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Alternate US Presidents Game

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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Round 1 Statistics

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:13 pm

Presidents -

40 Presidents (including VP ascending to office, non-consecutive presidents count as 2)

Non-Aligned (NA)- 1 - 2.5%
Federalist (F)- 4 - 10%
Democratic-Republican (DR)- 3 - 7.5%
Republican (R)- 19 - 47.5%
Free Soil (FS)- 2 - 5%
Democratic (D)- 7 - 17.5%
Progressive (P)- 4 - 10%


Longest Tenure - 12 years (John Quincy Adams, Herbert Hoover, Thomas Dewey, Gerald Ford)

Elections

NA - 2 - 3.4%
F - 5 - 8.6%
DR - 3 - 5.2%
R - 31 - 53.4%
FS - 3 - 5.2%
D - 10 - 17.2%
P - 4 - 6.9%

Longest Election Streak - Republicans - 1972-2016
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:37 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:15 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned Following Washington's heart attack death, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:27 pm

Guys, nobody can die before or after their death date in actual history. See Rule 6B.

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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:31 pm

Nova Corina wrote:Guys, nobody can die before or after their death date in actual history. See Rule 6B.

Why, of all things, would deaths be exempt from changes?

Especially that it's hard to change history in a way that wouldn't have us always start with Washington.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:36 pm

Petrolheadia wrote:
Nova Corina wrote:Guys, nobody can die before or after their death date in actual history. See Rule 6B.

Why, of all things, would deaths be exempt from changes?

Especially that it's hard to change history in a way that wouldn't have us always start with Washington.


Because then some guy could have George Washington be elected in 1960 or something like that.

Also, you can just say that George Washington refused the office of the presidency (like he almost did), and then have someone else come in.

You can keep John Adams, just don't say that Washington died. You can come up with literally any other reason.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:42 pm

Nova Corina wrote:
Petrolheadia wrote:Why, of all things, would deaths be exempt from changes?

Especially that it's hard to change history in a way that wouldn't have us always start with Washington.


Because then some guy could have George Washington be elected in 1960 or something like that.

Also, you can just say that George Washington refused the office of the presidency (like he almost did), and then have someone else come in.

You can keep John Adams, just don't say that Washington died. You can come up with literally any other reason.

That should be covered by some sort of an anti-ASB provision, not just ruled out in general.


But OK, for the time being:

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:34 pm

Thank you for that.

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.

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Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 588
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:40 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

Silver Commonwealth wrote:''I need a nice quote for my signature.
Anyone volunteer?''

I would recommend you to finish your OOC factbook instead.

Can’t be arsed.

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA


User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:44 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.

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Atheris
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 53
Founded: Oct 05, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:55 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
Last edited by Atheris on Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:57 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Social, not RP account for the person behind Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

The name of my nation comes from the scientific genus of Bush vipers, the coolest species of snake.

Old enough to be in school but to have a job, Virginian, self-proclaimed vexillologist/vexillographer/vexillophile, semi-fluent in German, trombonist, social democrat (left-leaning centrist), pro-choice, marching band, part time dragon trainer. Expect swearing.
#PsychoticDictatorship2Anarchy
Brandon Rogers wrote: I'm not here because I wanna be; I'm here because I'm lost.

The reason that the United States does so well in wartime, is that war is chaos, and the United States practices chaos on a daily basis.”
t-series aint nothing but a bitch lasagna

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:56 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.

User avatar
Atheris
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 53
Founded: Oct 05, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:00 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
Last edited by Atheris on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Social, not RP account for the person behind Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

The name of my nation comes from the scientific genus of Bush vipers, the coolest species of snake.

Old enough to be in school but to have a job, Virginian, self-proclaimed vexillologist/vexillographer/vexillophile, semi-fluent in German, trombonist, social democrat (left-leaning centrist), pro-choice, marching band, part time dragon trainer. Expect swearing.
#PsychoticDictatorship2Anarchy
Brandon Rogers wrote: I'm not here because I wanna be; I'm here because I'm lost.

The reason that the United States does so well in wartime, is that war is chaos, and the United States practices chaos on a daily basis.”
t-series aint nothing but a bitch lasagna

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:15 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8502
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:25 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
The Federal States of Xathuecia

Ongoing P2TM Roleplay's:
Washington Political RP (I help and stuff)

[Recognized By the Community Miscellaeous Role Play: 'Washington Political RP' (Co-OP)]


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Atheris
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 53
Founded: Oct 05, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:31 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After roughness in Jay's expansion to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against what he regards as 'imperialist centralization' and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans instead of expansion.
Last edited by Atheris on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Social, not RP account for the person behind Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

The name of my nation comes from the scientific genus of Bush vipers, the coolest species of snake.

Old enough to be in school but to have a job, Virginian, self-proclaimed vexillologist/vexillographer/vexillophile, semi-fluent in German, trombonist, social democrat (left-leaning centrist), pro-choice, marching band, part time dragon trainer. Expect swearing.
#PsychoticDictatorship2Anarchy
Brandon Rogers wrote: I'm not here because I wanna be; I'm here because I'm lost.

The reason that the United States does so well in wartime, is that war is chaos, and the United States practices chaos on a daily basis.”
t-series aint nothing but a bitch lasagna

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:31 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Atheris
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 53
Founded: Oct 05, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:36 pm

"]1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
Last edited by Atheris on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:39 pm, edited 4 times in total.
Social, not RP account for the person behind Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

The name of my nation comes from the scientific genus of Bush vipers, the coolest species of snake.

Old enough to be in school but to have a job, Virginian, self-proclaimed vexillologist/vexillographer/vexillophile, semi-fluent in German, trombonist, social democrat (left-leaning centrist), pro-choice, marching band, part time dragon trainer. Expect swearing.
#PsychoticDictatorship2Anarchy
Brandon Rogers wrote: I'm not here because I wanna be; I'm here because I'm lost.

The reason that the United States does so well in wartime, is that war is chaos, and the United States practices chaos on a daily basis.”
t-series aint nothing but a bitch lasagna

User avatar
Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8502
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:38 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
Last edited by Federal States of Xathuecia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:41 pm, edited 4 times in total.
The Federal States of Xathuecia

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Restored England
Civilian
 
Posts: 0
Founded: Nov 26, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby Restored England » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:50 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840- William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
Last edited by Restored England on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Atheris
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 53
Founded: Oct 05, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:59 pm

[quote="Federal States of Xathuecia";p="35002315"]1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
Social, not RP account for the person behind Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

The name of my nation comes from the scientific genus of Bush vipers, the coolest species of snake.

Old enough to be in school but to have a job, Virginian, self-proclaimed vexillologist/vexillographer/vexillophile, semi-fluent in German, trombonist, social democrat (left-leaning centrist), pro-choice, marching band, part time dragon trainer. Expect swearing.
#PsychoticDictatorship2Anarchy
Brandon Rogers wrote: I'm not here because I wanna be; I'm here because I'm lost.

The reason that the United States does so well in wartime, is that war is chaos, and the United States practices chaos on a daily basis.”
t-series aint nothing but a bitch lasagna

User avatar
Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8502
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:04 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
Last edited by Federal States of Xathuecia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The Federal States of Xathuecia

Ongoing P2TM Roleplay's:
Washington Political RP (I help and stuff)

[Recognized By the Community Miscellaeous Role Play: 'Washington Political RP' (Co-OP)]


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Restored England
Civilian
 
Posts: 0
Founded: Nov 26, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby Restored England » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:07 pm

quote="Federal States of Xathuecia";p="35002315"]1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
Last edited by Restored England on Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8502
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:33 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere. He dies in 1858, leaving an unprepared William Tecumseh Sherman as President.
Last edited by Federal States of Xathuecia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
The Federal States of Xathuecia

Ongoing P2TM Roleplay's:
Washington Political RP (I help and stuff)

[Recognized By the Community Miscellaeous Role Play: 'Washington Political RP' (Co-OP)]


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Arcturus Novus
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6050
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:44 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States.
The Federal Republic of Arcturus Novus (apparently a grade 13.7 civilization).
Arcturus Novus - Pollemus in dolore
The Honorable Tertius Quirinus Maro, President of the Arcturan Federation.
Dr. Andreas Delas, Arcturan Ambassador to the WA.

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Federal States of Xathuecia
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Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:17 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
Last edited by Federal States of Xathuecia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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