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Does YN Have A Military Code?

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 10:13 am
by Makko Oko
I'm curious, does your nation have a military code (military law) that supersedes and replaces regular law for active duty soldiers, much like the UCMJ (Uniformed Code Of Military Justice) in the US? Feel free to be specific on some of what it bans, etc.

I'll start, my nation actually does. It's called the Military Criminal & Justice Code, or MCJC for short and while it's not nearly as descriptive or specific as civilian law is, regardless of the fact, it does have some unique provisions that apply solely to the military. In addition to that, the MCJC does, in times of martial law, replace civilian law and become the defacto law & order until martial law ends.

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 10:59 am
by Rhodevus
Rhodevus is a signatory to the Imperial Formations Treaty. It was initially written in 1762 as a way to help soldiers treat POWs during war, as well as laying out some basic war crimes for which leaders and high ranking officers could be charged. It has since evolved into Rhodevus's military code, and the main treaty for war crimes.

The Imperial Formations Treaty (v1. 1762)

Imperial Formations Military Prisoners Treaty

This is a list of rules about military prisoners captured during times of war. All must be followed or face strict sanctions from other members of the Imperial Formations Group.

Prisoners from Direct Enemy
These are prisoners from the nation that you have declared war on directly:
-Prisoners must be given minimum 2 meals a day
-Prisoners may be ransomed, but if ransom has been given, the prisoner is safe from any harm until the time that he/she reenters combat against you
-Prisoners may be held in prison for up to one year after the war has ended. After that time, he will be released back to the nation he came from

Prisoners from allied Direct Enemy
These are prisoners from the nations that are allied with those you have declared war on, and are fighting against you without any formal war declaration:
-These prisoners must be given 3 meals a day
-These prisoners are only allowed to work in labour camps for a period of 10 hours a day and must have two days off every week
-These prisoners may be ransomed, but if ransom has been given, the prisoner is safe from any harm until the time that he/she reenters combat against you
-These prisoners can be held in prison for up to six months after the war has ended. After that time, he will be released back to the nation he came from

Prisoners from allied Enemy
These are prisoners from nations that are allied with both you and your direct enemy, and are fighting on the side of the enemy:
-These prisoners must be given three meals a day
-They must be given back in stable health after a maximum period of 3 months after capture

Crimes of War

Against Direct Enemy
These are crimes against an enemy you have directly declared war against:
-The slaughter, rape and kidnapping of children
-The slaughter of extensive non-military targets
-Excessive pillaging of non-vital targets


Against Allied Direct Enemy
These are crimes against an ally of the Direct Enemy, for whom there has not been a formal declaration of war against:
-The slaughter, rape and kidnapping of non-military targets
-Pillaging of non-vital targets
-Usage of New Science Weapons (can be equated to WMDs)

Against Allied Enemy
These are crimes against nations which are allied with both you and the enemy, but fight on the side of the enemy:
-Rape and kidnapping of any targets, which are not deemed hostages
-The extensive slaughter of any targets
-Usage of New Science Weapons
-Usage of Old Science Weapons (can be equated to terrorist acts)

Rules for Empires
An Empire is defined as any nation-state that has control over a region through use of militarism, colonialism, or tributism:
-An empire may not attack a holy site of any of its vassals
-An empire may not displace a vassal people
-An empire will treat a vassal as an Allied Enemy during times of disruption

New Imperial Formations Rules

These are rules which came about following the Age of Imperialism and meant to ensure the IF continues into the modern age.

-WMDs cannot be used towards any enemies (Direct, Allied Direct and Allied)
-A nation must limit the contact they have with Allied Enemies, in order to face them as little as possible while on the battlefied
-Allied Direct Enemies when captured should be treated as citizen prisoners, given respect to their position, luxury comforts and quick way back when possible
-Nations shall not engage in methods of war deemed immoral by the times

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 12:58 pm
by Thermodolia
Yes. Thermodolia has the Unified Military Code which was originally created via the Military Justice and Regulation Act of 1922, replacing the previous Articles of War and the Naval Code of Justice.

The UMC has been changed and updated multiple times since 1922 but the general structure of the code hasn’t changed and includes things regarding rank structure and status, military specific rules and punishments, procedures for punishments, the establishment of military courts, and other related things

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 1:01 pm
by Thamesholm and Wallborough
I'm curious, does your nation have a military code (military law) that supersedes and replaces regular law for active duty soldiers, much like the UCMJ (Uniformed Code Of Military Justice) in the US?


The military of Thamesholm and Wallborough have two rules.
1. Never disobey Hereward the Woke.
2. Without disobeying rule 1, further the woke cause by any means necessary.

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 1:04 pm
by Cantport
I'm curious, does your nation have a military code (military law) that supersedes and replaces regular law for active duty soldiers, much like the UCMJ (Uniformed Code Of Military Justice) in the US? Feel free to be specific on some of what it bans, etc.


There is an extensive military code, based on chivalric principles but applied to modern weapons and other modern technology.

Certain armoured regiments are called cavalry and their officers consider themselves the heirs to the knights and squires of the late Middle Ages as do most Army officers, many Navy officers and most fighter pilots (but other than fighter pilots this view is unusual in the Air Force)

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 1:10 pm
by Most of Britain
I'm curious, does your nation have a military code (military law) that supersedes and replaces regular law for active duty soldiers, much like the UCMJ (Uniformed Code Of Military Justice) in the US? Feel free to be specific on some of what it bans, etc.

We follow the Geneva Conventions as well as having our own King's Regulations and Rules of Engagement.

PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2022 11:02 pm
by Nova Universo
No. The Entity does not have a military service. Therefore, we don't have a military code. We follow the Geneva Conventions and refer disputes of a military nature to the Union-in-Bench of the Union.

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2022 5:09 am
by Lemsrow

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2022 1:32 pm
by Nazbol Denmark
There are some values, standards and rules but mostly how to treat prisoners of war is down to the unit commanders, there is a law that states that "the treatment of Northumbrian prisoners shall depend on how their side treats Danish prisoners".

PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2022 3:20 pm
by Equai
No. We do not have an army

PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2022 7:43 pm
by Coconut Palm Island
The Kingdom of Coconut Palm Island has two military organizations-- the professional military, and the civilian militia. It is important to note that the civilian militia is entirely under the civilian justice system; militia members settle small matters in-house, up to and including a person being suspended or removed from the militia, but no militia member may be actually punished criminally without a civilian conviction. However, members of Royal Army, Royal Navy, and Royal Air Force are subject to the Coconut Palm Island Military Code of Justice.

The Coconut Palm Island Military Code of Justice is set up similar to the Island's regular criminal code, in that there are six offense levels (three felony levels, two misdemeanor levels, and one petty offense level). The code enacts the "default standard", which states that, when the Military Code of Justice is silent on an issue, the civilian law (and accompanying sentencing range) is used. However, civilian law caps sentences at 1 year for any non-violent offense, 7 years for all but the most severe offense, and 15 years for the worst of the worst (sentences cannot be "stacked" or run consecutively to exceed these limits)-- the military caps are at 2, 14, and 30 years, respectively (essentially, double the possible maximum civilians can receive) in peacetime, and the death penalty is technically allowed during wartime when incarceration is not feasible. The death penalty has never been used on Coconut Palm Island, even in the military.

Coconut Palm Island is one of the few "free" countries in the world that does not use juries. Normally, civilian trials occur in front of three judges, all of whom must agree for a conviction to occur (if there is not a unanimous guilty finding, the accused is found not guilty). In the military, cases are judged differently. A court martial is overseen by a committee consisting of a General or Admiral, a lesser commissioned officer (Lieutenant, Captain, etc), and a non-commissioned officer (sergeant/petty officer). A unanimous finding (3/3 guilty) is still required to impose "criminal" (such as discharge and probation/incarceration in a civilian prison) or "military-criminal" sanctions (such as incarceration in a military prison), but a majority finding (2/3 guilty) is sufficient to impose "military" sanctions (loss of rank, removal from the military, etc). If a death penalty is being sought, the panel is opened to five people-- two General/Admirals, one lower-ranking officer, and two non-commissioned officers; a 5/5 guilty finding is required for a death penalty or lesser criminal sanction, while a 3/5 guilty is sufficient for a military sanction up to a discharge (no incarceration).

The Military Code of Justice consists of several sections. Section One is "Rights and Procedures". Section Two is "General Offenses"-- this reiterates that all civilian laws also apply, but that many laws carry enhanced penalties for military members. Section Three is "Your Duty and Your Right to Refuse Unlawful Orders"-- it outlines penalties for things like desertion, disobedience of orders, being away without leave (AWOL), but it also lists circumstances where soldiers can refuse unlawful orders and will be protected. Section Four is "Military Conduct"-- here, the general requirements imposed on military members are listed. Section Five is "Battlefield Conduct"-- it lists and prohibits war crimes, and specifies which tactics and weapons are unlawful, as well as protecting civilians. Section Six is "Treatment of Prisoners"-- it specifies that prisoners of war must be treated according to the same standards as civilian prisoners.