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Petrolheadia
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 9772
Founded: May 02, 2015
New York Times Democracy

Postby Petrolheadia » Wed Dec 05, 2018 11:56 am

Dekerin Domains wrote: Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and the threat of a nuclear America forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward.

Seeing the fact that the real A-Bomb didn't even come close to it, this seems rather ASB.
Capitalism, single-payer healthcare, pro-choice, LGBT rights, progressive personal taxation, low corporate tax, pro-business law, welfare for those in need.
Communism, socialism, Nazism, edgism, dogmatic statements, multiculturalism, most of Abrahamic-derived morality (esp. as law), welfare for those not in need.
We are not Albania and I am not Albanian, FFS!
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Dekerin Domains
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 397
Founded: Aug 16, 2009
New York Times Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Wed Dec 05, 2018 11:58 am

Petrolheadia wrote:
Dekerin Domains wrote: Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and the threat of a nuclear America forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward.

Seeing the fact that the real A-Bomb didn't even come close to it, this seems rather ASB.


? Edited in any case to cause a more conventional victory over the European Reds led by MacArthur.
Last edited by Dekerin Domains on Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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Scottish Socialists
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Posts: 602
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Scottish Socialists » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:18 pm

Note: please use font colour in your posts.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

RANGERS FOREVER!
F**K THE POPE AND THE IRA!
(Glasgow Rangers, that is.)

WEST VIRGINIAAAAAAAA
MOUNTAIN MOMMAAAAAA


Cannae be fucked to change my flag.
Christmas all year, yay!

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy, Rangers F.C
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA, Celtic F.C


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Scottish Socialists
Diplomat
 
Posts: 602
Founded: Dec 27, 2016
Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Scottish Socialists » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:23 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
☭ Soviet Republic of Scottish Socialists ☭
“Here’s the funny, we’ve arrived at the funny.” - Mark Meechan
This nation does not represent my views!
Valentine Z is the epitome of happiness
CHANGE MY MIND


NSG in a nutshell

When someone joins an RP and begins declaring war on everyone

RANGERS FOREVER!
F**K THE POPE AND THE IRA!
(Glasgow Rangers, that is.)

WEST VIRGINIAAAAAAAA
MOUNTAIN MOMMAAAAAA


Cannae be fucked to change my flag.
Christmas all year, yay!

Pro: Israel, EU, Megali Idea, Independent Kurdistan, Greater Armenia, Independent Scotland, Social Democracy, Rangers F.C
Anti: Palestine, Brexit, Greater Turkey, Total English rule over Britain, Trump, Putin, Communism, Fascism, IRA, Celtic F.C


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Arcturus Novus
Negotiator
 
Posts: 6079
Founded: Dec 03, 2011
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:41 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
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Ex-Nation

Postby Taliostia » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:45 pm

2018 - Hillary Clinton social democrat

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Postby Dekerin Domains » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:46 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
Last edited by Dekerin Domains on Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Scottish Socialists » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:58 pm

Tip: quote the previous post and delete the [quote] sections, that way you already have all of the previous results and colours.

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralazation (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
Last edited by Scottish Socialists on Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Dekerin Domains
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New York Times Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:18 pm

OOC: Thanks.

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed. This leads to him and his faction merging with the Dixiecrats toward the end of his term to form the new Conservative Party, an openly conservative, pro-business, and pro-war organization.
Last edited by Dekerin Domains on Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:29 pm, edited 5 times in total.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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Arcturus Novus
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Left-wing Utopia

Postby Arcturus Novus » Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:31 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
Last edited by Arcturus Novus on Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Nova Corina
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:49 pm

Guys, when you post, keep the old coloring scheme. I don't want to have to keep setting it back to the standard.

To do this, just, quote the person above you, add your bit, and then remove the [quote][/quote] at the beginning and end of the original post.

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Nova Corina
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:53 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.

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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Free California Republic » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:12 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Sarah Palin - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Sarah Palin is an Alaskan, who caused a riot in New York after her alleged affair with a student attending Columbia University. She was then attacked by rebels, claiming to be part of the terrorist group "Rogue." Sarah Palin then went missing in 1983, last seen at the Chrysler Dental Offices in New York.
This is not a Fallout nation. While I am a very big fan of Fallout, this is leaning on Californian independence.

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Atheris
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:25 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Sarah Palin - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Sarah Palin is an Alaskan, who caused a riot in New York after her alleged affair with a student attending Columbia University. She was then attacked by rebels, claiming to be part of the terrorist group "Rogue." Sarah Palin then went missing in 1983, last seen at the Chrysler Dental Offices in New York.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After the disappearance of Sarah Palin, George H.W Bush vows to unite the party in revenge for her apparent death. He begins to create special forces and teams made for hunting Rogue, which he calls the "Greatest threat to American sovereignty".
Made Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

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Ghost Land
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Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Ghost Land » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:26 pm

Nobody's noticed that Sarah Palin was only 16 in 1980, and thus ineligible to become president?
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Nova Corina
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Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:27 pm

Why would a US president last be seen at a dentist's?

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Free California Republic
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Founded: Feb 06, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Free California Republic » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:28 pm

Nova Corina wrote:Why would a US president last be seen at a dentist's?

It's high up on the Chrysler, the ideal spot for--
This is not a Fallout nation. While I am a very big fan of Fallout, this is leaning on Californian independence.

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Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Ghost Land » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:32 pm

Fixing the Palin problem:

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Ronald Reagan becomes extremely popular with the American public despite his advanced age, even winning over a large number of Democrats and independents. He sends the economy to greater heights than ever seen before and strengthens relations with foreign countries the world over, earning himself an 88% approval rating as of summer 1984.
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Nova Corina
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Founded: Oct 15, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:32 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Ronald Reagan becomes extremely popular with the American public despite his advanced age, even winning over a large number of Democrats and independents. He sends the economy to greater heights than ever seen before and strengthens relations with foreign countries the world over, earning himself an 88% approval rating as of summer 1984.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After Reagan deciding to retire after one term, his VP George Bush succeeds him.
1988 - George HW Bush - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
Last edited by Nova Corina on Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Corporate Police State

Postby Socialist Communist States » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:37 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Sarah Palin - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Sarah Palin is an Alaskan, who caused a riot in New York after her alleged affair with a student attending Columbia University. She was then attacked by rebels, claiming to be part of the terrorist group "Rogue." Sarah Palin then went missing in 1983, last seen at the Chrysler Dental Offices in New York.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After the disappearance of Sarah Palin, George H.W Bush vows to unite the party in revenge for her apparent death. He begins to create special forces and teams made for hunting Rogue, which he calls the "Greatest threat to American sovereignty".
1988 - George HW Bush - Republican - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
1992 - Al Gore - Democrat - Unexpectedly winning in the Democratic Primaries and even in the Presidential election, Al Gore's main goal was to tackle climate change. He also took the initiative in passing bills that would create the information superhighway, which would inevitably lead to the widespread use of the internet.
Last edited by Socialist Communist States on Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:40 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Atheris » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:40 pm

[quote="Socialist Communist States";p="35006550"]1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Sarah Palin - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Sarah Palin is an Alaskan, who caused a riot in New York after her alleged affair with a student attending Columbia University. She was then attacked by rebels, claiming to be part of the terrorist group "Rogue." Sarah Palin then went missing in 1983, last seen at the Chrysler Dental Offices in New York.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After the disappearance of Sarah Palin, George H.W Bush vows to unite the party in revenge for her apparent death. He begins to create special forces and teams made for hunting Rogue, which he calls the "Greatest threat to American sovereignty".
1988 - George HW Bush - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
1992 - Al Gore - Democrat - Unexpectedly winning in the Democratic Primaries and even in the Presidential election, Al Gore's main goal was to tackle climate change. He also took the initiative in passing bills that would create the information superhighway, which would inevitably lead to the widespread use of the internet.
1996 - Al Gore - Democrat - Al Gore's creation of the information superhighwya as well as tackling climate change lead to him becoming a popular president, helping him win the 1996 elections as well as gain a democratic majority in Congress.
Made Die PreuBen Kaiserreich.

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I've been called an oppressor by one guy and have been accused of not having morals by one of my NS idols because I know believe there are only two genders (first guy) and because I made a joke about abstinence (Dawetid). How about you?
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Nova Corina
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:54 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Ronald Reagan becomes extremely popular with the American public despite his advanced age, even winning over a large number of Democrats and independents. He sends the economy to greater heights than ever seen before and strengthens relations with foreign countries the world over, earning himself an 88% approval rating as of summer 1984.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After Reagan deciding to retire after one term, his VP George Bush succeeds him.
1988 - George HW Bush - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
1992 - Al Gore - Democrat - Unexpectedly winning in the Democratic Primaries and even in the Presidential election, Al Gore's main goal was to tackle climate change. He also took the initiative in passing bills that would create the information superhighway, which would inevitably lead to the widespread use of the internet.
1996 - Al Gore - Democrat - Al Gore's creation of the information superhighway as well as tackling climate change lead to him becoming a popular president, helping him win the 1996 elections as well as gain a democratic majority in Congress.
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - Bush is elected, barely defeating Bill Clinton, Gore's VP, in a controversial election. He is helped by his father's legacy.
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Dekerin Domains
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New York Times Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Wed Dec 05, 2018 4:54 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Ronald Reagan becomes extremely popular with the American public despite his advanced age, even winning over a large number of Democrats and independents. He sends the economy to greater heights than ever seen before and strengthens relations with foreign countries the world over, earning himself an 88% approval rating as of summer 1984.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After Reagan deciding to retire after one term, his VP George Bush succeeds him.
1988 - George HW Bush - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
1992 - Al Gore - Democrat - Unexpectedly winning in the Democratic Primaries and even in the Presidential election, Al Gore's main goal was to tackle climate change. He also took the initiative in passing bills that would create the information superhighway, which would inevitably lead to the widespread use of the internet.
1996 - Al Gore - Democrat - Al Gore's creation of the information superhighway as well as tackling climate change lead to him becoming a popular president, helping him win the 1996 elections as well as gain a democratic majority in Congress.
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - Bush is elected, barely defeating Bill Clinton, Gore's VP, in a controversial election. He is helped by his father's legacy.
2004- Bill Clinton - Democrat - Bush’s horrible mishandling of the deficit and Medicare reform lead to ballooning deficits and inflation worse than the Goldwater era, enabling Bill Clinton to really be “the Comeback Kid.” Clinton sails to victory in a landslide, reforms Medicare, curbs the deficit through a high earner tax hike, and forges a true alliance with Great Britain and its Commonwealth.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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Nova Corina
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Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Nova Corina » Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:01 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Ronald Reagan becomes extremely popular with the American public despite his advanced age, even winning over a large number of Democrats and independents. He sends the economy to greater heights than ever seen before and strengthens relations with foreign countries the world over, earning himself an 88% approval rating as of summer 1984.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After Reagan deciding to retire after one term, his VP George Bush succeeds him.
1988 - George HW Bush - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
1992 - Al Gore - Democrat - Unexpectedly winning in the Democratic Primaries and even in the Presidential election, Al Gore's main goal was to tackle climate change. He also took the initiative in passing bills that would create the information superhighway, which would inevitably lead to the widespread use of the internet.
1996 - Al Gore - Democrat - Al Gore's creation of the information superhighway as well as tackling climate change lead to him becoming a popular president, helping him win the 1996 elections as well as gain a democratic majority in Congress.
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - Bush is elected, barely defeating Bill Clinton, Gore's VP, in a controversial election. He is helped by his father's legacy.
2004- Bill Clinton - Democrat - Bush’s horrible mishandling of the deficit and Medicare reform lead to ballooning deficits and inflation worse than the Goldwater era, enabling Bill Clinton to really be “the Comeback Kid.” Clinton sails to victory in a landslide, reforms Medicare, curbs the deficit through a high earner tax hike, and forges a true alliance with Great Britain and its Commonwealth.
2008 - John McCain - Republican The 2008 recession makes the economy even worse, leading to Clinton being kicked out of office. McCain is elected President, defeating Clinton. McCain restores the American economy and prosperity, but somewhat controversially, as he cuts back on climate change reform and Medicare.

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Dekerin Domains
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New York Times Democracy

Postby Dekerin Domains » Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:11 pm

1788 - John Adams - Nonaligned - Following Washington's decision to remain the commander-in-chief of the Army, Adams was elected as the first POTUS. He started building US-Great Britain relationships, building the army up and centralizing the government, not without opposition.
1792 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican Thomas Jefferson leads the opposition against Adams after relations begin to fray between the two, especially with Adams appointing Alexander Hamilton as Vice President. With many against Adams's alliance with Great Britain and centralization (with some saying that Adams is trying to become a king and/or give America back to Great Britain), Thomas Jefferson wins in a landslide. Soon, Democratic-Republican authorities begin accusing Adams of treason.
1796 - Alexander Hamilton - Democratic-Republican - Adams and Jefferson continue to have a rivalry, but after Adams makes an attempt on Jefferson’s life, he is badly injured, and cannot continue his presidency. He retires and hands control over to Hamilton. Hamilton continues with Jefferson’s policy, and pursues decentralisation.
1800 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson, having recovered from his wounds, runs for the presidency again and wins.
1804 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - After winning the 1800 elections, Jefferson runs again for president and, albeit somewhat controversially, wins his third presidency.
1808 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson wins re-election once again, as he continues to keep America neutral in the Napoleonic Wars.
1812 - John Adams - Federalist - Extremely controversially, Adams wins the 1812 elections and keeps America neutral after British sailors seize American merchant ships and forcing their crews to become part of the British Royal Navy. This leads to much more of the country being opposed to him, with few loyalists left...
1816 - Thomas Jefferson - Democratic-Republican - Jefferson originally hoped to retire to Monticello, but after the threat posed by the sudden return of John Adams, he once again steps up to defeat his formal rival, 24 years after their first matchup. Once again, Jefferson wins, winning a 5th term.
1820 - John Jay - Nonaligned - Acting on concerns of Jefferson's political dominance, he uses his patriotic stance and Supreme Court experience to convince many Democratic-Republicans and Federalists to not support Jefferson. Jay campaigns as a nonaligned and nonpartisan candidate with a focus on Westward expansion and domestic improvements, which he succeeds though not as thoroughly as he hoped.
1824 - John Quincy Adams - Democratic-Republican - After Jay's failure to expand to the West, Adams unites the Democratic-Republican parties against him and seizes the reigns of Presidency, beginning assimilation of the Native Americans.
1828 - Henry Clay - Democratic-Republican - John Quincy Adams is percieved as a aristocratic president, and he is overthrown by Henry Clay, proclaiming himself the new Thomas Jefferson campaigning against the son of John Adams. Clay wins in a landslide.
1832 - Henry Clay - Whig - Many people rally around Clay, and he is reelected for a second term. Some opponents try to fight him, but none succeed, as he wins in a second landslide. To distance himself from the party of Adams' son, he creates the Whig Party as a rough offshoot from the Democratic-Republican party leaning more towards decentralization and American nationalism (in response to the disastrous 1812 election of Adams).
1836 - Andrew Jackson - Democrat - With Henry Clay potentially winning the presidency again, Jackson is able to gather his opponents as well as old Federalists to form an offshot of the party. His new party, the Democrats, hijack the 'common man' ideal and win the close election.
1840 - William Henry Harrison- Whig - With strong resistance to the idea of another Clay or Jackson term, forces in the Whig Party coalesce behind "Tippecanoe," who won a key victory during the Jay Administration. Martin Van Buren, his running mate, however, takes over as President when a displace Delaware shoots Harrison early in his term. Van Buren quickly uses the occasion to justify more westward expansion and removal of Native Americans, thus leading the way to the "Trail of Tears."
1844 - Abraham Lincoln - Republican - Resistance by Native Americans and Civil Rights activists against the Trail of Tears lead way to a young Abraham Lincoln becoming president, promising an end to the Trail. While not able to stop it, he does reduce suffering against Native Americans and reintroduces Quincy Adams' assimilation with the Native Americans.
1848 - James Polk - Democrat - With Andrew Jackson as a mentor and the failure of Lincoln's promises and a divided Whig party, Polk leads the Democrats. They win with a promise of expansion and his first year is marked by a war against Mexico. He dies in 1849 though, leaving George M. Dallas, his VP, as president. He wins the war and continues further expansion as well as a fierce opponent of slavery.
[b]1852- Winfield Scott - Whig - Trying to rally the country behind something that can avoid and distract from the polarizing issue of slavery, Virginian Whig Winfield Scott defeats George Dallas in a close, three-way race, mostly due to the splits in the Democratic Party over that very issue. Scott then uses the issue of Japan and Perry's mission to win a quick and decisive victory over the Shogun, forcing humiliating terms that the Japanese nation never truly forgives or forgets.
1856- Matthew C. Perry - Democrat - With Scott playing up Perry's efforts in Japan, the Democratic Party recruits him to run for the party to promote an expansionist agenda. His popularity is strong and with the Whigs praising him before, they are unable to beat him. He wins a massive landslide with a promise to seize the Carribbean for American democracy to be spread about. He establishes the Perry Protocol, that the U.S. will be the sole authority in the Western Hemisphere.
1860 - John C. Fremont - Republican - the Perry administration saw a costly and unsuccessful bid to claim the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as a series of demonstrations against the so-called "great seahawk" for his landing Marines on the various independent shores of the West Indies. He was voted out of office in favor of former California governor John C. Fremont, who promised "a return to peace in the Americas for all its people." The Fremont administration focused on normalizing terms with the myriad island states, as well as the Spanish Empire and Mexico, and under Fremont new railroad and telegraph networks were built to promote links between the New West and the rest of the United States
1864 - Millard Fillmore - American (Know Nothing) - Following an influx of immigrants to the Northeastern United States following by increasingly tense relations with the Mexican Empire to the south, the Whig party was transitioned by Fillmore into the American Party also known as the Know Nothings though they rejected such a label. Their focus was reducing immigration which made them popular in urban areas in the north and they remained steadfast in rejecting Mexican advances, helping them in the West. The won the election in a hard-fought battle against Fremont as the Democrats suffered from internal infighting. Nonetheless, the Congress was gridlocked with the three-party system still in place.
1868 - Millard Fillmore - American - President Fillmore was narrowly elected to a second term in office thanks to support from more moderate Democrats, further eroding the party's real power in Congress. Fillmore's second term saw tensions rise along the US-Mexico border, as well as concerns with the ever-present issue of slavery. Under President Fillmore, the so-called "Compromise of 1868" was passed, leaving any legislation on slavery out of federal hands, leaving it purely a state-by-state issue. While his party (and many Democrats) praised this act, many among the Whig-Republican coalition decried it as an avoidance of the nation's biggest problem.
1872 - Millard Fillmore - American - Fillmore managed to rally his supporters enough to get elected for a third term, although it was another narrow victory. It saw further limitation of immigration, and slavery managed to move from a national to a local issue in the public's eye, with an especially strong public debate in West Virginia.
In 1873, a war with Mexico over Texas and California started. The end of Fillmore's presidency saw the front move rather slowly to the south, but no clear victor emerged yet.
1876 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Fillmore authorized an attempted siege of Mexico City, creating fierce nationalism among Mexicans that results in a major American defeat. The war continues with Mexican forces blockading the Gulf of Mexico with the help of Spain and advancing in Texas. Grant forms a coalition with many dissastified American party members, moderate Whigs, and rallies his own party. He wins in a landslide, the first since Democrat Matthew Perry, promising not only an end to the war but victory. The House remains controlled by Americans while the Senate is a slim Whig and Republican majority. Grant defeats the forces in Texas but the American navy suffers defeats against the Spanish.
1880 - Ulysses S. Grant - Democrat - Following victories in Texas, US forces continue to push through in California. Finally, in late 1882, they capture the new US territory, with the Mexican army distracted by revolts in the country's south. In the same year, West Virginia becomes the first Southern state to abolish slavery, and Virginia follows suit two years later.
The Grant administration also starts funding Spanish communist movements to destabilize the country and capture its colonial holdings.
1884 - Rutherford B. Hayes - Workingmen's - in late 1883, the labor-oriented, almost-socialist Workingmen's Party of America was founded, with Ohio governor R. B. Hayes at its head. In his term, Hayes and the Workers formally end the Second Mexican War, regaining the territories lost some years prior. Between 1885 and 1888, slavery is abolished in the Carolinas, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Perhaps the greatest achievement of the Hayes administration was the 13th Amendment to the Constitution is narrowly passed, granting automatic citizenship (and its related benefits) to any freed slave in the United States.
Financial support to Spanish rebels in the Caribbean continues until September 12, 1888, when anarchists bomb the colonial administration in La Habana, Cuba. The Spanish crown is left unaware of the rebels' links to the United States.
1888 - Grover Cleveland - Democrat - The Democrats manage to rally the opponents of Hayes' left-wing policies under one banner and win the election under a free-market banner. They also use the situation in Cuba to capture the island in 1889, althougn they are left with an unstable mess of local insurgency. However, capturing other Spanish colonies until 1892 goes a lot smoother.
In 1890, Georgia abolishes slavery, and Tennessee follows suit in 1892. Alabama holds a referendum on the issue, in which the slavery side wins.
1892 - John Marshall Stone - Whig - The Whig Party revives it’s membership and party enthusiasm with Mississippi Governor Stone moving the party towards a pro-slavery stance. The victory of the party with conservative Republicans and American party supporter show that slavery and racism are still very well alive. The 14th amendment is passed, stating that all African-Americans must be separate yet equal in terms of their facilities and institutions.
1896 - William McKinley - Republican - McKinley is elected. In 1898, the brief Spanish-American War is won by the United States, boosting McKinley's popularity.
1900 - William Jennings Bryan - Workingmen's - racial tension in the South and socioeconomic troubles in the North saw former Democrat and failed 1896 candidate William Jennings Bryan finally assume the presidency. An unsteady Worker-Democrat coalition kept Congress out of more conservative, middle-class hands, and under Bryan, the US dollar became bimetallic - backed by gold and silver, concurrently, at a ratio of 1:16. President Bryan also worked to improve working conditions for both rural farmers and urban factory workers, mandating a maximum 10-hour workday for all private employees. The Bryan administration, despite its accomplishments, was overshadowed mostly by Northeastern outrage over the 14th Amendment, with some rumblings of secession over this "most unjust law of the Union".
1904- Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Growing Northern disgust with the Fourteenth Amendment and the final collapse of the Whig Party lead to the victory of the Republicans over a split Democratic-Workingmen's coalition that was divided over racial equality. Bryan kept the Western states and his populism even intruded into the South, but Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson held onto just enough of the South and his home state of New Jersey to deny Bryan a second term. Roosevelt successfully pushed through a repeal of the Fourteenth Amendment in favor of the Fifteenth, granting full and equal citizenship to black men. His attempts to push for woman's suffrage, however, cost him in the mid-terms, and Democrats swept into control of the House and Senate, leading to a complete repeal of the restrictive immigration laws and a flood of European immigrants, especially from Ireland, Germany, and the French-Canadian province of Quebec.
1908 - Champ Clark - Democratic The new voters are heavily Democratic and fiercely opposed to increasing pushes for Prohibition among Republicans and the new Progressive movement, leading to a Democratic victory by Champ Clark, who beat out both Roosevelt and former President Bryan in yet another three-way race. Clark had already trounced Woodrow Wilson, who had lost last time, arguing that Wilson proved that he couldn't get the party "back out of the Wilderness." Clark worked closely with the Democratic majority in both houses to defeat woman's suffrage yet again, warning that "it will lead to Prohibition, and Prohibition will be a fiasco." Clark also cleverly maneuvered behind the scenes to end slavery in the last few Southern states still keeping it. South Carolina became the last slave state to turn free in 1908, while Utah became a state at last after Clark struck a deal with Mormon President Wilford Woodruff not to interfere with Arizona and Nevada. Mormon polygamy was thus left intact.
1912 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican "Teddy" wins re-election in a landslide, the first president to do so since Ulysses S. Grant in 1880. In World War I, he joins the Allies against Germany, and the war ends in an Allied victory in 1916.
1916 - Theodore Roosevelt - Republican - Teddy Roosevelt's third term saw the Allies negotiate the Treaty of Buckingham in London, placing the brunt of wartime reparations on Austria-Hungary and the soon-to-be-defunct German Empire; the costs of reparations caused Kaiser Wilhelm to be forcibly abdicated, and the monarchy in Germany was dissolved. Roosevelt, ever the champion for democracy, started a diplomatic campaign to establish a US-friendly government in the newly-founded German Federal Republic. The Roosevelt administration made similar attempts for a democratic White government amid the Russian Civil War, but President Roosevelt's death in 1919 halted such moves.
Charles W. Fairbanks, his VP, replaced him and managed to fund crucial European armies (Russian, Polish and German) enough to stop a communist takeover in Russia and Germany.
1920 - James M. Cox - Democratic With the Republicans being oft-disliked for their spending in Europe and prohibition plans, the Democrats won. The party managed to temporarily suppress the women's suffrage movement, but they did it at the cost of riots in major US cities.
With European militaries and police departments defunded by the US, a communist takeover took place in Spain in 1924, and tensions rose in Germany and Russia. The Russian government lowered them with civil rights and welfare legislation, but the Germans didn't have the money for such things.
1924 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Cox's growing unpopularity over woman's suffrage leads to a Republican victory under California Governor Herbert Hoover and a stronger push for civil rights in the South. Hoover's administration is more vigorous than Cox by far and major regulations necessary for the economy, such as a Federal Reserve Bank, are instituted. A major Hoover Dam project is built as well, improving hydroelectric energy and reducing American dependence on oil. However, Hoover's success in achieving woman suffrage is followed by defeat on Prohibition yet again.
1928 - Herbert Hoover - Republican - Hoover's second term is plagued with troubles overseas as Spain, Austria, Hungary, and Russia fall under a series of communist uprisings. In Spain, Alfonso XIII is publicly executed by communist rebels, much to the dismay of the world's governments. While the Hoover administration condemns the actions of the rising red tide, they do nothing to stop the threats across the Atlantic.
1932 - Alfred E. Smith - Democratic With international Communist threats on the rise, New York Governor Alfred E. Smith trounces Hoover in the Republican's desperate effort for a third term, ending the GOP's rule at last. Smith also carries a Democratic landslide in Congress, "Red-Scare" tactics leading to talk of "Republican softness" on Communism. Smith's administration pushes through old-age pensions on the pretext of "stealing the Reds' thunder," followed by improved regulations of banks and industries to prevent a Wall Street crash scare like the one in 1932. He is haunted, however, by growing criticism from his successor in Albany, Boston-born Winston Churchill, who doesn't think that the country is doing enough to fight Communism, so he orders an intervention in Russia that quickly gets bogged down near St. Petersburg.
1936 - Winston Churchill - Republican - Churchill manages to make some advances in Russia, but as his Central European allies are engaged in Russia, the communists take Czechoslovakia over. The war is cut short in 1937 by Churchill's attempts at making a peace, and the Russian Republic is created in Northern Europe, with a capital in St. Petersburg. Czechoslovakia is temporarily regarded as a lost cause, but opposition movements are funded by the US, as in other communist countries. While the Polish and German economies improve to the point where people aren't no longer turning to authoritarians or Nazis, the Japanese start demanding some of the US' Pacific holdings, with outright threats of war over them by 1940.
1940 - Alf Landon - Republican - Churchill’s failure to fully win the war in Russia makes him mocked by the people, and the Republicans replace him with a new candidate, known as Alf Landon. Landon mocks Japan’s threat, and in 1941, the United States declares war on Japan, and intstantly goes to cripple their navy and Air Force. By 1943, the Japanese had over 800,000 casualties, with the Americans having only 75,000. The Japanese, after having been bombed for over 3 years, surrenders in 1944, with Landon declaring it as a complete victory.
1944 - Henry A. Wallace - Democrat - Landon's increased belligerence and the war weariness of two fronts for more than a dozen years lead to the rise of Henry Wallace, an agrarian populist Democrat and "peace" candidate who vows to set things "right here in America now." Under Wallace, a GI Bill is enacted, civil rights strengthened nationwide, and his own biggest priority, farm subsidies, become widespread. Also, an interstate highway system really picks up momentum, allowing farmers to sell their produce more easily nationwide (and worldwide). However, his increasingly progressive stance on the rights of blacks, especially in the South, lead to the rise of Dixiecrats who soon form a third party under Governor Strom Thurmond of South Carolina.
1948 - Thomas E. Dewey - Republican - While Wallace's domestic agenda gains him props from many corners, he has alienated much of the Southern, conservative wing of the Democratic Party, leading to a three-way split in 1948 that puts New York Governor and famous prosecutor of American Reds Thomas E. Dewey in the White House. Under Dewey, the Manhattan Project comes to full fruition, leading to the detonation of the first ever atomic bomb, the interstate highway system is completed, and a last American push under General Douglas MacArthur forces the European Communists to at last surrender. Europe is no longer haunted by the Red Menace, allowing the continent, and America itself, to look inward. However, the Red Scare at home increasingly threatens civil liberties and the Southern Democrats block any further progress on greater racial integration. Even so, Dewey desegregates the armed forces and federal government, defying Thurmond and others of his ilk.
1952 - Dwight D. Eisenhower - Republican - The Republicans are elected in the next election, but Dewey is replaced by a new candidate, Eisenhower. Without consulting the Southern Democrats, he pursues greater racial integration, and proceeds to build up the US Army, just in case.
1956 - Walt Disney - Republican - late into his term, President Eisenhower suffered a serious heart attack, effectively preventing him from running for reelection. The Republicans prop up an unlikely candidate: Californian media mogul and noted patriot, Walter Elias Disney. The hectic and unusual Disney administration promoted the development of a high-speed national rail network, further expansion of civil rights for African-Americans, and a foreign policy of "speak softly, and build bigger bombs." The Southern Democrats end up taking the House, but cannot hold the Senate, leading to congressional gridlock for much of Disney's term, and Disney's brother Roy effectively uses the family business as a propaganda wing of the US government.
1960 - Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. - Democrat - Disney's increased corruption and the gradual reunification of the Democratic Party under the less controversial Governor Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts leads to the way to an end to twelve years of Republican rule. Kennedy is able to push through Medicare and Medicaid, reducing poverty and improving urban conditions through a new cabinet department: Housing and Urban Development. However, he also fails to achieve any meaningful civil rights reform and his relationship with Great Britain and Canada is frosty at best. There is even growing talk of war with the British Commonwealth, something that Kennedy does little to discourage.
1964 - Lyndon B. Johnson - Democrat - The death of Kennedy Sr’s son, John, leads to him choosing to retire from politics entirely. Fellow Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson becomes president as a result, and continues Medicare and Medicaid. Although, one reform goes horribly wrong, and medical prices skyrocket as a result.
1968 - Barry M. Goldwater - Republican - Johnson's medical price fiasco combines with strained relations with Great Britain and the OPEC nations to lead to the rise of Barry Goldwater, who is able to offer an attractive tax cut and rollback of regulations to "jump start" the economy. Unfortunately for Goldwater, he's unable to pay for his tax cuts and deficits rise dramatically, spurring inflation. He also sees an increasing opposition from more progressive Republicans within his own party and must work with Southern Democrats to get any further legislation passed.
1972 - Barry Goldwater - Conservative - a coalition of conservative Republicans and Southern Democrats form the United States Conservative Party, and pledge the incumbent President Goldwater as their nominee. The new third party controls a razor-thin majority in Congress, and Goldwater puts emergency ceilings on inflation, as well as gold and silver trade, to prevent an economic recession. He still does not manage to even out the deficit his administration's actions built, instead relying on the supply-side economics established four years prior to stimulate economic growth.
1976 - Gerald Ford - Republican - After Goldwater retires, the Conservative Party falls apart, once again merging with the Republican Party. Ford wins the election, and goes on to repair relations with the Commonwealth.
1980 - Ronald Reagan - Republican Gerald Ford was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 1979, a terminal disease that caused his loss in the 1980 election. Ronald Reagan becomes extremely popular with the American public despite his advanced age, even winning over a large number of Democrats and independents. He sends the economy to greater heights than ever seen before and strengthens relations with foreign countries the world over, earning himself an 88% approval rating as of summer 1984.
1984 - George H.W Bush - Republican - After Reagan deciding to retire after one term, his VP George Bush succeeds him.
1988 - George HW Bush - Bush is re-elected due to a high economy.
1992 - Al Gore - Democrat - Unexpectedly winning in the Democratic Primaries and even in the Presidential election, Al Gore's main goal was to tackle climate change. He also took the initiative in passing bills that would create the information superhighway, which would inevitably lead to the widespread use of the internet.
1996 - Al Gore - Democrat - Al Gore's creation of the information superhighway as well as tackling climate change lead to him becoming a popular president, helping him win the 1996 elections as well as gain a democratic majority in Congress.
2000 - George W. Bush - Republican - Bush is elected, barely defeating Bill Clinton, Gore's VP, in a controversial election. He is helped by his father's legacy.
2004- Bill Clinton - Democrat - Bush’s horrible mishandling of the deficit and Medicare reform lead to ballooning deficits and inflation worse than the Goldwater era, enabling Bill Clinton to really be “the Comeback Kid.” Clinton sails to victory in a landslide, reforms Medicare, curbs the deficit through a high earner tax hike, and forges a true alliance with Great Britain and its Commonwealth.
2008 - John McCain - Republican The 2008 recession makes the economy even worse, leading to Clinton being kicked out of office. McCain is elected President, defeating Clinton. McCain restores the American economy and prosperity, but somewhat controversially, as he cuts back on climate change reform and Medicare.
2012- Barack Obama - Democrat - The Medicare cutbacks start to really harm elderly Americans and the economy in the process, increasing the national deficit just as cancer propels Vice President Mitt Romney into the role of Acting President. Romney’s elitist attitude and corporate background lead to the rise of Illinois Governor Barack Obama and another landslide for Democrats. Obama institutes measures for health care reform with the help of moderate Republicans and also helps reverse McCain’s and Romney’s damage to the environment.
"Democracy is two wolves and a rabbit voting on what to eat for supper. Liberty is a well-armed rabbit keeping the result from being enforced."

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