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Constitutional Rights in YN

A place to put national factbooks, embassy exchanges, and other information regarding the nations of the world. [In character]

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Orange-Bourgogne
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 102
Founded: Jun 13, 2014
Democratic Socialists

Postby Orange-Bourgogne » Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:05 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
First of all, the United Kingdom of Orange-Bourgogne does not have a written constitution, nor did it ever have one. It does, however, have an Act on Privileges. The term 'privileges' must be distinctly interpreted by the term of 'rights', as in the vocabulaire of Orange-Bourgogne the former can be restricted to some extent by statutes, whereas the latter cannot. Therefore, I undertake it that where in these following questions is referred to 'rights', 'privileges' are meant. The same applies to the terms of 'freedoms' and 'liberties'.

Freedom of information:
The citizens and corporations of Orange-Bourgogne do have a liberty of information. This means that they can put reasonable requests to public entities which considers their actions, policies, and the like. Note however that this does only apply to public entities. Private legal relationships (between or among corporations or citizens) do not necessarily have a similar liberty.

Right to bear arms:
The State has the absolute prerogative of violence. This means that private entities (citizens/corporations) are barred from legally owning arms.

Freedom of speech:
In principle, the privilege of speech is respected. However, the State may, by Act of Parliament, restrict this privilege as it sees fit. Currently, there are no restrictions other than that of lese majesty and blatantly lying.

Freedom of association:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law.

Freedom of movement:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty.

Freedom of assembly:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty.

Freedom from arbitrary arrest:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this liberty.

Freedom of religion:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this liberty.

Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty.

Freedom of thought:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this liberty.

Right of self-defense:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty.

Right to food:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this liberty.

Right to form a labor union:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty when there is already such a union within a single corporation.

Right to clothing:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this liberty.

Right of asylum:
This liberty is not respected through the established rule of law.

Right to housing:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this liberty.

Right to internet access:
This liberty is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty.

Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation):
This liberty is sometimes respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this liberty.

Right to property:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may regulate this privilege. This does however not apply to the ownership of land, as all territories are owned by the Crown. All "owners" are formally tenants of the Crown, who may hold these lands.

Freedom from discrimination:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this privilege.

Freedom from exile:
This privilege is not respected through the established rule of law.

Freedom from slavery:
Even though this privilege is not formally recognised by the rule of law, in practice slavery has been banned for more than two centuries, and thus it will be highly likely that, if it be brought before a court of justice, it will be then recognised.

Right to die:
This privilege is not respected through the established rule of law.

Right to water:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this privilege.

Right to a fair trial:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this privilege.

Right to a lawyer:
The privilege to legal counsel has been widely recognised by the rule of law and jurisprudence. It applies, though, only to "unequal" trials. By this it is to be understood that citizens and corporations are considered to be equals, whereas government institutions are not equal to those private entities. Thus, this privilege is only recognised in penal and administrative cases.

Right to life:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. Acts of Parliaments may not restrict this privilege.

Right to refuse medical treatment:
This privilege is not respected through the established rule of law.

Right to petition:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this privilege.

Right to protest:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this privilege.

Right to privacy:
This privilege is respected through the established rule of law. However, Acts of Parliaments may restrict this privilege.
♔ - Founder of the Alliance of Nobles
This nation does not necessarily represent my real life opinions.

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Lyridgradia
Attaché
 
Posts: 82
Founded: Jul 06, 2017
Ex-Nation

Postby Lyridgradia » Fri Jan 26, 2018 11:35 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information:
Right to bear arms: Yes, but after locked down, you loose this right
Freedom of speech: Yes except communism
Freedom of association: Yes except communism
Freedom of movement: Yes except communism
Freedom of assembly: Yes except communism
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Yes
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Yes
Freedom from slavery: No
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer:
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: No
Right to privacy: Yes

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Vedastia
Diplomat
 
Posts: 857
Founded: Jan 19, 2012
Capitalizt

Postby Vedastia » Mon Jan 29, 2018 1:13 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: Yes; absolute
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes; within national borders and out of the country
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: No
Right to form a labor union: Yes; not specifically mentioned in the Constitution, but is covered under freedom of association
Right to clothing: No
Right of asylum: No
Right to housing: No
Right to internet access: No
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes; by the government and essential medical services
Freedom from exile: No
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: No
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes
Right to privacy: Yes
Carl von Leslie, Prime Minister of Saint Hilda in the NS Parliament
Leader of the National People's Party - For Family and Freedom
Dinake wrote:
Zoice wrote:The far right is truly to blame. The left may lose ground to them, but they wouldn't be losing ground if there wasn't the far right in the first place calling for batshit insanity.
That's like saying "blockbuster wouldn't be losing ground to netflix if there wasn't any netflix".
Major-Tom wrote:
Risottia wrote:Reality has a left-wing bias.
God, if I had a nickel for every time I heard some smug internet warrior say this...

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Omicron Tara
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 20
Founded: Jan 11, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby Omicron Tara » Mon Jan 29, 2018 1:23 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Barring classification for reasons of national security.
Right to bear arms: Permitted, but limited to semiautomatic small arms.
Freedom of speech: Yes.
Freedom of association: Yes.
Freedom of movement: Yes, with exemptions for private property and safety.
Freedom of assembly: Yes.
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes.
Freedom of religion: Yes.
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes.
Freedom of thought: No specific protection, as no one has ever tried to enact such a law.
Right of self-defense: Yes.
Right to food: Yes.
Right to form a labor union: Yes.
Right to clothing: Yes.
Right of asylum: Subject to government review.
Right to housing: Yes.
Right to internet access: No (while access is universal on all stations and settled moons, guaranteeing access in interplanetary space is simply impossible).
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): No.
Right to property: No, although the limitations on eminent domain are quite strict.
Freedom from discrimination: Yes.
Freedom from exile: No - exile is the standard punishment for low treason, although the defendant can always choose to opt for a long prison sentence.
Freedom from slavery: Yes.
Right to die: Yes.
Right to water: Yes.
Right to a fair trial: Yes.
Right to a lawyer: Yes.
Right to life: No. Both capital punishment and abortion are legal.
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes for adults.
Right to petition: Yes.
Right to protest: Yes.
Right to privacy: Yes.

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Mzeusia
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 473
Founded: Oct 30, 2017
Liberal Democratic Socialists

Postby Mzeusia » Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:44 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: No
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Yes
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Yes
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes
Right to privacy: Yes unless you are a suspect of terrorism
I set out to build a nation and so that is exactly what I will achieve, I hope.

Also, if you are interested in having the Mzeusian Library write something for your nation, click here!

User avatar
Hamidiye
Envoy
 
Posts: 299
Founded: Jan 06, 2018
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Hamidiye » Mon Jan 29, 2018 12:32 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?

Freedom of information:
Right to bear arms:
Freedom of speech:
Freedom of association:
Freedom of movement:
Freedom of assembly:
Freedom from arbitrary arrest:
Freedom of religion:
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment:
Freedom of thought:
Right of self-defense:
Right to food:
Right to form a labor union:
Right to clothing:
Right of asylum:
Right to housing:
Right to internet access:
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation):
Right to property:
Freedom from discrimination:
Freedom from exile:
Freedom from slavery:
Right to die:
Right to water:
Right to a fair trial:
Right to a lawyer:
Right to life:
Right to refuse medical treatment:
Right to petition:
Right to protest:
Right to privacy:


Let's make this short: No.
[ kebab intensifies ]

factbook link - read my rambles

User avatar
Socialist Union Of Deutschland
Envoy
 
Posts: 322
Founded: Aug 05, 2017
Ex-Nation

Postby Socialist Union Of Deutschland » Tue Jan 30, 2018 3:59 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: No
Right to bear arms: No
Freedom of speech: No
Freedom of association: No
Freedom of movement: No
Freedom of assembly: No
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: No
Freedom of religion: No
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: No
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: N/A
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: N/A
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work: Yes
Right to private property: No
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Yes
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: N/A
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: No
Right to a lawyer: N/A
Right to life: No
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: No
Right to protest: No
Right to privacy: Yes
Supporter Of: Environmentalism, Labourism, Militarism, Nationalism, Populism, Rationalism, Socialism, Unionism, Nationalization of Economics, Universal Basic Income.

Opposed To: Capitalism, Conservatism, Corporatism, Empiricism, Fascism, Imperialism, Monarchism, Neo-Liberalism, Neo-Nazism, Objectivism, Separatism, Wahhabism, Zionism, Religious Fundamentalism, Anarchy, Democracy, Oligarchy, Ignorance, Slavery.

User avatar
Maelstrom Islands
Civil Servant
 
Posts: 9
Founded: Jan 30, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby Maelstrom Islands » Wed Jan 31, 2018 1:29 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: No
Right to bear arms: No
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: No
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: No
Right of asylum: N/A
Right to housing: No
Right to internet access: No
Right to work: No
Right to private property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Yes
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: No
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: No
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: No
Right to refuse medical treatment: No
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes
Right to privacy: Yes

User avatar
Gleissar
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 11
Founded: Jan 29, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby Gleissar » Thu Feb 01, 2018 2:53 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes, the right to truth.
Right to bear arms: Yes
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Food is a commodity not a right.
Right to form a labor union: As long as they commit no force or fraud.
Right to clothing: Clothing is a commodity not a right.
Right of asylum: Yes
Right to housing: Houses are a commodity not a right.
Right to internet access: The internet is a utility not a right.
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): The right of the pursuit of happiness (the right to engage in (and or start up) a profession, trade, occupation, business, concern, or commerce unfettered by force, fruad and government tyranny) is inviolable, but that is not necessarily congruent with the so-called "right" to work.
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: No. There is no naturally constituted right to be free from the opinions and preferences of others which would entail enslaving others to another's differing opinions and preferences. Freedom from discrimination is self-refuting. The only "freedoms from" are freedom from despotism (arbitrary and vague decree resulting in force or fraud) and lawlessness (loss of liberty and equal protection under the law) which are remedied by law and order. Gleissan society has a way of handling bigots and unreasonable people by ostracization and public shaming without needing to spend billions in taxpayer dollars for an inefficient and ineffective remedy.
Freedom from exile: No, there is no naturally constituted right to be "free from exile." The principle of persona non grata is regularly enforced and practitioners of outlawry (brigandry, highway robbery, piracy, perfidy, deprivation of rights under color of authority) who are not duly convicted and executed are rewarded with a writ of persona non grata and exiled under pain of death. This allows society to be free from those who show by their actions utter contept for the lives, freedom, and labors of those who do choose to live civilly.
Freedom from slavery: No. Voluntary servitude is used for punishment. Like the US, felons are wards of the state for the duration of their sentences.
Right to die: No, as it countermands the naturally constituted right to life.
Right to water: Water is a commodity not a right.
Right to a fair trial: Yes.
Right to a lawyer: No. One has a right to competent counsel, which may or may not be a lawyer. Incompetent public defenders are exiled.
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: No, it is a privilege reserved to those who are free from stress, fatigue, trauma, mental anguish or psychiatric disorder.
Right to petition: Yes.
Right to protest: Yes, as long as it is a protest (a manifesto, declaration or remonstrance), not just an excuse for uncivil behaviour and rioting.
Right to privacy: The right to be let be and to be let alone is held sacrosanct, as is to be secure in person, property, and possessions. This is not necessarily congruent with the so called "right" to privacy.
Last edited by Gleissar on Thu Feb 01, 2018 3:06 am, edited 7 times in total.

User avatar
Elvectica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 538
Founded: Sep 11, 2017
New York Times Democracy

Postby Elvectica » Thu Feb 01, 2018 3:01 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: Almost, deadly weaponry are barred from civil use.
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Yes
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Yes
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: No, Elvectica has an exception: All citizens have the right to live, meaning they will be administrated mandatory medical treatment. Anti-vaxxers are almost non-existent at the time.
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes
Right to privacy: Yes, parents and children may be able to opt out any time from the state-funded id chip implant at birth
....... | The Elvectican Empire | The Elective Monarchy of the High Enchantressdom | Undergoing retcon

A modern-ISH magitek-fantasy world, centred on the matriarchal meritocracy of the Elvectican Queendom.
Long live the Queen! | Her Royal Majesty, Queen Adecyn VII | General Overview
"Witcheric socialism is one of the most fundamentally important new ideologies of this century. And one of the most dangerous, if you ask my sister. And I think there's some truth to that, to be honest."
—Her Royal Majesty Adecyn Zabinski, on the question of whether the empire should contain the growing socialist witcherism movement on the other side of the world.

Other nations └ CronicaValehartBNL CorporationMedallionFreilibre (Retired)

User avatar
Vyzhva
Envoy
 
Posts: 317
Founded: Aug 31, 2017
Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Vyzhva » Thu Feb 01, 2018 6:30 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: No.
Right to bear arms: No.
Freedom of speech: No.
Freedom of association: No.
Freedom of movement: No.
Freedom of assembly: No.
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: No.
Freedom of religion: No.
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: No.
Freedom of thought: No.
Right of self-defense: No.
Right to food: No.
Right to form a labor union: No.
Right to clothing: No.
Right of asylum: No.
Right to housing: No.
Right to internet access: No.
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): No.
Right to property: No.
Freedom from discrimination: No.
Freedom from exile: No.
Freedom from slavery: No.
Right to die: No.
Right to water: No.
Right to a fair trial: No.
Right to a lawyer: No.
Right to life: Partially.
Right to refuse medical treatment: No.
Right to petition: No.
Right to protest: No.
Right to privacy: No.
vyzhva // esoteric juche-fascists // angry kyrgyz goat-keepers
disregard forum posts made prior to 27/8/2019

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Bengal and Assam
Diplomat
 
Posts: 656
Founded: Jun 18, 2017
Democratic Socialists

Postby Bengal and Assam » Thu Feb 01, 2018 6:39 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: No
Freedom of speech: Yes,unless it causes damage to life and property
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes,as long as it isn't any radicalist groups
Freedom from arbitrary arrest:Yes
Freedom of religion:We are officialy Secular,but the government's unofficial position has always been to discourage religion
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes,as long as it doesn't affect mental wellbeing
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: No
Right to clothing: Yes,obviously
Right of asylum: Depends on the situation
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Yes
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Only natural death is legal by law,attempt to suicide is illegal
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: No
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes
Right to privacy: Yes
A country with a mixed Bengali and Japanese population and culture. NSStats not Used...
Led By King Adit Tsumikado(King Eishi)... Mostly MT, with some elements of FT.
BBSOne:Former Hong Kong movie star Jackie Chan arrested by HK authorities. According to Hong Kong Crown Prosecution, Jackie Chan provided funds to pro-Chinese rebel groups operating from neighbouring South China. Hong Kong is an autonomous British Overseas Territory, with it's population identifying as British

User avatar
Bagong Luzon
Attaché
 
Posts: 72
Founded: Jan 30, 2018
Corporate Police State

Postby Bagong Luzon » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:33 am

Does your nation's constitution and/orcurrent law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes.
Right to bear arms: No; private ownership of weaponry is a privilege enjoyed by the New Luzon elite.
Freedom of speech: Yes.
Freedom of association: Yes; left-leaning organizations are typically held to intense scrutiny to rule out any possible links to known Communist-aligned terror groups.
Freedom of movement: Yes.
Freedom of assembly: Yes.
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes.
Freedom of religion: Yes; there are, however, strong social taboos vis-a-vis insulting the Abrahamic belief systems.
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes.
Freedom of thought: Yes.
Right of self-defense: Yes.
Right to food: Yes.
Right to form a labor union: Yes; labor unions are typically held to intense scrutiny to rule out any possible links to known Communist-aligned terror groups.
Right to clothing: Yes.
Right of asylum: Yes.
Right to housing: Yes.
Right to internet access: Yes.
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes.
Right to property: Yes.
Freedom from discrimination: Yes.
Freedom from exile: Yes.
Freedom from slavery: Yes.
Right to die: No; euthanasia is illegal.
Right to water: Yes.
Right to a fair trial: Yes.
Right to a lawyer: Yes.
Right to life: Yes.
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes.
Right to petition: Yes.
Right to protest: Yes.
Right to privacy: Yes.
Puppet of the New Visayan Islands, typically used for fluff purposes.

Naturally, this does not represent my actual beliefs.

User avatar
The Great-German Empire
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 489
Founded: Nov 25, 2017
New York Times Democracy

Postby The Great-German Empire » Sun Feb 04, 2018 5:26 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: Yes
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes, with the exception of designated terror groups
Freedom of movement: To a point. Without a court ruling that says otherwise, one can freely move within Germany, but border procedures are still quite secure.
Freedom of assembly: Yes, with the exception of designated terrorist groups.
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Implicitly, included in freedom of speech
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: No (all further down rights to free stuff are marked no, but of course you can have it if you buy it)
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: No
Right of asylum: No
Right to housing: No
Right to internet access: No
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: All individuals have the same rights, but private entities can discriminate within the law's framework
Freedom from exile: No
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: No
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes, nonviolently
Right to privacy: Yes
IC Name: Empire of Germany
Just your friendly neighborhood Weltmacht. Und Doch Gang | NS Stats are not used. Q&A if you need it!
Pro/Anti, 8Values and other tests: Here
Unapologetic libertarian populist monarchism

Vossische Zeitung: Corvettes on track to outsell 911s on German soil, market and development panic ensues | Gossip media obsessed over bizarre German-Japanese royal house friendships | Radical environmentalism a new pillar of hard-left politics all over the world

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Midand
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 433
Founded: Sep 08, 2017
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Midand » Sun Feb 04, 2018 5:33 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Mostly
Right to bear arms: No
Freedom of speech: Mostly
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Not a lot
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Mostly
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: No
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Not really
Right to privacy: No
It's the Glorious Democratic Republic!
A nation filled with SPIT, dogs, fooling around, and self-proclaimed humor.
Why yes, I DO use NS Stats!

User avatar
Uxyrkystan
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 14
Founded: Feb 03, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby Uxyrkystan » Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:44 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: no
Right to bear arms: no
Freedom of speech: limited, cannot yell fire in a crowded theater-like limitations as well as government intimidation/supression
Freedom of association: yes
Freedom of movement: yes
Freedom of assembly: limited, protest permits required
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: no
Freedom of religion: yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: yes; technically not always enforced
Freedom of thought: yes
Right of self-defense: yes
Right to food: yes
Right to form a labor union: yes
Right to clothing: yes
Right of asylum: no
Right to housing: no
Right to internet access: no
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): yes
Right to property: yes
Freedom from discrimination: yes
Freedom from exile: yes
Freedom from slavery: yes
Right to die: no
Right to water: yes; not always enforced
Right to a fair trial: yes
Right to a lawyer: no
Right to life: no
Right to refuse medical treatment: yes
Right to petition: yes
Right to protest: no
Right to privacy: limited

User avatar
Andrabia
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 55
Founded: Jan 26, 2018
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Andrabia » Sun Feb 04, 2018 8:42 pm

Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: Yes (Must pass screening, people with mental health issues cannot purchase firearms)
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Yes
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination:Yes
Freedom from exile:Yes
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: Yes
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes (Excluding riots)
Right to privacy: Yes

User avatar
Cosparia
Envoy
 
Posts: 229
Founded: Jun 19, 2017
Ex-Nation

Postby Cosparia » Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:01 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?

Freedom of information: Yes, unless for highly-classified military projects and operations.
Right to bear arms: Yes.
Freedom of speech: Mostly; limitations however are pretty much limited to "fire"-in-a-crowded-theater-type scenarios.
Freedom of association: Yes.
Freedom of movement: Yes.
Freedom of assembly: Yes.
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes.
Freedom of religion: Yes.
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes.
Freedom of thought: Yes.
Right of self-defense: Yes.
* Right to food: N/A.
Right to form a labor union: Yes.
* Right to clothing: N/A.
Right of asylum: Yes.
* Right to housing: N/A.
* Right to internet access: N/A.
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes.
Right to property: Yes.
Freedom from discrimination: Legally, yes.
Freedom from exile: Yes.
Freedom from slavery: Yes.
Right to die: Yes.
* Right to water: N/A.
Right to a fair trial: Yes.
Right to a lawyer: Yes.
Right to life: Yes.
Right to refuse medical treatment: No.
Right to petition: Yes.
Right to protest: Yes, in a non-violent manner.
Right to privacy: Yes.

Entries marked with a * are not considered to be "rights" by the current Cosparian government. Official reasoning given is stated to be that "any government which arbitrarily declares these things a right is certain to fail to provide them to their citizens," citing chronic shortages of such items in nations such as Cuba, North Korea, and Venezuela, among others.
Disregard most NS stats, I don't play by those rules.
I take a very dim view of politicians IRL.

19-year-old American. Interest in military, history, politics, and firearms. Hobbies include airsoft, gaming, and NS (obviously).
PRO: Guns, weed, border security, strong military, militia, capitalism, Constitution, republicanism, right-libertarianism, choice.
ANTI: Gun-control, Democrat, Republican, Trump, fascism, Antifa, Black Lives Matter, Blue Lives Matter, tyranny, communism, domestic spying, foreign involvement.

User avatar
Patagonia New Wales
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 48
Founded: Jan 09, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby Patagonia New Wales » Mon Feb 05, 2018 4:50 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?

Freedom of information: YES
Right to bear arms: NO
Freedom of speech: YES (Constitution)
Freedom of association: YES (Constitution)
Freedom of movement: YES (Constitution)
Freedom of assembly: YES (Constitution)
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: YES (Constitution)
Freedom of religion: YES (Constitution)
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: YES (Constitution)
Freedom of thought: YES (Constitution)
Right of self-defense: NO
Right to food: NO
Right to form a labor union: YES (Constitution)
Right to clothing: NO
Right of asylum: NO
Right to housing: NO
Right to internet access: NO
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): YES (Constitution)
Right to property: YES (Constitution)
Freedom from discrimination: YES (Constitution)
Freedom from exile: YES
Freedom from slavery: YES (Constitution)
Right to die: NO
Right to water: YES
Right to a fair trial: YES (Constitution)
Right to a lawyer: YES (Constitution)
Right to life: YES (Constitution)
Right to refuse medical treatment: YES (over 18)
Right to petition: YES (Constitution)
Right to protest: YES (Constitution)
Right to privacy: YES
The Commonwealth of Patagonia

Factbook
A Welsh-speaking republic in South America, which declared independence from Argentina in 1894.

I can make you a flag, seal or logo - TG me if interested.

User avatar
Medwedian Democratic Federation
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1257
Founded: May 27, 2014
Ex-Nation

Postby Medwedian Democratic Federation » Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:10 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Note: human rights are explicitly NOT given to Medwedian citizens according to the Constitution of the Medwedian Democratic Federation. All citizens are considered serfs of His Excellency, mandated to obey God, President and Fatherland and only entitled to "bear the honor of Medwedian blood and enthusiastically serve the people". Talking about "human rights" or "liberties" is considered light or medium treason and rebellion against the state; thinking about those is considered first degree thoughtcrime. Death is mandatory; impalement, burning at the stake, boiling or shooting (for military officers and those considered "men of honor" by the law) are the prescribed execution methods.
Freedom of information: It is explicitly stated that "the state has every right and is obliged to publicly act for the greater good, be it in words, speeches or reports", meaning that 99.9% of the content of newspapers, radio or television programs is heavily censored brainwashing propaganda. There are no state obligations toward any citizen when it comes to giving information.
Right to bear arms: Civilians are strictly prohibited from bearing arms without special permits. Illegal bearing or possession of arms is considered high treason.
Freedom of speech: No. Any public statements must be pre-approved; any criticism or anti-governmental murmur, even in privacy, is considered treason.
Freedom of association: No. The formation of civilian groups must be approved. Political organizations (other than those of the state) are strictly prohibited on pain of boiling or beheading, self-explanatory.
Freedom of movement: No. Even crossing a county or provincial border (for bonded citizens, e.g. factory workers and farm serfs, leaving the premises of the farm or industrial complex) without a permit is punishable by flogging and labor camp; trying to leave the country without an exit visa is high treason. Any trips must be applied for and approved in a month-long process - even if it means just visiting your grandmother on the other side of the village (otherwise punishable by amputation and labor camp)!
Freedom of assembly: No. Any meetings or communication between two or more persons outside of the collegial sphere of work or intimate sphere of family are subject to prior approval in a month-long bureaucratic process. Self-organized group gatherings are almost never permitted.
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: No. The state reserves the right to detain anybody for any reason or for none at all, indefinitely.
Freedom of religion: Medwedian Orthodox Christianity is the sole and mandatory state religion. Refusal to practice it or attempts to practice other beliefs are considered heresy and punishable by burning at the stake or hanging, drawing and quartering.
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: No. The state is the legal owner of its citizens (and their bodies) and reserves the right to do anything to them at all times. Judges, policemen and executioners are encouraged to invent and practice new, torturous punishment and execution methods.
Freedom of thought: No. The state reserves the right to control and mandate thoughts; a specially-trained thought police consisting of psychologists exists. The Federal Thought and Thoughtcrime Law specifies approved and banned thoughts. Committing a crime in thought is considered to be almost as bad as committing it in reality and punished accordingly.
Right of self-defense: Gray zone here. De jure, self-defence in a threatening situation may function as a ground for mitigation (not complete rebuttal) of punishment if a violent act has been committed; de facto, most Tribunal Judges sentence the victim to death for "Provoking a crime".
Right to food: No. The Federal Resources Law states that it is acceptable for whole regions to be blocked off by the military or police and left to starve after the important residents have been evacuated in order to preserve the nourishment of more important regions or cities. However, several Disaster and Emergency Protocols prescribe that these regions are depopulated and gotten rid of by means of bombardment (even nuclear) if a severe drought or similar food-threatening situation occurs.
Right to form a labor union: No. Labor unions and any form of demands towards one's employer is considered Employer Treason or Proletarian Revolt, punishable by death.
Right to clothing: All citizens are issued uniforms or liveries according to their social position or profession and expected to care for them and regularly report for laundry service. Losing or damaging the clothing is usually punished by flogging. Technically, there is no right to clothing but very well the obligation to cover oneself. Improper or absent clothing in public (and in private, except during bathing and medical examinations of course) is considered immoral exposure and punished by skinning alive with subsequent impalement.
Right of asylum: There is no construct associated with asylum in the Medwedian constitution and legislation, even though major ministers are calling for the introduction. The President and his ministers decide when somebody formally asks for asylum whether they are to be denied at the border, let in and put into a safe place run by the government or let in and tortured to death. The government is notable for having granted asylum to major communist and fascist leaders or politicians and even to a group of far-right chrisitan extremist terrorists who successfully bombed the PETA headquarters of New York in 1998, killing 272 persons.
Right to housing: Technically not; at the same time, those found homeless are sent to labor camps or summarily executed. Usually, workers and farm serfs get barrack beds assigned.
Right to internet access: No. Internet access is heavily controlled; normal citizens are banned from using the World Wide Web and illegal connection attempts are punishable by death. There is a national (controlled and censored) Intranet mainly used by the upper-middle professional class for work (and internet newspapers) that can only be accessed with a special permit that needs to be renewed every six months.
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): There is an obligation to work for every (male) citizen. For some, it means sweating in uranium mines twelve hours a day; for others, it means warming leather chairs and drinking tea - but if anybody is found unemployed (which is very rare, because the state assigns work), they are sent to labor camps or summarily executed in the streets.
Right to property: Officially, not. All property is state property by law; however, when the state assigns property (clothes, a car, personal cutlery, etc...), the receiver is given the privilege to solely use it (and is obliged to care for it). Others are not allowed to use the property on pain of punishment (e.g. amputation of hands for theft, for example.)
Freedom from discrimination:
Freedom from exile:
Freedom from slavery:
Right to die:
Right to water:
Right to a fair trial:
Right to a lawyer:
Right to life:
Right to refuse medical treatment:
Right to petition:
Right to protest:
Right to privacy:

User avatar
Hamilpore
Attaché
 
Posts: 74
Founded: Feb 11, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby Hamilpore » Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:56 pm

Freedom of information:
Information is allowed to be freely accessed in our nation with a few exceptions. There are classifications levels for the case of national security. While, theoretically this means any document could be controlled, in practice this does not happen. A judge can review any challenged controlled document.

Right to bear arms:
In order to protect the Jewish people, Hamilpore not only allows its citizens to bear arms, it strongly encourages it.

Freedom of speech:
Speech is protected in this country. However, libel and the consequences of negative speech may still be prosecuted in a court of law.

Freedom of association:
Organizations that are deemed dangerous to the state of Hamilpore are banned. Associating with such groups may result in being prosecuted for sedition.

Freedom of movement:
People are allowed to move freely within the nation. To leave or enter the nation, a citizen will require a necessary passport.

Freedom of assembly:
Citizens may assemble and protest the government at will. However, they must acquire a license to assemble at certain locations as not to disturb the process of government.

Freedom from arbitrary arrest:
For any arrest to take place, there must be a warrant for that arrest or the officer must have reasonable reason to arrest a person at a certain moment. All arrests that are arbitrary, unless there is a reasonable and measurable danger, must be released within two weeks time.

Freedom of religion:
People may practice whatever religion they follow, but laws in the state of Hamilpore are influenced by Jewish law and practices.

Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment:
Torture is banned in this nation. This includes enhanced interrogation techniques.

Freedom of thought:
No one can control another's thought.

Right of self-defense:
Everyone has a right to defend themselves if their life is reasonably threatened. Each case will be handled individually.

Right to food:
Everyone has a right to live with their basic necessities, but the government can not always provides these. In practice, these are provided by the temples and charities.

Right to form a labor union:
No, the people do not have the right to form a labor union without consequences from the business owner.

Right to clothing:
[See Right to Food]

Right of asylum:
Hamilpore recognizes that some foreign nationals deserve safety from their inhabiting nations. Hamilpore and their embassies will grant this right by virtue of the president.

Right to housing:
[See Right to Food]

Right to internet access:
Nobody has an inherent right to internet. They must pay for it through a commercial company.

Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation):
The government will not force labor union participation

Right to property:
Everyone has the right to the land that they own and it can only be taken away via high criminal action

Freedom from discrimination:
Discrimination is a fact that can not always be avoided. As to protect speech, we do not band all discrimination. However, libel is still a crime.

Freedom from exile:
Exile is a medieval practice and is not practiced in Hamilpore

Freedom from slavery:
Slavery is a medieval practice and is not practiced in Hamilpore

Right to die:
Those that receive life in prison have the right to a death penalty. However, euthanasia is banned within Hamilpore.

Right to water:
[See Right to Food]

Right to a fair trial:
There is a guaranteed right to a free and fair trial with a jury.

Right to a lawyer:
No everyone can provide for their own defense thus they will be given a lawyer if the need be.

Right to life:
As according to Jewish law, all people have a right to life unless it will cause a medical emergency or live a terrible life. All abortions will be overseen by a judge.

Right to refuse medical treatment:
Everyone has the right to refuse medical treatment

Right to petition:
The right to petition the government for change is protected.

Right to protest:
People have the right to protest and assembly with a licensed permit and notice to the government.

Right to privacy:
Every person has a basic right to privacy from others and the government.

User avatar
Sharkland
Civil Servant
 
Posts: 7
Founded: Feb 05, 2017
Ex-Nation

Postby Sharkland » Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:20 pm

Freedom of information: Not specifically addressed but the government is typically very open.
Right to bear arms: Yes, to nonviolent adults without substantially dangerous mental health issues.
Freedom of speech: Strongly protected
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: Yes-- arrests are very uncommon in Sharkland because of a well-trained police force and the decriminalization of victimless offenses.
Freedom of religion: Yes. The national religion is Christianity, but it is not forced upon anyone.
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: Yes-- prisons do not exist in Sharkland (rehabilitation centers are used instead and are very humane) and the entire police force and judicial system are focused on rehabilitation, not punishment.
Freedom of thought: Implied but not in The Royal Charter
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Yes-- citizenship is granted to all who request it, especially refugees.
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Not in Royal Charter, but the government is currently working on a wireless network that will cover the entire island.
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): No, the government feels most labor unions are usually a force for good.
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: Not in The Royal Charter, but such a thing would likely never happen in Sharkland because of the liberal attotude towards crime.
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes, with some limitations (a person cannot request to die because they have had a bad day.)
Right to water: Free to all households and in many public areas
Right to a fair trial: Yes-- the trial is conducted by three judges, all of whom must find a defendant guilty for a conviction. Rather than a "sentencing", a person is held until they are rehabilitated-- with a "maximum sentence". For example, a person convicted of petty theft cannot be held for longer than 30 days, even if they are not rehabilitated in this time.
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: The Royal Charter does not yet mention abortion, but it is typically permitted. The death penalty is illegal, however.
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes, unless you are mentally ill and it is likely that you would accept the treatment if you were mentally healthy.
Right to petition: Yes, and each month the King will pubically respond with his opinion to the petitions with the most signatures, no matter what the subject matter.
Right to protest: Yes, as long as the protest is peaceful.
Right to privacy: Yes, strongly protected. Searches of private residences are rarely conducted, except in emergency situations (ie the police can enter a private residence to free a kidnapped person).

Sharkland takes rights very seriously. Intentionally violating them can lead to suspension or impeachment of government officials.

User avatar
Lethen Empire
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1164
Founded: Dec 03, 2017
Ex-Nation

Postby Lethen Empire » Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:30 pm

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: No
Right to bear arms: Only in special cases
Freedom of speech: No
Freedom of association: No
Freedom of movement: No
Freedom of assembly: No
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: No
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: No
Freedom of thought: No
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: No
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Case-by-case
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: No
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: No
Freedom from exile: No
Freedom from slavery: Yes
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: No
Right to a lawyer: Yes (unless on direct orders from monarch)
Right to life: No (If the state wants you dead, you're dead)
Right to refuse medical treatment: Yes
Right to petition: No
Right to protest: No
Right to privacy: No
Leader Anthem Overview
An alternate universe Letheny - where the monarchy never lost its power.

A 14 civilization, according to this index.
Current Year: 2017
Tech level: MT
We don't use NS stats!
IC Q&A Thread - Koningsplatz Alliance
TG me if you wanna talk, RP, or do whatever!
Lethen INA: Victory in Tel Aviv! Jerusalem within reach! Pro-Crusader assault on Isratine going very well | Raaagh! The Viking Age: Lethen sailors confiscate capital from the con-artists leading Japan in a nostalgic callback to our medieval forefathers

User avatar
Evea
Attaché
 
Posts: 93
Founded: May 11, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Evea » Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:53 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: Yes, if they pass strict psychiatric tests and have no criminal record. May only have small handguns.
Freedom of speech: yes, but hate speech has consequences
Freedom of association: yes
Freedom of movement: yes
Freedom of assembly: yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: yes
Freedom of religion: yes, but not freedom to impose on others
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: yes
Freedom of thought: yes
Right of self-defense: yes
Right to food: yes
Right to form a labor union: yes
Right to clothing:yes
Right of asylum: yes
Right to housing: yes
Right to internet access: yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): yes
Right to property: yes
Freedom from discrimination: yes
Freedom from exile: yes
Freedom from slavery: yes
Right to die: yes
Right to water: yes
Right to a fair trial: yes
Right to a lawyer: yes
Right to life: yes (if you have already been born, abortions are legal)
Right to refuse medical treatment: not entirely (for example, vaccinations are a requirement to receive free national healthcare entitlement unless there is a medical reason)
Right to petition: yes
Right to protest: yes
Right to privacy: yes
Last edited by Evea on Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
NovaUtopia
Civil Servant
 
Posts: 9
Founded: Feb 07, 2018
Ex-Nation

Postby NovaUtopia » Wed Feb 21, 2018 8:05 am

Does your nation's constitution and/or current law protect the following human rights?
Freedom of information: Yes
Right to bear arms: Yes
Freedom of speech: Yes
Freedom of association: Yes
Freedom of movement: Yes
Freedom of assembly: Yes
Freedom from arbitrary arrest: No
Freedom of religion: Yes
Freedom from cruel and unusual punishment: No
Freedom of thought: Yes
Right of self-defense: Yes
Right to food: Yes
Right to form a labor union: Yes
Right to clothing: Yes
Right of asylum: Yes
Right to housing: Yes
Right to internet access: Yes
Right to work (bars the government from forcing labor union participation): Yes
Right to property: Yes
Freedom from discrimination: Yes
Freedom from exile: No
Freedom from slavery: No
Right to die: Yes
Right to water: Yes
Right to a fair trial: No
Right to a lawyer: Yes
Right to life: Yes
Right to refuse medical treatment: No
Right to petition: Yes
Right to protest: Yes
Right to privacy: Yes

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