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Alternate US Presidents Game

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Old Hope
Diplomat
 
Posts: 711
Founded: Sep 21, 2014
Tyranny by Majority

Postby Old Hope » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:17 pm

Socialist Communist States wrote:I'm sorry, you got ninja'd

Fixed.

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Arcturus Novus
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6050
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:24 pm

OOC: can I get some clarification on what the situation is overseas right now?
The Federal Republic of Arcturus Novus (apparently a grade 13.7 civilization).
Arcturus Novus - Pollemus in dolore
The Honorable Tertius Quirinus Maro, President of the Arcturan Federation.
Dr. Andreas Delas, Arcturan Ambassador to the WA.

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Old Hope
Diplomat
 
Posts: 711
Founded: Sep 21, 2014
Tyranny by Majority

Postby Old Hope » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:27 pm

Arcturus Novus wrote:OOC: can I get some clarification on what the situation is overseas right now?

Well, following the removal of American troops in Europe by Briggs Socialists went into power in Russia, and without American intervention(due to the poor state of their well... state) they didn't have major opponents... and went on to conquer more and more of Europe and Asia gradually while America was concerned with itself. That's pretty much normal because America had lots of setbacks and... they were the power that stopped communism and Socialism when it came up in the normal timeline.. which didn't happen here.
FURTHER EDIT: Look at the alternate history. The states were only concerned with themselves after the American-German war. No one put troops back to Europe after they were all removed, nor were any other troops deployed outside the continent
Last edited by Old Hope on Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:33 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Arcturus Novus
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Posts: 6050
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:44 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic- Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 -Richard Nixon - Socialist
But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - an unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
The Federal Republic of Arcturus Novus (apparently a grade 13.7 civilization).
Arcturus Novus - Pollemus in dolore
The Honorable Tertius Quirinus Maro, President of the Arcturan Federation.
Dr. Andreas Delas, Arcturan Ambassador to the WA.

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8502
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:49 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic- Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - An unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead of focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
1996 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Shirley "Spearhead" Chisholm, becomes a new rallying point for the National Coalition. She is much more aggressive and brings women and minorities into the fold of the coalition. She defeats Kissinger in the primaries, and upon entering office, bans most socialist parties and limits communism. She restricts free speech in regard to the 'reds' and begins the "Red Scares" by purging socialist officials. She continues support of far-right and extremists in the Middle East and Western Europe, using the internet to funnel convert information.
Last edited by Federal States of Xathuecia on Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Old Hope
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Tyranny by Majority

Postby Old Hope » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:58 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic- Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - An unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead of focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
1996 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Shirley "Spearhead" Chisholm, becomes a new rallying point for the National Coalition. She is much more aggressive and brings women and minorities into the fold of the coalition. She defeats Kissinger in the primaries, and upon entering office, bans most socialist parties and limits communism. She restricts free speech in regard to the 'reds' and begins the "Red Scares" by purging socialist officials. She continues support of far-right and extremists in the Middle East and Western Europe, using the internet to funnel convert information.
2000 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition Chisholm continues the military buildup - although it still lags behind the USS by around 10 years... Unfortunately, during the term, more and more sabotage happens and spies continue to be revealed in the USS. Even more unfortunately, a leak ensues publication of all support for extremists. Three years into the term a shocking revelation is made- the Vice President, Robert Hanssen, is an agent of the USS! They are quickly impeached and imprisoned, but the public image of the National Coalition is damaged.
Last edited by Old Hope on Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Avagra
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Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:08 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic - Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - An unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead of focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
1996 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Shirley "Spearhead" Chisholm, becomes a new rallying point for the National Coalition. She is much more aggressive and brings women and minorities into the fold of the coalition. She defeats Kissinger in the primaries, and upon entering office, bans most socialist parties and limits communism. She restricts free speech in regard to the 'reds' and begins the "Red Scares" by purging socialist officials. She continues support of far-right and extremists in the Middle East and Western Europe, using the internet to funnel convert information.
2000 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Chisholm continues the military buildup - although it still lags behind the USS by around 10 years... Unfortunately, during the term, more and more sabotage happens and spies continue to be revealed in the USS. Even more unfortunately, a leak ensues publication of all support for extremists. Three years into the term a shocking revelation is made- the Vice President, Robert Hanssen, is an agent of the USS! They are quickly impeached and imprisoned, but the public image of the National Coalition is damaged.
2004 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - Fox, born in the Mexican states, is the first President to be elected from the New Mexican states. A former businessman, he runs on a platform of restoring freedoms to the country and silently expells the remaining USS agents. He enhances economic sanctions on the USS, which plagued by internal conflicts, begins to dissolve. Fox provides economic free trade with South America and African nations, to speed up this process. He also is the first major proponent of Medicare-For-All.

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Arcturus Novus
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Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:25 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic - Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - An unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead of focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
1996 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Shirley "Spearhead" Chisholm, becomes a new rallying point for the National Coalition. She is much more aggressive and brings women and minorities into the fold of the coalition. She defeats Kissinger in the primaries, and upon entering office, bans most socialist parties and limits communism. She restricts free speech in regard to the 'reds' and begins the "Red Scares" by purging socialist officials. She continues support of far-right and extremists in the Middle East and Western Europe, using the internet to funnel convert information.
2000 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Chisholm continues the military buildup - although it still lags behind the USS by around 10 years... Unfortunately, during the term, more and more sabotage happens and spies continue to be revealed in the USS. Even more unfortunately, a leak ensues publication of all support for extremists. Three years into the term a shocking revelation is made- the Vice President, Robert Hanssen, is an agent of the USS! They are quickly impeached and imprisoned, but the public image of the National Coalition is damaged.
2004 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - Fox, born in the Mexican states, is the first President to be elected from the New Mexican states. A former businessman, he runs on a platform of restoring freedoms to the country and silently expells the remaining USS agents. He enhances economic sanctions on the USS, which plagued by internal conflicts, begins to dissolve. Fox provides economic free trade with South America and African nations, to speed up this process. He also is the first major proponent of Medicare-For-All.
2008 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - President Fox manages to pass a universal healthcare plan in 2009, and in the same year establishes diplomatic relations with the newly-founded republics of France and Ireland, both former states of the USS. The economy stayed relatively stable throughout Fox's presidency, with Wall Street optimistic about the future of US relations in former Socialist states.
Last edited by Arcturus Novus on Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Old Hope
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Founded: Sep 21, 2014
Tyranny by Majority

Postby Old Hope » Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:36 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic - Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - An unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead of focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
1996 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Shirley "Spearhead" Chisholm, becomes a new rallying point for the National Coalition. She is much more aggressive and brings women and minorities into the fold of the coalition. She defeats Kissinger in the primaries, and upon entering office, bans most socialist parties and limits communism. She restricts free speech in regard to the 'reds' and begins the "Red Scares" by purging socialist officials. She continues support of far-right and extremists in the Middle East and Western Europe, using the internet to funnel convert information.
2000 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Chisholm continues the military buildup - although it still lags behind the USS by around 10 years... Unfortunately, during the term, more and more sabotage happens and spies continue to be revealed in the USS. Even more unfortunately, a leak ensues publication of all support for extremists. Three years into the term a shocking revelation is made- the Vice President, Robert Hanssen, is an agent of the USS! They are quickly impeached and imprisoned, but the public image of the National Coalition is damaged.
2004 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - Fox, born in the Mexican states, is the first President to be elected from the New Mexican states. A former businessman, he runs on a platform of restoring freedoms to the country and silently expells the remaining USS agents. He enhances economic sanctions on the USS, which plagued by internal conflicts, begins to dissolve. Fox provides economic free trade with South America and African nations, to speed up this process. He also is the first major proponent of Medicare-For-All.
2008 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - President Fox manages to pass a universal healthcare plan in 2009, and in the same year establishes diplomatic relations with the newly-founded republics of France and Ireland, both former states of the USS. The economy stayed relatively stable throughout Fox's presidency, with Wall Street optimistic about the future of US relations in former Socialist states.
2012 - Bill Clinton - Progressive After Fox retires, his former Vice President is elected. Unfortunately, the healthcare plan was poorly thought out, and costs so much that the debt becomes insurmountable and is ultimatively repealed- not before causing a recession, and public protest.
The Islamic State of China is proclaimed by extremists funded by the States many years ago, and the government of China will probably lose the civil war against these terrorists.
Last edited by Old Hope on Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Arcturus Novus
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Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:48 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
1908 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins another election, this time more close due to his vocal support of increasing the term of the President to eight or six years, saying he believed elections took away from the "Democratic process of governing the Republic". He supports the American support for the Panama Canal in order to monopolize on it as well as supporting state agriculture throughout the West and Mexico. This hurts his support among Republicans. He also creates the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration, regulating two major industries and enhancing their authority with the power to wage litigation against violators. He continues to nationalize industry and the party takes over many newspapers to control their image. He then proposes the 16th Amendment, to increase the Presidential term to 6 years, which passes Congress but looms over the states during the election of 1912.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Liberal - Theodore Roosevelt organizes a major backlash against Debs' serious overreach, championing regulation over nationalization, winning over much of the West, South, and even North behind him. His coalition, called the Liberal Party, warns against Debs' strong tendencies toward "Jayism," meaning executive and federal tyranny. TR keeps the more popular reforms under Debs, but privatizes industry, newspapers, and agriculture, even as he upholds anti-trust laws. He also packs the courts with Liberal Justices, removing Imperialists through timely impeachments. He further pushes an income tax Constitutional Amendment and estate tax to keep the Rockefeller family from attempting a dynastic comeback. He even sets up an alliance with Kaiser Wilhelm II to strengthen America overseas. He helps defeat the extended Presidential term as well and reintroduces Presidential term-limits, this time for a single term to prevent any more "Jays, Debs, Huntons, and Rockefellers."
1916 - Charles Evans Hughes - Liberal - The second consecutive Liberal victory puts another New York Governor, Charles Evans Hughes, in the White House, creating the so-called "Albany Dynasty" period of the Presidency. Hughes leads America into World War I on Germany's side, helping the Central Powers achieve victory and dictate humiliating terms to the Allied Powers, which leads to America's annexation of much of Canada, Jamaica, and the Bahamas at Great Britain's expense. Canada becomes an occupied territory, with only pro-American territorial governments allowed and a long-term plan for statehood once they have been sufficiently "Americanized." Hughes also vetoes a proposed "Daylight Savings' Time" Act, but he helps push through direct election of U.S. Senators and woman suffrage, hoping to gain support for Liberals by that means.
1920 - William Howard Taft - Liberal - A narrow victory for William Howard Taft marks the beginning of a horrible period for America. Blatant mismanagement in the White House ensues, and much cash is wasted on monuments and in the pockets of corrupt politicians. At the end of the term America faces an extreme debt, hyperinflation and a serious armed rebellion in Canada.
1924 - Miriam Ferguson - Liberal - Ferguson riding the wave of the suffrage movement becomes the first women as president. She passed the equal rights amendment, which guarantees gender equality but otherwise makes the US's current situation worse.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Reform - As the old political parties become weak, corrupt, and meaningless, the progressive and anti-corruption Reform Party runs Governor Herbert Hoover of California for President. Hoover is able to calm down the Canadian revolt by promises of easier statehood, after sending General Douglas MacArthur to suppress things. He also mandates open primaries through the Fair Elections Act and creates a National Labor Act to preserve gains for labor through a National Labor Board. He also pushes through better securities regulation, farm subsidies, negotiates better free trade, and raises taxes on the rich to balance the budget. Old-age pensions, however, elude him in spite of his efforts.
1932 - Franklin D.Roosevelt - Reform - Franklin D.Roosevelt brings the country back on track economically. However, at the end of the term the German Empire, which due to the help of America earlier now ruled all of Europe and parts of Africa and Asia, landed with 2000 battleships and 3000 supporting ships, carrying a total of two million soldiers and armed equipment, in New England. The restriction to one term for a president was immediately repealed before the end of the term, but America now faces war against a colossal empire.
1936 - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Reform - Facing a massive threat and betrayal by former ally Germany, the USA re-elects FDR by a huge margin, giving him a broad mandate to fight the imminent threat. Allying quickly with former enemies Japan and the remnants of the British, French, and Russian empires, Roosevelt dispatches General Douglas MacArthur to New England to face the foe head-on. MacArthur stumbles at first, due to vast numeral disadvantages, but then gains the initiative and spearheads a counter-offensive to expel the Germans from American soil. At home, Canadian states Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan are admitted to the Union, reassuring the Canadians of America's sincerity and helping him steer Social Security through Congress. FDR is now by far the most beloved President in American history.
1940 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - The war continues to drag out and the image of FDR in a wheelchair fuel German propaganda of a weak presidency. It angers many and with the Reform's policies sucking up valuable financial resources, the Resolute Coalition forms out of remnants of the remaining Republicans, Imperialists, Labor, and Democrats. With the Liberals and Reform fighting for the liberal constituencies, the conservative American population sweeps the Coalition into power led by Pierre Jay. He plays up the strength of the previous John Jay and claims that that is exactly what America needs. He launches a bloody attack against the Germans, landing in Morocco and winning costly attacks in North Africa. He increases tariffs to support American industry and undoes the privatization of key industries like banking and military construction.
1944 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition - Jay is swept into a second term, with the Reform and LIberal factions shrinking in Congress. Jay continues to respond aggressively to the German threat, reaching Berlin late into his term and ordering the execution of much German leadership once captured. Many African colonies are also declared independent, with the Jay Declaration to protect their independence from any attempt of takeover from France or Britain. The war continued with remnants of the German forces in Europe but with liberated French and British forces, it was expected to be much easier.
1948 - Pierre Jay - Resolute Coalition/Dwight D.Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - The resources for war being massively overstretched on their capacity the war stalled. The aging Pierre Jay died amongst peace talks with the remnants of Germany, and Eisenhower continued these peace efforts during a years long ceasefire but no solution was found when his term ended.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Resolute Coalition - Eisenhower wins his reelection with a comfortable margin, defeating a coalition of Liberals and Reformists. He ends the war by launching a surprise attack on the remaining German holdings and continues to build a military presence in Europe. He restores the single-term law and focuses on rebuilding New England following the attack.
1956 - Frank Parks Briggs - Peace Coalition - An escalating debt and resource problem from many costly wars and continued resource problems bring a newly formed Peace Coalition into power. Briggs cuts the military budget, recalls the army from Europe amidst bloody uprisings against the military presence, and focuses solely on rebuilding the economy and industry of the States - while some success already manifestates itself when his term ends the situation is still very difficult to manage, and will likely need several presidental terms to get comfortable again.
1960 - Lyndon B. Johnson - New Democratic - Both coalitions fall apart due to the war’s end and the New Democrats sweep into power, promising a “Great Society” under Senator Lyndon Johnson of Texas. Johnson ends the destructive high tariffs and privatizes both banking and military construction, bringing more revenue in, as the tariffs had been too prohibitive to actually offset war spending. He also brings down health care costs through adopting single payer healthcare and annexes Newfoundland and has Congress admit Alberta to the Union.
1964 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - Following the "sellout of the state" Richard Nixon, who opportunistically switched to the Socialist Party, is elected. Sweeping changes ensue, including constitutional amendments that repeal the term limit, and outlaw private property, with food and common household items being exempt. Against the will of the President, the Congress and the state also amend the constitution to ban "the consumption of dangerous mind-altering drugs, such as ethanol, for this purpose".
1968 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic - The imminent collapse of the American and global economy due to the Communist policies of Richard Nixon lead to the Second American Revolution, a provisional government, and free elections that put capitalist and philanthropist Nelson Rockefeller in the White House. With the New Democrats behind him, he begins the hard work of restoring free enterprise and civil liberties in a Republic that lost its way.
1972 - Nelson Rockefeller - New Democratic/Non-aligned - Luckily, for Rockefeller, the term limit was never repealed. However, in his second term, he faced an opposing Congress with a majority of Socialists in the House; which resulted in legislative stalemate. Due to his distaste of their opponents he began to veto every law that was designed to pass, even sensible ones that matched his parties' policies; which resulted in his expulsion from the party. At the end of the term the economy and state were ruined, and mass protests were once more heard around the States. Meanwhile Canada declared full independence from "the failed and not so United States".
1976 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - With Rockefeller's popularity in the toilet, Ronald Reagan, running under the newly founded Conservative moniker, begins progressively restoring the economy to its former heights, continuing the erosion of Nixon's Socialist policies, and repairing relations with Canada, officially setting up a trade union between the two countries. By 1979, unemployment is at a 40-year low, and civil, economic, and political freedoms are back to moderately high levels, earning him an 84% approval rating.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Conservative - The president is re-elected in a landslide. Reagan's economic plans keeps employment and corporate wealth high, but income inequality begins to become a serious issue by 1982. In early 1981, the first confirmed cases of HIV are recorded in the United States, but President Reagan's moralistic social policies do little to help the largely LGBT and drug-using victims of the virus. Thousands are dead by 1984, and LGBT rights groups stage demonstrations in major cities across the country.
1984 - John Connolly - Conservative - The Vice President to Reagan, wins the election, but he losses congress due to the HIV epidemic and the LGBT demonstration. Many in the Conservative party are divided, but Connolly constructs a "reluctant compromise," as he puts it, that helps those in the LGBT community deal with the HIV epidemic.
1988 - Richard Nixon - Socialist - But most are not interested in LGBT rights and concerns this much, but they are much more concerned to restore income equality that was left unaddressed, and dream back to times when everyone was equal in income; and as such the Socialists are elected again; however, they miss majority in the Senate and are not(yet) able to make sweeping reforms; although they are able to force collectivization of most major companies. This is accompanied by United Socialist States(founded in Russia), who, without opposition from major armed forces, were able to conquer Europe and most of Asia during the 40 years of American isolationism and mismanagement, conquering Japan.
1992 - Henry Kissinger - National Coalition - An unexpectedly popular and reactionary coalition of anti-socialist lawmakers rally around retired policymaker Henry Kissinger, who pushes to once more establish the United States as a world military power. The collectivization efforts of the previous administration are broken up, with the government instead of focusing its large industry base on building a modernized army and navy. President Kissinger enters a sort of cold war with the USS, and covertly backed multiple right-wing movements in East Asia, including an Islamic fundamentalist group in Xinjiang, China.
1996 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Shirley "Spearhead" Chisholm, becomes a new rallying point for the National Coalition. She is much more aggressive and brings women and minorities into the fold of the coalition. She defeats Kissinger in the primaries, and upon entering office, bans most socialist parties and limits communism. She restricts free speech in regard to the 'reds' and begins the "Red Scares" by purging socialist officials. She continues support of far-right and extremists in the Middle East and Western Europe, using the internet to funnel convert information.
2000 - Shirley Chisholm - National Coalition - Chisholm continues the military buildup - although it still lags behind the USS by around 10 years... Unfortunately, during the term, more and more sabotage happens and spies continue to be revealed in the USS. Even more unfortunately, a leak ensues publication of all support for extremists. Three years into the term a shocking revelation is made- the Vice President, Robert Hanssen, is an agent of the USS! They are quickly impeached and imprisoned, but the public image of the National Coalition is damaged.
2004 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - Fox, born in the Mexican states, is the first President to be elected from the New Mexican states. A former businessman, he runs on a platform of restoring freedoms to the country and silently expells the remaining USS agents. He enhances economic sanctions on the USS, which plagued by internal conflicts, begins to dissolve. Fox provides economic free trade with South America and African nations, to speed up this process. He also is the first major proponent of Medicare-For-All.
2008 - Vicente Fox - Progressive - President Fox manages to pass a universal healthcare plan in 2009, and in the same year establishes diplomatic relations with the newly-founded republics of France and Ireland, both former states of the USS. The economy stayed relatively stable throughout Fox's presidency, with Wall Street optimistic about the future of US relations in former Socialist states.
2012 - Bill Clinton - Progressive After Fox retires, his former Vice President is elected. Unfortunately, the healthcare plan was poorly thought out, and costs so much that the debt becomes insurmountable and is ultimatively repealed- not before causing a recession, and public protest.
The Islamic State of China is proclaimed by extremists funded by the States many years ago, and the government of China will probably lose the civil war against these terrorists.
2016 - James Mattis - National Coalition - as the popularity of the Progressive Party waned during the 2014 Recession, the National Coalition regained control of the government. Despite promises of "America First" and non-interventionism, the United States supports the Islamists in the Chinese Civil War, going so far as to bomb the cities of Shanghai and Hong Kong. The Mattis presidency was remembered as the most chaotic of the 2010s, marked by economic and geopolitical instability and yet another costly foreign war.
The Federal Republic of Arcturus Novus (apparently a grade 13.7 civilization).
Arcturus Novus - Pollemus in dolore
The Honorable Tertius Quirinus Maro, President of the Arcturan Federation.
Dr. Andreas Delas, Arcturan Ambassador to the WA.

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Arcturus Novus
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6050
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:50 pm

Okay, I think that's the end of that one, right? Let's get back to another one/


1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
The Federal Republic of Arcturus Novus (apparently a grade 13.7 civilization).
Arcturus Novus - Pollemus in dolore
The Honorable Tertius Quirinus Maro, President of the Arcturan Federation.
Dr. Andreas Delas, Arcturan Ambassador to the WA.

User avatar
Socialist Communist States
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 24
Founded: Apr 03, 2017
Corporate Police State

Postby Socialist Communist States » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:01 pm

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
Last edited by Socialist Communist States on Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:31 pm, edited 12 times in total.
I am actually John Key. It's not a lie. I pull pony tails and do 3 way handshakes. That proves I am John Key...plz.
Also, no this nation doesn't represent my views. Also, I know what you're thinking, and no, that doesn't
represent my views either.


REAL NEWS NETWORK:

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8502
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Round 3 Informal Statistics

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:29 pm

There were 40 Presidents of the United States.

From 1788 to 1799, there were 3 Presidents

From 1800 to 1899, there were 16 Presidents

From 1900 to 1999, there were 18 Presidents

From 2000 to 2016, there were 4 Presidents

The longest serving President was John Jay, serving 25 years of which 21 were continuous.

Second place was a tie between John D. Rockefeller and Eugene V. Debs, who each served 12 years though Rockefeller only served 8 continuously.

Percentage of US History of Party Control (23 Parties)

Anti-Federalists (AF) = 1.75%

Non-Aligned (NA) = 12.28%

Federalist (F) = 1.75%

Democratic-Republicans (DR) = 1.75%

Jefferson Coalition (JC) = 1.75%

National Party (NP) = 5.26%

Van Buren Coalition (VBC) = 1.75%

Democratic (D) = 5.26%

Nativist (N) = 1.75%

Republican (RP) = 7.01%

National-Nativist (NN) = 1.75%

Labor (LR) = 1.75%

Imperial (I) = 5.26%

Imperial-Labor (IL) = 5.26%

Liberal (LI) = 7.01%

Reform (RF) = 5.26%

Resolute Coalition (RC) = 7.01%

Peace Coalition (PC) = 1.75%

New Democratic (ND) = 3.94%

Socialist (S) = 3.50%

Conservative (C) = 5.26%

National Coalition (NC) = 5.26%

Progressive (P) = 3.50%
The Federal States of Xathuecia

Ongoing P2TM Roleplay's:
Washington Political RP (I help and stuff)

[Recognized By the Community Miscellaeous Role Play: 'Washington Political RP' (Co-OP)]


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Dekerin Domains
Envoy
 
Posts: 327
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:38 pm

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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Reorganized Akros
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 11
Founded: Nov 03, 2018
Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:58 pm

Federal States of Xathuecia wrote:There were 40 Presidents of the United States.

From 1788 to 1799, there were 3 Presidents

From 1800 to 1899, there were 16 Presidents

From 1900 to 1999, there were 18 Presidents

From 2000 to 2016, there were 4 Presidents

The longest serving President was John Jay, serving 25 years of which 21 were continuous.

Second place was a tie between John D. Rockefeller and Eugene V. Debs, who each served 12 years though Rockefeller only served 8 continuously.

Percentage of US History of Party Control (23 Parties)

Anti-Federalists (AF) = 1.75%

Non-Aligned (NA) = 12.28%

Federalist (F) = 1.75%

Democratic-Republicans (DR) = 1.75%

Jefferson Coalition (JC) = 1.75%

National Party (NP) = 5.26%

Van Buren Coalition (VBC) = 1.75%

Democratic (D) = 5.26%

Nativist (N) = 1.75%

Republican (RP) = 7.01%

National-Nativist (NN) = 1.75%

Labor (LR) = 1.75%

Imperial (I) = 5.26%

Imperial-Labor (IL) = 5.26%

Liberal (LI) = 7.01%

Reform (RF) = 5.26%

Resolute Coalition (RC) = 7.01%

Peace Coalition (PC) = 1.75%

New Democratic (ND) = 3.94%

Socialist (S) = 3.50%

Conservative (C) = 5.26%

National Coalition (NC) = 5.26%

Progressive (P) = 3.50%


Hopefully, we can avoid the bizarre scenarios this time. :clap:
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

User avatar
Reorganized Akros
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 11
Founded: Nov 03, 2018
Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:04 pm

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
Last edited by Reorganized Akros on Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

User avatar
Socialist Communist States
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 24
Founded: Apr 03, 2017
Corporate Police State

Postby Socialist Communist States » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:18 pm

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
Last edited by Socialist Communist States on Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:22 pm, edited 3 times in total.
I am actually John Key. It's not a lie. I pull pony tails and do 3 way handshakes. That proves I am John Key...plz.
Also, no this nation doesn't represent my views. Also, I know what you're thinking, and no, that doesn't
represent my views either.


REAL NEWS NETWORK:

User avatar
Reorganized Akros
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 11
Founded: Nov 03, 2018
Father Knows Best State

Postby Reorganized Akros » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:25 pm

[quote="Reorganized Akros";p="35012245"]1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
My nation does not (mostly) represent my real-life views. It's a military dictatorship with strong secularist and Islamophobic tendencies (okay, so the secularist part represents me, but not the militant Islamophobia).

"Religious creeds encourage some of the craziest kinds of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and favor severe manifestations of neurosis, borderline personality states, and sometimes even psychosis." - Albert Ellis

"Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." --H. L. Mencken

User avatar
Provisional America
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 434
Founded: Sep 14, 2005
Capitalizt

Postby Provisional America » Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:10 am

Old Hope wrote:
Arcturus Novus wrote:OOC: can I get some clarification on what the situation is overseas right now?

Well, following the removal of American troops in Europe by Briggs Socialists went into power in Russia, and without American intervention(due to the poor state of their well... state) they didn't have major opponents... and went on to conquer more and more of Europe and Asia gradually while America was concerned with itself. That's pretty much normal because America had lots of setbacks and... they were the power that stopped communism and Socialism when it came up in the normal timeline.. which didn't happen here.
FURTHER EDIT: Look at the alternate history. The states were only concerned with themselves after the American-German war. No one put troops back to Europe after they were all removed, nor were any other troops deployed outside the continent


I'm still trying to wrap my mind around the idea of Richard Nixon tanking the economy by turning Communist, and then somehow Rockefeller tanking it all over again? Weird as fuck, but as noted, that whole round had some really absurd situations emerge. John D. Rockefeller and Eugene Debs as dictators, when Debs was likely a total nobody at the turn of the century and had little in common with Ol' Rocky? Yeah, not so much.
Pro-gun, pro-life, pro-gay, Constitutional libertarian Republican. No, that doesn't make me anti-safety, anti-woman, anti-family, or racist. It just means that I stand for the unalienable rights of Man under Natural Law.

"Then why do you alter the Law to suit yourselves? In a thousand ways, you have perverted not only Moses, but the Nazarene, and you have done so ever since the blasphemous Paul of Tarsus said, 'Christ is the end of the Law.' You are neither Hebrew nor Galilean, but opportunists!" - Julian by the late, great Gore Vidal

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Provisional America
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 434
Founded: Sep 14, 2005
Capitalizt

Postby Provisional America » Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:21 am

[quote="Reorganized Akros";p="35012245"]1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist[/color] - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
Last edited by Provisional America on Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
Pro-gun, pro-life, pro-gay, Constitutional libertarian Republican. No, that doesn't make me anti-safety, anti-woman, anti-family, or racist. It just means that I stand for the unalienable rights of Man under Natural Law.

"Then why do you alter the Law to suit yourselves? In a thousand ways, you have perverted not only Moses, but the Nazarene, and you have done so ever since the blasphemous Paul of Tarsus said, 'Christ is the end of the Law.' You are neither Hebrew nor Galilean, but opportunists!" - Julian by the late, great Gore Vidal

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Socialist Communist States
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 24
Founded: Apr 03, 2017
Corporate Police State

Postby Socialist Communist States » Fri Dec 07, 2018 3:09 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
Last edited by Socialist Communist States on Fri Dec 07, 2018 4:09 am, edited 17 times in total.
I am actually John Key. It's not a lie. I pull pony tails and do 3 way handshakes. That proves I am John Key...plz.
Also, no this nation doesn't represent my views. Also, I know what you're thinking, and no, that doesn't
represent my views either.


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The Federation of Kendor
Senator
 
Posts: 4523
Founded: Dec 08, 2015
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby The Federation of Kendor » Fri Dec 07, 2018 3:14 am

Not going to post here yet. Just want to say that it's good to see this being revived and popular now. I just wish for an option of other countries, rather than just the US

/skip
My Dispatch
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The Sakhalinsk Empire
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 368
Founded: Jan 27, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby The Sakhalinsk Empire » Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:16 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - Napoleon Bonaparte - Union - Madison decides to temporarily take a break from politics, and thus Napoleon takes his place, becoming President due to there being practically no opposition to the Union Party. The reason isn't an Imperial was since Madison was the one who saved him, and joined his party to return the favor; he was also allowed to run since he was massively popular. While not necessarily friendly to the Bourbons, he begins relations with France and partly with Spain, angering Britain.
This is my signature. The old one was odd.

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Old Hope
Diplomat
 
Posts: 711
Founded: Sep 21, 2014
Tyranny by Majority

Postby Old Hope » Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:21 am

The Sakhalinsk Empire wrote:1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - Napoleon Bonaparte - Union - Madison decides to temporarily take a break from politics, and thus Napoleon takes his place, becoming President due to there being practically no opposition to the Union Party. The reason isn't an Imperial was since Madison was the one who saved him, and joined his party to return the favor; he was also allowed to run since he was massively popular. While not necessarily friendly to the Bourbons, he begins relations with France and partly with Spain, angering Britain.

Rule 2 of the thread has been violated. Invalid submission.

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Arcturus Novus
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6050
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:01 am

1788 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - George Washington declines to run, and shocks the partisans by supporting his protege's bid for the presidency. Hamilton struggles to remain popular in his term, both among anti-Federalists and among the more moderate supporters of his vice president, John Adams.
1792 - Alexander Hamilton - Federalist - Despite his unpopularity, Adams support, albeit reluctant, is enough to beat Jefferson and get Hamilton re-elected. However, due to Jefferson coming second in the electoral count, he replaces Adams, as per the rules of the election, as Vice-President. The Hamilton presidency faces a major political stalemate from Jefferson, as he opposes Hamilton's plans to build a National bank, establish a national debt, turn the US into a mercantile nation, and create a whisky tax to fund the government. In foreign policy, Hamilton wants to support Britain against the French, who are in the midst of a revolution. However, Jefferson wants to support France, which is seen as controversial as Robespierre's 'Reign of Terror' is going on.
1796 - Samuel Adams - Democratic Republican - With Jefferson still rather divisive and rumors about Sally Hemings surfacing, Jefferson taps Massachusetts Governor Samuel Adams, an early Founding Father, to stand for the Presidency. Unfortunately for Jefferson, Adams is a bit more prudish and uses the opportunity to ban Ms. Hemings from accompanying Jefferson on visits to Philadelphia, an action that Jefferson takes as a personal affront. The party splits into Northern and Southern wings and never truly recovers, forcing Samuel to rely on cousin John and the Federalists to govern effectively.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Independent - In spite of his lack of party support, Jefferson is able to convince enough Federalists and disaffected Southern Democratic Republicans to back him to squeeze his way into the new White House. Requiring more support to simply hold his governing coalition together than he would otherwise need, Jefferson reluctantly concedes to two demands from John Adams and Alexander Hamilton: preserving the Bank of the United States and avoiding overt support of France. Feeling betrayed, however, Napoleon threatens to expose a closely guarded secret of Jefferson's about his days as minister to France, one regarding Sally Hemings and their children. Jefferson refuses to seek another term rather than yield to such blackmail. Jefferson does, however, achieve a shocking agreement with Spain to sell him Florida, which he grabs in spite of his strict constructionist views.
1804 -John Adams - Federalist - Although it was expected that Hamilton was going to run again for a controversial third term, his death by Aaron burr buried those plans. So John Adams was propelled into the race. Although, some question that Adams was now beginning to get too old to be President, including an ambitious Charles Pinckney. Despite this, Adams is elected and he begins to continue his support of Britain against France, even blockading the French colony of Saint-Domingue, which helps the local slaves in their rebellion against France, and inevitably leads to the French withdrawal.
1808 - John Adams - Federalist - The victory over France at Saint-Domingue stirs controversy in the South, but it also increases Adams' personal popularity in most of the country, leading easily to a second term for the man. While still cantankerous by nature, Adams is able to work with Pinckney, King, and even Madison to achieve a complete ban on importation of slaves into the United States and a ban on the slave trade inside the District of Columbia itself. Those who already own slaves can keep them in the nation's capital, but they can't sell them inside the city. Adams also successfully pushes for the creation of a national military and naval academy, significant achievements that add to the luster of his purchase of Louisiana from a weakened Napoleon and his new alliance with Saint-Domingue.
1812 - James Madison - Union - Weary of Federalist administrations, but also aware of the collapse of the Jeffersonian movement and legacy, James Madison leads more moderate oppositionists back into power as the Union Party or Unionists. Their avowed goals are to unify the country, achieve consensus on divisive matters such as slavery, achieve pragmatic reform, and balance the various sectional interests "rationally." Internal improvements are encouraged, but the Madison Administration works closely with Congress and Governors on their implementation and any useful revisions. A Constitutional Amendment to create a permanent dividing line that respects "sectional differences" in even the territories is approved on the advice of the U.S. Representative John C. Crittenden of Kentucky, known as the Crittenden Compromise or Crittenden Amendment. DC, being in the middle, allows slavery, but continues to ban a slave trade as such. The Crittenden Amendment also reverses the Fugitive Slave Clause in the Constitution, allowing each state to establish its own laws regarding runaway slaves from slave states.
1816 - James Madison - Union - Madison's rational compromise helps him to carry large portions of both Northern and Southern States. Although, there had been criticism from both radical abolitionists and slave-holders about those plans. However, a bigger problem facing Madison was his shocking agreement with the British, in which he agreed to exile the defeated Napoleon to the US. He also promised the European Powers that Napoleon would never ever be allowed to return to Europe. Napoleon's arrival in New York harbour was expected to be controversial and met with protests. However, Napoleon's appearance turned the crowd silent, then to cordial greeting, which soon turned to outright jubilation. Madison himself even gave Napoleon, what is considered to be, the first State-Dinner of a former Head of State in the newly built White House. Madison and the people were so impressed by him, that Napoleon was made a naturalised-citizen and even became the governor of Louisiana. Napoleon also starts a new family here.
1820 - John Armstrong Jr. - Union - Madison declined to run for a third term, believing that the United States needed "a consul, not a Caesar." His VP, John Armstrong Jr., was seen as the next best choice for the Unionist ticket. Under President Armstrong, the United States worked toward establishing itself as a commercial and military power, with special focus being given to building a strong maritime presence. In a bid to secure America's place in the world, Armstrong vocally supported the republican movements across South America in the 1820's, saying that European nations had no right to govern affairs outside their hemisphere.
The Federal Republic of Arcturus Novus (apparently a grade 13.7 civilization).
Arcturus Novus - Pollemus in dolore
The Honorable Tertius Quirinus Maro, President of the Arcturan Federation.
Dr. Andreas Delas, Arcturan Ambassador to the WA.

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