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Kavagrad
Diplomat
 
Posts: 624
Founded: Nov 22, 2017
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kavagrad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:50 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dicatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
Claorica wrote:It's leftists like this that really warm me up to Hoppe's idea of physical removal
NPO delenda est!

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Restored England
Civilian
 
Posts: 0
Founded: Nov 26, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Restored England » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:51 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
Last edited by Restored England on Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:54 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Window Land
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 14
Founded: Nov 02, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Window Land » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:14 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the nativists combine with the nationalists and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a standstill by 1868.
Last edited by Window Land on Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:23 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Restored England
Civilian
 
Posts: 0
Founded: Nov 26, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Restored England » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:22 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
Last edited by Restored England on Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Kavagrad
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Founded: Nov 22, 2017
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kavagrad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:32 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labor Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
Last edited by Kavagrad on Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:24 am, edited 3 times in total.
Claorica wrote:It's leftists like this that really warm me up to Hoppe's idea of physical removal
NPO delenda est!

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Restored England
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Founded: Nov 26, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Restored England » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:34 am

OOC: You showed 1868 a second time, Kavagrad.

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Waladis
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Founded: Sep 18, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Waladis » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:34 am

hey lol im a president of waladis
:) 8) :?:

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Kavagrad
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Posts: 624
Founded: Nov 22, 2017
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kavagrad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:35 am

Restored England wrote:OOC: You showed 1868 a second time, Kavagrad.

Nice catch. Fixed.
Claorica wrote:It's leftists like this that really warm me up to Hoppe's idea of physical removal
NPO delenda est!

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Restored England
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Founded: Nov 26, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Restored England » Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:39 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.

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Macureus
Envoy
 
Posts: 254
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Macureus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:01 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National- After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - American Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
Last edited by Macureus on Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:36 am, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Kavagrad
Diplomat
 
Posts: 624
Founded: Nov 22, 2017
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kavagrad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:13 am

OOC: Might wanna use the name and colour already established for American Labor
Claorica wrote:It's leftists like this that really warm me up to Hoppe's idea of physical removal
NPO delenda est!

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Macureus
Envoy
 
Posts: 254
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Macureus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:33 am

OOC: Ah, missed that. Thanks.

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Avagra
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 56
Founded: Apr 02, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:43 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
Last edited by Avagra on Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:47 am, edited 5 times in total.

User avatar
Macureus
Envoy
 
Posts: 254
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Macureus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:45 am

OOC: You have the date wrong. It should be 1884.

User avatar
Avagra
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 56
Founded: Apr 02, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:47 am

Macureus wrote:OOC: You have the date wrong. It should be 1884.

OOC: thanks!

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Macureus
Envoy
 
Posts: 254
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Macureus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:51 am

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
Last edited by Macureus on Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:55 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Federal States of Xathuecia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8902
Founded: Jan 19, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Federal States of Xathuecia » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:00 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
Last edited by Federal States of Xathuecia on Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
The Federal States of Xathuecia

The Washington 2017 Roleplay || Veteran Status

Progressive Party
Eastern Region Chair Noémie Thatcher of Massachusetts
Democratic Party
Mayoral Candidate Scotty Marlowe of Los Angeles
Representative Eleanor McCroskey of New York
Former Senator Josephine Stafford of Michigan
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Senatorial Candidate Marli O of New York
Governor Julie Mondale of Ohio

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Kavagrad
Diplomat
 
Posts: 624
Founded: Nov 22, 2017
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kavagrad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:04 pm

OOC: What Caribbean territories aren't American at this stage? Is it just Cuba?
Claorica wrote:It's leftists like this that really warm me up to Hoppe's idea of physical removal
NPO delenda est!

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Avagra
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 56
Founded: Apr 02, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:05 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
Last edited by Avagra on Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Avagra
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Founded: Apr 02, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:07 pm

Kavagrad wrote:OOC: What Caribbean territories aren't American at this stage? Is it just Cuba?

OOC: Well, the French-American war, in the beginning, relinquished all French territories and the Spanish war took everything else. So yeah, probably only Cuba and maybe a couple smaller British holdings.
Last edited by Avagra on Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Macureus
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Macureus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:09 pm

Deleted.
Last edited by Macureus on Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Macureus
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Founded: Aug 16, 2009
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Macureus » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:11 pm

OOC: The years are all wrong. The next Presidential elections should be in 1892 and 1896.

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Avagra
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Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:12 pm

Macureus wrote:OOC: The years are all wrong. The next Presidential elections should be in 1892 and 1896.

Fixed mine!

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Kavagrad
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Founded: Nov 22, 2017
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Kavagrad » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:13 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
Last edited by Kavagrad on Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Claorica wrote:It's leftists like this that really warm me up to Hoppe's idea of physical removal
NPO delenda est!

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Avagra
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Founded: Apr 02, 2016
Democratic Socialists

Postby Avagra » Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:19 pm

1788 - George Clinton - Anti-Federalist - Washington declines to run, so instead returns to his home in Mount Vernon. Also, George Clinton's unexpected win causes a major uproar for the Federalists. Clinton's opposition to the ratification to the constitution already has the Federalists up in arms, and it threatens to tear the young nation apart.
1792 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Washington's refusal to act to the save the new country, Jay decides to run on a nonpartisan platform and steps down from being Chief Justice. He uses this position to leverage support from all sides and promising to lead the country according to a strict interpretation of the Constitution, defeats Clinton.
1796 - James Madison - Federalist - Worried that either Hamilton or Jefferson will be elected at such a divisive moment, moderate Federalists convince James Madison to stand and he narrowly defeats the wildly unpopular Alexander Hamilton for the Presidency. Madison gets busy upholding the peace treaty with Great Britain that John Jay left him and helps establish a stronger tariff on with help from Hamilton, a sumptuary tax as well with support from John Adams, both angering Thomas Jefferson in the process.
1800 - Aaron Burr - Democratic-Republican - Burr's victory was the result of a controversial and surprising election, involving Madison's surprising defeat, and one delegate forgetting to throw his vote away for Burr in favour of Jefferson. A bitter contest heated up between Burr and Jefferson that lasted for 36 rounds. However, even with Hamilton's surprising endorsement of Jefferson, the delegates finally voted on the 36th round in favour of Aaron Burr.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Coalition - Burr’s disastrous Presidency, largely impacted by his lingering feud with Alexander Hamilton, ends in impeachment for graft, bribery, and nepotism, but he avoids conviction only to face a broader coalition of disgruntled Democratic Republicans and very hostile Federalists, leading to Jefferson finally winning election. More conciliatory at first, thanks to the coalition that elected him, Jefferson soon breaks with Adams and Hamilton over their firm pressure to create a Bank of the United States, which Burr had dissolved. Jefferson’s friendship and administration are both in decline, but he manages to win a surprising war against France over Louisiana with secret British aid, gaining all of French possessions in North America.
1808 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With pressure from Adams and Hamilton to remove Jefferson due to his failure to support the Bank, the Jefferson Coalition falls apart. John Jay, now a rising politician in New York, decides to entire the race supporting the Bank. His experience as an ambassador wins favor among Federalists who fear that the new territory may be threatened by encroaching European nations. His judicial tenure was also impressive and refusing to bow to the political leadership of either party, he wins in a close election against Jefferson. He restores the Bank and establishes that the U.S. will refrain from any European affairs if they do the same with the new American territory. He also expands the rights of statehood procedure to the new territories.
1812 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - With Hamilton's death and Adam being regulated to a cushy job in the Jay administration, there stand few in opposition to John Jay's third election. He is victorious to another failed Jefferson attempt. He continues to remain out of European affairs, with no guilt for not aiding France due to the previous war. He uses the Bank to fund internal improvements and build a series of roads to connect the states.
1816 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Political parties begin to decline as the Democratic-Republicans collapse without effective leadership. The Federalists, seeing their work being done by a largely nonpartisan administration, pose a candidate in opposition of Jay. It is a resounding failure as the Federalist leadership splinter and the party begins to collapse. The Congress, for the first time since the founding of the country, becomes majority non-aligned. Jay wins a landslide and begins to concentrate power by opposing slavery. The 13th Amendment is proposed and Jay tells a joint-session of Congress that he will not tolerate opposition, whether politically or with force.
1820 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - He faces his biggest challenger when he announces his intention to seek a 5th term. Southern states form a new party, the Democrats, and oppose Jay's proposition to end slavery. He carries the North though as long with the new Western states. He passes the 13th Amendment by allowing many Western territories to become states, inflating the approval rate, which allows Congress to pass it quickly. With the law in place, he removes many of the Democrats from Congress. Jay then takes control of the army and with several Northern states providing their militias, he marches into the South to disband the legislatures and place military governors to oversee the transition.
1824 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - His actions are viewed as dictatorial actions and he is greatly opposed by many. Yet with differences between the Northern and the Southern factions, the Democrats failed to raise a significant opponent. Jay wins in a massive landslide again, this time giving the President authority to establish offices to oversee the Southern transition as well as promoting equality. He rallies the country in Western expansion to help distract his opponents from his consolidation of power due to a largely nonpartisan so ineffective Congress.
1828 - John Jay - Non-Aligned - Jay is essentially considered a monarch at this point with elections being largely ceremonial as political parties are restricted in their actions due to laws he has passed. He focuses on expanding statehood to further increase his margins of victory and takes an approach of establishing Indian-only territories for their peaceful retreat to not discourage settlers. He also sends forces to the islands that the U.S. gained from France, establishing stronger control. He is the first president to win all electoral college votes. He dies in late 1829 at 83, the oldest President and leaves behind an ambitious Andrew Jackson. Jay's death rocks the nation and demoralizes many due to his 25-year total political control, 21 of which was continuous, serving an outstanding 6 total terms and being elected 7 times.
1832 - Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After Jackson fails to rally the country to his side following the death of John Jay, he loses Congress to the rising National Party, formed as a Reactionary opposition to Jay's egalitarian reforms. Hunton, though not explicitly dictatorial, rules with a similar iron fist to Jay, not restoring many of the democratic institution of the Union lost over the previous 3 decades.
1836-Jonathan G. Hunton - National - After defeating Jackson a second time Hunton continues with his iron fist rule. The newfound nationalist party has trouble against the disestablishment party who runs to reduce power of the fedderal government and increase states' rights. The nationalist party mainly appeals to the north and disestablishment to the south. By 1840, it seems the US may be headed for a civil war.
1840 - Martin Van Buren - New Coalition - Wanting Hunton gone, but no civil war, Andrew Jackson forms a coalition with those Northerners who worry about dictatorship but don't want things too decentralized. A coalition forms around Martin Van Buren, a moderate, compromise candidate, who gets elected on a promise to behave "as a republican, not a tyrant" and serve a single term. Van Buren also pushes for a Constitutional Amendment to limit a President to one-term only. It is watered down to two terms only and passes with enough state legislatures in the hopes of preventing more Huntons and Jays from becoming dictators again. The Fourteenth, or Term Limits Amendment, is honored by many as the "Amendment that saved the Union." Van Buren also manages to help establish a permanent treaty with most native tribes and get Congressional recognition for their self-rule in certain territories. Nevertheless, this also feeds the hunger for Westward expansion to bypass these "reservations."
1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse - National - Van Buren's coalition collapses in the final year of his term into 3 separate parties (Democrats, Republicans, and Democratic Nativists), and the 1844 election is a close 4-way race, leading to the re-emergence of the National Party under Samuel Morse. Morse focuses heavily on improving America's infrastructure network, particularly subsidising new forms of communication technology. The National Party adopts an isolationist foreign policy.
1848 - Lewis Cass - Democratic In a very close election, Lewis Cass with the Democratic Party wins over the Republican, National, and Democratic Nativist candidates, also promising to only seek one term. Cass establishes himself quickly as an effective President and manages to rally the nation behind a war with Mexico that ends in a decisive victory and the annexation of more territory in Texas and the Southwest, largely by using Mexico's political instability to "divide and conquer." Yet his push to annex all of Mexico is quickly stopped by Congress and his war does run up the national debt.
1852 - Millard Fillmore - Nativist - Shortening their party name to "Nativist" to avoid confusion with the Democrats, the anti-immigration bloc squeaks out a Presidential election victory under Millard Fillmore, who quickly finds that he is hampered by a very wary Congress dominated by the opposition parties. Even so, Fillmore manages to push through a compromise bill that set requirements and quotas for immigrants from predominantly Catholic nations. It costs him in the mid-terms, though, with Democrats in particular benefiting from outrage by Catholic voters, who vote almost monolithically against the Nativists. Fillmore is unable to avoid a Congressional override of his veto to a bill that overturns the quotas and requirements entirely. On the plus side, he is able to strengthen tariffs and internal improvements, gaining favor with the Nationalists. This leads to talks of a coalition between the two parties.
1856 - Henry David Thoreau - Republican - With memories of President Cass' war debt fresh in the minds of American voters, and opposition to Fillmore's Nativists at an all-time high, a radical pro-state's rights leader becomes Republican leader as the party desperately seeks to avoid irrelevancy. Thoreau plays off of the dictatorial history of the Presidency, advocating a significantly weakening of the Federal Government, and this sees him elected. By 1860, there is a huge divide between Southern states, which continue to apply Nativist policies and overpower Congress' attempts to stop them in the Supreme Court, and the Northern states, that are split between Republicans and Democrats. Thoreau does not run for re-election in 1860, now bedridden with a combination of Tuberculosis and Bronchitis.
1860 - Jefferson Davis - Democratic - Exploiting his past, heroic record of having stood up to both John Jay and Jonathan Hunton (and gotten a Presidential pardon from Martin Van Buren afterward), Senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, the Democratic candidate, sweeps into the White House by reassuring people that he will not apply Nativist policies in the White House and will only serve one term. He is helped immensely by his Secretary of State, Benjamin F. Butler, who maneuvers a purchase of Quebec from Great Britain in order to keep the numbers of Catholic voters high and further strengthen the Democratic Party. He also pushes through a useful internal improvement that mollifies the Nationalists: a transatlantic railroad that is completed on record time. However, between this, the tariff cuts, and the Quebec Purchase, Davis leaves a mountain of national debt, something which the Republicans and Nationalist tax him for, leading to losses in the mid-terms. One positive spot is his appointment of a colleague, Alexander H. Stephens, to the Supreme Court, strengthening the Democratic view of the Constitution.
1864-Millard Fillmore - National-Nativists - After failing to accomplish anything in the 1862 election the national and nativists combine and elect Millard Fillmore. His second presidency is plagued with a second war with Mexico and Mexican-sponsored disestablishment radicals. The rebels have captured Florida while Mexico advances on the southern border. The American army is able to bring the war to a stand still by 1868.
1868 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Promising to bring victory in the war against Mexico and its proxy insurgents, General William T. Sherman is elected on the Republican ticket and quickly achieves exactly that. His main commanders, Grant and Longstreet, working as a team, crush both the rebels and the Mexicans with remarkable ruthlessness and efficiency. Most of the insurgents are pardoned, but their leaders are hanged for treason. Some of their more sensible proposals are passed, including a Constitutional Amendment to forbid Presidents from removing or arresting members of Congress while in office. Mexico is forced to sign a truly galling and humiliating treaty, surrendering Baja California, Sonora, and Chihuahua to the United States.
1872 - William T. Sherman - Republican - Sherman, works on re-strengthening federal power in his second term, disgusting the Thoreau-ite wing of the party. There is a split, as the Thoreauites align with the rising labour movement in the US to form the American Labour Party. This also leads to the Democrats taking the house in the midterms, though Sherman is able to continue his reforms after striking a deal to combat the National-Nativists.
1876 - Samuel Tilden - Democratic - Exploiting popular discontent and vowing to serve a single term only, Governor Samuel Tilden leads the Democratic Party back into the White House. He implements some pro-labor measures to appease the rising labor movement and possibly attract its members and also encourages an inflationary "paper money" policy to improve the lot of farmers and pay off the national debt. The six-day work week becomes law, even surviving a Constitutional challenge in the Supreme Court by the narrowest margin. The national debt is paid off to a huge extent and Tilden becomes seen as the man who saved America from financial collapse. He also uses his veto sparingly, to help avoid being seen as a dictator.
1880 - Benjamin F. Butler - Labor - Tilden's decision to break his promise and seek a second term results in many reformist Democrats and Republicans rallying behind Benjamin F. Butler, a former Secretary of State, who champions a pro-labor platform as the candidate of the Labor Party. Butler has to compromise on many issues to get legislation passed, but he is able to introduce key reforms, including the first national income tax and looser credit laws, as well as a broad Homestead Act for settlement and a ten-hour workday. Safety regulations are introduced and the Interstate Commerce Commission is created to regulate more nefarious trade practices and speculation.
1884 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - A joint declaration of war from Mexico, France, and Spain to reclaim territories lost jolt the nation as fears rise that the country will be unable to survive. Business magnate and industrialist, Rockefeller forms his own party, the Imperialists, and sweep the Congress and the Presidency. Due largely to support from large businesses which are able to use the idea of money and financial benefits to motivate workers, Rockefeller claims to have the mandate to return the country to a simpler time. He idealizes John Jay as a peaceful time for America and outlines the various failures of all administrations since then. He launches defensive procedures in the South and captures Mexico City. He also it quick to modernize the navy to defend against blockades though the loss of Carribbean islands strands many Americans on occupied territory.
1888 - Benjamin Harrison - Republican - Mounting debts and concerns about stranded Americans lead to charges that Rockefeller bungled the war effort and Benjamin Harrison leads a resurgent Republican Party back to the White House. Viewed by many as something of a "cold fish," Harrison nonetheless impresses many with his formidable intellect and decisiveness, breaking through the enemy defenses to retake several Caribbean territories before negotiating a peace that allows America to keep most of its overseas territory. He also purchases Alaska from a Russia that's even worse off and uses that to offset the loss of Cuba, which America has to hand back to Spain.
1892 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - With the loss of Cuba and economic downturn, the collapse of the Labor party brings Rockefeller back into the political sphere as the Imperial party adopts Labor-centric policies. He promises to defend worker's rights and increases wages for Standard Oil. He also is one of the first to use corporate money to influence elections, defeating Harrison in a close election. With the Senate still in Imperial hands and the new Labor/Imperial coalition controlling the House, he passes the 15th amendment in the Congress to remove the two-term limit. The statehood of the Mexican states and the strength of the Northern labor political machine pass the amendment though it is extremely controversial. He mantains that he intends to seek a 3rd election. His policies strengthen the economy and provide suitable jobs to many, decreasing unemployment and raising the standard of living.
1896 - John D. Rockefeller - Imperial - Rockefeller wins a third term, with a comfortable majority due to his economic policies which end the depression. He defeats the Republicans who split the ticket with the Democratic/Nativist ticket. He commences a major railroad project to interconnect the entire nation, establishing another major infrastructure upgrade program. He mantains that he will also seek to open up the East to trade, sending forces to claim islands in the Pacific and takes Hawaii. The Supreme Court is also packed with Imperial sympathizers.
1900 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Rockefeller steps down after his third term, and is replaced at the helm of the Imperial Party by Eugene Debs, a Socialist firebrand that jumped ship during the collapse of the Labor Party. Debs turns on some of Rockefeller's policies almost immediately, nationalising the large amounts of American infrastructure and banning corporate influence in politics. The National Party re-emerges as a reactionary force in the South, as the Democrats and Republicans struggle for power in the Western states.
1904 - Eugene V. Debs - Imperial-Labor - Debs wins the next election resoundingly, with a 60% of the popular vote. He continues his policies of strengthening the federal government, stripping state's rights to control and regulate industries. He also begins to rip away the conservation policies of the Republican party, designating several areas of the West for National Parks. He continues to support worker's rights and moves towards nationalizing all industry, especially oil and factories. He uses unions to establish political control over large sectors of the American workforce and quickly expands influence to South America for resource extraction.
Last edited by Avagra on Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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