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How to Draft a Professional Looking Constitution

PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2018 11:46 pm
by Calsolato
This is how to write a Constitution, useful resources will be at the bottom for everyone to check out. I would recommend going around and looking around at actual countries constitutions and getting an idea of the content and layout of the constitutions. Try not to copy off another countries constitution. Make your constitution original, that's what makes it stand out, put time and effort into your constitution, remember it takes days and months to make a constitution so put time and effort into it. Personally, it took me 2 weeks to write article 1 of my constitution.
Here is my Constitution (a work in progress).



1. Know the layout. The typical layout of a constitution looks like this.
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Code: Select all
[center][b]Title[/b][/center]
[center][b]Preamble[/b][/center]
[center][b]Articles[/b][/center]
[center][b]Amendments[/b][/center]


2. The Title (Optional)
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If you want to add a title to your Constitution that's fine. Know that there will also be a title on your factbook. I opted not to put on into mine but if you want to, make sure its bolded, centered and says something like "The Constitution of @@NATION@@" or "The @@DEMONYMNAME@@ Constitution" You may also choose a custom for your title, make it creative.

3. The Preamble
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One of the most crucial components of your constitution. The Preamble, the preamble should state the real reason you are creating a constitution and an introduction to it. Spend some time doing this, this is the first thing people are going to see when they view your constitution. Heres an example from the United States of America's constitution.

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.


This is a prime example of a preamble for a constitution. It lists the reasons for creating it "in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity" and summarizes how and why they are forming it. Try and list at least 3 reasons for creating the constitution. You can also choose to add "We the people of @@NATION@@" at the start to indicate a democracy. I wouldn't recommend it if you are trying to be original.

4. The Articles
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The articles are the all the ingredients for a constitution. Articles layout the laws and boundaries on how to establish the government, rules for the government, and the correct procedures for events that might happen in government (vacancies, tied vote, etc.) Most of your time drafting a constitution should go towards this part. Let's break it down.

Articles should have something they describe. For example, Article 1 of the US Constitution describes congress, article 2 describes the duties of president and vice-president, article 3 describes the court system, so on and so forth. Before you write anything, decide how many articles you're going to have, and what each article is going to address. Be creative and feel free to do whatever you want, make your constitution original, don't copy.

Once you have the articles laid out, decide what the content is going to be, again, make it about establishing the government, rules for the government, and correct procedures for events that might happen in government. Optionally, you can break down these articles further into smaller "sub-articles" called sections. These are even smaller articles, try to categorize laws in your constitution into sections kind of like articles. Again, a great example of this is the US Constitution, look at it before you write ANYTHING.

Try to follow this template:
[center]Article #.[/center]
Section #.
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Mauris ullamcorper mi ut massa egestas fermentum. Ut semper tristique lacus eu volutpat. Donec commodo finibus dui, eu facilisis augue semper ac. Nulla hendrerit justo vel tincidunt convallis. Suspendisse suscipit nulla eu accumsan dictum. Sed id lectus vitae ipsum vulputate placerat nec a ligula.


Take note though, that many countries also have a bill of rights in their constitutional articles. In some constitutions like the United States', they have an entirely different section for this called Amendments. Which is Directly down below this section of the post.

5. Amendments (optional)
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The Amendments is the cherry on top. It provides rights for citizens in your nation. AGAIN, the US Constitution is a great example of this, tons of amendments for the nation so go ham. For Example:

Amendment 1.
All citizens have the right to vote in the national election.

Do as many amendments as you want.

This is completely optional though as only the United States has amendments. Many other countries simply do not have a bill of rights or it is featured in their articles. Remember, look at other countries constitutions
to get a general baseline of how this should look.

6. Table of Contents (optional)
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This is a table of contents, this is completely optional but its definitely something you might want to put into your constitution. Make sure you put this part after your title but before your preamble. Use this template, make sure you delete anything you haven't put into your constitution.

Code: Select all
[box][floatleft][b]Table of Contents[/b]
[url=REPLACELINKHERE#Preamble]The Preamble[/url]
[url=REPLACELINKHERE#Articles]Articles[/url]
[url=REPLACELINKHERE#Amendments]Amendments[/url][/box][/floatleft]


Make sure when you put this in you add anchors like this.
Code: Select all
[anchor=EXAMPLE]Example[/anchor]

7. Helpful Sources
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US Constitution:
https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/ ... transcript
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_St ... nstitution
WikiHow:
https://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Constitution

PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 12:40 am
by A m e n r i a
Thank you for sharing. Will try out.

PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:29 am
by Great Nortend
I would also like to point out that not all constitutions have 'articles' called articles. The Australian constitution, for example, has chapters, parts and sections. I would also caution against having amendments solely providing rights to the citizenry. That seems to be very much an Americanism. Australian constitutional amendments, for example, do not really touch on the rights of the Queen's subjects but rather are varied and include maximum age for judges and making provision for the Commonwealth's making of laws concerning Aborigines.

PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 1:51 am
by Lillorainen
What I would like to add is that, unlike the U.S. constitution, those of many European countries do not have amendments, but solely consist of articles, which are added, changed, or repealed just in the same way as regular laws. For example, Art. 1 to 19 of the German constitution deal with basic rights (and cannot be repealed) - government principles and organization come after that. State constitutions naturally vary from state to state, but they mostly follow a similar principle and structure. In Switzerland, basic rights are listed by the articles 7 to 36, with 1 to 6 defining the principles of the Confederacy and 37 and following describing the organization. Continental Europe has a different tradition of law than the Anglosphere.
Other than that, nice work!

PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:37 am
by The Huterric Union
This has motivated me to write the constitution. Thanks.

Lillorainen wrote:What I would like to add is that, unlike the U.S. constitution, those of many European countries do not have amendments, but solely consist of articles, which are added, changed, or repealed just in the same way as regular laws. For example, Art. 1 to 19 of the German constitution deal with basic rights (and cannot be repealed) - government principles and organization come after that. State constitutions naturally vary from state to state, but they mostly follow a similar principle and structure. In Switzerland, basic rights are listed by the articles 7 to 36, with 1 to 6 defining the principles of the Confederacy and 37 and following describing the organization. Continental Europe has a different tradition of law than the Anglosphere.
Other than that, nice work!

This. This was always how I would've intended the Huterric constitution. Please take this into account also.

PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:27 am
by Calsolato
Lillorainen wrote:What I would like to add is that, unlike the U.S. constitution, those of many European countries do not have amendments, but solely consist of articles, which are added, changed, or repealed just in the same way as regular laws. For example, Art. 1 to 19 of the German constitution deal with basic rights (and cannot be repealed) - government principles and organization come after that. State constitutions naturally vary from state to state, but they mostly follow a similar principle and structure. In Switzerland, basic rights are listed by the articles 7 to 36, with 1 to 6 defining the principles of the Confederacy and 37 and following describing the organization. Continental Europe has a different tradition of law than the Anglosphere.
Other than that, nice work!


Absolutely, I will add that into the post. Thank you!

PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:47 pm
by Alsase
This thread and its ideals have inspired me to construct a Constitution for my nation. In the instance, I've completed the preamble & a single chapter; Which I would like to receive insight on its current progress.

The Constitution of Alsase

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 5:20 am
by Great Nortend
Alsase wrote:This thread and its ideals have inspired me to construct a Constitution for my nation. In the instance, I've completed the preamble & a single chapter; Which I would like to receive insight on its current progress.

The Constitution of Alsase

You seem to have some sort of strange affection with 'thee' and 'thy'. They are used incorrectly. 'Thee' is not an 'olde timey' form of 'the'. It is the 2nd person singular equivalent of 'me', that is it is the same as 'you' when used as an object. For example, 'Thou art mine eyes' and 'He gaveth unto thee the Word'. If you want to use 'thee' and 'thy' then I recommend you also use the correct 3rd person singular suffix, 'eth'. Thus, 'much of society has been ruled' should ideally be 'much of society hath been ruled'. Again, 'thy' is for the 2nd person. '[The] citizenry followed thee word of thy lord or lady' is highly irregular. It ought to be, '[The] citizenry followed the word of their lord or lady'. 'Thy' and 'thine', use before words starting with a vowel sound, are the early modern English forms for 'your', similar to 'my' and 'mine'.

I hope this helps.

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 5:37 am
by Dawuan
I'm going to write the constitution of Dawuan but I cancelled

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:11 am
by Great Aletia
Are articles strictly necessary for all constitutions? I wrote one a while back that is basically a series of paragraphs and headings. How many paragraphs a topic gets depends on its importance. The section dealing with the legislature has three parapraghs, while the section dealing with the succession has two, ect.

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 7:08 am
by Normund
May I please have some opinions on my own constitution? Please give recommendations and advice. Thanks.
https://www.nationstates.net/nation=nor ... id=1114314

PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:49 am
by Alsase
Great Nortend wrote:You seem to have some sort of strange affection with 'thee' and 'thy'. They are used incorrectly. 'Thee' is not an 'olde timey' form of 'the'. It is the 2nd person singular equivalent of 'me', that is it is the same as 'you' when used as an object. For example, 'Thou art mine eyes' and 'He gaveth unto thee the Word'. If you want to use 'thee' and 'thy' then I recommend you also use the correct 3rd person singular suffix, 'eth'. Thus, 'much of society has been ruled' should ideally be 'much of society hath been ruled'. Again, 'thy' is for the 2nd person. '[The] citizenry followed thee word of thy lord or lady' is highly irregular. It ought to be, '[The] citizenry followed the word of their lord or lady'. 'Thy' and 'thine', use before words starting with a vowel sound, are the early modern English forms for 'your', similar to 'my' and 'mine'.

I hope this helps.


Thank you, I'm that of an uncultured swine, looking for all the help he can get.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 2:24 am
by Wawakanatote
Thank you, I think I'll just save this here for later use