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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:08 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:41 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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The Sakhalinsk Empire
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 368
Founded: Jan 27, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby The Sakhalinsk Empire » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:44 am

Nova Corina wrote:1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Huey Long - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Huey Long gains mass support from the poor and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Long quickly implements the "Every Man a King" policy across America to help the poor recover, but he continues Hoover's policy of isolation.

OOC: Huey Long died in 1935.
This is my signature. The old one was odd.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:46 am

The Sakhalinsk Empire wrote:
Nova Corina wrote:1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Huey Long - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Huey Long gains mass support from the poor and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Long quickly implements the "Every Man a King" policy across America to help the poor recover, but he continues Hoover's policy of isolation.

OOC: Huey Long died in 1935.

fixed it

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Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1938
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:15 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united
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Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
A 12 civilization, according to this index.
Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
Anti: Democrats, 3rd wave feminism, Racism, Socialism, Guðni Jóhannesson

BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:37 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1938
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:07 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
Last edited by Aureumterra on Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
♔-Put this in your sig if you’re a Monarchy/Empire
◉-Put this in your sig if you are an autocracy
I’m your average Íslandic NS player (yes, I live in Ísland, and it’s NOT called Iceland)
I DO NOT USE NS STATS!
Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
A 12 civilization, according to this index.
Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
Anti: Democrats, 3rd wave feminism, Racism, Socialism, Guðni Jóhannesson

BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

User avatar
Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:42 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR..
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:44 am, edited 2 times in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:45 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".

User avatar
Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:52 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:55 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.

User avatar
Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:24 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
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If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 10:27 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1938
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:54 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal
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User avatar
Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:55 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:56 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 12:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Thermodolia
Post Czar
 
Posts: 45741
Founded: Oct 07, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Thermodolia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:09 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president. How his victory is short lived. In 1990 Reagan is assassinated by a Soviet sympathizer and possible KGB agent John Hinckley. Reagan is succeeded by his vice president William Jefferson Clinton.
Male, centrist cultural nationalist, lives somewhere in the Deep South, loves dogs particularly German Shepherds, give me any good Irish or Scottish whiskey and I will be your friend for life. I'm GAY!
I'm agent #69 in the Gaystapo!
>The Sons of Adam: I'd crown myself monarch... cuz why not?
>>Dumb Ideologies: Why not turn yourself into a penguin and build an igloo at the centre of the Earth?
>Xovland: I keep getting ads for printer ink. Sometimes, when you get that feeling down there, you have to look at some steamy printer pictures.
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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9500
Founded: May 02, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Petrolheadia » Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:13 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican  Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president. How his victory is short lived. In 1990 Reagan is assassinated by a Soviet sympathizer and possible KGB agent John Hinckley. Reagan is succeeded by his vice president William Jefferson Clinton.
However, the Reagan/Clinton administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Clinton's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
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User avatar
Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 588
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:14 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican  Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president. How his victory is short lived. In 1990 Reagan is assassinated by a Soviet sympathizer and possible KGB agent John Hinckley. Reagan is succeeded by his vice president William Jefferson Clinton.
However, the Reagan/Clinton administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Clinton's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Clinton’s efforts as interim president do not get him elected, as popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

Silver Commonwealth wrote:''I need a nice quote for my signature.
Anyone volunteer?''

I would recommend you to finish your OOC factbook instead.

Can’t be arsed.

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA


User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:23 pm

6B. Every person dies when they did OTL. For example, Abraham Lincoln must die in 1865. The causes, however, can be different. Reagan died in 2004.

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican  Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president.
However, the Reagan administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Reagan's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
1996 - George H. W. Bush - Republican

User avatar
Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 588
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:33 pm

Sorry for posting so soon, but I really wanted to do 9/11.
1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican  Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president.
However, the Reagan administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Reagan's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
1996 - George H. W. Bush - Republican
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - History is made in the 2000 Presidential Election, as son of George W. Bush is the first president to take charge after his father. Bush’s first action is to pump more money into the Transportation Safety Administration. On September 11th, 2001, a large terrorist attack was foiled by TSA staff at multiple airports along the East Coast, with 23 people arrested. Bush is hailed as a hero for his plan to upgrade the TSA. However, on April 7th, 2003, a hijacked aircraft bound for Sacramento slams into the Luxor Hotel, in Las Vegas. Hundreds are killed, and the attack is forever known as 4/7.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

Silver Commonwealth wrote:''I need a nice quote for my signature.
Anyone volunteer?''

I would recommend you to finish your OOC factbook instead.

Can’t be arsed.

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA


User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:35 pm

It's OK. As long as you don't double-post, you can post as frequently as you want (just look at what I'm doing).

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican  Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president.
However, the Reagan administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Reagan's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
1996 - George H. W. Bush - Republican
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - History is made in the 2000 Presidential Election, as son of George W. Bush is the first president to take charge after his father. Bush’s first action is to pump more money into the Transportation Safety Administration. On September 11th, 2001, a large terrorist attack was foiled by TSA staff at multiple airports along the East Coast, with 23 people arrested. Bush is hailed as a hero for his plan to upgrade the TSA. However, on April 7th, 2003, a hijacked aircraft bound for Sacramento slams into the Luxor Hotel, in Las Vegas. Hundreds are killed, and the attack is forever known as 4/7.[/quote]
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican Due to his massive popularity and without a War on Terror, Bush is easily re-elected in a landslide.

User avatar
Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 588
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:50 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican  Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president.
However, the Reagan administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Reagan's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
1996 - George H. W. Bush - Republican
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - History is made in the 2000 Presidential Election, as son of George W. Bush is the first president to take charge after his father. Bush’s first action is to pump more money into the Transportation Safety Administration. On September 11th, 2001, a large terrorist attack was foiled by TSA staff at multiple airports along the East Coast, with 23 people arrested. Bush is hailed as a hero for his plan to upgrade the TSA. However, on April 7th, 2003, a hijacked aircraft bound for Sacramento slams into the Luxor Hotel, in Las Vegas. Hundreds are killed, and the attack is forever known as 4/7.[/quote]
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican Due to his massive popularity and without a War on Terror, Bush is easily re-elected in a landslide.
2008 - Steve Jobs - Republican - During Bush’s term, Apple founder Steve Jobs decided to get into politics. He studies politics for 3 years while at Apple, and joins the Republican Party. During the 2008 election, Jobs promised to loosen regulations on corporations, and fund relief efforts for areas hit by bad weather. Jobs got 72% of the vote, as he appeals to young voters.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
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This nation does not represent my views!
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CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

Silver Commonwealth wrote:''I need a nice quote for my signature.
Anyone volunteer?''

I would recommend you to finish your OOC factbook instead.

Can’t be arsed.

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy
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User avatar
Pachenstein
Attaché
 
Posts: 92
Founded: Jun 28, 2015
New York Times Democracy

Postby Pachenstein » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:52 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president.
However, the Reagan administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Reagan's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
1996 - George H. W. Bush - Republican
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - History is made in the 2000 Presidential Election, as son of George W. Bush is the first president to take charge after his father. Bush’s first action is to pump more money into the Transportation Safety Administration. On September 11th, 2001, a large terrorist attack was foiled by TSA staff at multiple airports along the East Coast, with 23 people arrested. Bush is hailed as a hero for his plan to upgrade the TSA. However, on April 7th, 2003, a hijacked aircraft bound for Sacramento slams into the Luxor Hotel, in Las Vegas. Hundreds are killed, and the attack is forever known as 4/7.[/quote]
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican Due to his massive popularity and without a War on Terror, Bush is easily re-elected in a landslide.
2008 - Steve Jobs - Republican During Bush’s term, Apple founder Steve Jobs decided to get into politics. He studies politics for 3 years while at Apple, and joins the Republican Party. During the 2008 election, Jobs promised to loosen regulations on corporations, and fund relief efforts for areas hit by bad weather. Jobs got 72% of the vote, as he appeals to young voters.
2012 - Condoleezza Rice - Republican Steve Jobs dies in office in 2011. Vice-President Condoleezza Rice succeeds him and comes into the election in a strong position, with the shift under Jobs towards a more moderate Republican Party focused on being business-friendly having wide appeal. Condoleezza Rice holds the GOP nomination and the presidency in due turn, thus becoming both the first African-American and the first woman to win a presidential election.
Last edited by Pachenstein on Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Hochstift Pachenstein - Prince-Bishopric of Pachenstein

About me: M/21/British (currently resident in Austria). My interests include the German language, history, philosophy, classical music, ice hockey and rugby.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:07 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
1932 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Following a large economic depression in 1931, Hoover, a critic of both Republicans and Progressives, won. He applied free-market policies to the US economy, helping it rebound and enriching the rich and richer parts of the middle class at the poor's cost. Hoover took an isolationist stance on fascism and communism in Europe, as well as Japanese imperialism.
1936 - Franklin Delano Roosevelt - Progressive Herbert Hoover is confident that he can win re-election, but Franklin gains mass support from the poor and those who supported his famous cousin and rebuilds the Progressive party, eventually winning the presidency, to the shock of most of the nation. Roosevelt implements the New Deal, making him even more popular among the poor.
1940 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Due to a divide in the opposition, split between the Republicans and Progressives, Hoover beats Roosevelts, as the Democrat base is united.
1944 - Herbert Hoover - Democrat Herbert Hoover is re-elected. Although keeping his isolationism, he is urged by many advisors, including George Marshall, to start research into the atom bomb. Hoover accepts to preserve American sovereignty, and the Manhattan Project begins. Meanwhile, in Europe, World War II begins.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey’s campaigning manages to win over former progressives, closing the schism in the party, and securing the victory
1952 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican In 1952, Japan is defeated via atomic bombings of Tokyo, Kokura and Hiroshima. Rather liberal terms of surrender are given to the nation, and capitalist states are created in Korea and China.
A year later, American nuclear involvement in Berlin, Frankfurt and Cologne lets the Allies take Germany over and meet the Soviets at the Polish border. Zones of influence are accordingly split, and the USA pledges to help fund redevelopment of both the capitalist and communist part of Europe, in an attempt to created good relations with the USSR.
1956 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican Dewey is elected for a third term, as America settles in to the complacent "50's".
1960 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat Following a late 50s financial crisis and disapproval of aid for Europe, the Republicans lose the 1960 election. Nixon's policies end financial support for the Eastern Bloc and start a policy of distrust of the Soviets, as well as limiting aid for Western Europe, China, Korea and Japan. His popularity is helped by the economy rebounding.
1964 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon wins re-election, while relations with the Soviets continue to fall, beginning the Cold War between the two powers.
1968 - Richard M. Nixon - Democrat - Nixon was re-elected the second time. However, in 1970 a political espionage scandal broke out, in which the Democrats were accused of spying on opposition leaders, mainly Republicans. It was coupled with the young populace's disapproval of the Cold War and Nixon's right-wing policies.
In 1971, Nixon was impeached and replaced with the Vice President, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., who pretty much doubled-down on Nixon's policies,,earning him further disapproval from Nixon's critics.
1972 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford is elected on his promises to conduct detente with the Soviet Union and restore public faith in the government.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - Ford gets elected for a second term, as he continues the cold war, his leadership also starts to turn Republicans more to the Right, and Democrats are becoming more liberal.
1980 - Gerald Ford - Republican - As the American populace starts to turn right and the Republicans follow the trend, Ford gets re-elected once again. However, a fuel crisis coupled with an economic downturn in 1983 weakens faith in the government.
1984 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Reagan is elected after Ford retires from office. HIs succession to office completes the "conservativation" of the Republican Party. The economy grows in his first term, as the Soviet Union begins to feel economic pressure, helped by Reagan's "Star Wars" program.
1988 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Due to his success against the Soviets Reagan is easily re-elected as president.
However, the Reagan administration also sees the beginning of the fall of Communism - in 1991, a civil war ends it in Romania and it gets peacefully removed in Poland and Hungary, and in 1992, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia peacefully split in internationally-overseen processes.
A few days before the end of Reagan's first term, a civil war breaks out in the USSR.
1992 - George H. W. Bush - Republican - Popular Republican candidate George H. W. Bush gains 63% of the vote. In 1993, the United States sends volunteer troops to the Russian Federation, as the Second Russian Revolution is still ongoing.
1996 - George H. W. Bush - Republican
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - History is made in the 2000 Presidential Election, as son of George W. Bush is the first president to take charge after his father. Bush’s first action is to pump more money into the Transportation Safety Administration. On September 11th, 2001, a large terrorist attack was foiled by TSA staff at multiple airports along the East Coast, with 23 people arrested. Bush is hailed as a hero for his plan to upgrade the TSA. However, on April 7th, 2003, a hijacked aircraft bound for Sacramento slams into the Luxor Hotel, in Las Vegas. Hundreds are killed, and the attack is forever known as 4/7.[/quote]
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican Due to his massive popularity and without a War on Terror, Bush is easily re-elected in a landslide.
2008 - Steve Jobs - Republican During Bush’s term, Apple founder Steve Jobs decided to get into politics. He studies politics for 3 years while at Apple, and joins the Republican Party. During the 2008 election, Jobs promised to loosen regulations on corporations, and fund relief efforts for areas hit by bad weather. Jobs got 72% of the vote, as he appeals to young voters.
2012 - Condoleezza Rice - Republican Steve Jobs dies in office in 2011. Vice-President Condoleezza Rice succeeds him and comes into the election in a strong position, with the shift under Jobs towards a more moderate Republican Party focused on being business-friendly having wide appeal. Condoleezza Rice holds the GOP nomination and the presidency in due turn, thus becoming both the first African-American and the first woman to win a presidential election.
2016 - Jeb Bush - Republican Jeb manages to use the fame of his father and brother to propel himself to the nomination, eventually winning the presidency.

That's it for Round 1! Whoever posts next, begin again at 1788!
Last edited by Nova Corina on Tue Dec 04, 2018 3:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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