NPC takes too much time. Others simply think it is unnecessary and believe they can create good NPCs “on the fly.” The truth is that creating an NPC can be simple and quick. And NPCs created “on the fly” tend to end up looking and acting more or less the same.

One common solution is to decide what is needed and build a random character. This can give NPCs some beliefs, religious or political affiliations, reputations, or other signs of life and personality. But that is not enough. NPCs should be more than 2-dimensional constructs. They should be recognizable and "real." So, how do we make them such?

First item to decide is what type of adventure you are running.
You want your NPCs to add to the genre, not detract from it. If you are going for a light and fun story you probably don’t want too may NPCs who are dour and serious, except as occasional comedy relief. If you are going for a medieval fantasy story then you probably don’t want too many people who are overly educated and knowledgeable, except as the occasional McGuffin (an element of the story that serves a definite purpose to make sure something specific happens).

Second, you need to decide who would normally be in the environment you are creating.
In an old west town you are going to need people taking care of horses because everyone has horses and they don’t take care of themselves. There will be people stocking general stores, people working nearby farms and ranches, and, of course, the local sheriff. There are going to be the missionaries working the frontier, and it’s almost mandatory to have a bartender in his (or her) saloon. It takes no significant time to imagine who should be there if you can picture the environment. In a far-in-the-future space terminal you are going to have dock-workers (lots of them) loading and unloading ships, maintenance workers and mechanics, traffic coordinators, and people collecting fees, taxes, tariffs and import/export duties. The basic idea is to think about who needs to be there to make the environment work. They make that environment independent of the players. Simply by having people there doing their jobs you give an impression of a well-developed world.

Modern-day resources can give you a sense of the NPCs you need to develop in other environments.
For example, a spaceport is comparable to the major shipping ports or the major airports today. It is fairly simple to find out who works in ports and airports. Real resources are a simple internet search away if you need to know about people in Wild West towns and many other environments. Photographs may even be available to give you a good feel for who they were. A few minutes on your computer can be immensely valuable. If you are doing a modern day adventure in New York City, you can look at the internet for the happenings around town, and for the flavor of various neighborhoods and their residents.

Next step is to figure out what information about the adventure each NPC needs to know.
But it is important to be careful here. NPCs do not exist solely to help the characters. They exist because every story requires that they exist. Some may help characters, some may impede characters, and some may be distractions. Most simply create the environment that the players have to negotiate. If you want particular NPCs to be useful then think about the extent to which you want them to be useful, and the natural limit to how useful those people could be. Individual NPCs should have a range or limit to their knowledge and abilities. For example, a bartender is going to know almost everyone and their personal business. But there are limits on how much he can tell you without offending his customers. A mechanic in a Spaceport can help you with physical stuff (like that lock-down device that has been attached your ship) and will know the local bureaucracy, but probably won’t know much about the people who come and go.

These are just the beginning steps to decide what NPCs are within a given scenario of your adventure. We hope we have already made the point that they do not need to be cardboard cutouts that you just put a new costume on.

Make sure that your NPCs are there for more than just being a warm body or giving the NPCs direction (or misdirection for that matter). In other words give them something to do. If it is a particularly important NPC then go a step further and give him (or her) beliefs, social and political views, areas of interest outside of just work. A bureaucrat NPC who spends all his free time playing baseball with the guys might use baseball analogies to explain things. This kind of background, if expressed, gives players a way to connect with that NPC, get in the NPCs good graces, or get the NPC upset (perhaps by mentioning your support for the wrong team). Background could also be motive. If your NPC has a grudge against someone, that NPC could steer the main character towards an adventure as a form of pay-back against the team’s opponent, or maybe against someone on the team.

Example Adventure
For this beginning adventure you have decided on a simple quest. Your players have entered a neighboring town because there have been rumors of strange things going on. The basic goal is for your fellow RP’ers to find out what is happening. Sounds pretty simple. Now you explore the plot a little further. How did they hear about this problem? Were they hired by someone or is there a personal reason to get involved with the residents of the town. What is happening in the town? Are the residents part of the plot or are they being coerced? If it's a nefarious plot who is the mastermind behind it? Who will the PCs meet on their journey, and will those people be helpful or try to stop them? Is the only possible accomplishment information gathering or can they possibly help solve the problem?


Questions to consider about your NPC
• Is he from the town or is he visiting?
• What is this person's family like? Does he have siblings? Are his parents alive? Is he married and does he have children?
• What are his motivations and aspirations? What events brought those wants and desires into being?
• What can this character do (both for fun and for a living)?
• What are this characters goals for the future, is he working on anything specific?
• What oddities or quirks does this person have. We all take some sort of disability or Achilles Heel. What is it for this person? Is he overconfident? Does he habitually lie? Does he trust everyone and everything?
• What is the character's basic personality - Does he react to specific things?
• Appearance – What will your fellow RP’ers see when they first meet him?


Personality
We all have a tendency to make our characters with stereotypical personality traits. We have a "too-chipper" girl scout type, the "boy scout" who can do no wrong, the psychotic, the angry woman, etc. Even worse, often all of the NPCs will have your own personality. We have all been in games where every NPC acts exactly like the main character. How about giving your NPC some real personality of their own. People's personalities change depending on their mood, what has recently happened and how they are treated. Their personalities also depend on what they value and what they despise. Someone who likes to gamble on the weekend, who thinks competitions are interesting and who likes to pick sides is going to act very differently than someone who doesn’t gamble, hates conflicts and tries to keep people calm and reasonable. So it pays to have a general sense of an NPCs current mood and their general personality.

One good way to add personality to an NPC is to base them on people you know. In your notes, next to that NPC write the name of someone you know from work. Next to that other NPC, write the name of one of your aunts. You know how a bit about how these real people act. That gives you a quick reference for how NPCs might act, and they won’t all be clones of you.

Interaction
This can really breathe life or death into your NPC portrayal. If you have your character sitting around not really interacting with anyone or anything, then they might as well be store mannequins for how believable they will seem. We have seen many RP-creators have a number of NPCs and only a few interact while the rest are basically background furniture. If nothing else you can move to the next step beyond this. You can have the character interact with objects in his environment. The bar patron breaking a glass and flinching before picking it up, a little girl playing with her favorite toy and reacting to what it does, etc. can at least mimic a living being. It doesn't require a lot of work and can add texture and believability to a scene.

Of course, the best is interacting or reaction to the main characters and other NPCs. Not just your main NPCs need do this. When NPCs do interact with main characters, then how the main characters interact with them can change what information and assistance they give. Roleplaying has a purpose and if they are going to be given the same info and help regardless of what/how they play then roleplaying is pointless. Give your players some control of what their characters learn. Good roleplaying leads to good information and more of it. Bad roleplaying leads to less information, or maybe bad information. Giving your players both good and bad information sees how much ability they have as a team to work out ALL the clues together. Plus, the whole scene comes alive with plot devices and intrigue you just couldn't get with your average two-dimensional NPC.

Combining all these traits makes for a more vibrant, "real" scene. Add in your own plot twists and intrigue and your story is exactly what it's supposed to be: fun.
Last edited by Euroslavia on Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:08 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Euroslavia
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Postby Euroslavia » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:34 pm

Limit the number of players

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When you are first learning how to create your own RP, you have so many different items to keep track of, the NPCs, the flow of the story, adversaries, and many more. If you allow too many player characters into a game, it's hard to make sure that every single one is accounted for, not to mention that having one too many players could end up impeding the story from continuing in the event that they are away, which could end up killing the RP altogether. 4-6 players is a good number to keep anyone from getting completely lost, but allowing the story to continue by other means. This is a recommendation though, if you feel your story will benefit from more (or less), absolutely continue with it.

Keeping your Players Interested

Creative NPCs – Make sure that your NPCs are not generic. Give each one a distinct possibility and roleplay those differences. Do not hesitate to go for nontraditional gender roles or other "differences." It will keep your players on their toes.
Ask your players for advice – I think this is one of the hardest. You may feel nervous about asking for advice, fearing to lose authority. But, sometimes, you run out of ideas. You have a group that can help you. It has nothing to do with your knowledge of the game. Make it clear that you are still the referee, you just want some input. It will really help your players feel a part of the creative process. And besides, they will see for themselves, its not always that easy to come up with ideas. A new respect will grow from this. Send a telegram in-game or exchange instant messengers in the event that you can't seem to catch each other on the forum/game together, or use IRC to have a group pow-wow to further develop ideas for the storyline.
Reward Creativity - Make sure that the only answer to a solution is not being sliced by Bart's dagger. If the players are crafty, they make find a way around the problem you were stumping them with. Even if the idea had never occurred to you, if its intelligent and well thought out, let it work. Show them that roleplaying is not only beating up the bad guy. Maybe the villain is too hard to actually beat in combat so the players need to think of a new way around the problem. See how the players handle some loss and if they regroup and make the best of the situation. As you gain in experience you can give your players new and exciting challenges to deal with.
Keep it Simple- As you can see in the previous paragraph, by no means am I saying you cannot have puzzles, riddles or a couple of subplots or plot twists brewing. There is nothing more satisfying than being in a group that has just figured out the set of clues or exhilarating as a creative plot twist. But be careful. I have seen many Role-Players have so many subplots going on that the main storyline is lost. Unless players are mindreaders they may not see where this is all leading. Both players and the RP-creator can get frustrated at this point and the story get stranded. Too many red herrings makes players wary of trusting the RP-creator. Don't get carried away. And the most important issue:
Have fun with it!
Remember, that is the number one reason for roleplaying. It's a game for you and your friends. Relax, trust your instincts, and don't take things too seriously. I have seen many fights break out over unimportant issues. You need to keep this in mind.
Last edited by Euroslavia on Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:10 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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Euroslavia
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Postby Euroslavia » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:34 pm

Good Villains

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When you are ready to design a roleplay, you need to come up with what the characters are going to try to accomplish. One of the many decisions you have to make is who the ultimate foe is. We don’t mean your average villain of the week, a throwaway grunt working for someone else, but rather whom that grunt is working for.

Good villains are very rare. Many times it is assumed that a huge amount of power and bad ‘tude are all that is needed. But power and attitude are only part of what makes a villain great. When it comes to developing that character into a bonafide, believable villain, a lot is frequently overlooked. It is not true that as long as they give the hero a bad time, they are golden.

There have been in various roleplays where, as a team, a group of RP'ers are faced with a supervillain. He has tons of power, but he is basically standing in the middle of the street yelling out a challenge to the heroes. While the fight maybe good and difficult, it leaves a bad taste in the mouth. Why would he risk his own neck when he can have his henchmen do it for him? Why is this guy, powerful though he may be, not quite believable as a worthy opponent? To begin with, he violates most of the rules a good, solid opponent should be founded upon.

Two good examples of the ultimate enemy would be Lex Luthor and Professor Moriarty. Rather than just copy these characters verbatim, let’s look at what you should do to create a good bad guy and the opposite, what should you avoid using as your chief nemesis.

Layers of Difficulty


As I have already mentioned, the bad guy sends other people out to do the dirty work. He has minions. The true villain knows that plans go wrong. Plans fail. People get caught. But no matter what happens, it will not be him that gets caught. Secrecy is another big part of the layers of difficulty. Players can beat up that henchman all they want, but if he doesn’t really know who the top boss is then he can’t tell. The true villain gets extra credit if the henchmen think they are working for someone else. Always frame your competition.

Resources


The big bad guy should not be easy to capture. What made Lex Luthor such an excellent foe is that he used his resources. Here was a well-respected citizen who was actually a chief mastermind behind a huge crime syndicate. Yet, because of his position in society, his support for charities, and of course his political connections no one believed it was him or if they did, proof was not forthcoming. Plus, if he was in a tight spot he used his wealth, power and his position within society to get him out of any difficulty that arose. He has teams of lawyers waiting for an opportunity to smear a hero, and he has never been afraid to use them. He also had other bad guys working for him, and many times it seemed as if the heroes themselves did his work for him. Your villain doesn’t even have to be rich to have these kinds of resources. A villain who is really just big and strong can intimidate people into working for him, or else. If he’s good enough then he’ll have the wealth someday, but that doesn’t mean he isn’t already a growing threat today.

If your villain uses these kinds of indirect tactics then your players will not be able to just attack him head on, or if they do there will be very bad consequences. They will have to work as a team within the system to prove his misdeeds, or attack him indirectly. And sometimes, the bad guy will win. It will be very fulfilling to them when (and if) they finally accomplish the task of putting him/her out of business for good. It’s not only wealth and popularity that can make a character a good villain. Moriarty for example was a brilliant man. And, part of that brilliance was the way he played his cards behind the scenes. He was never really noticed because no one knew who he was. He was a match for Holmes in everyway and, despite the fact that he rarely confronted Holmes directly his influence was always felt. A good villain sharpens the hero providing him a focus to prove himself, but he doesn’t have to be obvious to do it. Sherlock Holmes would not be an icon without his matching wits with Professor Moriarty.

Believability/Complexity


To be a believable character, even an evil one, has to follow a set of core values. Nobody really thinks of himself or herself as evil. Everyone follows some sort of internal guide as he/she continue through life. Take for instance, Magneto from the X-men ™. No one can deny he is the bad guy. But he truly feels he is doing the right thing. Righting the wrongs done to his people. Survival makes us do things we are not always proud of. Taken to extremes a “good act” does not always mean one that is right.

The Sheriff of Nottingham thought he was preserving order and “the way things are supposed to be” from the chaos and villainy of Robin Hood. He truly believed that some people deserved to live in luxury, and other people deserved to be downtrodden. Some people were meant to work their way to the top, and other people were there purely to be taxed. Your villains should believe just as strongly in what they are doing.

To create a truly successful evil doer, villain, or whatever you want to call him, he should earn people’s respect, and even their sympathy. This does not mean that we must like them or wish them well, but a good villain has to have something likeable and admirable about them. No one wants to be friends with Hannibal Lector, yet here is an absolute genius who can be very charming and disarming (literally I guess) at times. This is what makes him so incredibly dangerous.

To go even further, a good villain doesn’t always have to do evil things, at least not all the time. Take one of the most memorable villains of all time. Don Vito Corleone (the Godfather) was the head of a crime family. He was well capable of ordering someone murdered (or even doing it himself if he had to), having a prized animal mutilated to prove a point, and many other horrendous deeds. Yet, he was a good family man and looked out for his neighbors and friends. If there was someone causing problems in his neighborhood, they would either get an offer they couldn’t refuse or they weren’t around to consider anything anymore.

It doesn’t hurt to add some humor and compassion to your villain’s personality. Having a softer side does wonders and adds to his complexity. It also makes it a little tougher for the good guys to see the bad guys for what they are. Plus, don't forget to check out all sources. For example, catering to the discriminating villain's taste there are resources available online for all things evil.

Basically what we are advocating is the creation of a master villain who is 3-dimensional. Giving the character layers beyond just a powerful punch and mean disposition will add layers to your world and make it worth the chase. There is a whole world out there waiting to be exploited. Let’s get moving and create the ultimate foil for your team of players. They will appreciate the fight even more…
Last edited by Euroslavia on Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:12 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Euroslavia
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Postby Euroslavia » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:35 pm

Questions You Need to Ask to Properly Integrate Religion into your Game



How would you deal with all of this? Let’s look at questions you need to ask yourself:

1. Who are the gods, what are the general religious practices of each, and what do they represent?
2. Why does each god intervene, and in what ways? Are these gods purely selfish and only do what aids them. Or do these gods do what is good for their followers? You need to decide how you are going to treat the deities in your world and how they will respond.
3. How often will the god(s) intervene? Is this something that happens regularly or only on real special occasions?
4. How difficult is it to get them to intervene? Will simple belief be able to call down the hand of god, or will their need to be a quest, something that you need to give up etc.?
5. Who can call upon these deities? Many believe that only religious figures can do so. Can only the village shaman call upon the powers that be or can any religious follower do so?
6. How do these beings manifest themselves? Do they actually show up in solid form (incarnate), does a messenger (avatar) of said god visit you, or do they simply send you omens (they don’t manifest at all)? Maybe just the miracle or intervention takes place, yet you never see anyone. It’s up to you to create the proper atmosphere for your game.
7. What (if any) is the religious hierarchy or the relationships between the gods.
8. What is the effect of religion on lay people.

To integrate religion not only into your characters you need to think about all these issues. It can’t be random. As with other parts of your roleplay, your religion needs to be believable. It should be something that the characters can “have faith in” so to speak. Feel free to base it on known religions and take your ideas from writings and history. Just make it comfortable from your standpoint so you, in turn, can make it believable to the other players.
Last edited by Euroslavia on Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Euroslavia
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Postby Euroslavia » Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:35 pm

3 Exciting Ways To Create Tension

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1. Create Some Competition For The Prize

You can create fantastic tension by introducing a party nemesis. A nemesis should be close to the main character in power and capabilities. And the best nemesis is an entire band of NPCs who are close duplications of the main character (i.e. an evil twin of each character--or a good twin if the characters are evil). Have the band frequently be one step ahead of the main character, getting the main character in trouble through set-ups and false rumours, and outperform the main character in every possible way.

Nemesis examples:
* A bounty hunter after the main character to bring them to justice or into the villain's hands.
* Did the main character "accidentally" commit a bad crime in the last town? Form a posse and chase 'em down!
* Another band of adventurers after the same legendary treasure.
* A rival band of NPCs hired by the main characters' employer either as assurance the quest will be completed by one of the groups, or to "take care of the main characters" so there are no loose ends once the quest is completed.
* The PCs are asked to teach some NPCs, but the NPCs turn out to be more capable than the PCs and embarrass them often by doing things better.

2. Say Something is Going to Happen Then Put It Off


The title says it all. Let the players know that the villain is quickly approaching them, or that they feel the tremors of a giant monster and the tremors are getting worse, or that the bridge they're on is breaking apart...and then make it a false alarm or give the characters a brief respite.

Drawing things out creates a lot of tension.

A great way to perform this technique is to have an NPC do the telling:
* a story
* a warning
* in song or poetry
* through a note or diary entry
* through an overheard conversation

3. Use Omens


An omen is an event or sign that gives a hint about what the future holds. Omens are tricky because if they are too subtle the players won't understand them and the effect is lost. Another problem is cause and effect. If the players do not associate your omen with potential future happenings, or if they are too skeptical to believe, then the omen will not create tension. The solution is to introduce an omen, make sure the players recognize it as an omen, and have the omen come true in that same game session. Do this three times and you will make a believer out of the most skeptical player. Omens that create the most tension are bad omens: nasty things could happen to the characters in the near future. And if your omen also contains a hint about the nature of the upcoming event even more tension can be created.
Last edited by Euroslavia on Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:15 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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Posts: 44
Founded: Mar 04, 2012
Democratic Socialists

Sick in depth roleplaying

Postby Lehemad » Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:21 pm

For real sick MT (and FT) RP threads, with: planes/tanks/missiles + countering them
I found some scientific calculators: http://www.5596.org/equations.html

This (I hope) will allow your inner nerd to fully express themselves... and to understand what it really takes to counter a modern age cruise missile or a WW2 tank armor
...or if the calculators are too scientific, there are also simpler "missions rations" calculators to give more insight in to what it takes (logistically) to feed your army.

Hope it helps to add more depth in to Your next RP thread : )
(and I hope I don't get a**rap*d for posting in the admin thread)
We are a small group of semi-advanced religious telepaths.
The people of Lehemad have evolved on their planet in various stages for over 75 000 000 earth years.
The last religious wars ended 8000 earth years ago leaving the population at about 1 240 200 to 1 265 200 citizens.
Most of the time past years were spent in closed isolation, since science-fields like direct space exploration and genetics were prohibited by the religion.
The isolation with the past religious dogmas where abandoned after the spiritual leader achieved the 8th dimension enlightenment.
The nation is now guided by "that thing that guides us" from the 8th dimension.
The nation has finally engaged in genetics what has fueled a population boom, and began building a space fleet.

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Euroslavia
Game Moderator
 
Posts: 7691
Founded: Antiquity
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Euroslavia » Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:54 pm

Lehemad wrote:For real sick MT (and FT) RP threads, with: planes/tanks/missiles + countering them
I found some scientific calculators: http://www.5596.org/equations.html

This (I hope) will allow your inner nerd to fully express themselves... and to understand what it really takes to counter a modern age cruise missile or a WW2 tank armor
...or if the calculators are too scientific, there are also simpler "missions rations" calculators to give more insight in to what it takes (logistically) to feed your army.

Hope it helps to add more depth in to Your next RP thread : )
(and I hope I don't get a**rap*d for posting in the admin thread)

That's a very fantastic link, thank you for providing it. :)

And no, I always leave these sort of threads open for feedback and for additional suggestions to add on to it. I'm always open to improvements! I'll add this link to the first post.
Cards Against Nationstates | Getting Help | The One Stop Rules Shop

"It's okay to make mistakes. It's okay to fall down. Get up, look SICKENING, and make them eat it!" Latrice Royale.
Trans waz here!

Rest in Peace Dyakovo.

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Phantasmagoricland
Secretary
 
Posts: 29
Founded: Mar 28, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Phantasmagoricland » Wed May 16, 2012 11:53 am

so how would i create a forum page of my own for a RP?
For the glory and honor of His Phantasmagoricness!


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Euroslavia
Game Moderator
 
Posts: 7691
Founded: Antiquity
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Euroslavia » Wed May 23, 2012 2:52 pm

Phantasmagoricland wrote:so how would i create a forum page of my own for a RP?

All you need to do is click on the "New Topic" button while looking inside of the forum you want it in.
Cards Against Nationstates | Getting Help | The One Stop Rules Shop

"It's okay to make mistakes. It's okay to fall down. Get up, look SICKENING, and make them eat it!" Latrice Royale.
Trans waz here!

Rest in Peace Dyakovo.

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Alyekra
Minister
 
Posts: 2815
Founded: May 03, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Alyekra » Tue May 29, 2012 8:27 pm

The link to "Big List of RP Plots" is dead, along with "What Is a Role-Play Game?", and "The Name Generator".

May I suggest adding http://www.seventhsanctum.com to the list?
---Christian Voluntaryist---
---.-Citizen of Yggdrasil--.-
Pro:
Mark 12:31
Philosophy
Idealism*
Property Rights
Moral Objectivism
G.K. Chesterton
Anti:
Authoritarianism
Unexamined lives
Materialism*
Relativism
Postmodernism
Apathy
"Do not act as if you were going to live ten thousand years. Death hangs over you.
While you live, while it is in your power, be good.
"
― Marcus Aurelius
Feel free to send me a telegram for any reason.
---
- -

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Page
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6652
Founded: Jan 12, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Page » Mon Jul 16, 2012 9:12 pm

I don't know if this has been suggested but I certainly think it is helpful to mention - while it is certainly improper to control another's character without permission, if you are on good terms with your fellow roleplayer and know their writing style, it can certainly make stories more realistic and better paced to allow some mutual character control between you and your fellow RPer. It is of course best to TG communicate about things you are uncertain of, and for that matter always better to TG people than to clutter up the thread with OOC chatter. If you have more than 2 people it is best to have a dedicated OOC thread. Threads that look clean are less likely to derail.

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Syrakhstan
Envoy
 
Posts: 289
Founded: Apr 14, 2012
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Syrakhstan » Wed Sep 12, 2012 1:25 pm

Myrten wrote:this shit is fucking retarded,I can't even go on half the pages linked


There are much better ways of saying it than using offensive obnoxious language, however yes every link in the index leads to a page that states "You are not authorised to read this forum."
DEFCON: [2]
Tech Level Varies: (Technology ranging from 1191-2012)
[When I do past tech, I tend to toss in a just a bit of Fantasy.]
Current Roleplays: None.
If you have to ask, you'll never know. If you know, you need only ask.

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Page
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6652
Founded: Jan 12, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Page » Mon Sep 17, 2012 11:04 pm

A spambot without a sense of time.

Although, before that post is deleted, take note of the capitalization and punctuation this thing inexplicably managed to use. I'm impressed.

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Maltropia
Senior N&I RP Mentor
 
Posts: 6821
Founded: Dec 19, 2009
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Maltropia » Mon Sep 17, 2012 11:11 pm

Some horrible mistakes there. I mean, come on, "great adequate"?
Ɛ> Maltropia + Tiami 4ever <3
[17:46] <bc> MY ENTHUSIASM EFFECTS MY SPELLING / [19:25] <minn> srsly is maltropia the only one with a brain here :|
Call me Mal(t?). Reduce risk of carpal tunnel syndrome!
GE&T:Maritime Imperial Shipwrights | T-O Cartographic
II:Amistad, EATC signatory | PRV founder | CFDS, FIR, ECU member
F&NI:IIwiki | Factbook | Embassy program
WA:Represented by Ambassador Seán Lemass

I'm a Roleplay Mentor, specialising in GE&T. Please TG me if you have any questions.

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Serkonas
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 2
Founded: Oct 22, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Serkonas » Mon Oct 22, 2012 9:27 pm

Entirely new to this site. I am very familiar with roleplaying but I do not know how to start my country off great.

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Eragon45
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 4
Founded: Nov 06, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Eragon45 » Mon Nov 12, 2012 6:44 pm

Um hey just wanted to know how to vote and or endorse nations voting as in on general assembly resolutions ?


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Rattlestan
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 12
Founded: Aug 12, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Rattlestan » Sat Nov 17, 2012 2:59 am

Erm, none of the links appear to be working; could somebody look into this please? I'm keen to get involved but frankly bewildered at present.
Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity.

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Rorai
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 61
Founded: Dec 01, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Rorai » Sun Dec 02, 2012 10:57 am

Links still don't work.

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Araraukar
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 10691
Founded: May 14, 2007
Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Araraukar » Tue Dec 18, 2012 5:47 am

The links that don't work are headlines for the text that comes in the posts after them. It's annoying they don't work, but just scroll down to see what they're supposed to link to.
"My nation may not always be in the WA, but that hasn't stopped me from meddling in its affairs." - Miss Janis Leveret, Araraukarian ambassador, wielder of the Proposal ScalpelTM and a flamethrower
"I've come to appreciate boring bureaucracy much more after my official execution..." - Johan Milkus, aide to miss Leveret
Giovenith wrote:And sorry hun, if you were looking for a forum site where nobody argued, you've come to wrong one.

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Euroslavia
Game Moderator
 
Posts: 7691
Founded: Antiquity
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Euroslavia » Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:59 pm

Araraukar wrote:The links that don't work are headlines for the text that comes in the posts after them. It's annoying they don't work, but just scroll down to see what they're supposed to link to.

What links? There are a few headlines that are underlined and bolded, but aren't links. Perhaps I should change the format to not have anyone confused about it.
Cards Against Nationstates | Getting Help | The One Stop Rules Shop

"It's okay to make mistakes. It's okay to fall down. Get up, look SICKENING, and make them eat it!" Latrice Royale.
Trans waz here!

Rest in Peace Dyakovo.

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San Leggera
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 13414
Founded: Dec 15, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby San Leggera » Sat Jan 05, 2013 9:03 pm

Euroslavia wrote:
Araraukar wrote:The links that don't work are headlines for the text that comes in the posts after them. It's annoying they don't work, but just scroll down to see what they're supposed to link to.

What links? There are a few headlines that are underlined and bolded, but aren't links. Perhaps I should change the format to not have anyone confused about it.

I think Araraukar is referring to
Index
1. Creating Your Own Roleplay/Scenario
2. Types of Roleplays
3. Character Development
4. Non-Playable Characters
5. Limiting the Number of Players Involved
6. Creating a Successful Villain
7. Involving Religion in your Story
8. Successful Ways of Creating Tension


All of the links generate the 'You are not authorised to read this forum' error message.
#JusticeForGat
Flag | CoA | Map (bigger!)
I Just Want to Sell Out My Funeral

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Euroslavia
Game Moderator
 
Posts: 7691
Founded: Antiquity
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Euroslavia » Sun Jan 06, 2013 12:26 pm

San Leggera wrote:
Euroslavia wrote:What links? There are a few headlines that are underlined and bolded, but aren't links. Perhaps I should change the format to not have anyone confused about it.

I think Araraukar is referring to
Index
1. Creating Your Own Roleplay/Scenario
2. Types of Roleplays
3. Character Development
4. Non-Playable Characters
5. Limiting the Number of Players Involved
6. Creating a Successful Villain
7. Involving Religion in your Story
8. Successful Ways of Creating Tension


All of the links generate the 'You are not authorised to read this forum' error message.

Oh Jesus, I linked to the wrong copy. I'll fix that up, thanks!
Edit: And done.
Last edited by Euroslavia on Sun Jan 06, 2013 12:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Cards Against Nationstates | Getting Help | The One Stop Rules Shop

"It's okay to make mistakes. It's okay to fall down. Get up, look SICKENING, and make them eat it!" Latrice Royale.
Trans waz here!

Rest in Peace Dyakovo.

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