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Land of The Free: American Political Roleplay (OOC V)

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Kargintina the Third
Senator
 
Posts: 3891
Founded: Dec 17, 2019
Corporate Bordello

Postby Kargintina the Third » Mon Sep 28, 2020 6:37 pm

Poor Volker no one responded to his livestream
Representative Earl Tenson (R-MT-All)

Senate candidate Christina Mudale (R-AL)

Senator Nickolai Dernilski (D-OH)

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Louisianan
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1300
Founded: Mar 21, 2020
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Louisianan » Mon Sep 28, 2020 6:40 pm

I was looking over the Character list and in Non Officeholders I didn't see, the great, the powerful, and the bathtaking, Russell Long! Former democratic governor of Louisiana and possible competitor in the 2020 US La Senate Race against yours truly....
US Conservative
Join Nationstates P2TM US Political RP Land Of The Free
(R) [Louisiana] Hypolite Gaspard (D) [Texas] Linda Lazare
(SD) [Louisiana] Dules Broussard
Ozane Gaspard

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New Cobastheia
Senator
 
Posts: 4921
Founded: Apr 12, 2014
New York Times Democracy

Postby New Cobastheia » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:06 pm

Louisianan wrote:I was looking over the Character list and in Non Officeholders I didn't see, the great, the powerful, and the bathtaking, Russell Long! Former democratic governor of Louisiana and possible competitor in the 2020 US La Senate Race against yours truly....

Someone's feeling petty

Also, I love that energy Gord
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First Lady of the United States Eliza LeBlanc Wolf (R-ME)
Representative Kathleen Nez (D-AZ-7)
Representative Chip Renfus (R-MS-4)

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Gordano and Lysandus
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8459
Founded: Sep 24, 2012
New York Times Democracy

Postby Gordano and Lysandus » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:09 pm

New Cobastheia wrote:
Louisianan wrote:I was looking over the Character list and in Non Officeholders I didn't see, the great, the powerful, and the bathtaking, Russell Long! Former democratic governor of Louisiana and possible competitor in the 2020 US La Senate Race against yours truly....

Someone's feeling petty

Also, I love that energy Gord


Someone has to provide the antagonism. <3

The new character lists are beautiful, hopefully we can get them fully up to date. :D
One Nation Conservative (UK), Moderate Democrat (US), liberal Eurosceptic | Biden/Harris 2020
"Making peace with the establishment is an important aspect of maturity."
Join NS P2TM's pre-eminent US politics RP! - Land of the Free
Speaker of the House of Representatives Caroline Simone (D-NY-12)
Governor Jonah Prendergast Jr. of West Virginia (R-WV)
Senator Augusta Merriam (R-NH)
Fmr. Governor John Nathan Lynskey of Massachusetts (D-MA)
Secretary of Defense George M. Berentsen (I-IL)
Representative Dr. Katherine Edwards (R-GA-3)
Governor Rudolf Kohl of Minnesota (DFL-MN)

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 15628
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:17 pm

I just want to say I really love the new Spellman logo, like ugh, graphic design :p
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Louisianan
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1300
Founded: Mar 21, 2020
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Louisianan » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:30 pm

New Cobastheia wrote:
Louisianan wrote:I was looking over the Character list and in Non Officeholders I didn't see, the great, the powerful, and the bathtaking, Russell Long! Former democratic governor of Louisiana and possible competitor in the 2020 US La Senate Race against yours truly....

Someone's feeling petty

Also, I love that energy Gord

I'm not being petty!!! I'm just pushing Lavan Tiri's buttons!
US Conservative
Join Nationstates P2TM US Political RP Land Of The Free
(R) [Louisiana] Hypolite Gaspard (D) [Texas] Linda Lazare
(SD) [Louisiana] Dules Broussard
Ozane Gaspard

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Sarenium
Minister
 
Posts: 3147
Founded: Sep 18, 2015
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Sarenium » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:42 pm

Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:I just want to say I really love the new Spellman logo, like ugh, graphic design :p


Please redesign the Dayton one it isn't sufficiently American enough and excludes an adaptable way of adding a VP underneath.
Just another Australian. Chalmers 2021 | Nandy 2024

LOTF Characters: Senator Jillian Dayton (D-VA) | Senator Howard Frankston (R-TX) | Representative Fiona Lowell (D-WI) | Lieutenant General Joe Frankston (R-TX)

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 15628
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:53 pm

If anyone is willing/able, I'd love to have Spellman or Sullivan have a national TV interview.
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Kargintina the Third
Senator
 
Posts: 3891
Founded: Dec 17, 2019
Corporate Bordello

Postby Kargintina the Third » Mon Sep 28, 2020 7:54 pm

Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:If anyone is willing/able, I'd love to have Spellman or Sullivan have a national TV interview.

I could do it if you could do an interview for Mudale
Representative Earl Tenson (R-MT-All)

Senate candidate Christina Mudale (R-AL)

Senator Nickolai Dernilski (D-OH)

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St George Territory
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 422
Founded: Apr 04, 2017
Democratic Socialists

Postby St George Territory » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:26 pm

Reposting my app from previous ooc

St George Territory wrote:
(Image)


Character Information Sheet


NS Nation Name: St. George Territory
Character Name: Peter van Driel
Character Gender: Male
Character Age: 51 (April 4th, 1968)
Character Height: 1.82 metres (5'10")
Character Weight: 83.5 kilos (184 lbs)
Character Position/Role/Job: Welder (1988-2011)
Union Rep (2011-2011)
Part-time Welder (2011-present)
Political activist/'Journalist' (2012-present)
Appearance:
Character State of Origin: Pennsylvania
Character State of Residence: Pennsylvania
Character Party Affiliation: Republican (but leans Libertarian)
Main Strengths: Passionate about his work, has found a niche for his writing, perseverant.
Main Weaknesses: Hot-headed, bit of a drinker, not very well respected by most, conspiracy theorist.
Biography: (Minimum 2-3 paragraphs)
Other Info:

Born April 4th, 1968 into the East Hills neighbourhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to a distant Father and an overworked Mother, with that in mind, Peter always had a little too much time on his hands. When he wasn't causing trouble with the other kids, he found an interest with the news, keeping up with modern events, who's who in the political world. Boring stuff to just about anyone, but Peter found some enjoyment in it, finding heroes in the ranks of the Republican party, be it Reagen or the likes, he just knew that he wasn't a liberal.

When it came to schooling, Peter also found little success, known as rather roudy and a 'tough guy' the only classes that he seemed to find some success at was with welding and partly at English, and Journalism, with the former he would take an apprenticeship after highschool and begin his work, and with the latter he would practice and begin his passion; and truth be told, he was a decent welder, calming down from his shell he can point to just about any building and try and tell you that he had some part in constructing it, or repairing it, the story might change depending at which time you catch him in the bar.

"Married, divorced, twice", is all he'll talk about his short attempt at love, usually over some small quam, like politics. It was the election of Baharia that inspired him to go back to writing, even being featured in a vox populi in the local paper every once in a blue moon, most of the time heavily redacted, written in some blind rage mad at a world that seemed to go push down on the little guy, seeking to reclaim some sense of control he managed a short lived reign as a union rep, until comments brought him down. But, in spite of all that, he decided to go all in on his dream of becomming something of a journalist, and in the sense of the word, he's something, finding small readership, but readership none-the-less, he writes about politics and current events.

I have read and accept the rules of the roleplay: St. George Territory

Do Not Remove: 84721
St. George Territory- come for the view, stay because you've been mauled by Polar Bears

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 15628
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:27 pm

Updated him!

Image

Image


Character Information Sheet



Character Name: Jonathan Davis
Character Gender: Male
Character Age: 64
Height: 5 ft. 9 in.
Weight: 171 lbs.
Character Position/Role: Senior Senator from Wisconsin (2007 - Present); Electrician (2001 - 2003, 1980 - 1990)

Late Career
Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District (2003 - 2007);
State Senator for Wisconsin's 25th Senate District (1994 - 2001);
State Representative for Wisconsin's 74th Assembly District (1990 - 1994)

Mid Career
IBEW Northwestern Wisconsin District Chief Organizer (1984 - 1990);
IBEW Green Bay District Assistant Organizer (1982 - 1984);
IBEW Green Bay District Secretary (1980 - 1982)

Early Career
Apprentice Electrician (1976 - 1980);
Day Laborer (1975 - 1976);
Bus Boy (1970 - 1975)

Character State of Origin: Indiana
Character State of Residence: Wisconsin
Character Party Affiliation: Democrat (1977 - Present)

Character Strengths
Strong ties to rural Wisconsin; Respected credentials on foreign affairs; Previous state legislative background helps with bipartisan appeal and with his law & order clout; Popular with unions; Largely considered a safe seat with him; Protectionist on trade

Character Weaknesses:
Controversial law & order comments & record; No notable social or racial stances or legislation; Somewhat seen as politically shrewd; Establishment nature that earns him frustration from some moderates and distrust from progressives; Supported a number of moderate and centrist liberals colleagues that were ousted in 2018; Dismissive of Sam Baginiski and the some in the progressive wing of the party; Makes off-the-cuff remarks; Largely seen as gruff; Keeps his head down and focuses less on making a splash, Uses PAC money though refuses corporate donations

Biography
Born in early December, Jonathan grew up in Gary, Indiana. Growing up in the home of a single mother, he focused on taking care of his younger siblings and helping his only parent whenever he could. It was not a particularly easy task, given that two little brothers were certainly a handful for any family and more so for a slightly older boy. He made sure to take them back and forth from school, one time tackling and fighting with an older student who teased his brothers. It led to a week long suspension from school and while his mother reprimanded him, his grandparents were quick to offer relief given that he had done so to defend his family. As her mother began to work not just as a waitress but as an assistant cook, her schedule grew more erratic and Jonathan began to take on more of a duty at home, even more than before too. His grades began to slip through this middle school time period and eventually he chose to take a year off between 9th and 10th grade to earn some money as a bus boy. His grandmother had encouraged him to not do so but her untimely death pushed him even more to make the choice to help cover the funeral costs.

The death greatly traumatized Jonathan's mother, eventually leading to an actual breakdown when she stopped going to work and stopped feeding her children. He ended up picking up the slack, hiding the family's troubles from friends and other relatives, hoping to keep them at bay to avoid having to deal with them taking away his family. But after a second year skipping high school, his grandfather finally made the call to stop ignoring his daughter's absence with her children. Calling child services, the agents soon arrived and transplanted the Davis children to their aunt in Ashland, Wisconsin. Life change completely for the family there, not only did they suddenly have a cousin but a chance to finally focus on learning. Jonathan returned to school and while he was rather frustrated at having to return to school especially given his age, he ended up completing high school. It was a big celebrated moment only soured by the death of their grandfather come the summer after graduation. College was not at all on the mind of the young man and instead he focused on helping out his aunt. She too was a single mother, though unlike his own father who had run out, her husband had died in a mining accident in West Virginia. She had been unable to handle the grief alone and moved to Ohio due to her in-laws family. But Jonathan had no ties to the hometown community and soon left to work in Green Bay.

Starting off as just a labor hand for the construction of the city's many bridges, he eventually befriended a fellow worker, Mike Isgro. The quickly became close friends, moving in together in an apartment in Suamico. Going out for beers after work, they eventually began to run into the same crowd and while the rest spent their money away, he sent money back home. It caught the eye of one of the older folks, Quentin Wells and eventually the man offered both Mike and Jonathan a chance at an electrician fellowship. Challenging themselves and earning their due, the pair worked hard to complete their apprenticeship before becoming hired by General Electric almost two years later. During one of these early days after becoming a full flung electrician and celebrating their successes, Davis ran into a young gal at a sold out Reds game. They chatted and hit it off immediately, eventually dating for the next five years. It was also during these years that he became both an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers and in the future, soccer too with the Green Bay Voyageurs FC. He also began to take one a few leadership posts in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, largely at the encouragement of Quentin Wells, who had risen to a district manager. He was a secretary for a few years before finally becoming the right hand to Wells' successor, largely due to his mentor's private encouragement for him to succeed him.

This particular position was short lived though, mere months actually, as he was soon recalled home due to his aunt's death at the hands of a break in robbery. It led to widespread frustration in the community and soon after, Jonathan made his move back to Ashland permanent. His previous leadership in Cincinnati's IBEW led him within a year succeed the retiring chief district organizer in the northern rural and working-class region of Wisconsin. It was a fairly large area and while there is lots of logistic work to be done, he also proved his merits are being an effective advocate. But he also focused on a number of community based issues, like leading a local campaign to hire two more officers in the police force as well as testifying before the state legislature calling for greater funding to Wisconsin's county sheriffs, especially for the rural areas that he believed were constantly being forgotten about. It was a brilliant way to captivate the state Democratic party, particularly a state senator and party official who saw the chops of a potential lawmaker. A former police officer himself, Owen Rogers began to befriend Davis and eventually pitched him to run for state representative, a position he held for a couple of years.

Getting elected was surprisingly easier than expected, even by Rogers' standards. He had expected a difficult challenge to Davis but instead the community had embraced him given his strong local roots. It was never a competitive race for state representative. During his tenure and being a freshman of course, he had little legislative experience and thus accomplished very little. But he began to build a reputation as a moderate Democrat who did not mince words, focusing on advocating for greater funding for rural police precincts and sheriff jurisdictions, while also becoming a reliable supporter of pro-union legislation. He also became a fierce opponent of tax cuts on the wealthy, a position that earned him a lot of credibility in his own district. Thus, it came to no surprise that Wisconsin's party officials courted him to run for the larger 25th state senate district, a far harder challenge than a single house district. He had to campaign further from his home base and thus he faced greater skepticism. But mobilizing his union connections as well as running a door-to-door type operation, he managed to swing the direction as the race dragged on wards. It was also a race to get his second hometown to turn out for him, something that eventually led to his close victory.

Now a state senator, Jonathan focused on hopefully accomplishing more this time around. He entered into some hot water early on by commenting on the need for unions to support letting 'the blacks' to strengthen their number, a comment that hurt him among some less than open union leaders. He walked the comment back eventually, but never apologized or denied it. But perhaps even the unions were willing to ignore that after his biggest moment came when he fought fiercely to defend pensions due to Wisconsin's mounting budget crisis at the time. His spoke on the floor, reading aloud teachers and other educators who would have seen their life's savings eroded. But he also showed his bipartisan marks, helping save increased investments in child care and health care, especially for low-income working families though he did accomplish this by coupling it with the governor's aggressive welfare reform, something he later critiqued as a cost saving measure rather than a family saving one. Additionally, he clashed with Republicans in their attempts to reduce the tax burden on the wealthy, their friendliness to big tobacco, and their attempts to undermine Ojibwa tribe land rights.

His outward perception also began to change as his adoption of a number of more liberal social views like not bashing abortion and supporting immigration saw him become a top contender for a potential statewide or federal office. The opportunity soon presented itself in 2001 with the retirement of the elder representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District. His own deep ties in the community made him a top choice and thus sought to win the primary. His mentor, Rogers, had already secured top brass support for Jonathan, leaving him to win over rural voters with a deeply populist message of fighting for them against out of touch Washington. His connections to the unions and his own background of being a working-class champion proved essential. Nonetheless, he was going up against a solid contender in what was usually a conservative-leaning district and in an election year. He lost.

What does not kill you makes you stronger thought Davis, now out a job. So resuming his electrician job, he stayed in tune with national politics as well as meeting with a number of rural, smaller communities as part of an outreach program with his wife, a school nurse, to teach kids about health and offering family-focused events through his union. It was a way to build his reputation when he would look back at it but Jonathan had thought he had left politics behind now. But two years later and after redistricting, it was clear the 7th Congressional District was not just friendlier to a working-class Democrat like himself but probably intrinsically gave him an edge. Thus, running a similar campaign as before with his outreach fresh in voters minds, he managed to make his previous opponent a one term congressman. It was still a close election but with his background and eventually with his record, he would hold it for the party for two terms. Serving on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, he crafted legislation to expand electricity access to rural communities, a measure that made him popular for both his previous profession's irony and among rural Democratic voters.

He also served on the Committee on Education and Labor, specifically serving on the Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions subcommittee. He passed a bill to expand requirements for state held education pensions, making it harder for potential cuts or erosion of benefits, though he complained it was still not enough. He also voted against the PATRIOT Act. He also held onto his law & order background, pushing for a tough on crime approach. This was a belief he had held since his aunt’s death and only began to shift on it in late 2017. As for other issues, Jonathan largely held to the party line, by complaining about encroachments by President Burke and slowly adapting to certain liberal social policies, carefully moving left on abortion and contraception but primarily sticking to the primary line. This made him a favorite of the establishment, something that had begun to paint him as more with Washington than his rural Ohio constituency. It also likely he would face a tough challenge, thus he looked for a way out, a politically savvy move from an increasingly shrewd Davis.

And then the opportunity arose in 2006, with the retirement of (Not-Herb Kohl) and the nomination of a potentially electorally weak (Not-Tommy Thompson) up for reelection. The former governor had won many elections statewide already and thus there was little excitement in the Democratic primary field. So taking it in stride, Jonathan spoke with his now elder mentor Owen and convincing leaders in D.C. to back him, he launched his campaign. It was an easy primary of course, giving him a chance to build his political infrastructure across the state. Likewise, the GOP senator faced a noteworthy primary challenge, a root that Davis took in stride to show how even his own party was doubting his ability to serve Ohioans. Almost immediately, the unions swung heavily to the congressman as he sought to mobilize their voting base and encouraging them to get out to vote. Likewise, his own rural hometown proved to be a great backdrop for both ads and rallying voters to trust him, not as a flashy city mayor but a hard working small town guy. The biggest group he needed to fold into his coalition were the inner cities though, something his campaign eventually accomplished by touting his tough childhood as a sign he knew hardship and how to help others rise about. But perhaps the biggest pitfalls were the incumbent Senator's poor decision digitally alter a 9/11 photo for campaign purposes and lie about Davis' own record on race, hoping to push away black voters from him by digging up his tough record on race. Alas, come election day, he won with a decisive margin (not close or comfortable though), becoming the new Democratic senator for the Badger state.

Taking office, Jonathan was now a developed politician and knew how to serve, focusing on being an effective legislator and less on eye-grabbing grandstanding. He focused on curating his image of a champion for the working-class focusing on legislation like defending union dues and combating right-to-work laws. He also sought greater strength allocated to the National Labor Relations Board and hoping to deliver on a fair playing field between companies and workers. He also has focused on supporting affordable housing in a bid to both shore up his urban support, proposing the Neighborhood Homes Investment Act. Davis faced a minor scandal midway through his first term after his campaign failed to report certain donations from certain groups, namely other Wisconsin and Midwestern unions. It consumed the media for a short while but given his nature of keeping his head down working, it passed. He opposed the opposed the Iraq War, something that ran contrary to his gruff style he had campaign on, but nonetheless he covered by playing up the need to focus on American workers. He also voted against the $87 billion war budgetary supplement and voted for redeploying US troops out of Iraq by March 2008.

But he also accomplished some foreign policy matters, namely introducing the New Start treaty with Russia with help from senior Senators and co-sponsored an amendment to the budget that would reimpose sanctions on Iran if Iran violated the terms of the interim or final agreement by advancing its nuclear program. He also earned his chops working with American allies by sponsoring the reaffirmations of the Taiwan Relations Act and supporting Hong Kong democratic & human rights legislation. As Davis has gained experience, he has now gone toe to toe with President Wolf, urging him to not pull out of the Iran Deal yet he has also remained silent on whether to continue to sell arms to Middle Eastern allies. More recently, he has supported legislation to restrict ISIS's financing by authorizing new sanctions on foreign financial institutions that knowingly facilitate financial transactions with ISIS, sought to recognize a democratic Venezuelan government and denouncing Maduro, quietly supporting the Cuban thaw, and encouraging tact when dealing with Iran.

On other issues, Davis was a major fighter against the Wolf Tax Cuts and called them serving America's working class on a platter. He also has sought to pass a number of middle-class and low-income tax cuts to little avail though he supporting the 2008 stimulus and the bailout of the auto industry, another mixed issue that earned him flak from some Wisconsinites. He also introduced the Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014 that would expand preferred eligibility for federal jobs to the fathers of certain permanently disabled or deceased veterans and legislation that would give military veterans priority in scheduling classes in colleges and universities. He has consistently supported gun control, seeking to prevent people on the no-fly list to purchase assault weapons, criticizing the political influence of gun manufacturers, calling Wisconsin state legislators "sick" for supporting open carry, and sponsoring a ban on bump stocks. He has supported Dodd-Frank but has stayed quiet on more progressive approaches to regulating Wall Street.

He worked with Senator Moore to support legislation that would force the federal government to step in when cities and states fail to warn residents about lead-contaminated drinking water and to give Wisconsin's school districts money to test it. Davis also voted for the Affordable Care Act while eventually deriding some single-payer systems as too optimistic. While initially quiet on some social issue, he has followed the party line supporting the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, remained silent on sanctuary cities but denounced child separations, backed the Charter School Accountability Act of 2015 and called for better teacher wages, joined other senators in requesting investigations of opioid companies, and generally advocating against biased systems and for affirmative action. Jonathan also takes a protectionist approach to trade, criticizing free trade with China and other countries, sponsoring a bill that would officially declare China a currency manipulator and require the Department of Commerce to impose countervailing duties on Chinese imports. He has called for better trade enforcement and opposed NAFTA, while also voting against Wolf's new deal.

Electorally, Jonathan has been a survivor and a surprise. Despite facing difficult odds in 2012 given the intense Republican money flowing into the race, he enjoyed good polling margins. While he has never been a spectacular debator, he held his own against his opponent while also drawing up his typical working-class coalition. Additionally, being close to the establishment brought benefits like a number of PACs giving him a competitive arm to fight back the expensive horserace he was running within. He won solidly, by a smaller margin than before but still a majority victory. Despite being a quiet senator most of the time, he had earned himself a strong reputation and with the 2018 midterm elections favoring the Democrats, he faced an easier path to victory and a similar comfortable margin as his first time around.

As for 2016, Davis was an early supporter of Clifford, though he did push for her to adopt some of Baginiski’s working class platforms. But he was largely critiqued for not doing enough to support his most signature issue, often stepping aside for Diane to push her ideas and digging into Sam on a number of other issues, primarily healthcare plans for unions. This adherence to the establishment also proved to narrow his credibility as a number of mainstream incumbents he endorsed in 2018 were toppled though he has since distanced himself endorsing candidates just because he’s told to do so. This has not stopped him from critiquing some new progressives as too out of touch with the working class, both in sensible and off the cuff ways. Now, he continues to be a diligent legislator and largely staying on the party line with regard to social issues, while continuing to advocate some progressive working-class solutions. Jonathan enjoys a close friendship with a number of other Midwestern Democrats and while he briefly considered running for President, he decided against it given that the party felt he remains their strongest contender to keep one Wisconsin U.S. Senate seat blue.

Ideology
Middle of the road is a commonly used adjective to describe Jonathan Davis. He is in the middle of the pack when it comes to the Democratic Senate Caucus, focusing on typical & party-line issues, with a particular focus on working-class issues. As the party has moved to the left on some issues, he has followed but he hardly is at the forefront of this change when it does not concern working-class concerns. He is helped by his rural and union Wisconsin roots to avoid being painted as an elite liberal, open to some progressive working-class fiscal ideas but that's about it. Still, as a moderate liberal, Kane largely focuses on getting bills passed and leading incremental reform for the working-class.

Other Information
Considered a potential run for President for 2020 before deciding against it at the advice of Diane Clifford and other establishment leaders; While sort of personally close to his fellow Wisconsin senator, he remains very ideologically apart from him and both have actively tried to unseat the other; No plans to endorse in the primary until shortly before Wisconsin's primary
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User avatar
New Cobastheia
Senator
 
Posts: 4921
Founded: Apr 12, 2014
New York Times Democracy

Postby New Cobastheia » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:43 pm

All these new apps are getting me in the mood to make a Gay Hispanic Colorado Senator for some reason and I have absolutely no idea why
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First Lady of the United States Eliza LeBlanc Wolf (R-ME)
Representative Kathleen Nez (D-AZ-7)
Representative Chip Renfus (R-MS-4)

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Bruke
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 7622
Founded: Nov 21, 2017
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Bruke » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:43 pm

Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:Updated him!

(Image)

(Image)


Character Information Sheet



Character Name: Jonathan Davis
Character Gender: Male
Character Age: 64
Height: 5 ft. 9 in.
Weight: 171 lbs.
Character Position/Role: Senior Senator from Wisconsin (2007 - Present); Electrician (2001 - 2003, 1980 - 1990)

Late Career
Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District (2003 - 2007);
State Senator for Wisconsin's 25th Senate District (1994 - 2001);
State Representative for Wisconsin's 74th Assembly District (1990 - 1994)

Mid Career
IBEW Northwestern Wisconsin District Chief Organizer (1984 - 1990);
IBEW Green Bay District Assistant Organizer (1982 - 1984);
IBEW Green Bay District Secretary (1980 - 1982)

Early Career
Apprentice Electrician (1976 - 1980);
Day Laborer (1975 - 1976);
Bus Boy (1970 - 1975)

Character State of Origin: Indiana
Character State of Residence: Wisconsin
Character Party Affiliation: Democrat (1977 - Present)

Character Strengths
Strong ties to rural Wisconsin; Respected credentials on foreign affairs; Previous state legislative background helps with bipartisan appeal and with his law & order clout; Popular with unions; Largely considered a safe seat with him; Protectionist on trade

Character Weaknesses:
Controversial law & order comments & record; No notable social or racial stances or legislation; Somewhat seen as politically shrewd; Establishment nature that earns him frustration from some moderates and distrust from progressives; Supported a number of moderate and centrist liberals colleagues that were ousted in 2018; Dismissive of Sam Baginiski and the some in the progressive wing of the party; Makes off-the-cuff remarks; Largely seen as gruff; Keeps his head down and focuses less on making a splash, Uses PAC money though refuses corporate donations

Biography
Born in early December, Jonathan grew up in Gary, Indiana. Growing up in the home of a single mother, he focused on taking care of his younger siblings and helping his only parent whenever he could. It was not a particularly easy task, given that two little brothers were certainly a handful for any family and more so for a slightly older boy. He made sure to take them back and forth from school, one time tackling and fighting with an older student who teased his brothers. It led to a week long suspension from school and while his mother reprimanded him, his grandparents were quick to offer relief given that he had done so to defend his family. As her mother began to work not just as a waitress but as an assistant cook, her schedule grew more erratic and Jonathan began to take on more of a duty at home, even more than before too. His grades began to slip through this middle school time period and eventually he chose to take a year off between 9th and 10th grade to earn some money as a bus boy. His grandmother had encouraged him to not do so but her untimely death pushed him even more to make the choice to help cover the funeral costs.

The death greatly traumatized Jonathan's mother, eventually leading to an actual breakdown when she stopped going to work and stopped feeding her children. He ended up picking up the slack, hiding the family's troubles from friends and other relatives, hoping to keep them at bay to avoid having to deal with them taking away his family. But after a second year skipping high school, his grandfather finally made the call to stop ignoring his daughter's absence with her children. Calling child services, the agents soon arrived and transplanted the Davis children to their aunt in Ashland, Wisconsin. Life change completely for the family there, not only did they suddenly have a cousin but a chance to finally focus on learning. Jonathan returned to school and while he was rather frustrated at having to return to school especially given his age, he ended up completing high school. It was a big celebrated moment only soured by the death of their grandfather come the summer after graduation. College was not at all on the mind of the young man and instead he focused on helping out his aunt. She too was a single mother, though unlike his own father who had run out, her husband had died in a mining accident in West Virginia. She had been unable to handle the grief alone and moved to Ohio due to her in-laws family. But Jonathan had no ties to the hometown community and soon left to work in Green Bay.

Starting off as just a labor hand for the construction of the city's many bridges, he eventually befriended a fellow worker, Mike Isgro. The quickly became close friends, moving in together in an apartment in Suamico. Going out for beers after work, they eventually began to run into the same crowd and while the rest spent their money away, he sent money back home. It caught the eye of one of the older folks, Quentin Wells and eventually the man offered both Mike and Jonathan a chance at an electrician fellowship. Challenging themselves and earning their due, the pair worked hard to complete their apprenticeship before becoming hired by General Electric almost two years later. During one of these early days after becoming a full flung electrician and celebrating their successes, Davis ran into a young gal at a sold out Reds game. They chatted and hit it off immediately, eventually dating for the next five years. It was also during these years that he became both an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers and in the future, soccer too with the Green Bay Voyageurs FC. He also began to take one a few leadership posts in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, largely at the encouragement of Quentin Wells, who had risen to a district manager. He was a secretary for a few years before finally becoming the right hand to Wells' successor, largely due to his mentor's private encouragement for him to succeed him.

This particular position was short lived though, mere months actually, as he was soon recalled home due to his aunt's death at the hands of a break in robbery. It led to widespread frustration in the community and soon after, Jonathan made his move back to Ashland permanent. His previous leadership in Cincinnati's IBEW led him within a year succeed the retiring chief district organizer in the northern rural and working-class region of Wisconsin. It was a fairly large area and while there is lots of logistic work to be done, he also proved his merits are being an effective advocate. But he also focused on a number of community based issues, like leading a local campaign to hire two more officers in the police force as well as testifying before the state legislature calling for greater funding to Wisconsin's county sheriffs, especially for the rural areas that he believed were constantly being forgotten about. It was a brilliant way to captivate the state Democratic party, particularly a state senator and party official who saw the chops of a potential lawmaker. A former police officer himself, Owen Rogers began to befriend Davis and eventually pitched him to run for state representative, a position he held for a couple of years.

Getting elected was surprisingly easier than expected, even by Rogers' standards. He had expected a difficult challenge to Davis but instead the community had embraced him given his strong local roots. It was never a competitive race for state representative. During his tenure and being a freshman of course, he had little legislative experience and thus accomplished very little. But he began to build a reputation as a moderate Democrat who did not mince words, focusing on advocating for greater funding for rural police precincts and sheriff jurisdictions, while also becoming a reliable supporter of pro-union legislation. He also became a fierce opponent of tax cuts on the wealthy, a position that earned him a lot of credibility in his own district. Thus, it came to no surprise that Wisconsin's party officials courted him to run for the larger 25th state senate district, a far harder challenge than a single house district. He had to campaign further from his home base and thus he faced greater skepticism. But mobilizing his union connections as well as running a door-to-door type operation, he managed to swing the direction as the race dragged on wards. It was also a race to get his second hometown to turn out for him, something that eventually led to his close victory.

Now a state senator, Jonathan focused on hopefully accomplishing more this time around. He entered into some hot water early on by commenting on the need for unions to support letting 'the blacks' to strengthen their number, a comment that hurt him among some less than open union leaders. He walked the comment back eventually, but never apologized or denied it. But perhaps even the unions were willing to ignore that after his biggest moment came when he fought fiercely to defend pensions due to Wisconsin's mounting budget crisis at the time. His spoke on the floor, reading aloud teachers and other educators who would have seen their life's savings eroded. But he also showed his bipartisan marks, helping save increased investments in child care and health care, especially for low-income working families though he did accomplish this by coupling it with the governor's aggressive welfare reform, something he later critiqued as a cost saving measure rather than a family saving one. Additionally, he clashed with Republicans in their attempts to reduce the tax burden on the wealthy, their friendliness to big tobacco, and their attempts to undermine Ojibwa tribe land rights.

His outward perception also began to change as his adoption of a number of more liberal social views like not bashing abortion and supporting immigration saw him become a top contender for a potential statewide or federal office. The opportunity soon presented itself in 2001 with the retirement of the elder representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District. His own deep ties in the community made him a top choice and thus sought to win the primary. His mentor, Rogers, had already secured top brass support for Jonathan, leaving him to win over rural voters with a deeply populist message of fighting for them against out of touch Washington. His connections to the unions and his own background of being a working-class champion proved essential. Nonetheless, he was going up against a solid contender in what was usually a conservative-leaning district and in an election year. He lost.

What does not kill you makes you stronger thought Davis, now out a job. So resuming his electrician job, he stayed in tune with national politics as well as meeting with a number of rural, smaller communities as part of an outreach program with his wife, a school nurse, to teach kids about health and offering family-focused events through his union. It was a way to build his reputation when he would look back at it but Jonathan had thought he had left politics behind now. But two years later and after redistricting, it was clear the 7th Congressional District was not just friendlier to a working-class Democrat like himself but probably intrinsically gave him an edge. Thus, running a similar campaign as before with his outreach fresh in voters minds, he managed to make his previous opponent a one term congressman. It was still a close election but with his background and eventually with his record, he would hold it for the party for two terms. Serving on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, he crafted legislation to expand electricity access to rural communities, a measure that made him popular for both his previous profession's irony and among rural Democratic voters.

He also served on the Committee on Education and Labor, specifically serving on the Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions subcommittee. He passed a bill to expand requirements for state held education pensions, making it harder for potential cuts or erosion of benefits, though he complained it was still not enough. He also voted against the PATRIOT Act. He also held onto his law & order background, pushing for a tough on crime approach. This was a belief he had held since his aunt’s death and only began to shift on it in late 2017. As for other issues, Jonathan largely held to the party line, by complaining about encroachments by President Burke and slowly adapting to certain liberal social policies, carefully moving left on abortion and contraception but primarily sticking to the primary line. This made him a favorite of the establishment, something that had begun to paint him as more with Washington than his rural Ohio constituency. It also likely he would face a tough challenge, thus he looked for a way out, a politically savvy move from an increasingly shrewd Davis.

And then the opportunity arose in 2006, with the retirement of (Not-Herb Kohl) and the nomination of a potentially electorally weak (Not-Tommy Thompson) up for reelection. The former governor had won many elections statewide already and thus there was little excitement in the Democratic primary field. So taking it in stride, Jonathan spoke with his now elder mentor Owen and convincing leaders in D.C. to back him, he launched his campaign. It was an easy primary of course, giving him a chance to build his political infrastructure across the state. Likewise, the GOP senator faced a noteworthy primary challenge, a root that Davis took in stride to show how even his own party was doubting his ability to serve Ohioans. Almost immediately, the unions swung heavily to the congressman as he sought to mobilize their voting base and encouraging them to get out to vote. Likewise, his own rural hometown proved to be a great backdrop for both ads and rallying voters to trust him, not as a flashy city mayor but a hard working small town guy. The biggest group he needed to fold into his coalition were the inner cities though, something his campaign eventually accomplished by touting his tough childhood as a sign he knew hardship and how to help others rise about. But perhaps the biggest pitfalls were the incumbent Senator's poor decision digitally alter a 9/11 photo for campaign purposes and lie about Davis' own record on race, hoping to push away black voters from him by digging up his tough record on race. Alas, come election day, he won with a decisive margin (not close or comfortable though), becoming the new Democratic senator for the Badger state.

Taking office, Jonathan was now a developed politician and knew how to serve, focusing on being an effective legislator and less on eye-grabbing grandstanding. He focused on curating his image of a champion for the working-class focusing on legislation like defending union dues and combating right-to-work laws. He also sought greater strength allocated to the National Labor Relations Board and hoping to deliver on a fair playing field between companies and workers. He also has focused on supporting affordable housing in a bid to both shore up his urban support, proposing the Neighborhood Homes Investment Act. Davis faced a minor scandal midway through his first term after his campaign failed to report certain donations from certain groups, namely other Wisconsin and Midwestern unions. It consumed the media for a short while but given his nature of keeping his head down working, it passed. He opposed the opposed the Iraq War, something that ran contrary to his gruff style he had campaign on, but nonetheless he covered by playing up the need to focus on American workers. He also voted against the $87 billion war budgetary supplement and voted for redeploying US troops out of Iraq by March 2008.

But he also accomplished some foreign policy matters, namely introducing the New Start treaty with Russia with help from senior Senators and co-sponsored an amendment to the budget that would reimpose sanctions on Iran if Iran violated the terms of the interim or final agreement by advancing its nuclear program. He also earned his chops working with American allies by sponsoring the reaffirmations of the Taiwan Relations Act and supporting Hong Kong democratic & human rights legislation. As Davis has gained experience, he has now gone toe to toe with President Wolf, urging him to not pull out of the Iran Deal yet he has also remained silent on whether to continue to sell arms to Middle Eastern allies. More recently, he has supported legislation to restrict ISIS's financing by authorizing new sanctions on foreign financial institutions that knowingly facilitate financial transactions with ISIS, sought to recognize a democratic Venezuelan government and denouncing Maduro, quietly supporting the Cuban thaw, and encouraging tact when dealing with Iran.

On other issues, Davis was a major fighter against the Wolf Tax Cuts and called them serving America's working class on a platter. He also has sought to pass a number of middle-class and low-income tax cuts to little avail though he supporting the 2008 stimulus and the bailout of the auto industry, another mixed issue that earned him flak from some Wisconsinites. He also introduced the Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014 that would expand preferred eligibility for federal jobs to the fathers of certain permanently disabled or deceased veterans and legislation that would give military veterans priority in scheduling classes in colleges and universities. He has consistently supported gun control, seeking to prevent people on the no-fly list to purchase assault weapons, criticizing the political influence of gun manufacturers, calling Wisconsin state legislators "sick" for supporting open carry, and sponsoring a ban on bump stocks. He has supported Dodd-Frank but has stayed quiet on more progressive approaches to regulating Wall Street.

He worked with Senator Moore to support legislation that would force the federal government to step in when cities and states fail to warn residents about lead-contaminated drinking water and to give Wisconsin's school districts money to test it. Davis also voted for the Affordable Care Act while eventually deriding some single-payer systems as too optimistic. While initially quiet on some social issue, he has followed the party line supporting the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, remained silent on sanctuary cities but denounced child separations, backed the Charter School Accountability Act of 2015 and called for better teacher wages, joined other senators in requesting investigations of opioid companies, and generally advocating against biased systems and for affirmative action. Jonathan also takes a protectionist approach to trade, criticizing free trade with China and other countries, sponsoring a bill that would officially declare China a currency manipulator and require the Department of Commerce to impose countervailing duties on Chinese imports. He has called for better trade enforcement and opposed NAFTA, while also voting against Wolf's new deal.

Electorally, Jonathan has been a survivor and a surprise. Despite facing difficult odds in 2012 given the intense Republican money flowing into the race, he enjoyed good polling margins. While he has never been a spectacular debator, he held his own against his opponent while also drawing up his typical working-class coalition. Additionally, being close to the establishment brought benefits like a number of PACs giving him a competitive arm to fight back the expensive horserace he was running within. He won solidly, by a smaller margin than before but still a majority victory. Despite being a quiet senator most of the time, he had earned himself a strong reputation and with the 2018 midterm elections favoring the Democrats, he faced an easier path to victory and a similar comfortable margin as his first time around.

As for 2016, Davis was an early supporter of Clifford, though he did push for her to adopt some of Baginiski’s working class platforms. But he was largely critiqued for not doing enough to support his most signature issue, often stepping aside for Diane to push her ideas and digging into Sam on a number of other issues, primarily healthcare plans for unions. This adherence to the establishment also proved to narrow his credibility as a number of mainstream incumbents he endorsed in 2018 were toppled though he has since distanced himself endorsing candidates just because he’s told to do so. This has not stopped him from critiquing some new progressives as too out of touch with the working class, both in sensible and off the cuff ways. Now, he continues to be a diligent legislator and largely staying on the party line with regard to social issues, while continuing to advocate some progressive working-class solutions. Jonathan enjoys a close friendship with a number of other Midwestern Democrats and while he briefly considered running for President, he decided against it given that the party felt he remains their strongest contender to keep one Wisconsin U.S. Senate seat blue.

Ideology
Middle of the road is a commonly used adjective to describe Jonathan Davis. He is in the middle of the pack when it comes to the Democratic Senate Caucus, focusing on typical & party-line issues, with a particular focus on working-class issues. As the party has moved to the left on some issues, he has followed but he hardly is at the forefront of this change when it does not concern working-class concerns. He is helped by his rural and union Wisconsin roots to avoid being painted as an elite liberal, open to some progressive working-class fiscal ideas but that's about it. Still, as a moderate liberal, Kane largely focuses on getting bills passed and leading incremental reform for the working-class.

Other Information
Considered a potential run for President for 2020 before deciding against it at the advice of Diane Clifford and other establishment leaders; While sort of personally close to his fellow Wisconsin senator, he remains very ideologically apart from him and both have actively tried to unseat the other; No plans to endorse in the primary until shortly before Wisconsin's primary


W o r k i n g c l a s s w h i t e f r o m t h e M i d w e s t

You’re a perfect endorser for Dayton and kick Murphy down a peg

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Main Nation Ministry
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Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Main Nation Ministry » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:43 pm

New Cobastheia wrote:All these new apps are getting me in the mood to make a Gay Hispanic Colorado Senator for some reason and I have absolutely no idea why

We need more yaoi. Do it.
Local 20 year old Diet Coke Addict College Student Ruins Everything

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Well who else could I be when I can’t hardly see." - Dr. Sunshine is Dead by Will Wood and the Tapeworms.

RPs or other goodies to see.. MHAHAHAHAAA..

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Postby New Cobastheia » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:45 pm

Main Nation Ministry wrote:
New Cobastheia wrote:All these new apps are getting me in the mood to make a Gay Hispanic Colorado Senator for some reason and I have absolutely no idea why

We need more yaoi. Do it.

There is the possibility I'd be making him a Former Governor (either 2007-2015 or 2013-2019) instead of the other Senator if I want to challenge our Republican Senator from Colorado

The main problem is that I'm not really sure what I'd be doing with him after making him
| LAND OF THE FREE ||AMERICAN||POLITICAL|| RP || IS || UP! | - JOIN NOW!
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Main Nation Ministry
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Founded: Sep 28, 2016
Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Main Nation Ministry » Mon Sep 28, 2020 10:48 pm

New Cobastheia wrote:
Main Nation Ministry wrote:We need more yaoi. Do it.

There is the possibility I'd be making him a Former Governor (either 2007-2015 or 2013-2019) instead of the other Senator if I want to challenge our Republican Senator from Colorado

The main problem is that I'm not really sure what I'd be doing with him after making him

Do some yaoi.
Local 20 year old Diet Coke Addict College Student Ruins Everything

Quote of the Week: "I am not the sunshine, I am not the moon at night.
Well who else could I be when I can’t hardly see." - Dr. Sunshine is Dead by Will Wood and the Tapeworms.

RPs or other goodies to see.. MHAHAHAHAAA..

- How do you do fellow kids? You want to see something violent? - Artemis: Deimos Trafficking League (Horror/Mature)

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Postby Meelducan » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:13 pm

Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:Updated him!

(Image)

(Image)


Character Information Sheet



Character Name: Jonathan Davis
Character Gender: Male
Character Age: 64
Height: 5 ft. 9 in.
Weight: 171 lbs.
Character Position/Role: Senior Senator from Wisconsin (2007 - Present); Electrician (2001 - 2003, 1980 - 1990)

Late Career
Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District (2003 - 2007);
State Senator for Wisconsin's 25th Senate District (1994 - 2001);
State Representative for Wisconsin's 74th Assembly District (1990 - 1994)

Mid Career
IBEW Northwestern Wisconsin District Chief Organizer (1984 - 1990);
IBEW Green Bay District Assistant Organizer (1982 - 1984);
IBEW Green Bay District Secretary (1980 - 1982)

Early Career
Apprentice Electrician (1976 - 1980);
Day Laborer (1975 - 1976);
Bus Boy (1970 - 1975)

Character State of Origin: Indiana
Character State of Residence: Wisconsin
Character Party Affiliation: Democrat (1977 - Present)

Character Strengths
Strong ties to rural Wisconsin; Respected credentials on foreign affairs; Previous state legislative background helps with bipartisan appeal and with his law & order clout; Popular with unions; Largely considered a safe seat with him; Protectionist on trade

Character Weaknesses:
Controversial law & order comments & record; No notable social or racial stances or legislation; Somewhat seen as politically shrewd; Establishment nature that earns him frustration from some moderates and distrust from progressives; Supported a number of moderate and centrist liberals colleagues that were ousted in 2018; Dismissive of Sam Baginiski and the some in the progressive wing of the party; Makes off-the-cuff remarks; Largely seen as gruff; Keeps his head down and focuses less on making a splash, Uses PAC money though refuses corporate donations

Biography
Born in early December, Jonathan grew up in Gary, Indiana. Growing up in the home of a single mother, he focused on taking care of his younger siblings and helping his only parent whenever he could. It was not a particularly easy task, given that two little brothers were certainly a handful for any family and more so for a slightly older boy. He made sure to take them back and forth from school, one time tackling and fighting with an older student who teased his brothers. It led to a week long suspension from school and while his mother reprimanded him, his grandparents were quick to offer relief given that he had done so to defend his family. As her mother began to work not just as a waitress but as an assistant cook, her schedule grew more erratic and Jonathan began to take on more of a duty at home, even more than before too. His grades began to slip through this middle school time period and eventually he chose to take a year off between 9th and 10th grade to earn some money as a bus boy. His grandmother had encouraged him to not do so but her untimely death pushed him even more to make the choice to help cover the funeral costs.

The death greatly traumatized Jonathan's mother, eventually leading to an actual breakdown when she stopped going to work and stopped feeding her children. He ended up picking up the slack, hiding the family's troubles from friends and other relatives, hoping to keep them at bay to avoid having to deal with them taking away his family. But after a second year skipping high school, his grandfather finally made the call to stop ignoring his daughter's absence with her children. Calling child services, the agents soon arrived and transplanted the Davis children to their aunt in Ashland, Wisconsin. Life change completely for the family there, not only did they suddenly have a cousin but a chance to finally focus on learning. Jonathan returned to school and while he was rather frustrated at having to return to school especially given his age, he ended up completing high school. It was a big celebrated moment only soured by the death of their grandfather come the summer after graduation. College was not at all on the mind of the young man and instead he focused on helping out his aunt. She too was a single mother, though unlike his own father who had run out, her husband had died in a mining accident in West Virginia. She had been unable to handle the grief alone and moved to Ohio due to her in-laws family. But Jonathan had no ties to the hometown community and soon left to work in Green Bay.

Starting off as just a labor hand for the construction of the city's many bridges, he eventually befriended a fellow worker, Mike Isgro. The quickly became close friends, moving in together in an apartment in Suamico. Going out for beers after work, they eventually began to run into the same crowd and while the rest spent their money away, he sent money back home. It caught the eye of one of the older folks, Quentin Wells and eventually the man offered both Mike and Jonathan a chance at an electrician fellowship. Challenging themselves and earning their due, the pair worked hard to complete their apprenticeship before becoming hired by General Electric almost two years later. During one of these early days after becoming a full flung electrician and celebrating their successes, Davis ran into a young gal at a sold out Reds game. They chatted and hit it off immediately, eventually dating for the next five years. It was also during these years that he became both an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers and in the future, soccer too with the Green Bay Voyageurs FC. He also began to take one a few leadership posts in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, largely at the encouragement of Quentin Wells, who had risen to a district manager. He was a secretary for a few years before finally becoming the right hand to Wells' successor, largely due to his mentor's private encouragement for him to succeed him.

This particular position was short lived though, mere months actually, as he was soon recalled home due to his aunt's death at the hands of a break in robbery. It led to widespread frustration in the community and soon after, Jonathan made his move back to Ashland permanent. His previous leadership in Cincinnati's IBEW led him within a year succeed the retiring chief district organizer in the northern rural and working-class region of Wisconsin. It was a fairly large area and while there is lots of logistic work to be done, he also proved his merits are being an effective advocate. But he also focused on a number of community based issues, like leading a local campaign to hire two more officers in the police force as well as testifying before the state legislature calling for greater funding to Wisconsin's county sheriffs, especially for the rural areas that he believed were constantly being forgotten about. It was a brilliant way to captivate the state Democratic party, particularly a state senator and party official who saw the chops of a potential lawmaker. A former police officer himself, Owen Rogers began to befriend Davis and eventually pitched him to run for state representative, a position he held for a couple of years.

Getting elected was surprisingly easier than expected, even by Rogers' standards. He had expected a difficult challenge to Davis but instead the community had embraced him given his strong local roots. It was never a competitive race for state representative. During his tenure and being a freshman of course, he had little legislative experience and thus accomplished very little. But he began to build a reputation as a moderate Democrat who did not mince words, focusing on advocating for greater funding for rural police precincts and sheriff jurisdictions, while also becoming a reliable supporter of pro-union legislation. He also became a fierce opponent of tax cuts on the wealthy, a position that earned him a lot of credibility in his own district. Thus, it came to no surprise that Wisconsin's party officials courted him to run for the larger 25th state senate district, a far harder challenge than a single house district. He had to campaign further from his home base and thus he faced greater skepticism. But mobilizing his union connections as well as running a door-to-door type operation, he managed to swing the direction as the race dragged on wards. It was also a race to get his second hometown to turn out for him, something that eventually led to his close victory.

Now a state senator, Jonathan focused on hopefully accomplishing more this time around. He entered into some hot water early on by commenting on the need for unions to support letting 'the blacks' to strengthen their number, a comment that hurt him among some less than open union leaders. He walked the comment back eventually, but never apologized or denied it. But perhaps even the unions were willing to ignore that after his biggest moment came when he fought fiercely to defend pensions due to Wisconsin's mounting budget crisis at the time. His spoke on the floor, reading aloud teachers and other educators who would have seen their life's savings eroded. But he also showed his bipartisan marks, helping save increased investments in child care and health care, especially for low-income working families though he did accomplish this by coupling it with the governor's aggressive welfare reform, something he later critiqued as a cost saving measure rather than a family saving one. Additionally, he clashed with Republicans in their attempts to reduce the tax burden on the wealthy, their friendliness to big tobacco, and their attempts to undermine Ojibwa tribe land rights.

His outward perception also began to change as his adoption of a number of more liberal social views like not bashing abortion and supporting immigration saw him become a top contender for a potential statewide or federal office. The opportunity soon presented itself in 2001 with the retirement of the elder representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District. His own deep ties in the community made him a top choice and thus sought to win the primary. His mentor, Rogers, had already secured top brass support for Jonathan, leaving him to win over rural voters with a deeply populist message of fighting for them against out of touch Washington. His connections to the unions and his own background of being a working-class champion proved essential. Nonetheless, he was going up against a solid contender in what was usually a conservative-leaning district and in an election year. He lost.

What does not kill you makes you stronger thought Davis, now out a job. So resuming his electrician job, he stayed in tune with national politics as well as meeting with a number of rural, smaller communities as part of an outreach program with his wife, a school nurse, to teach kids about health and offering family-focused events through his union. It was a way to build his reputation when he would look back at it but Jonathan had thought he had left politics behind now. But two years later and after redistricting, it was clear the 7th Congressional District was not just friendlier to a working-class Democrat like himself but probably intrinsically gave him an edge. Thus, running a similar campaign as before with his outreach fresh in voters minds, he managed to make his previous opponent a one term congressman. It was still a close election but with his background and eventually with his record, he would hold it for the party for two terms. Serving on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, he crafted legislation to expand electricity access to rural communities, a measure that made him popular for both his previous profession's irony and among rural Democratic voters.

He also served on the Committee on Education and Labor, specifically serving on the Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions subcommittee. He passed a bill to expand requirements for state held education pensions, making it harder for potential cuts or erosion of benefits, though he complained it was still not enough. He also voted against the PATRIOT Act. He also held onto his law & order background, pushing for a tough on crime approach. This was a belief he had held since his aunt’s death and only began to shift on it in late 2017. As for other issues, Jonathan largely held to the party line, by complaining about encroachments by President Burke and slowly adapting to certain liberal social policies, carefully moving left on abortion and contraception but primarily sticking to the primary line. This made him a favorite of the establishment, something that had begun to paint him as more with Washington than his rural Ohio constituency. It also likely he would face a tough challenge, thus he looked for a way out, a politically savvy move from an increasingly shrewd Davis.

And then the opportunity arose in 2006, with the retirement of (Not-Herb Kohl) and the nomination of a potentially electorally weak (Not-Tommy Thompson) up for reelection. The former governor had won many elections statewide already and thus there was little excitement in the Democratic primary field. So taking it in stride, Jonathan spoke with his now elder mentor Owen and convincing leaders in D.C. to back him, he launched his campaign. It was an easy primary of course, giving him a chance to build his political infrastructure across the state. Likewise, the GOP senator faced a noteworthy primary challenge, a root that Davis took in stride to show how even his own party was doubting his ability to serve Ohioans. Almost immediately, the unions swung heavily to the congressman as he sought to mobilize their voting base and encouraging them to get out to vote. Likewise, his own rural hometown proved to be a great backdrop for both ads and rallying voters to trust him, not as a flashy city mayor but a hard working small town guy. The biggest group he needed to fold into his coalition were the inner cities though, something his campaign eventually accomplished by touting his tough childhood as a sign he knew hardship and how to help others rise about. But perhaps the biggest pitfalls were the incumbent Senator's poor decision digitally alter a 9/11 photo for campaign purposes and lie about Davis' own record on race, hoping to push away black voters from him by digging up his tough record on race. Alas, come election day, he won with a decisive margin (not close or comfortable though), becoming the new Democratic senator for the Badger state.

Taking office, Jonathan was now a developed politician and knew how to serve, focusing on being an effective legislator and less on eye-grabbing grandstanding. He focused on curating his image of a champion for the working-class focusing on legislation like defending union dues and combating right-to-work laws. He also sought greater strength allocated to the National Labor Relations Board and hoping to deliver on a fair playing field between companies and workers. He also has focused on supporting affordable housing in a bid to both shore up his urban support, proposing the Neighborhood Homes Investment Act. Davis faced a minor scandal midway through his first term after his campaign failed to report certain donations from certain groups, namely other Wisconsin and Midwestern unions. It consumed the media for a short while but given his nature of keeping his head down working, it passed. He opposed the opposed the Iraq War, something that ran contrary to his gruff style he had campaign on, but nonetheless he covered by playing up the need to focus on American workers. He also voted against the $87 billion war budgetary supplement and voted for redeploying US troops out of Iraq by March 2008.

But he also accomplished some foreign policy matters, namely introducing the New Start treaty with Russia with help from senior Senators and co-sponsored an amendment to the budget that would reimpose sanctions on Iran if Iran violated the terms of the interim or final agreement by advancing its nuclear program. He also earned his chops working with American allies by sponsoring the reaffirmations of the Taiwan Relations Act and supporting Hong Kong democratic & human rights legislation. As Davis has gained experience, he has now gone toe to toe with President Wolf, urging him to not pull out of the Iran Deal yet he has also remained silent on whether to continue to sell arms to Middle Eastern allies. More recently, he has supported legislation to restrict ISIS's financing by authorizing new sanctions on foreign financial institutions that knowingly facilitate financial transactions with ISIS, sought to recognize a democratic Venezuelan government and denouncing Maduro, quietly supporting the Cuban thaw, and encouraging tact when dealing with Iran.

On other issues, Davis was a major fighter against the Wolf Tax Cuts and called them serving America's working class on a platter. He also has sought to pass a number of middle-class and low-income tax cuts to little avail though he supporting the 2008 stimulus and the bailout of the auto industry, another mixed issue that earned him flak from some Wisconsinites. He also introduced the Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014 that would expand preferred eligibility for federal jobs to the fathers of certain permanently disabled or deceased veterans and legislation that would give military veterans priority in scheduling classes in colleges and universities. He has consistently supported gun control, seeking to prevent people on the no-fly list to purchase assault weapons, criticizing the political influence of gun manufacturers, calling Wisconsin state legislators "sick" for supporting open carry, and sponsoring a ban on bump stocks. He has supported Dodd-Frank but has stayed quiet on more progressive approaches to regulating Wall Street.

He worked with Senator Moore to support legislation that would force the federal government to step in when cities and states fail to warn residents about lead-contaminated drinking water and to give Wisconsin's school districts money to test it. Davis also voted for the Affordable Care Act while eventually deriding some single-payer systems as too optimistic. While initially quiet on some social issue, he has followed the party line supporting the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, remained silent on sanctuary cities but denounced child separations, backed the Charter School Accountability Act of 2015 and called for better teacher wages, joined other senators in requesting investigations of opioid companies, and generally advocating against biased systems and for affirmative action. Jonathan also takes a protectionist approach to trade, criticizing free trade with China and other countries, sponsoring a bill that would officially declare China a currency manipulator and require the Department of Commerce to impose countervailing duties on Chinese imports. He has called for better trade enforcement and opposed NAFTA, while also voting against Wolf's new deal.

Electorally, Jonathan has been a survivor and a surprise. Despite facing difficult odds in 2012 given the intense Republican money flowing into the race, he enjoyed good polling margins. While he has never been a spectacular debator, he held his own against his opponent while also drawing up his typical working-class coalition. Additionally, being close to the establishment brought benefits like a number of PACs giving him a competitive arm to fight back the expensive horserace he was running within. He won solidly, by a smaller margin than before but still a majority victory. Despite being a quiet senator most of the time, he had earned himself a strong reputation and with the 2018 midterm elections favoring the Democrats, he faced an easier path to victory and a similar comfortable margin as his first time around.

As for 2016, Davis was an early supporter of Clifford, though he did push for her to adopt some of Baginiski’s working class platforms. But he was largely critiqued for not doing enough to support his most signature issue, often stepping aside for Diane to push her ideas and digging into Sam on a number of other issues, primarily healthcare plans for unions. This adherence to the establishment also proved to narrow his credibility as a number of mainstream incumbents he endorsed in 2018 were toppled though he has since distanced himself endorsing candidates just because he’s told to do so. This has not stopped him from critiquing some new progressives as too out of touch with the working class, both in sensible and off the cuff ways. Now, he continues to be a diligent legislator and largely staying on the party line with regard to social issues, while continuing to advocate some progressive working-class solutions. Jonathan enjoys a close friendship with a number of other Midwestern Democrats and while he briefly considered running for President, he decided against it given that the party felt he remains their strongest contender to keep one Wisconsin U.S. Senate seat blue.

Ideology
Middle of the road is a commonly used adjective to describe Jonathan Davis. He is in the middle of the pack when it comes to the Democratic Senate Caucus, focusing on typical & party-line issues, with a particular focus on working-class issues. As the party has moved to the left on some issues, he has followed but he hardly is at the forefront of this change when it does not concern working-class concerns. He is helped by his rural and union Wisconsin roots to avoid being painted as an elite liberal, open to some progressive working-class fiscal ideas but that's about it. Still, as a moderate liberal, Kane largely focuses on getting bills passed and leading incremental reform for the working-class.

Other Information
Considered a potential run for President for 2020 before deciding against it at the advice of Diane Clifford and other establishment leaders; While sort of personally close to his fellow Wisconsin senator, he remains very ideologically apart from him and both have actively tried to unseat the other; No plans to endorse in the primary until shortly before Wisconsin's primary

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Sarenium
Minister
 
Posts: 3147
Founded: Sep 18, 2015
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Sarenium » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:23 pm

Meelducan wrote:
Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:Updated him!

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Character Information Sheet



Character Name: Jonathan Davis
Character Gender: Male
Character Age: 64
Height: 5 ft. 9 in.
Weight: 171 lbs.
Character Position/Role: Senior Senator from Wisconsin (2007 - Present); Electrician (2001 - 2003, 1980 - 1990)

Late Career
Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District (2003 - 2007);
State Senator for Wisconsin's 25th Senate District (1994 - 2001);
State Representative for Wisconsin's 74th Assembly District (1990 - 1994)

Mid Career
IBEW Northwestern Wisconsin District Chief Organizer (1984 - 1990);
IBEW Green Bay District Assistant Organizer (1982 - 1984);
IBEW Green Bay District Secretary (1980 - 1982)

Early Career
Apprentice Electrician (1976 - 1980);
Day Laborer (1975 - 1976);
Bus Boy (1970 - 1975)

Character State of Origin: Indiana
Character State of Residence: Wisconsin
Character Party Affiliation: Democrat (1977 - Present)

Character Strengths
Strong ties to rural Wisconsin; Respected credentials on foreign affairs; Previous state legislative background helps with bipartisan appeal and with his law & order clout; Popular with unions; Largely considered a safe seat with him; Protectionist on trade

Character Weaknesses:
Controversial law & order comments & record; No notable social or racial stances or legislation; Somewhat seen as politically shrewd; Establishment nature that earns him frustration from some moderates and distrust from progressives; Supported a number of moderate and centrist liberals colleagues that were ousted in 2018; Dismissive of Sam Baginiski and the some in the progressive wing of the party; Makes off-the-cuff remarks; Largely seen as gruff; Keeps his head down and focuses less on making a splash, Uses PAC money though refuses corporate donations

Biography
Born in early December, Jonathan grew up in Gary, Indiana. Growing up in the home of a single mother, he focused on taking care of his younger siblings and helping his only parent whenever he could. It was not a particularly easy task, given that two little brothers were certainly a handful for any family and more so for a slightly older boy. He made sure to take them back and forth from school, one time tackling and fighting with an older student who teased his brothers. It led to a week long suspension from school and while his mother reprimanded him, his grandparents were quick to offer relief given that he had done so to defend his family. As her mother began to work not just as a waitress but as an assistant cook, her schedule grew more erratic and Jonathan began to take on more of a duty at home, even more than before too. His grades began to slip through this middle school time period and eventually he chose to take a year off between 9th and 10th grade to earn some money as a bus boy. His grandmother had encouraged him to not do so but her untimely death pushed him even more to make the choice to help cover the funeral costs.

The death greatly traumatized Jonathan's mother, eventually leading to an actual breakdown when she stopped going to work and stopped feeding her children. He ended up picking up the slack, hiding the family's troubles from friends and other relatives, hoping to keep them at bay to avoid having to deal with them taking away his family. But after a second year skipping high school, his grandfather finally made the call to stop ignoring his daughter's absence with her children. Calling child services, the agents soon arrived and transplanted the Davis children to their aunt in Ashland, Wisconsin. Life change completely for the family there, not only did they suddenly have a cousin but a chance to finally focus on learning. Jonathan returned to school and while he was rather frustrated at having to return to school especially given his age, he ended up completing high school. It was a big celebrated moment only soured by the death of their grandfather come the summer after graduation. College was not at all on the mind of the young man and instead he focused on helping out his aunt. She too was a single mother, though unlike his own father who had run out, her husband had died in a mining accident in West Virginia. She had been unable to handle the grief alone and moved to Ohio due to her in-laws family. But Jonathan had no ties to the hometown community and soon left to work in Green Bay.

Starting off as just a labor hand for the construction of the city's many bridges, he eventually befriended a fellow worker, Mike Isgro. The quickly became close friends, moving in together in an apartment in Suamico. Going out for beers after work, they eventually began to run into the same crowd and while the rest spent their money away, he sent money back home. It caught the eye of one of the older folks, Quentin Wells and eventually the man offered both Mike and Jonathan a chance at an electrician fellowship. Challenging themselves and earning their due, the pair worked hard to complete their apprenticeship before becoming hired by General Electric almost two years later. During one of these early days after becoming a full flung electrician and celebrating their successes, Davis ran into a young gal at a sold out Reds game. They chatted and hit it off immediately, eventually dating for the next five years. It was also during these years that he became both an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers and in the future, soccer too with the Green Bay Voyageurs FC. He also began to take one a few leadership posts in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, largely at the encouragement of Quentin Wells, who had risen to a district manager. He was a secretary for a few years before finally becoming the right hand to Wells' successor, largely due to his mentor's private encouragement for him to succeed him.

This particular position was short lived though, mere months actually, as he was soon recalled home due to his aunt's death at the hands of a break in robbery. It led to widespread frustration in the community and soon after, Jonathan made his move back to Ashland permanent. His previous leadership in Cincinnati's IBEW led him within a year succeed the retiring chief district organizer in the northern rural and working-class region of Wisconsin. It was a fairly large area and while there is lots of logistic work to be done, he also proved his merits are being an effective advocate. But he also focused on a number of community based issues, like leading a local campaign to hire two more officers in the police force as well as testifying before the state legislature calling for greater funding to Wisconsin's county sheriffs, especially for the rural areas that he believed were constantly being forgotten about. It was a brilliant way to captivate the state Democratic party, particularly a state senator and party official who saw the chops of a potential lawmaker. A former police officer himself, Owen Rogers began to befriend Davis and eventually pitched him to run for state representative, a position he held for a couple of years.

Getting elected was surprisingly easier than expected, even by Rogers' standards. He had expected a difficult challenge to Davis but instead the community had embraced him given his strong local roots. It was never a competitive race for state representative. During his tenure and being a freshman of course, he had little legislative experience and thus accomplished very little. But he began to build a reputation as a moderate Democrat who did not mince words, focusing on advocating for greater funding for rural police precincts and sheriff jurisdictions, while also becoming a reliable supporter of pro-union legislation. He also became a fierce opponent of tax cuts on the wealthy, a position that earned him a lot of credibility in his own district. Thus, it came to no surprise that Wisconsin's party officials courted him to run for the larger 25th state senate district, a far harder challenge than a single house district. He had to campaign further from his home base and thus he faced greater skepticism. But mobilizing his union connections as well as running a door-to-door type operation, he managed to swing the direction as the race dragged on wards. It was also a race to get his second hometown to turn out for him, something that eventually led to his close victory.

Now a state senator, Jonathan focused on hopefully accomplishing more this time around. He entered into some hot water early on by commenting on the need for unions to support letting 'the blacks' to strengthen their number, a comment that hurt him among some less than open union leaders. He walked the comment back eventually, but never apologized or denied it. But perhaps even the unions were willing to ignore that after his biggest moment came when he fought fiercely to defend pensions due to Wisconsin's mounting budget crisis at the time. His spoke on the floor, reading aloud teachers and other educators who would have seen their life's savings eroded. But he also showed his bipartisan marks, helping save increased investments in child care and health care, especially for low-income working families though he did accomplish this by coupling it with the governor's aggressive welfare reform, something he later critiqued as a cost saving measure rather than a family saving one. Additionally, he clashed with Republicans in their attempts to reduce the tax burden on the wealthy, their friendliness to big tobacco, and their attempts to undermine Ojibwa tribe land rights.

His outward perception also began to change as his adoption of a number of more liberal social views like not bashing abortion and supporting immigration saw him become a top contender for a potential statewide or federal office. The opportunity soon presented itself in 2001 with the retirement of the elder representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District. His own deep ties in the community made him a top choice and thus sought to win the primary. His mentor, Rogers, had already secured top brass support for Jonathan, leaving him to win over rural voters with a deeply populist message of fighting for them against out of touch Washington. His connections to the unions and his own background of being a working-class champion proved essential. Nonetheless, he was going up against a solid contender in what was usually a conservative-leaning district and in an election year. He lost.

What does not kill you makes you stronger thought Davis, now out a job. So resuming his electrician job, he stayed in tune with national politics as well as meeting with a number of rural, smaller communities as part of an outreach program with his wife, a school nurse, to teach kids about health and offering family-focused events through his union. It was a way to build his reputation when he would look back at it but Jonathan had thought he had left politics behind now. But two years later and after redistricting, it was clear the 7th Congressional District was not just friendlier to a working-class Democrat like himself but probably intrinsically gave him an edge. Thus, running a similar campaign as before with his outreach fresh in voters minds, he managed to make his previous opponent a one term congressman. It was still a close election but with his background and eventually with his record, he would hold it for the party for two terms. Serving on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, he crafted legislation to expand electricity access to rural communities, a measure that made him popular for both his previous profession's irony and among rural Democratic voters.

He also served on the Committee on Education and Labor, specifically serving on the Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions subcommittee. He passed a bill to expand requirements for state held education pensions, making it harder for potential cuts or erosion of benefits, though he complained it was still not enough. He also voted against the PATRIOT Act. He also held onto his law & order background, pushing for a tough on crime approach. This was a belief he had held since his aunt’s death and only began to shift on it in late 2017. As for other issues, Jonathan largely held to the party line, by complaining about encroachments by President Burke and slowly adapting to certain liberal social policies, carefully moving left on abortion and contraception but primarily sticking to the primary line. This made him a favorite of the establishment, something that had begun to paint him as more with Washington than his rural Ohio constituency. It also likely he would face a tough challenge, thus he looked for a way out, a politically savvy move from an increasingly shrewd Davis.

And then the opportunity arose in 2006, with the retirement of (Not-Herb Kohl) and the nomination of a potentially electorally weak (Not-Tommy Thompson) up for reelection. The former governor had won many elections statewide already and thus there was little excitement in the Democratic primary field. So taking it in stride, Jonathan spoke with his now elder mentor Owen and convincing leaders in D.C. to back him, he launched his campaign. It was an easy primary of course, giving him a chance to build his political infrastructure across the state. Likewise, the GOP senator faced a noteworthy primary challenge, a root that Davis took in stride to show how even his own party was doubting his ability to serve Ohioans. Almost immediately, the unions swung heavily to the congressman as he sought to mobilize their voting base and encouraging them to get out to vote. Likewise, his own rural hometown proved to be a great backdrop for both ads and rallying voters to trust him, not as a flashy city mayor but a hard working small town guy. The biggest group he needed to fold into his coalition were the inner cities though, something his campaign eventually accomplished by touting his tough childhood as a sign he knew hardship and how to help others rise about. But perhaps the biggest pitfalls were the incumbent Senator's poor decision digitally alter a 9/11 photo for campaign purposes and lie about Davis' own record on race, hoping to push away black voters from him by digging up his tough record on race. Alas, come election day, he won with a decisive margin (not close or comfortable though), becoming the new Democratic senator for the Badger state.

Taking office, Jonathan was now a developed politician and knew how to serve, focusing on being an effective legislator and less on eye-grabbing grandstanding. He focused on curating his image of a champion for the working-class focusing on legislation like defending union dues and combating right-to-work laws. He also sought greater strength allocated to the National Labor Relations Board and hoping to deliver on a fair playing field between companies and workers. He also has focused on supporting affordable housing in a bid to both shore up his urban support, proposing the Neighborhood Homes Investment Act. Davis faced a minor scandal midway through his first term after his campaign failed to report certain donations from certain groups, namely other Wisconsin and Midwestern unions. It consumed the media for a short while but given his nature of keeping his head down working, it passed. He opposed the opposed the Iraq War, something that ran contrary to his gruff style he had campaign on, but nonetheless he covered by playing up the need to focus on American workers. He also voted against the $87 billion war budgetary supplement and voted for redeploying US troops out of Iraq by March 2008.

But he also accomplished some foreign policy matters, namely introducing the New Start treaty with Russia with help from senior Senators and co-sponsored an amendment to the budget that would reimpose sanctions on Iran if Iran violated the terms of the interim or final agreement by advancing its nuclear program. He also earned his chops working with American allies by sponsoring the reaffirmations of the Taiwan Relations Act and supporting Hong Kong democratic & human rights legislation. As Davis has gained experience, he has now gone toe to toe with President Wolf, urging him to not pull out of the Iran Deal yet he has also remained silent on whether to continue to sell arms to Middle Eastern allies. More recently, he has supported legislation to restrict ISIS's financing by authorizing new sanctions on foreign financial institutions that knowingly facilitate financial transactions with ISIS, sought to recognize a democratic Venezuelan government and denouncing Maduro, quietly supporting the Cuban thaw, and encouraging tact when dealing with Iran.

On other issues, Davis was a major fighter against the Wolf Tax Cuts and called them serving America's working class on a platter. He also has sought to pass a number of middle-class and low-income tax cuts to little avail though he supporting the 2008 stimulus and the bailout of the auto industry, another mixed issue that earned him flak from some Wisconsinites. He also introduced the Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014 that would expand preferred eligibility for federal jobs to the fathers of certain permanently disabled or deceased veterans and legislation that would give military veterans priority in scheduling classes in colleges and universities. He has consistently supported gun control, seeking to prevent people on the no-fly list to purchase assault weapons, criticizing the political influence of gun manufacturers, calling Wisconsin state legislators "sick" for supporting open carry, and sponsoring a ban on bump stocks. He has supported Dodd-Frank but has stayed quiet on more progressive approaches to regulating Wall Street.

He worked with Senator Moore to support legislation that would force the federal government to step in when cities and states fail to warn residents about lead-contaminated drinking water and to give Wisconsin's school districts money to test it. Davis also voted for the Affordable Care Act while eventually deriding some single-payer systems as too optimistic. While initially quiet on some social issue, he has followed the party line supporting the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, remained silent on sanctuary cities but denounced child separations, backed the Charter School Accountability Act of 2015 and called for better teacher wages, joined other senators in requesting investigations of opioid companies, and generally advocating against biased systems and for affirmative action. Jonathan also takes a protectionist approach to trade, criticizing free trade with China and other countries, sponsoring a bill that would officially declare China a currency manipulator and require the Department of Commerce to impose countervailing duties on Chinese imports. He has called for better trade enforcement and opposed NAFTA, while also voting against Wolf's new deal.

Electorally, Jonathan has been a survivor and a surprise. Despite facing difficult odds in 2012 given the intense Republican money flowing into the race, he enjoyed good polling margins. While he has never been a spectacular debator, he held his own against his opponent while also drawing up his typical working-class coalition. Additionally, being close to the establishment brought benefits like a number of PACs giving him a competitive arm to fight back the expensive horserace he was running within. He won solidly, by a smaller margin than before but still a majority victory. Despite being a quiet senator most of the time, he had earned himself a strong reputation and with the 2018 midterm elections favoring the Democrats, he faced an easier path to victory and a similar comfortable margin as his first time around.

As for 2016, Davis was an early supporter of Clifford, though he did push for her to adopt some of Baginiski’s working class platforms. But he was largely critiqued for not doing enough to support his most signature issue, often stepping aside for Diane to push her ideas and digging into Sam on a number of other issues, primarily healthcare plans for unions. This adherence to the establishment also proved to narrow his credibility as a number of mainstream incumbents he endorsed in 2018 were toppled though he has since distanced himself endorsing candidates just because he’s told to do so. This has not stopped him from critiquing some new progressives as too out of touch with the working class, both in sensible and off the cuff ways. Now, he continues to be a diligent legislator and largely staying on the party line with regard to social issues, while continuing to advocate some progressive working-class solutions. Jonathan enjoys a close friendship with a number of other Midwestern Democrats and while he briefly considered running for President, he decided against it given that the party felt he remains their strongest contender to keep one Wisconsin U.S. Senate seat blue.

Ideology
Middle of the road is a commonly used adjective to describe Jonathan Davis. He is in the middle of the pack when it comes to the Democratic Senate Caucus, focusing on typical & party-line issues, with a particular focus on working-class issues. As the party has moved to the left on some issues, he has followed but he hardly is at the forefront of this change when it does not concern working-class concerns. He is helped by his rural and union Wisconsin roots to avoid being painted as an elite liberal, open to some progressive working-class fiscal ideas but that's about it. Still, as a moderate liberal, Kane largely focuses on getting bills passed and leading incremental reform for the working-class.

Other Information
Considered a potential run for President for 2020 before deciding against it at the advice of Diane Clifford and other establishment leaders; While sort of personally close to his fellow Wisconsin senator, he remains very ideologically apart from him and both have actively tried to unseat the other; No plans to endorse in the primary until shortly before Wisconsin's primary

You already have too many characters :eyebrow:


With Prendy out of the picture and the deadline for the next Texas race(s) having passed, Brookshire is effectively gone.

Leaves Xath with: Ruler, Spellman, Sullivan & Diehl from memory. Davis could be interpreted as Brookshire's replacement if Brookshire is fully retired. That is assuming I haven't missed any characters.
Just another Australian. Chalmers 2021 | Nandy 2024

LOTF Characters: Senator Jillian Dayton (D-VA) | Senator Howard Frankston (R-TX) | Representative Fiona Lowell (D-WI) | Lieutenant General Joe Frankston (R-TX)

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Meelducan
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 7761
Founded: Aug 24, 2016
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Meelducan » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:33 pm

Sarenium wrote:
Meelducan wrote:You already have too many characters :eyebrow:


With Prendy out of the picture and the deadline for the next Texas race(s) having passed, Brookshire is effectively gone.

Leaves Xath with: Ruler, Spellman, Sullivan & Diehl from memory. Davis could be interpreted as Brookshire's replacement if Brookshire is fully retired. That is assuming I haven't missed any characters.

There’s really no pressing need for Xath to have another Senate Democrat, considering he already has one, and he’ll have Spellman soon.

We’re really looking for Executive Branch characters rn
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Federal States of Xathuecia
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 15628
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Sep 29, 2020 12:50 am

Meelducan wrote:
Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:Updated him!

(Image)

(Image)


Character Information Sheet



Character Name: Jonathan Davis
Character Gender: Male
Character Age: 64
Height: 5 ft. 9 in.
Weight: 171 lbs.
Character Position/Role: Senior Senator from Wisconsin (2007 - Present); Electrician (2001 - 2003, 1980 - 1990)

Late Career
Representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District (2003 - 2007);
State Senator for Wisconsin's 25th Senate District (1994 - 2001);
State Representative for Wisconsin's 74th Assembly District (1990 - 1994)

Mid Career
IBEW Northwestern Wisconsin District Chief Organizer (1984 - 1990);
IBEW Green Bay District Assistant Organizer (1982 - 1984);
IBEW Green Bay District Secretary (1980 - 1982)

Early Career
Apprentice Electrician (1976 - 1980);
Day Laborer (1975 - 1976);
Bus Boy (1970 - 1975)

Character State of Origin: Indiana
Character State of Residence: Wisconsin
Character Party Affiliation: Democrat (1977 - Present)

Character Strengths
Strong ties to rural Wisconsin; Respected credentials on foreign affairs; Previous state legislative background helps with bipartisan appeal and with his law & order clout; Popular with unions; Largely considered a safe seat with him; Protectionist on trade

Character Weaknesses:
Controversial law & order comments & record; No notable social or racial stances or legislation; Somewhat seen as politically shrewd; Establishment nature that earns him frustration from some moderates and distrust from progressives; Supported a number of moderate and centrist liberals colleagues that were ousted in 2018; Dismissive of Sam Baginiski and the some in the progressive wing of the party; Makes off-the-cuff remarks; Largely seen as gruff; Keeps his head down and focuses less on making a splash, Uses PAC money though refuses corporate donations

Biography
Born in early December, Jonathan grew up in Gary, Indiana. Growing up in the home of a single mother, he focused on taking care of his younger siblings and helping his only parent whenever he could. It was not a particularly easy task, given that two little brothers were certainly a handful for any family and more so for a slightly older boy. He made sure to take them back and forth from school, one time tackling and fighting with an older student who teased his brothers. It led to a week long suspension from school and while his mother reprimanded him, his grandparents were quick to offer relief given that he had done so to defend his family. As her mother began to work not just as a waitress but as an assistant cook, her schedule grew more erratic and Jonathan began to take on more of a duty at home, even more than before too. His grades began to slip through this middle school time period and eventually he chose to take a year off between 9th and 10th grade to earn some money as a bus boy. His grandmother had encouraged him to not do so but her untimely death pushed him even more to make the choice to help cover the funeral costs.

The death greatly traumatized Jonathan's mother, eventually leading to an actual breakdown when she stopped going to work and stopped feeding her children. He ended up picking up the slack, hiding the family's troubles from friends and other relatives, hoping to keep them at bay to avoid having to deal with them taking away his family. But after a second year skipping high school, his grandfather finally made the call to stop ignoring his daughter's absence with her children. Calling child services, the agents soon arrived and transplanted the Davis children to their aunt in Ashland, Wisconsin. Life change completely for the family there, not only did they suddenly have a cousin but a chance to finally focus on learning. Jonathan returned to school and while he was rather frustrated at having to return to school especially given his age, he ended up completing high school. It was a big celebrated moment only soured by the death of their grandfather come the summer after graduation. College was not at all on the mind of the young man and instead he focused on helping out his aunt. She too was a single mother, though unlike his own father who had run out, her husband had died in a mining accident in West Virginia. She had been unable to handle the grief alone and moved to Ohio due to her in-laws family. But Jonathan had no ties to the hometown community and soon left to work in Green Bay.

Starting off as just a labor hand for the construction of the city's many bridges, he eventually befriended a fellow worker, Mike Isgro. The quickly became close friends, moving in together in an apartment in Suamico. Going out for beers after work, they eventually began to run into the same crowd and while the rest spent their money away, he sent money back home. It caught the eye of one of the older folks, Quentin Wells and eventually the man offered both Mike and Jonathan a chance at an electrician fellowship. Challenging themselves and earning their due, the pair worked hard to complete their apprenticeship before becoming hired by General Electric almost two years later. During one of these early days after becoming a full flung electrician and celebrating their successes, Davis ran into a young gal at a sold out Reds game. They chatted and hit it off immediately, eventually dating for the next five years. It was also during these years that he became both an avid fan of the Green Bay Packers and in the future, soccer too with the Green Bay Voyageurs FC. He also began to take one a few leadership posts in the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, largely at the encouragement of Quentin Wells, who had risen to a district manager. He was a secretary for a few years before finally becoming the right hand to Wells' successor, largely due to his mentor's private encouragement for him to succeed him.

This particular position was short lived though, mere months actually, as he was soon recalled home due to his aunt's death at the hands of a break in robbery. It led to widespread frustration in the community and soon after, Jonathan made his move back to Ashland permanent. His previous leadership in Cincinnati's IBEW led him within a year succeed the retiring chief district organizer in the northern rural and working-class region of Wisconsin. It was a fairly large area and while there is lots of logistic work to be done, he also proved his merits are being an effective advocate. But he also focused on a number of community based issues, like leading a local campaign to hire two more officers in the police force as well as testifying before the state legislature calling for greater funding to Wisconsin's county sheriffs, especially for the rural areas that he believed were constantly being forgotten about. It was a brilliant way to captivate the state Democratic party, particularly a state senator and party official who saw the chops of a potential lawmaker. A former police officer himself, Owen Rogers began to befriend Davis and eventually pitched him to run for state representative, a position he held for a couple of years.

Getting elected was surprisingly easier than expected, even by Rogers' standards. He had expected a difficult challenge to Davis but instead the community had embraced him given his strong local roots. It was never a competitive race for state representative. During his tenure and being a freshman of course, he had little legislative experience and thus accomplished very little. But he began to build a reputation as a moderate Democrat who did not mince words, focusing on advocating for greater funding for rural police precincts and sheriff jurisdictions, while also becoming a reliable supporter of pro-union legislation. He also became a fierce opponent of tax cuts on the wealthy, a position that earned him a lot of credibility in his own district. Thus, it came to no surprise that Wisconsin's party officials courted him to run for the larger 25th state senate district, a far harder challenge than a single house district. He had to campaign further from his home base and thus he faced greater skepticism. But mobilizing his union connections as well as running a door-to-door type operation, he managed to swing the direction as the race dragged on wards. It was also a race to get his second hometown to turn out for him, something that eventually led to his close victory.

Now a state senator, Jonathan focused on hopefully accomplishing more this time around. He entered into some hot water early on by commenting on the need for unions to support letting 'the blacks' to strengthen their number, a comment that hurt him among some less than open union leaders. He walked the comment back eventually, but never apologized or denied it. But perhaps even the unions were willing to ignore that after his biggest moment came when he fought fiercely to defend pensions due to Wisconsin's mounting budget crisis at the time. His spoke on the floor, reading aloud teachers and other educators who would have seen their life's savings eroded. But he also showed his bipartisan marks, helping save increased investments in child care and health care, especially for low-income working families though he did accomplish this by coupling it with the governor's aggressive welfare reform, something he later critiqued as a cost saving measure rather than a family saving one. Additionally, he clashed with Republicans in their attempts to reduce the tax burden on the wealthy, their friendliness to big tobacco, and their attempts to undermine Ojibwa tribe land rights.

His outward perception also began to change as his adoption of a number of more liberal social views like not bashing abortion and supporting immigration saw him become a top contender for a potential statewide or federal office. The opportunity soon presented itself in 2001 with the retirement of the elder representative for Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District. His own deep ties in the community made him a top choice and thus sought to win the primary. His mentor, Rogers, had already secured top brass support for Jonathan, leaving him to win over rural voters with a deeply populist message of fighting for them against out of touch Washington. His connections to the unions and his own background of being a working-class champion proved essential. Nonetheless, he was going up against a solid contender in what was usually a conservative-leaning district and in an election year. He lost.

What does not kill you makes you stronger thought Davis, now out a job. So resuming his electrician job, he stayed in tune with national politics as well as meeting with a number of rural, smaller communities as part of an outreach program with his wife, a school nurse, to teach kids about health and offering family-focused events through his union. It was a way to build his reputation when he would look back at it but Jonathan had thought he had left politics behind now. But two years later and after redistricting, it was clear the 7th Congressional District was not just friendlier to a working-class Democrat like himself but probably intrinsically gave him an edge. Thus, running a similar campaign as before with his outreach fresh in voters minds, he managed to make his previous opponent a one term congressman. It was still a close election but with his background and eventually with his record, he would hold it for the party for two terms. Serving on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, he crafted legislation to expand electricity access to rural communities, a measure that made him popular for both his previous profession's irony and among rural Democratic voters.

He also served on the Committee on Education and Labor, specifically serving on the Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions subcommittee. He passed a bill to expand requirements for state held education pensions, making it harder for potential cuts or erosion of benefits, though he complained it was still not enough. He also voted against the PATRIOT Act. He also held onto his law & order background, pushing for a tough on crime approach. This was a belief he had held since his aunt’s death and only began to shift on it in late 2017. As for other issues, Jonathan largely held to the party line, by complaining about encroachments by President Burke and slowly adapting to certain liberal social policies, carefully moving left on abortion and contraception but primarily sticking to the primary line. This made him a favorite of the establishment, something that had begun to paint him as more with Washington than his rural Ohio constituency. It also likely he would face a tough challenge, thus he looked for a way out, a politically savvy move from an increasingly shrewd Davis.

And then the opportunity arose in 2006, with the retirement of (Not-Herb Kohl) and the nomination of a potentially electorally weak (Not-Tommy Thompson) up for reelection. The former governor had won many elections statewide already and thus there was little excitement in the Democratic primary field. So taking it in stride, Jonathan spoke with his now elder mentor Owen and convincing leaders in D.C. to back him, he launched his campaign. It was an easy primary of course, giving him a chance to build his political infrastructure across the state. Likewise, the GOP senator faced a noteworthy primary challenge, a root that Davis took in stride to show how even his own party was doubting his ability to serve Ohioans. Almost immediately, the unions swung heavily to the congressman as he sought to mobilize their voting base and encouraging them to get out to vote. Likewise, his own rural hometown proved to be a great backdrop for both ads and rallying voters to trust him, not as a flashy city mayor but a hard working small town guy. The biggest group he needed to fold into his coalition were the inner cities though, something his campaign eventually accomplished by touting his tough childhood as a sign he knew hardship and how to help others rise about. But perhaps the biggest pitfalls were the incumbent Senator's poor decision digitally alter a 9/11 photo for campaign purposes and lie about Davis' own record on race, hoping to push away black voters from him by digging up his tough record on race. Alas, come election day, he won with a decisive margin (not close or comfortable though), becoming the new Democratic senator for the Badger state.

Taking office, Jonathan was now a developed politician and knew how to serve, focusing on being an effective legislator and less on eye-grabbing grandstanding. He focused on curating his image of a champion for the working-class focusing on legislation like defending union dues and combating right-to-work laws. He also sought greater strength allocated to the National Labor Relations Board and hoping to deliver on a fair playing field between companies and workers. He also has focused on supporting affordable housing in a bid to both shore up his urban support, proposing the Neighborhood Homes Investment Act. Davis faced a minor scandal midway through his first term after his campaign failed to report certain donations from certain groups, namely other Wisconsin and Midwestern unions. It consumed the media for a short while but given his nature of keeping his head down working, it passed. He opposed the opposed the Iraq War, something that ran contrary to his gruff style he had campaign on, but nonetheless he covered by playing up the need to focus on American workers. He also voted against the $87 billion war budgetary supplement and voted for redeploying US troops out of Iraq by March 2008.

But he also accomplished some foreign policy matters, namely introducing the New Start treaty with Russia with help from senior Senators and co-sponsored an amendment to the budget that would reimpose sanctions on Iran if Iran violated the terms of the interim or final agreement by advancing its nuclear program. He also earned his chops working with American allies by sponsoring the reaffirmations of the Taiwan Relations Act and supporting Hong Kong democratic & human rights legislation. As Davis has gained experience, he has now gone toe to toe with President Wolf, urging him to not pull out of the Iran Deal yet he has also remained silent on whether to continue to sell arms to Middle Eastern allies. More recently, he has supported legislation to restrict ISIS's financing by authorizing new sanctions on foreign financial institutions that knowingly facilitate financial transactions with ISIS, sought to recognize a democratic Venezuelan government and denouncing Maduro, quietly supporting the Cuban thaw, and encouraging tact when dealing with Iran.

On other issues, Davis was a major fighter against the Wolf Tax Cuts and called them serving America's working class on a platter. He also has sought to pass a number of middle-class and low-income tax cuts to little avail though he supporting the 2008 stimulus and the bailout of the auto industry, another mixed issue that earned him flak from some Wisconsinites. He also introduced the Gold Star Fathers Act of 2014 that would expand preferred eligibility for federal jobs to the fathers of certain permanently disabled or deceased veterans and legislation that would give military veterans priority in scheduling classes in colleges and universities. He has consistently supported gun control, seeking to prevent people on the no-fly list to purchase assault weapons, criticizing the political influence of gun manufacturers, calling Wisconsin state legislators "sick" for supporting open carry, and sponsoring a ban on bump stocks. He has supported Dodd-Frank but has stayed quiet on more progressive approaches to regulating Wall Street.

He worked with Senator Moore to support legislation that would force the federal government to step in when cities and states fail to warn residents about lead-contaminated drinking water and to give Wisconsin's school districts money to test it. Davis also voted for the Affordable Care Act while eventually deriding some single-payer systems as too optimistic. While initially quiet on some social issue, he has followed the party line supporting the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010, remained silent on sanctuary cities but denounced child separations, backed the Charter School Accountability Act of 2015 and called for better teacher wages, joined other senators in requesting investigations of opioid companies, and generally advocating against biased systems and for affirmative action. Jonathan also takes a protectionist approach to trade, criticizing free trade with China and other countries, sponsoring a bill that would officially declare China a currency manipulator and require the Department of Commerce to impose countervailing duties on Chinese imports. He has called for better trade enforcement and opposed NAFTA, while also voting against Wolf's new deal.

Electorally, Jonathan has been a survivor and a surprise. Despite facing difficult odds in 2012 given the intense Republican money flowing into the race, he enjoyed good polling margins. While he has never been a spectacular debator, he held his own against his opponent while also drawing up his typical working-class coalition. Additionally, being close to the establishment brought benefits like a number of PACs giving him a competitive arm to fight back the expensive horserace he was running within. He won solidly, by a smaller margin than before but still a majority victory. Despite being a quiet senator most of the time, he had earned himself a strong reputation and with the 2018 midterm elections favoring the Democrats, he faced an easier path to victory and a similar comfortable margin as his first time around.

As for 2016, Davis was an early supporter of Clifford, though he did push for her to adopt some of Baginiski’s working class platforms. But he was largely critiqued for not doing enough to support his most signature issue, often stepping aside for Diane to push her ideas and digging into Sam on a number of other issues, primarily healthcare plans for unions. This adherence to the establishment also proved to narrow his credibility as a number of mainstream incumbents he endorsed in 2018 were toppled though he has since distanced himself endorsing candidates just because he’s told to do so. This has not stopped him from critiquing some new progressives as too out of touch with the working class, both in sensible and off the cuff ways. Now, he continues to be a diligent legislator and largely staying on the party line with regard to social issues, while continuing to advocate some progressive working-class solutions. Jonathan enjoys a close friendship with a number of other Midwestern Democrats and while he briefly considered running for President, he decided against it given that the party felt he remains their strongest contender to keep one Wisconsin U.S. Senate seat blue.

Ideology
Middle of the road is a commonly used adjective to describe Jonathan Davis. He is in the middle of the pack when it comes to the Democratic Senate Caucus, focusing on typical & party-line issues, with a particular focus on working-class issues. As the party has moved to the left on some issues, he has followed but he hardly is at the forefront of this change when it does not concern working-class concerns. He is helped by his rural and union Wisconsin roots to avoid being painted as an elite liberal, open to some progressive working-class fiscal ideas but that's about it. Still, as a moderate liberal, Kane largely focuses on getting bills passed and leading incremental reform for the working-class.

Other Information
Considered a potential run for President for 2020 before deciding against it at the advice of Diane Clifford and other establishment leaders; While sort of personally close to his fellow Wisconsin senator, he remains very ideologically apart from him and both have actively tried to unseat the other; No plans to endorse in the primary until shortly before Wisconsin's primary

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Federal States of Xathuecia
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Posts: 15628
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Sep 29, 2020 12:51 am

Meelducan wrote:
Sarenium wrote:
With Prendy out of the picture and the deadline for the next Texas race(s) having passed, Brookshire is effectively gone.

Leaves Xath with: Ruler, Spellman, Sullivan & Diehl from memory. Davis could be interpreted as Brookshire's replacement if Brookshire is fully retired. That is assuming I haven't missed any characters.

There’s really no pressing need for Xath to have another Senate Democrat, considering he already has one, and he’ll have Spellman soon.

We’re really looking for Executive Branch characters rn

why do we need Executive Branch people?

Veep spot?
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Jovuistan
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Posts: 4177
Founded: May 10, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Jovuistan » Tue Sep 29, 2020 6:21 am

New Cobastheia wrote:
Main Nation Ministry wrote:We need more yaoi. Do it.

There is the possibility I'd be making him a Former Governor (either 2007-2015 or 2013-2019) instead of the other Senator if I want to challenge our Republican Senator from Colorado

The main problem is that I'm not really sure what I'd be doing with him after making him

I’ve already made a challenger in the CO race, I just haven’t wheeled her out yet.
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Meelducan
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Founded: Aug 24, 2016
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Meelducan » Tue Sep 29, 2020 6:49 am

Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:
Meelducan wrote:There’s really no pressing need for Xath to have another Senate Democrat, considering he already has one, and he’ll have Spellman soon.

We’re really looking for Executive Branch characters rn

why do we need Executive Branch people?

Veep spot?

Because it’s the branch with the least characters!
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Gordano and Lysandus
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Posts: 8459
Founded: Sep 24, 2012
New York Times Democracy

Postby Gordano and Lysandus » Tue Sep 29, 2020 7:01 am

Meelducan wrote:
Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:why do we need Executive Branch people?

Veep spot?

Because it’s the branch with the least characters!


There's a lot of important spots that need filling, Meel's right to be concerned.
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Federal States of Xathuecia
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 15628
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Sep 29, 2020 7:46 am

Meelducan wrote:
Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:why do we need Executive Branch people?

Veep spot?

Because it’s the branch with the least characters!

Which positions?
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