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Alternate US Presidents Game

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Reorganized Akros
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Founded: Nov 03, 2018
Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:15 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

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Latvijas Otra Republika
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Founded: Feb 22, 2017
Father Knows Best State

Postby Latvijas Otra Republika » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:27 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
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Reorganized Akros
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Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:42 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

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Nova Corina
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Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:12 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
1996 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush wins against Hart in a close race, gaining popularity from being Reagan's VP.

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Reorganized Akros
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Postby Reorganized Akros » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:20 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
1996 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush wins against Hart in a close race, gaining popularity from being Reagan's VP.
2000 - Al Gore - Liberal - Bush's policies having increased the national debt and caused a nasty, bloody war in South America against New Granadan leftist rebels in support of the military regime there, Liberal Senator Al Gore of Tennessee wins election against him for the Presidency and begins to reinstate many of the same effective policies of the Hart and Kennedy Administrations before him. A negotiated peace ends the New Granada civil war and free elections replace the military dictator with a freely elected government, while at home, Al Gore helps encourage more conservation and get the United States more weaned off fossils fuels as well as adding more public transit. However, his gasoline tax increase costs him heavily in the 2002 mid-terms, even if it helps balance the budget.
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

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Latvijas Otra Republika
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Founded: Feb 22, 2017
Father Knows Best State

Postby Latvijas Otra Republika » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:34 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
1996 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush wins against Hart in a close race, gaining popularity from being Reagan's VP.
2000 - Al Gore - Liberal - Bush's policies having increased the national debt and caused a nasty, bloody war in South America against New Granadan leftist rebels in support of the military regime there, Liberal Senator Al Gore of Tennessee wins election against him for the Presidency and begins to reinstate many of the same effective policies of the Hart and Kennedy Administrations before him. A negotiated peace ends the New Granada civil war and free elections replace the military dictator with a freely elected government, while at home, Al Gore helps encourage more conservation and get the United States more weaned off fossils fuels as well as adding more public transit. However, his gasoline tax increase costs him heavily in the 2002 mid-terms, even if it helps balance the budget.
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican - George Bush Junior wins a narrow election against his Liberal opponent, mainly by capitalising on the high costs of Gore's fossil fuel transition. His victory sparks controversy due to the fact he didn't win in the popular vote, as well as the discontent of the famous rapper Kanye West. He pursues a Necon economic and socially conservative policies throughout his tenure while having a few international slip ups such as a shoe being thrown at him in a conference room.
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Restored England » Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:02 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
1996 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush wins against Hart in a close race, gaining popularity from being Reagan's VP.
2000 - Al Gore - Liberal - Bush's policies having increased the national debt and caused a nasty, bloody war in South America against New Granadan leftist rebels in support of the military regime there, Liberal Senator Al Gore of Tennessee wins election against him for the Presidency and begins to reinstate many of the same effective policies of the Hart and Kennedy Administrations before him. A negotiated peace ends the New Granada civil war and free elections replace the military dictator with a freely elected government, while at home, Al Gore helps encourage more conservation and get the United States more weaned off fossils fuels as well as adding more public transit. However, his gasoline tax increase costs him heavily in the 2002 mid-terms, even if it helps balance the budget.
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican - George Bush Junior wins a narrow election against his Liberal opponent, mainly by capitalising on the high costs of Gore's fossil fuel transition. His victory sparks controversy due to the fact he didn't win in the popular vote, as well as the discontent of the famous rapper Kanye West. He pursues a Necon economic and socially conservative policies throughout his tenure while having a few international slip ups such as a shoe being thrown at him in a conference room.
2008 - John McCain - Republican - Tired of the ultra-conservatism and bungling of George W. Bush, progressives and centrists in the Republican Party stage an effective revolt, even though it leads to Bush staging a weak third-party effort from the party's evangelical fringe. Senator John McCain of Arizona, highly popular and respected as a war hero, champions a moderate stance that wins over some Liberal and independent voters to compensate for the loss of disgruntled religious right types. McCain, running with a Liberal VP candidate, Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, is easily elected and balances sensible environmental reforms with tax incentives for business and consumers as well as a multi-lateral foreign policy that strongly supports allies without seeking out reckless foreign adventures such as Bush had advocated in his latest platform in South America.

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Postby Wunderstrafanstalt » Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:38 pm

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
1996 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush wins against Hart in a close race, gaining popularity from being Reagan's VP.
2000 - Al Gore - Liberal - Bush's policies having increased the national debt and caused a nasty, bloody war in South America against New Granadan leftist rebels in support of the military regime there, Liberal Senator Al Gore of Tennessee wins election against him for the Presidency and begins to reinstate many of the same effective policies of the Hart and Kennedy Administrations before him. A negotiated peace ends the New Granada civil war and free elections replace the military dictator with a freely elected government, while at home, Al Gore helps encourage more conservation and get the United States more weaned off fossils fuels as well as adding more public transit. However, his gasoline tax increase costs him heavily in the 2002 mid-terms, even if it helps balance the budget.
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican - George Bush Junior wins a narrow election against his Liberal opponent, mainly by capitalising on the high costs of Gore's fossil fuel transition. His victory sparks controversy due to the fact he didn't win in the popular vote, as well as the discontent of the famous rapper Kanye West. He pursues a Necon economic and socially conservative policies throughout his tenure while having a few international slip ups such as a shoe being thrown at him in a conference room.
2008 - John McCain - Republican - Tired of the ultra-conservatism and bungling of George W. Bush, progressives and centrists in the Republican Party stage an effective revolt, even though it leads to Bush staging a weak third-party effort from the party's evangelical fringe. Senator John McCain of Arizona, highly popular and respected as a war hero, champions a moderate stance that wins over some Liberal and independent voters to compensate for the loss of disgruntled religious right types. McCain, running with a Liberal VP candidate, Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, is easily elected and balances sensible environmental reforms with tax incentives for business and consumers as well as a multi-lateral foreign policy that strongly supports allies without seeking out reckless foreign adventures such as Bush had advocated in his latest platform in South America.
2012 - Bill Gates - Liberal-Progressive
With George W. Bush certain to win National Christian nomination, tech mogul Bill Gates jumped into national politics, elbowing Liberal's favourite Nancy Pelosi. He steered his campaign to 'fiscally sensical socially liberal' guise, merging with the Republicans to victory. Gates tripled US international humanitarian efforts, promoted tech industries and increased McCain's environmental laws. However, he also greatly increased the power of NSA and government surveillance, which isn't popular. He is also increasingly seen as a 'corrupt 1%' as he surrounded himself with big business representatives and news of Microsoft's big profits. The PC culture dramatically grew under his administration.
Last edited by Wunderstrafanstalt on Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Wunderstrafanstalt
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Corporate Bordello

Postby Wunderstrafanstalt » Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:57 pm

Also to clarify the Republican Party didn't disappear, only some of them rebelled and joined the Liberal-Progressives.

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Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Scottish Socialists » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:08 pm

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
1824 - Henry Clay - Whig - The influential Speaker of the House creates his own party to rival the Union Party, believing that the United States should stay isolated in foriegn affairs and the government should be less centralized. He surprisingly wins, and begins working on his propositions. He is especially popular with "the common man" in the South and West, which allowed for his surprise victory.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Union - Despite Clay's personal popularity, a decline in the number of internal improvements triggers a recession, and talk of removing the Bank of the United States makes it worse. This results in a very narrow victory for John Quincy Adams and the Union Party, though Clay actually wins the popular vote. Congress is a split decision, the Whigs keeping the House, but the Unionists retaking the Senate by a slender majority. Gridlock ensues and Adams lacks the personal gifts for compromise and dialogue, which worsens it for the next four years. Even so, Adams' Secretary of the Treasury, John Crittenden, is able to preserve the Bank of the United States and win some support for the beginnings of a national railroad, though on a meager budget.
1832 - William Pope Duval - Union - the younger Adams' irresponsible government spending cost him the official support of his party, who instead backed Florida governor William Duval. In a historically contentious three-way race, Duval was elected with a slim majority of electoral votes, but cracks began to show in the Unionists' party loyalty. The Duval presidency was plagued with congressional gridlock as the Whigs, Adamsian Unionists, and establishment Unionists agreed on very little in four years. President Duval's most noteworthy achievement was the establishment of a military alliance with the young nation of New Granada in South America.
1836 - Daniel Webster - Whig - Senator Daniel Webster emerges as a "dark horse" in a very fractured Whig Party, but with the Unionists split between Adams' and Duvals' factions, he is able to squeak through into the White House. Webster's administration sees a lot more compromise, though, as he works closely with leading Whigs and Unionists in Congress to achieve a sort of temporary consensus on the proper level of public spending and internal improvements. The national railroad and some canals are permitted to continue, but little else, and a new tobacco excise helps restore public solvency. In foreign affairs, the New Granada alliance is maintained and friendly relations with Great Britain, but the country is mostly isolated. The states of Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, and Wisconsin are finally admitted to the Union, along with a new state from out of Massachusetts: Maine. Due to the Crittenden Compromise, this means three new free states and two new slave ones.
1840 - Andrew Jackson - Union/Democratic - Southern Unionist elements, plus disaffected Southern Whigs, coalesced to vote heavily, almost in a bloc, for a favorite son and Unionist from Tennessee, retired Army Colonel and former Senator Andrew Jackson, who squeezed into the Presidency on a rather narrow vote. His championing of possible war with Mexico over Texas, California, and other territories, as well as the Oregon frontier, combined to help motivate more hawkish voters even in the North and West. Jackson acted on his threat, too, quickly mobilizing the United States Army, Navy, and Marines to fight Mexico on the slenderest pretext. As a wartime Commander-in-Chief, he was very ruthless and effective, picking the right commanders and winning a rather decisive victory that brought Mexico to the table for a devastating and punitive peace treaty at Laredo, Texas. However, the war was expensive and the national debt rose dramatically once again. The Union Party, what was left of it, formally expelled Jackson and he formed his own political party, the Democrats.
1844 - Martin Van Buren - Democratic - Jackson declines to run for a second term, citing his recent illness. Martin Van Buren takes his place as President. Buran causes an uproar with many Southerners as he attempts to veto congress' plan to create a slave state in the newly formed state of Texas. Buren even attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment, but strong opposition in the South and from congress forces him to abandon those hopes. Buren inevitably concedes to creating Texas as a slave state, since he is forced to deal with the newly enlarged national debt.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - Van Buren wins a second term under a new party banner, that of the Free Soil Party, though it's a real squeaker of an election. In this term, while trying to balance the budget, he also attempts to repeal the Crittenden Amendment yet again, but his former party comrades, the Democrats combine with the remnants of Unionists and Whigs to resist his pressure in that direction. He is, however, able to get Minnesota, Iowa, and Michigan admitted as states at last, adding to the growing demographic power of free states. However, he's unable to stop the long-delayed admission of Mississippi and Alabama to the Union.
1852 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Troubled by the threat posed by another Free Soiler candidate, this time Governor John C. Fremont of California, to the Crittenden Compromise and the regional balance, Democrats, Whigs, and Unions all forge a new party: the Constitution Party. They nominate Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, also known as the "Little Giant," who defeats Fremont in a scarily close election. Douglas sets about trying to preserve the national unity by distracting people with a convenient purchase: Prince Rupert's Land from Hudson's Bay Company. Great Britain nearly blocks the sale, but Secretary of State James Buchanan manages to seal the deal by forming a secret partnership with the British Empire based upon past co-operation and "mutual interests," especially in China and Japan. This, unfortunately, ends up dragging the United States into the Crimean War and Second Opium War on Great Britain's side. Russian North America becomes a very real threat to the United States' northwestern border.
1856 - Stephen A. Douglas - Constitution - Douglas wins another term as he promises that winning these wars are a "benefit to the US, and to it's necessary protection." Douglas sends troops to occupy Russian North America, which it does easily as the Russians are too caught up in Europe to do anything major. The expedition in China is also a success as the combined Anglo-French-American troops capture Beijing. In the peace treaty, the US acquires the port of Shanghai, from which they can use to trade their goods with China. The occupation of Russian America and the defeat of China, earn the US a place on the world stage and it is seen as a major world power. However, the internal problems, mostly slavery, is at a critical high, as secession among southern states is a possibility. What makes it worst is that a raid by John Brown to free the slaves ends in bloodshed, and a Supreme Court case, the Dredd Scott case, causes widespread discontent within the Northern States, who further their advocacy to abolish slavery entirely. All this could lead to the possibility of a civil war.
1860 - Albert Sidney Johnston - Democratic - General Albert Sidney Johnston, the chief American military hero of the Crimean War, barely wins a new term for the Democratic Party, even as the Constitution Party falls entirely apart. It's a razor-thin margin over Governor William H. Seward of New York, the Free Soiler candidate and there is even talk of Northern secession in light of the latest Free Soiler defeat. The South also becomes more nervous with every election that the country will become more anti-slavery over time, threatening the Crittenden Compromise. Johnston does his best to secure a more lasting peace and refill the Treasury due to war debts, which forces the printing of "Greenbacks" to restore fiscal solvency to the Union. A Panic ensues, right as Johnston dies in office, leaving a politically naive, notoriously drunk fellow general from Galena, Illinois named Ulysses S. Grant in the White House. Grant does his best, but his close friends are notoriously corrupt and manipulate him, except the one man who never lies to him and gives him honest counsel - San Francisco journalist and editor Samuel L. Clemens.
1864 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After four disastrous years of Democratic administration, American politics are fractured in time for the 1864 election. In the North, the Constitution Party and the Free Soil Party vie for supremacy, with the Free Soilers pushing radical politics while the Constitution Party adapts to a more moderate position. Already in shambles since the 1860 election, the Constitution Party is unable to field a viable candidate and wins only a small percent of the vote. The Free Soilers prevail in the North and even in some ostensibly slave states, Maryland, Delaware, and Missouri. Their opposition, the Democratic Party, founders and is only able to find tenuous support in the South, where Southern landowners fear a Free Soil Presidency. Ultimately, John Parker Hale, seen as a relatively fresh face, is elected to lead the nation by a significant margin. He immediately begins to undertake sweeping reform, which, although it is bogged down by the Democrats in Congress, slowly ebbs at the institution of slavery. Hale is weaker on issues of economics and foreign policy, but due to adept ministers manages to prevent an economic recession. Halfway through Hale's presidency, the Free Soilers launch a new campaign to outlaw slavery in Maryland and Delaware, a radical measure that would upset the delicate balance between slave and free states. This is met with immediate outcry from the South, who threaten almost daily to secede, and barely manage to halt reform in Congress, though public support of the Free Soil Party is evident in the northern states. As the 1868 elections approach, tensions heighten, and many southern leaders announce that they will advocate secession if Hale is elected to another term.
1868 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - Despite the threat of secession, the Northern States overwhelmingly re-elect President Hale over Democrat Horatio Seymour and Constitutionalist Andrew Johnson. Predictably, South Carolina and six other states secede from the Union, while Hale calls upon his British and New Granadan allies to come to America’s aid. Charles Francis Adams, his Secretary of State, works feverishly toward that purpose, even as Nebraska, Nevada, and Oregon join the Union as free states.
1872 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil / Andrew Johnson - Constitutionalist/ Vacant
The war does not go in the favour of the North. The early death of Hale and the ill health of his Vice President, Andrew Johnson, which makes them make critical military mistakes, lead to the Secessionist's army being near Washington at the beginning of 1875. After the death of Andrew Johnson in the Battle of Washington the Northern States resign. The war ends with a peace treaty that re- admits the Secessionists in the Union, as well as a forced Constitutional Amendment that makes Slavery and slave trade legal in all of the States and proclaims that "all Negroes have zero rights as they are incapable of proper thought and they are designed to be slaves" and another that re-enacts the Fugitive Slave Clause as well as a third one that indemnifys the actions of the secessionists. New elections for a president are scheduled at the end of 1875, for 1876
1876 - Joshua Norton - Imperial Americans, fed up with the Civil War and its aftermath, overwhelmingly elect Joshua Graham Norton. Using the military, Norton launches a suprise attack on the secessionists, revoking the Seccessionist Amendment and using the military to quell his political opposition. He declares himself Emperor of America, but is shot at the beginning of 1880 by Charles Guiteau. Norton did not have a vice president, which leads to even more chaos in America. As the 1880 elections approach, it seems like another civil war might break out.
1880 - James G. Blaine - Reconstruction - Offering to heal the nation’s scars and the “open breach between government and governed,” Speaker of the House James G. Blaine takes the helm of a badly divided, but fundamentally strong and prosperous America, forging an interim government just in time to hold elections where no party is able to organize an effective opposition to his hastily created Reconstruction ticket. Blaine is able to get the country back on its feet, but the price is high: reparations imposed on the planter class in the form of a special slave tax. This both raises revenue and makes slavery increasingly unprofitable for the planters, the final nail in slavery’s coffin lid.
1884 - James G. Blaine - Republican - Blaine is in charge once again and he runs under the newly formed Republican Party, which mostly composed of former free soil members. He manages to convince southern representatives to abolish slavery, although many were incredibly reluctant. Many slaves are set free, but many of them still don't have rights as the Southern states implement their own Jim Crow laws. These laws ensure that former slaves have access to education and such, but most of these are poorly-funded and poorly looked after, when compared to what their former owners are entitled too.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - A fairly pragmatic and more conservative Democrat, Governor Grover Cleveland of New York vowed to "preserve the spirit of national reconciliation and harmony" in his bid to capture the White House for the revived Democratic Party. Cleveland continues to help rebuild the country's financial solvency and agrees to endorse a formal abolition amendment, but also insists on the states' right to impose "separate but equal" laws and deny the franchise to the freedmen. He also presides over the admission of Washington, North and South Dakota, and Montana to the Union.
1892 - Levi P. Morton - Republican - Morton is narrowly voted in as president, which is quickly considered" one of the worst decisions of the people". These years see a weak adminstration, with already existing nepotism and corruption becoming widespread, and the President becoming disinterested in his role. At the end of 1887 most adminstrative requests need "extra money" to be processed, and the President does not much against it; indeed, shortly before the end of the presidency it becomes apparent that the President used large sums of money intended for projects for his own personal gain, and only the looming end of the presidency prevents impeachment.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democratic - Former President Grover Cleveland, very popular for his honest and able administration in the past, reluctantly agrees to serve again, sweeping aside the Republican candidate, Governor William McKinley of Ohio, in a landslide. Cleveland begins restoring faith in government and solvency once more, not to mention honesty, and the states of Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado are admitted at last.
1900 - Adlai Stevenson Sr - Democratic - The Vice President for Cleveland, wins due to Clevelands popularity. Stevenson begins his term by helping Americas ally, New Granada by crushing a revolt in the Panama region. In return for their help, New Granada leases land to the US where they can build a canal to connect the Atlantic and the Pacific. Stevenson also is the first Preaident to welcome the new King of Britain, Edward Vii, to the US. The king's visit is to prop up the continued alliance the US has had with the British ever since independence. This visit is also supposed to send a signal to the German Kaiser that the US is a strong supporter of the British and French.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Governor Theodore Roosevelt becomes yet the latest New York Governor to ascend to the Presidency, leading the reformist or progressive faction of the Republican Party to recapture the White House and Congress at last. Vigorous and visionary, Roosevelt encourages regulation of industry, anti-trust laws, an estate tax to reduce the excessive power of the wealthy elite, the rights of labor, conservation, and better civil rights for freedmen and blacks in the South. In foreign policy, however, he follows the same basic goals as the Cleveland and Stevenson Administrations, much to the chagrin of Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany, who had hopes of winning TR as an ally.
1908 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Earl Beshlin, a darling of the Democratic Party, is able to transition the Democratic party to continue a strong foreign policy, winning on a platform of developing relations with the rest of the Americas. He expands the use of the Executive Order to pass laws to favor his policies abroad as well as limiting the strength of the Republican party by passing censure laws. TR becomes a vocal critic of the administration but his passage of the bipartisan Income Tax amendment strengthens the government's grip on power.
1912 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The laws that Beshlin passes crush the strength of the Republican party as Democrats are elected across the country. They quickly establish gerrymandering as a common practice, with it being called "Beshlining". It only further secures the Democratic party's place in the country but Roosevelt remains a powerful political force, ensuring major backlash against this practice. The Congress remains securely in Republican hands. During his second term, Beshlin launches several interventions abroad, including deploying troops to put down Panamanian worker rebellions to speed up the construction of the Panama canal. He also begins to allow his administration to implement controversial laws that restrict African-Americans in the south as well as the Asian population out West.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - With anger at the lack of domestic focus, Roosevelt is swept into office as a backlash to Beshlin though the Democratic-controlled states are quick to challenge his authority. They cite state's rights and their win the Senate in the midterms, only further damaging the control that the President has. Roosevelt, initially refusing to use Executive Orders as excessively as Beshlin did, succumbs to pressure from Republicans to continue the practice to limit foreign intervention and allocate funds for regulating industries and conserving land.
1920 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Roosevelt's use of the Executive Orders hurts him as he is defeated by an ambitious Harding who is defeated by the surprising return of Beshlin. Beshlin is faced with a major issue in Europe, as domestic policies had distracted the country from the massive conflict. He decides to intervene on the side of the British and French, sending forces to infiltrate through Southern France and use Italy to launch a direct strike against Austria. A more classic attack is launched through the Western front as well, though trench warfare occurs on both American fronts in Europe. He also quickly repeals many conservation efforts by the previous administration, citing the need for wartime resources. He strengthens his ties with big businesses in order to mantain control over the Americas to prevent the rise of hostile foreign governments. The late entrance of the U.S. drags out the war and the economy booms with the production it stimulates.
1924 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - Beshlining and the war sweep massive control of the government, both federal and states, in favor of the Democratic party. He ends the war, with the intention of joining the newly formed League of Nations. The Congress agrees and in exchange he does not implement certain regulations on industry, in order to secure their support. His legitimacy as leader of the Party is also questioned though he begins to purge opposition in the party leadership. He continues support of Latin American development and goes on a major tour of the region. He supports Prohibition and the amendment passes, as he passes a major spending bill to strengthen its enforcement. He is questioned if he will seek another term and he makes it clear that he will.
1928 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - An amendment is introduced to limit Presidents to three terms and while it narrowly is passed by the Congress, his connections and support for a majority of Democratic governors ensure that the amendment cannot be ratified. He tightens his control on the Democratic party, creating the Federal Elections Commission though it is packed with loyal supporters in order to limit the Republican party and ensure only Democrats supporting him receiving favorable circumstances. He also packs the Supreme Court with personal friends and passes a major infrastructure improvement program to generate both jobs and public approval. The League of Nations also deals with the first issue of German aggression, which leads to a U.S. led intervention to push back, cementing the LoN as a strong international policing force.
1932 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - The federal infrastructure program delays the Great Depression but by Beshlin's controversial 6th term, he faces a collapsing government. Selecting FDR as his vice president, they preside over a major New Deal to expand the federal work programs to allow for people to continue to make a living. Food aid is created to feed people of the cities while farm subsidies are increased to help support farmers, the source of the American economy. Feeling that a wartime industry could help stimulate the nation, he organizes a League of Nation intervention in the Chinese Civil War. With the fear of the Soviets or other socialist interest rising in the Far East, European forces subdue these forces and uphold the democratic militias. Numerous war crimes are committed which anger many Republicans but with political corruption and election control of the Democrats, they are unable to make strides to defeat his efforts. At the same time, there arises a movement by Democrats to oust Beshlin as he had become increasingly belligerent and defensive.
1936 - Earl Hanley Beshlin - Democratic - By alledgedly using (not provable) election fraud Beshlin manages to get enough corrupt people in congress and in the States, despite an attempt by opposing Democrats to prevent this, to achieve his dream: At the end of 1937, the Presidental Amendment passes, which proclaims the President the head of the Executive, Legislative, and justice System, giving the president free reign to change ordinary laws at will(not the constitution though) and them having the final interpretative power over ordinary laws. Beshlin quickly uses this power for propaganda and to supress and imprison the opponents in both parties, and the huge number of dissidents that quickly protest upon the amendment's passage.
At the end of 1939, finally, the Beshlin Amendment passes Congress, which proclaims that as long as Earl Hanley Beshlin lives, there may not be any candidate for president than Earl Hanley Beshlin, and that all governors shall be appointed by the President. By this point people are already brainwashed into following Beshlin, which means that this causes little disagreement amongst the majority of dumb people, although intelligent people are hugely upset. At the end of the presidency term, the Beshlin Amendment, however, is still two states short for ratification.
1940 - Thomas Dewey - Republican The Beshlin Era finally ends, as the Amendment is defeated and the backlash puts Thomas Dewey in the White House. Beshlin is prosecuted and convicted for his crimes, the first former President to be imprisoned. Dewey introduces tough anti-gerrymandering laws, gets censorship and other authoritarian acts repealed, pushes for term limits, vigorously purges Democratic crooks in high office, and strengthens civil rights laws to end segregation if possible..
1944 - Thomas Dewey - Republican Wanting to stop such dictatorial action from ever happening again, congress passes an amendment where the President is restricted to two terms in office. However, Dewey, being exempt from this Passage, as he is the current sitting president, announces that he will run for one more term, and pledges to the American people that they can hold him to account if he ever does break that pledge. He is expected to beat the Democratic nominee in 1948, Harry Truman, who many write off. So much so, the Chicago daily Tribune has secretly printed “Dewey Defeats Truman,” a whole 5 months before the election.
1948 - Thomas Dewey - Republican With only two electors more than needed, Dewey defeats Truman, but much narrower than expected. Dewey's third term is strained by foreign affairs - the communist Russia is rumored to build a secret weapon based on radioactivity, according to spies. The scientists warn of its effectiveness and Dewey begins secret research himself. However, Russia is expected to finish the research much sooner... In the end of 1951 Russia declares "that it's comrades have sucessfully built a weapon capable of destroying countries" and demand from every other nation "to give way to the Socialist revolution within one year or to be annhilated"; an announcement that sends shockwaves of fear around the world.
1952 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - With the nation engulfed in the giant Red Scare, the avidly anti-communist Senator Joseph McCarthy from Wisconsin - and his even more hawkish VP Douglas MacArthur - crushed the moderate Democratic candidate Estes Kevaufer in a landslide. McCarthy's administration
instantly pushed on nuclear development, and in the eve of the Russian ultimatum deadline, proclaimed that they have (dubiously) created and tested the US's own nukes. HUAC and the Red Scare is formally institutionalized with the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). While the roaring 50's just starting to take hold, tension with the communist reached a breaking point after the US stationed its nukes in Shanghai, starting the Shanghai Crisis. In a Beshlin-like move McCarthy proposed the 'Emergency Amendment' to grant himself emergency power if potentially nuclear war breaks out, and with the DHS's hold over the country, it may actually pass...
1956 - Joseph McCarthy - Republican - Although McCarthy's strong anti-communist position are viewed by many in the American public to be trigger-happy and possibly lead to a nuclear war with the Russians, he is, however, seen as a more tougher candidate than Adlai Stevenson II. McCarthy wins again. However, Stevenson is appointed as the US ambassador to the League of Nation, by a reluctant McCarthy, on the advice by many of his Republican colleagues. The 'Emergency Amendment' act is seen by many in congress as a return to the days of Beshlin, and many try to block the vote, but are unable to stop it from going to a vote. However, the Senate does manage to make a major amendment to the act, which says that congress will have the power to take away the power when it sees fit, to the dismay of McCarthy. Meanwhile, the Shanghai missile crisis reaches a boiling point, as the Soviets "embargo" (not blockade) Shanghai. McCarthy threatens war, but Stevenson urges the President not to take any "reckless decisions." Stevenson makes an address to the League of Nation, condemning the embargo by the Soviets, and even gets into a heated debate with the Soviet Ambassador over the Shanghai missile crisis, which is, for the first time, shown on the new invention: the television, to the American people, who watch it very closely and are impressed at how he manages to corner the Ambassador, and cause embarrassment to the Soviets. While this is happening, McCarthy, getting impatient, sends warship to get rid of the Soviet embargo, and gives them a deadline to leave or else. War seems imminent, but by the last minute, the Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev, orders the withdrawal of the embargo, as he does not want to start a war with this "crazy man," as he puts it. McCarthy hails this as a major victory for his administration. Although, many Americans view Adlai Stevenson's fearsome exchange with the Soviet Ambassador at the League of Nation was what really pushed the Russians to leave, as the Soviets were humiliated in front of the world.
1960 - Adlai Stevenson Jr. - Democratic- Viewed by many as the true hero of the Shanghai Missile Crisis, Ambassador Adlai Stevenson Jr. is nominated handily for the Democratic Party candidate and easily defeats a Senator Everett Dirksen of Illinois, the nominee of a Republican Party that lost its sense of purpose other than ambition and greed. Stevenson is able to reach a final deal on civil rights with Republicans and also help create Medicare, but the biggest success is the final surrender of Chinese Communist insurgents led by Mao Zedong, letting the Anglo American coalition carve a large occupied zone in that country. Stevenson takes the heat from Southern Democrats on civil rights and sacrifices any chance of re-election to save the party itself.
1964 - Barry Goldwater - Republican
Stevenson wasn't able to prevent the schism within the Democrats, and the party splits. Goldwater swoops in and won an unprecedentedly thin majority by convincing the alienated Southern Democrats to vote for him instead of the impossible-to-win George Wallace. His administration pursued a fiscally conservative policy, breaking the Republican-Democrats Medicare compromise, resulting in gridlock. He denounced Stevenson's 'weak' foreign policy and pursued a more aggresive stance in the LoN. When Cuba experienced a socialist revolution in 1965, Goldwater hastily send troops but it quickly bogged down into a deadly guerilla mess and LoN condemnation. Goldwater's administration tried to revert the Civil Rights Act, and used a heavy-handed approach in dealing with the protesters - accusing them as communists - resulting in large riots across big cities. Fed up with the chaos, alienated republicans founded their own party, the Liberal Party under Nelson Rockefeller.
1968-Nelson Rockefeller-Libertarian
The Democratic and Republican parties offered multiple candidates due to the schisms,which paved way for Nelson to rise to power. He began reversing the acts of the 1964 administration and also finished the war in Cuba. Public Relations were in an all time high in years. Americans felt him as another polarizing figure for the nation.
1972 - Billy Graham - National Christian - The famous evangelist creates his own party as a reaction to the decline of traditional religion. He draws support from all parties, leading him to win the election in a landslide. He implements such bills as the Prayer in Schools Act, but he does keep the separation of church and state. This leads to a revival of general religion in America, as Graham is popular.
1976 - Jimmy Carter - Democratic - The personal popularity of Graham isn't enough to save his coalition from the ineffectiveness of his response to the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of Chinese revanchism, the growing secular backlash to his policies, the Supreme Court reversal of his Prayer In School act, the splits between Northern and Southern, Catholic and Protestant, conservative and progressive, and black and white factions in the National Christian Party. The result is the Democratic nomination of a charismatic, progressive Southern Baptist named Jimmy Carter, former Governor of Georgia, who sails into the White House with talk of more reform, better relations with other countries, and "applying Christ's command to love our neighbor." Carter insists upon greater transparency and less corruption in government and he is able to improve conditions in China, as well as his own party's standing with now enfranchised minorities. There is still some resistance from fellow Southern Democrats, however, hurting his party in the mid-terms as a lot of racist Southern independents bolt the Democrats and challenge the President, while many progressives feel that he hasn't gone far enough. Even so, a loose alliance of liberals from all parties achieve Medicaid, an EPA, Head Start, two new cabinet departments, and statehood for three Canadian territories long under American rule.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican - The conservative reaction against the Democrats leads to a merging of the National Christian and Republican parties, which sweeps former actor Ronald Reagan into power. He is strong in foreign affairs and rolls back many of Carter's reforms.
1984 - Edward Kennedy - Liberal - The backlash against the repeal of popular reforms and the decline of both Republican and Democratic parties lead to a four-way election, narrowly won by Liberal Massachusetts Senator Edward "Ted" Kennedy. An avowed progressive, Kennedy sets about reinstating key reform measures and pushes Congress to admit three new states to the Union, one from Canada (British Columbia), one from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico), and Shanghai. This strengthens his hand, as the new states favor him politically as their benefactor, leading to Liberal gains in the mid-terms. Medicaid and Medicare pave the way, after a lot of compromise, to universal health coverage for all Americans and better financial aid for students. His foreign policy also witnesses detente with the Russian post-Communist regime, even if it is a military junta.
1988 - Clint Eastwood - Republican - Fears of the American identity being mixed with other territories and the international backlash against this large expansion of the Union, combined with the confusion and political division caused by the introduction of a completely new form of Party governance lead Eastwood on a successful Republican backed campaign; this path to triumph was also paved by his career in acting. He promised to keep Reagan's agenda and his economic practices.
1992 - Gary Hart - Liberal - Eastwood's rather reactionary policies in the wake of the 1992 recession lead to the election of another Liberal Party Senator, this one Gary Hart of Colorado. Hart's administration undoes much of the harm from Eastwood's austerity agenda and his appeals to ultra-nationalism, while he also makes a point of zealously enforcing civil rights laws and pushing continued detente with the East. He notably even agrees to work with China's new, less corrupt, more progressive leaders, establishing better relations with that country and the newly independent nation of Korea. While the Donna Rice scandal emerges and hurts him with more prudish elements, he is able to emphasize that public policy is what voters should judge and the electorate pushes back in the mid-terms against his critics due to his success in achieving economic recovery and a balanced budget (even if it does require a tax hike on the rich and a stimulus package).
1996 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush wins against Hart in a close race, gaining popularity from being Reagan's VP.
2000 - Al Gore - Liberal - Bush's policies having increased the national debt and caused a nasty, bloody war in South America against New Granadan leftist rebels in support of the military regime there, Liberal Senator Al Gore of Tennessee wins election against him for the Presidency and begins to reinstate many of the same effective policies of the Hart and Kennedy Administrations before him. A negotiated peace ends the New Granada civil war and free elections replace the military dictator with a freely elected government, while at home, Al Gore helps encourage more conservation and get the United States more weaned off fossils fuels as well as adding more public transit. However, his gasoline tax increase costs him heavily in the 2002 mid-terms, even if it helps balance the budget.
2004 - George W. Bush - Republican - George Bush Junior wins a narrow election against his Liberal opponent, mainly by capitalising on the high costs of Gore's fossil fuel transition. His victory sparks controversy due to the fact he didn't win in the popular vote, as well as the discontent of the famous rapper Kanye West. He pursues a Necon economic and socially conservative policies throughout his tenure while having a few international slip ups such as a shoe being thrown at him in a conference room.
2008 - John McCain - Republican - Tired of the ultra-conservatism and bungling of George W. Bush, progressives and centrists in the Republican Party stage an effective revolt, even though it leads to Bush staging a weak third-party effort from the party's evangelical fringe. Senator John McCain of Arizona, highly popular and respected as a war hero, champions a moderate stance that wins over some Liberal and independent voters to compensate for the loss of disgruntled religious right types. McCainjerpa, running with a Liberal VP candidate, Senator Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, is easily elected and balances sensible environmental reforms with tax incentives for business and consumers as well as a multi-lateral foreign policy that strongly supports allies without seeking out reckless foreign adventures such as Bush had advocated in his latest platform in South America.
2012 - Bill Gates - Liberal-Progressive
With George W. Bush certain to win National Christian nomination, tech mogul Bill Gates jumped into national politics, elbowing Liberal's favourite Nancy Pelosi. He steered his campaign to 'fiscally sensical socially liberal' guise, merging with the Republicans to victory. Gates tripled US international humanitarian efforts, promoted tech industries and increased McCain's environmental laws. However, he also greatly increased the power of NSA and government surveillance, which isn't popular. He is also increasingly seen as a 'corrupt 1%' as he surrounded himself with big business representatives and news of Microsoft's big profits. The PC culture dramatically grew under his administration.
2016 - George W. Bush - National Christian - With Bush in another party, many Republicans pledged alliegance to the National Christian Party, which managed to win the election due to Gates’ terrible reforms and ideas.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

RANGERS FOREVER!
F**K THE POPE AND THE IRA!

Ah’m speaking Scots whether ye like it or no.

Cannae be fucked to change my flag.
Christmas all year, yay!

Scots, wha hae wi Wallace bled,
Scots, wham Bruce has often led,
Welcome tae yer gory bed,
Or tae victory!


Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy, Rangers F.C
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA, Celtic F.C


User avatar
Dekerin Domains
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 397
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
New York Times Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:20 pm

Damn I just barely missed my chance to put Bill Maher in the White House!
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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Socialist Communist States
Attaché
 
Posts: 89
Founded: Apr 03, 2017
Corporate Police State

Postby Socialist Communist States » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:25 pm

I was going to put Letterman in just for the absurdity.

User avatar
Reorganized Akros
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 15
Founded: Nov 03, 2018
Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:27 pm

Socialist Communist States wrote:I was going to put Letterman in just for the absurdity.

Wow. Hey, wasn’t the National Christian Party supposed to collapse in 1976?
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

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Nova Corina
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Posts: 87
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:28 pm

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned

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Nova Corina
Attaché
 
Posts: 87
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:29 pm

Socialist Communist States wrote:I was going to put Letterman in just for the absurdity.

At least I got Emperor Norton in. That was one of my main goals.

Anyone who wants to make a summary for this round can. I'll start keeping track again this round.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Reorganized Akros
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 15
Founded: Nov 03, 2018
Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:35 pm

One of my goals was to nip potential dictators and dictatorships in the bud, regardless of party. Who the hell was Norton, btw?
Last edited by Reorganized Akros on Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

User avatar
Wunderstrafanstalt
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 147
Founded: Feb 19, 2017
Corporate Bordello

Postby Wunderstrafanstalt » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:46 pm

Reorganized Akros wrote:One of my goals was to nip potential dictators and dictatorships in the bud, regardless of party. Who the hell was Norton, btw?


Norton I, self-proclaimed Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico is our lord and saviour. (He's basically an insane person in San Francisco).

CFR WUNDERSTRAFANSTALT - LAIRAN UNION
"Ad astra et ultra" - "To the stars and beyond"

14.0 | MT | F17 | $LFD | Kurzgesagt | Leaders

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Dekerin Domains
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 397
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
New York Times Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:47 pm

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
Last edited by Dekerin Domains on Sun Dec 09, 2018 4:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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The Grand Duchy Of Nova Capile
Minister
 
Posts: 3234
Founded: Jul 12, 2015
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby The Grand Duchy Of Nova Capile » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:29 pm

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
Last edited by The Grand Duchy Of Nova Capile on Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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✠ The Grand Duchy of Nova Capile ✠
Pray for Paris, for Brussels, for Europe
Stop Radical Islam
My flag isn't Kekistani.
~Got Oil?~

User avatar
Nova Corina
Attaché
 
Posts: 87
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Sun Dec 09, 2018 6:24 pm

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Jefferson is narrowly re-elected. Due to his friendship with Revolutionary France, France sells the Louisiana Purchase to him, making him even more popular.

User avatar
Arcturus Novus
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6114
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:37 pm

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Jefferson is narrowly re-elected. Due to his friendship with Revolutionary France, France sells the Louisiana Purchase to him, making him even more popular.
1804 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - President Jefferson declines to run for a third term, instead letting his former VP secure their party's candidacy. Burr's vice president, ironically, was his longtime rival Alexander Hamilton; the two engaged in a fatal duel that ended up leaving the latter's office vacant for almost all of Burr's presidency. Really, the entire Burr presidency followed as such - explosive incompetence. Relations soured with both France and Great Britain, a war was narrowly avoided with Spain over territory in Florida, corruption ran rampant in Washington, and the entire nation seemed at risk of toppling over. Historians would remember Aaron Burr as one of the worst presidents in US history.
Just your friendly neighborhood autistic furry transbian anarchist.
about me - about my politics - my twitter - my tumblr
Member of the Committee for Proletarian Degeneracy

User avatar
The Grand Duchy Of Nova Capile
Minister
 
Posts: 3234
Founded: Jul 12, 2015
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby The Grand Duchy Of Nova Capile » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:17 pm

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Jefferson is narrowly re-elected. Due to his friendship with Revolutionary France, France sells the Louisiana Purchase to him, making him even more popular.
1804 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - President Jefferson declines to run for a third term, instead letting his former VP secure their party's candidacy. Burr's vice president, ironically, was his longtime rival Alexander Hamilton; the two engaged in a fatal duel that ended up leaving the latter's office vacant for almost all of Burr's presidency. Really, the entire Burr presidency followed as such - explosive incompetence. Relations soured with both France and Great Britain, a war was narrowly avoided with Spain over territory in Florida, corruption ran rampant in Washington, and the entire nation seemed at risk of toppling over. Historians would remember Aaron Burr as one of the worst presidents in US history.
1808 - John Quincy Adams - Whig - After Aaron Burr's disastrous presidency, the Democratic-Republican Party fractures, divided by issues of federalism, foreign policy, and leadership. Aaron Burr, endorsed by Jefferson, runs in the 1808 election under the National Republican Party ticket, but due to his former exploits is widely ridiculed and receives little support, marking a steep decline in anti-federalism. John Quincy Adams, a former Federalist who was a recent convert to the Democratic-Republican cause, is chosen to run as the candidate of the newly-formed Whig Party. The Whig platform is based on improving the economy by expanding into new territory and incorporating Federalist policies. John Quincy Adams ends up running against his father, John Adams, who continues to campaign as a Federalist. The Federalist Party dwindles, however, as many of its members are attracted to the Whig Party, and in the 1808 election, John Quincy Adams prevails by a wide margin, with John Adams as his Vice President. Father and son reconcile and compromise on many issues, with Quincy Adams embracing more aspects of Federalism. Under the Whig presidency, Florida is purchased from Spain, the National Bank is reestablished, and tensions heighten with Britain, leading many to believe that war is imminent by the time of the 1812 elections.
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✠ The Grand Duchy of Nova Capile ✠
Pray for Paris, for Brussels, for Europe
Stop Radical Islam
My flag isn't Kekistani.
~Got Oil?~

User avatar
Wunderstrafanstalt
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 147
Founded: Feb 19, 2017
Corporate Bordello

Postby Wunderstrafanstalt » Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:47 am

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Jefferson is narrowly re-elected. Due to his friendship with Revolutionary France, France sells the Louisiana Purchase to him, making him even more popular.
1804 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - President Jefferson declines to run for a third term, instead letting his former VP secure their party's candidacy. Burr's vice president, ironically, was his longtime rival Alexander Hamilton; the two engaged in a fatal duel that ended up leaving the latter's office vacant for almost all of Burr's presidency. Really, the entire Burr presidency followed as such - explosive incompetence. Relations soured with both France and Great Britain, a war was narrowly avoided with Spain over territory in Florida, corruption ran rampant in Washington, and the entire nation seemed at risk of toppling over. Historians would remember Aaron Burr as one of the worst presidents in US history.
1808 - John Quincy Adams - Whig - After Aaron Burr's disastrous presidency, the Democratic-Republican Party fractures, divided by issues of federalism, foreign policy, and leadership. Aaron Burr, endorsed by Jefferson, runs in the 1808 election under the National Republican Party ticket, but due to his former exploits is widely ridiculed and receives little support, marking a steep decline in anti-federalism. John Quincy Adams, a former Federalist who was a recent convert to the Democratic-Republican cause, is chosen to run as the candidate of the newly-formed Whig Party. The Whig platform is based on improving the economy by expanding into new territory and incorporating Federalist policies. John Quincy Adams ends up running against his father, John Adams, who continues to campaign as a Federalist. The Federalist Party dwindles, however, as many of its members are attracted to the Whig Party, and in the 1808 election, John Quincy Adams prevails by a wide margin, with John Adams as his Vice President. Father and son reconcile and compromise on many issues, with Quincy Adams embracing more aspects of Federalism. Under the Whig presidency, Florida is purchased from Spain, the National Bank is reestablished, and tensions heighten with Britain, leading many to believe that war is imminent by the time of the 1812 elections.
1812 - John C. Calhoun - National-Republicans
Schisms in major parties saw the war hawk Calhoun to a close victory. With the British navy weakened by the very costly Trafalgar battle and Russia being more pro-France, the US declared war and invaded Canada. They quickly ran into problems of recalcitrant government, desertions of state millitias, and New England's direct opposition. Eventually, the British was forced to concede Canada except Newfoundland. Canadians organized a guerilla warfare, prompting a harsh, tyrannical federal response. Prolonged conflict ruined the economy and backlash brew. After French Empire's defeat to Russia's backstab, the British started to support the rebels in Canada - and the now-secessionist dissenters in New England...

CFR WUNDERSTRAFANSTALT - LAIRAN UNION
"Ad astra et ultra" - "To the stars and beyond"

14.0 | MT | F17 | $LFD | Kurzgesagt | Leaders

CommonerThink - Helisday, 2019-1-12-14: Blind of left and right, doctor removed the wrong kidney
Disaster relief donation | Acknowledge IRL me as emperor of the world; this nation in general and this in particular will be the result

User avatar
Nova Corina
Attaché
 
Posts: 87
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 10, 2018 5:41 am

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Jefferson is narrowly re-elected. Due to his friendship with Revolutionary France, France sells the Louisiana Purchase to him, making him even more popular.
1804 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - President Jefferson declines to run for a third term, instead letting his former VP secure their party's candidacy. Burr's vice president, ironically, was his longtime rival Alexander Hamilton; the two engaged in a fatal duel that ended up leaving the latter's office vacant for almost all of Burr's presidency. Really, the entire Burr presidency followed as such - explosive incompetence. Relations soured with both France and Great Britain, a war was narrowly avoided with Spain over territory in Florida, corruption ran rampant in Washington, and the entire nation seemed at risk of toppling over. Historians would remember Aaron Burr as one of the worst presidents in US history.
1808 - John Quincy Adams - Whig - After Aaron Burr's disastrous presidency, the Democratic-Republican Party fractures, divided by issues of federalism, foreign policy, and leadership. Aaron Burr, endorsed by Jefferson, runs in the 1808 election under the National Republican Party ticket, but due to his former exploits is widely ridiculed and receives little support, marking a steep decline in anti-federalism. John Quincy Adams, a former Federalist who was a recent convert to the Democratic-Republican cause, is chosen to run as the candidate of the newly-formed Whig Party. The Whig platform is based on improving the economy by expanding into new territory and incorporating Federalist policies. John Quincy Adams ends up running against his father, John Adams, who continues to campaign as a Federalist. The Federalist Party dwindles, however, as many of its members are attracted to the Whig Party, and in the 1808 election, John Quincy Adams prevails by a wide margin, with John Adams as his Vice President. Father and son reconcile and compromise on many issues, with Quincy Adams embracing more aspects of Federalism. Under the Whig presidency, Florida is purchased from Spain, the National Bank is reestablished, and tensions heighten with Britain, leading many to believe that war is imminent by the time of the 1812 elections.
1812 - John C. Calhoun - National-Republicans
Schisms in major parties saw the war hawk Calhoun to a close victory. With the British navy weakened by the very costly Trafalgar battle and Russia being more pro-France, the US declared war and invaded Canada. They quickly ran into problems of recalcitrant government, desertions of state millitias, and New England's direct opposition. Eventually, the British was forced to concede Canada except Newfoundland. Canadians organized a guerilla warfare, prompting a harsh, tyrannical federal response. Prolonged conflict ruined the economy and backlash brew. After French Empire's defeat to Russia's backstab, the British started to support the rebels in Canada - and the now-secessionist dissenters in New England...
1816 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican The Democratic-Republican Party manages to reform due to attempts by Jefferson and Madison, with Madison winning office in 1816.

User avatar
Latvijas Otra Republika
Diplomat
 
Posts: 994
Founded: Feb 22, 2017
Father Knows Best State

Postby Latvijas Otra Republika » Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:11 am

1788 - George Washington- Non-Aligned
1792 - John Adams - Federalist - Predictably, with George Washington retiring after just one term, John Adams is elected the Second President of the United States and continues his policies at the counsel of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. The Bank of the United States helps usher in better economic growth, pay war debts, and finance both subsidies for industry and infrastructure.
1796 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic Republican - Despite Adams' success in directing the economy, his popularity ebbs due to his staunch support of Britain against France. Due to this and other unfavorable positions, Adams loses by a huge margin in the 1796 election. Thomas Jefferson becomes President, with fellow Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr as his Vice President. Without any Federalists in key positions to frustrate his plans, Jefferson makes huge strides for the Anti-Federalist cause, completely dismantling the Bank of the United States within the first year of his presidency. He strikes a delicate balance between supporting the agrarian landholders of the South and also not obstructing the manufacturers of the North. Internationally, Jefferson snubs Britain and pursues friendly relations with Revolutionary France. Jefferson ends his term still relatively popular among the population, though the Federalist cause remains strong.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Jefferson is narrowly re-elected. Due to his friendship with Revolutionary France, France sells the Louisiana Purchase to him, making him even more popular.
1804 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - President Jefferson declines to run for a third term, instead letting his former VP secure their party's candidacy. Burr's vice president, ironically, was his longtime rival Alexander Hamilton; the two engaged in a fatal duel that ended up leaving the latter's office vacant for almost all of Burr's presidency. Really, the entire Burr presidency followed as such - explosive incompetence. Relations soured with both France and Great Britain, a war was narrowly avoided with Spain over territory in Florida, corruption ran rampant in Washington, and the entire nation seemed at risk of toppling over. Historians would remember Aaron Burr as one of the worst presidents in US history.
1808 - John Quincy Adams - Whig - After Aaron Burr's disastrous presidency, the Democratic-Republican Party fractures, divided by issues of federalism, foreign policy, and leadership. Aaron Burr, endorsed by Jefferson, runs in the 1808 election under the National Republican Party ticket, but due to his former exploits is widely ridiculed and receives little support, marking a steep decline in anti-federalism. John Quincy Adams, a former Federalist who was a recent convert to the Democratic-Republican cause, is chosen to run as the candidate of the newly-formed Whig Party. The Whig platform is based on improving the economy by expanding into new territory and incorporating Federalist policies. John Quincy Adams ends up running against his father, John Adams, who continues to campaign as a Federalist. The Federalist Party dwindles, however, as many of its members are attracted to the Whig Party, and in the 1808 election, John Quincy Adams prevails by a wide margin, with John Adams as his Vice President. Father and son reconcile and compromise on many issues, with Quincy Adams embracing more aspects of Federalism. Under the Whig presidency, Florida is purchased from Spain, the National Bank is reestablished, and tensions heighten with Britain, leading many to believe that war is imminent by the time of the 1812 elections.
1812 - John C. Calhoun - National-Republicans
Schisms in major parties saw the war hawk Calhoun to a close victory. With the British navy weakened by the very costly Trafalgar battle and Russia being more pro-France, the US declared war and invaded Canada. They quickly ran into problems of recalcitrant government, desertions of state millitias, and New England's direct opposition. Eventually, the British was forced to concede Canada except Newfoundland. Canadians organized a guerilla warfare, prompting a harsh, tyrannical federal response. Prolonged conflict ruined the economy and backlash brew. After French Empire's defeat to Russia's backstab, the British started to support the rebels in Canada - and the now-secessionist dissenters in New England...
1816 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican The Democratic-Republican Party manages to reform due to attempts by Jefferson and Madison, with Madison winning office in 1816.
1820 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican Unanimously reelected due to a lack of any competition.
Latvian Traditionalist

Interested in Folklore & Nature. KPV-LV Supporter.

"The bigger things get the smaller and duller or flatter the globe gets. It is getting to be all one blasted little provincial suburb. When they have introduced American sanitation, morale-pep, feminism, and mass production throughout the Near East, Middle East, Far East, USSR, the Pampas..." - Tolkien

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