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Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 2:41 pm

Scottish Socialists wrote:1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln avoids being killed when his assasain isn’t allowed into the play, so Lincoln continues to egalitarianise the US.

OOC: The rules say everyone has to die at IRL dates
♔-Put this in your sig if you’re a Monarchy/Empire
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I’m your average Íslandic NS player (yes, I live in Ísland, and it’s NOT called Iceland)
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Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
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Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
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BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

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Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 591
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Mon Dec 03, 2018 2:43 pm

Aureumterra wrote:
Scottish Socialists wrote:1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln avoids being killed when his assasain isn’t allowed into the play, so Lincoln continues to egalitarianise the US.

OOC: The rules say everyone has to die at IRL dates

OOC: I’ve just realised that he died in 1865, so, imma fix that
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Aureumterra
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Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:22 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1865 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism
Last edited by Aureumterra on Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
♔-Put this in your sig if you’re a Monarchy/Empire
◉-Put this in your sig if you are an autocracy
I’m your average Íslandic NS player (yes, I live in Ísland, and it’s NOT called Iceland)
I DO NOT USE NS STATS!
Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
A 12 civilization, according to this index.
Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
Anti: Democrats, 3rd wave feminism, Racism, Socialism, Guðni Jóhannesson

BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:42 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.

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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9529
Founded: May 02, 2015
New York Times Democracy

Postby Petrolheadia » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:50 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
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Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:57 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
Last edited by Aureumterra on Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
♔-Put this in your sig if you’re a Monarchy/Empire
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I’m your average Íslandic NS player (yes, I live in Ísland, and it’s NOT called Iceland)
I DO NOT USE NS STATS!
Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
A 12 civilization, according to this index.
Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
Anti: Democrats, 3rd wave feminism, Racism, Socialism, Guðni Jóhannesson

BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:00 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams and the vice president of Martin van Buren, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:01 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:01 pm

OOC: Adams got 3 terms?
♔-Put this in your sig if you’re a Monarchy/Empire
◉-Put this in your sig if you are an autocracy
I’m your average Íslandic NS player (yes, I live in Ísland, and it’s NOT called Iceland)
I DO NOT USE NS STATS!
Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
A 12 civilization, according to this index.
Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
Anti: Democrats, 3rd wave feminism, Racism, Socialism, Guðni Jóhannesson

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Nova Corina
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Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:03 pm

Aureumterra wrote:OOC: Adams got 3 terms?


OOC: Yeah, his dad did a while back, so the 2-term limit has already been "abolished" and there hasn't been an equivalent to the 22nd amendment yet.

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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9529
Founded: May 02, 2015
New York Times Democracy

Postby Petrolheadia » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:06 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1886 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1888 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged, a new election was called (legal in this timeline). The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:10 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
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If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9529
Founded: May 02, 2015
New York Times Democracy

Postby Petrolheadia » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:07 pm

Ninjad. Lemme get an edit.

Edited now.
Last edited by Petrolheadia on Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
Male, gearhead, classic rock fan, gamer, agnostic, centre-libertarian.
Where you can talk about cars!
If you can't get a convertible, run really fast down a highway with wind in your hair and people shouting "You're crazy!". - Kenny Loggins,
If a Porsche owner treats it like a bicycle, he's a gentleman. And if he prays to it, he's simply a moron. - Jan Nowicki.

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Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:15 pm

Remember, you only do elections every four years. If someone else becomes president in the middle of the term, put it into footnotes. I'm adding that as one of the rules. As such, I had to change a bit of the crime bits of Blaine, but I hope everyone's OK with that.

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged, a new election was called (legal in this timeline). The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:20 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged, a new election was called (legal in this timeline). The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
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Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
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BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:50 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:01 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term
♔-Put this in your sig if you’re a Monarchy/Empire
◉-Put this in your sig if you are an autocracy
I’m your average Íslandic NS player (yes, I live in Ísland, and it’s NOT called Iceland)
I DO NOT USE NS STATS!
Finally updated my factbook! Check it out!
News Forum
A 12 civilization, according to this index.
Pro: Trump, MAGA, Capitalism, Gender Equality, Romney 2020
Anti: Democrats, 3rd wave feminism, Racism, Socialism, Guðni Jóhannesson

BREAKING NEWS|Syndicalist Cell Raided, all 35 members given life in jail|Aureumterrese Military Honors event has the top soldiers looking forward to potentially getting awarded by the Empress herself|Hospitals are being built in remote areas of the Congo Basin to reach rural colonial villages|

User avatar
Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 591
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:15 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
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This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

RANGERS FOREVER!
F**K THE POPE AND THE IRA!
(Glasgow Rangers, that is.)

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User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:16 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Theodore Roosevelt runs for a third term. He has basically gained a cult following due to his actions in his past two terms, and even though it is much closer than his second race, Theodore Roosevelt manages to squeak by to the finish line, partly because he named a Republican, William Taft, as his running mate for this election, instead of Charles Fairbanks.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:20 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
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User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:34 pm

You can't just change the result of an election.

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Theodore Roosevelt runs for a third term. He has basically gained a cult following due to his actions in his past two terms, and even though it is much closer than his second race, Theodore Roosevelt manages to squeak by to the finish line, partly because he named a Republican, William Taft, as his running mate for this election, instead of Charles Fairbanks.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - World War I begins. Taft seeks to improve relations with the Allies, but stays out of the conflict.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning an unprecedented fourth term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an assastionation attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is suceeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.

User avatar
Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 591
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Scottish Socialists » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:37 pm

Nova Corina wrote:You can't just change the result of an election.

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Theodore Roosevelt runs for a third term. He has basically gained a cult following due to his actions in his past two terms, and even though it is much closer than his second race, Theodore Roosevelt manages to squeak by to the finish line, partly because he named a Republican, William Taft, as his running mate for this election, instead of Charles Fairbanks.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - World War I begins. Taft seeks to improve relations with the Allies, but stays out of the conflict.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning an unprecedented fourth term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an assastionation attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is suceeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.

OOC: Actually, you’ve just changed it there.
William Jennings Bryan was posted before you posted yours.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

RANGERS FOREVER!
F**K THE POPE AND THE IRA!
(Glasgow Rangers, that is.)

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy, Rangers F.C
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA, Celtic F.C


User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 6:03 pm

Scottish Socialists wrote:
Nova Corina wrote:You can't just change the result of an election.

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Theodore Roosevelt runs for a third term. He has basically gained a cult following due to his actions in his past two terms, and even though it is much closer than his second race, Theodore Roosevelt manages to squeak by to the finish line, partly because he named a Republican, William Taft, as his running mate for this election, instead of Charles Fairbanks.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - World War I begins. Taft seeks to improve relations with the Allies, but stays out of the conflict.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning an unprecedented fourth term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an assastionation attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is suceeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.

OOC: Actually, you’ve just changed it there.
William Jennings Bryan was posted before you posted yours.

Oh, sorry about that.

User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 6:05 pm

[quote="Aureumterra";p="34996790"]1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.

This should be right then.

User avatar
Aureumterra
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1959
Founded: Oct 25, 2017
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Aureumterra » Mon Dec 03, 2018 6:11 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island
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User avatar
Nova Corina
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Nova Corina » Mon Dec 03, 2018 6:24 pm

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.

User avatar
The Sakhalinsk Empire
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 376
Founded: Jan 27, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The Sakhalinsk Empire » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:08 am

1788 - George Washington - Nonaligned
1792 - George Washington - Nonaligned

1796 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican
1804 - Thomas Pinckney - Federalist - His brother Charles was second place in the elections. In this timeline, Charles gets struck with an illness that disables him for a long time, so he takes up his place. Having been elected before, he wins.
1808 - James Madison - Democratic-Republican
1812 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist
1816 - DeWitt Clinton - Federalist - Here, the Federalists stop the War of 1812 from happening, somehow starting the Era of Good Feelings early and boosting their party's popularity. The next elections would probably show no major opposition for Clinton...
1820 - Rufus King - Federalist - The Democratic-Republicans have become largely defunct at the national level. However, DeWitt Clinton is shot in New York City amidst the 1820 campaign, and though not fatal the injury and related medical complications rendered him unable to carry a third election and term. King, his running mate, assumed the candidacy. John E. Howard is elected his Vice President. The issue of slavery has started to become a point of considerable contention within the Federalist party.
1824 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - The issue of slavery causes a schism in the party, and leads to two Federalists running under the same party. This leads to a vote split which allows Clay to come to power.
1828 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - The Democratic-Republicans themselves have a schism over slavery as well, and Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams still compete in the elections. Adams wins this time, though.
1832 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - Adams, easily winning re-election, begins limiting slavery, as the Federalist party begins to crumble around the issue.
1836 - John Quincy Adams - Republican - In 1835, amid limitations on slavery, the South seceedes, forming the Confederate States of America. Adams becomes the first president to win a third term, due to wartime.
1840 - Winfield Scott - Republican - Having won some victories against Confederate forces, he is popularly elected into office after John Quincy Adams retires. He and his generals take Virginia to be used as farms and cities, making the war veer to the Union's side.
1844 - Winfield Scott - Republican - The Confederacy makes a large push, and the Union is pushed out of Virginia, but the people still have enough faith in him to re-elect him.
1848 - Martin Van Buren - Free Soil - The hard anti-slavery stance of the free soil party secures Van Buren the win, as the Union is starting to gain the upper hand.
1852 - Martin van Buren - Free Soil - The Confederacy finally crumbles under the economic pressures of 17 years of warfare, leading van Buren to be easily elected for a second term.
1856 - John Parker Hale - Free Soil - After the civil war, the Free Soil Party remains extremely popular, as their issues diversify into ending discrimination of freed African Americans
1860 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - With many in the North becoming alarmed at the radical politics of the Free Soil party, Abraham Lincoln is elected as a moderate that will protect African Americans while reconciling with the South.
1864 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Lincoln is assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, causing his Vice President to take office, during his time however, Lincoln managed to reconcile a bit with the South
1868 - Andrew Johnson - Republican - Lincoln’s Vice President continues his legacy, with a sense of egalitarianism. He is easily re-elected.
1872 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - The son of the hugely popular John Quincy Adams, Charles Francis is elected when Andrew Johnson retires. This is typically remembered as the end of the Reconstruction period and the beginning of the Gilded Age.
1876 - Charles Francis Adams - Republican - Adams continues to be popular among most Americans, but tensions arise at the right-wing attempts to pass discriminating legislation against minorities (moves widely supported by the Democrats) and Free Soil-supported protests against them that often turn violent.
1880 - Winfield S. Hancock - Democrat - Hancock, elected the first Democrat president of the United States, wins by a slight margin, he serves as a new moderate face for the right, gaining him the vote of some parts of the North as well
1884 - Charles F. Adams - Republican Charles Francis manages to win the presidency back, and live up to his father's reputation. However, upon his death in 1886, his vice president, James Blaine, becomes President.
1888 - James G. Blaine - Republican - This presidency was scarred first by the 1886 recession, and then by Blaine's 1889 conviction and arrest, following a widespread business (mostly railroad) bribery scandal caused by accusations of election stealing by the Republicans. As many other important Republican figures, including the Vice President, were also charged. The trials also got many businessmen, like Cornelius Vanderbildt or Henry M. Flagler, jailed on charges of corruption. His vice president, Benjamin Harrison, becomes the new president, but the public hates him.
1892 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat With the Republicans' popularity at an all-time low, Grover Cleveland is elected to be President.
1896 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat Cleveland runs for a second term, winning the South easily, and the new Western states
1900 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive - Many are angered that the Democrats aren't doing more against big monopolies. With Cleveland's retiring from politics, Theodore Roosevelt wins a landslide victory, supported by laborers who are tired of being oppressed by big businesses. He breaks up monopolies, while also engaging in the Spanish-American war, taking the rest of Spain's colonial empire, and building the Panama Canal. This is the time when historians consider the US to have entered the world stage.
1904 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive- Roosevelt’s amazing job in his first term causes him to win the second in a landslide, however, the progressives and ex-free soilers mostly realign with the Republican Party during this term.
1908 - William Jennings Bryan - Democrat - With Roosevelt’s second term over, the Democratic candidate manages to win by a small amount, and instantly begins looking towards allying the German Empire.
1912 - William Howard Taft - Republican - The relationship with the German Empire is extremely unpopular with the democratic US citizens, and Bryan gets almost unanimously voted out of office, Taft looks to improve relations with Western Europe and Britain
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Progressive Winning a third term, Theodore wins based on his campaigning to join World War I on the side of the Allies. America decides to support him, and he gets even more support after an asassination attempt fails. World War I ends in 1918, but at the beginning of the New Year 1919, Theodore Roosevelt dies. He is succeeded by his vice president in 1916, Charles Evans Hughes.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Republican - Roosevelt’s Vice President, who became incredibly popular with republicans, ex-free soilers, and ex-progressives secures the landslide victory. Almost all of the Progressive and Free Soil base by now has become republican, and Taft’s economic policies kickstart the roaring 20s. At the same time, massive flocks of immigrants from Europe start entering the US through Ellis Island.
1924 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - As the President leaves to become the Supreme Court justice, Calvin Coolidge is elected. He manages to sustain the prosperity of the Roaring 20's, as his first term is very successful.
1928 - Calvin Coolidge - Republican - The Democratic Party remains unpopular with many US citizens since Bryan's controversial move, and with the Progressive party waning by its own, Coolidge gets re-elected.
This is my signature. The old one was odd.

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