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A place to put national factbooks, embassy exchanges, and other information regarding the nations of the world. [In character]

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The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 600
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Wed Oct 14, 2020 4:17 pm

The United Artherian Federation wrote:
Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Artheria
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No.5
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No. 5
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? Only when matters of national security deem it necessary, and when minors rights are violated. 5
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No, there are not. 5
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? Yes. Board members are chosen by the Kaiser, and then face retention before the people every five years. 5
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Yes, pornography sites and sites that are terrorist in nature. 5
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? The state has the authority to take down websites that sell illegal goods, host illegal pornography or promote terrorist activites. 5
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No. 5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? Only when they believe it is necessary to do so. 4
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No. 5
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? Pornography is outlawed. 3
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? Diversity in what way? 3
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No. 5
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? Freedom of expression is protected. 5
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes. These laws involve illegal pornography and making terrorist threats against life or property. 4
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Only when it involves illegal pornography or organizing terrorist activities. 4
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No. 5
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No. 5
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Only when required by court order, or the Kaisers request. 3
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No. Any such actives often result in heavy criminal charges. 5


Liberty House has reviewed the status of internet freedom in Artheria, and has assessed an Internet Freedom Score of 93. The primary issue found was the ease in which the government can surveil their citizens, requiring only a simple request. A lower importance concern is the complete ban of pornagraphy, beyond just that which exploits minors.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



Member of the Council Of Free Market Economies

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Toin
Diplomat
 
Posts: 576
Founded: Dec 05, 2016
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Toin » Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:41 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Democratic States of Toin
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? No. Only registered voters may vote. Registered voters have to be citizens and cannot be incarcerated or convicted of a felony at the time of election. To get registered, there usually is no prejudice by voting staff or volunteers, but generally more rural or older staffers or volunteers may hold a prejudice in places of Toin - the rule generally is the more rural the more frequent. To the average citizen, though, prejudice is not often encountered in the voting sphere. Once registered, the "no" becomes a "yes"
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes, but don't necessarily carry it out. The Cabinet carries the policy and legislation out.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, but it's not perfect. Cases slip through occasionally.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, with certain exceptions. Documents that have the potential of being a threat to national security are not freely available, regardless of where they came from, but if someone makes a Freedom of Information Act request, chances are they will receive the document.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes. There is also public media that is owned by the state, but it is no different than private media.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes. Historically, the clerk of Parliament invited members to join in a moment of silent prayer before the session started. Since 2012, the clerk invites members to join in a moment of silent meditation instead.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Usually. Extremist views, such as calling for a Nazi-esque regime or an Islamic government that organizations such as ISIS are actively trying to implement will most likely call for you being placed on a surveillance list, but most anything else flies.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? No.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? The former: yes. The latter: all male residents over the age of 20 must register for the draft to enable them to be called up for service should it be absolutely necessary. Thus, there is no "freedom from war." However, Toin has not used the draft since World War II and follows a pacifist military policy when it comes to foreign engagements, so effectively this is an archane law.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes. There is always prejudice, but it is not frequently encountered, especially in denser areas.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? No.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes.
Links
News | Q&A | Make a Freedom of Information Act request | Factbook

All information posted before 26 April 2018 is retconned and completely inaccurate.

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The Union of British North America
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 361
Founded: Sep 03, 2017
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby The Union of British North America » Wed Oct 14, 2020 6:20 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Union of British North America
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?
Yes, in a parliamentary system
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
Yes, in a parliamentary system
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
Yes, the All-Union Chief Electoral Officer oversees general-level elections and related general-level political financing and election laws. The CELO is appointed by the President-General with the General Council of State upon hearing the nomination by the Grand Council.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
Yes
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
Yes
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?
Yes
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
Yes
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?
Yes
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
Yes, there are independent government officials with long terms and nonpoliticized appointment processes
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
D1. Are there free and independent media?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
Yes, at both the general and provincial levels
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
There are checks against the general government from utilizing conscription; the general government must get provincial approval to conscript citizens. The general government must also get provincial approval to use provincial forces in general or general-provincial operations.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
Yes, there is equality of opportunity and programs to promote it at the general and provincial levels


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Union of British North America
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? In some parts of the NAU, where they are rural and may lack infrastructural access.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?
If in impoverished, rural areas it can be expensive but the general and provincial governments in question are pushing for public broadband and more infrastructure.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?
Given the development of the internet in my country, called the 'combinet' and based more on Project Xanadu's ideas for the world wide web, there is some centralized control but not enough to deter people from getting on the web.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?
No, aside from the growing oligopoly of service providers in the NAU.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?
No, they are independent and impartial to service providers and digital technology providers.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?
Only for things deemed criminal or extremely obscene, such as snuff films, abuse of animals, abuse of children, or buying or selling hard drugs
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?
Not really. It's practically impossible to delete content because it's based on Project Xanadu, which stresses backwards attribution to an extreme level.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?
No, there is an appeals process through administrative tribunals and even the law courts.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?
Sometimes, depending on who they work for, but it is not widespread. Chilling effect is limited.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?
My nation's version of the internet has built-in micropayment systems for content, so content creators are far less dependent on advertisers. And prices are not prohibitively expensive.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?
No, there is wide diversity thanks to the interconnected backwards attribution to all created documents, leading people to past documents and ongoing discussions. Copyright is somewhat strong but still reasonable.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?

Not really, though there are 'moshnets', servers and platforms pushing against the micropayment systems and somewhat strong copyright protections of the combinet.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?
No, there is constitutional and statutory (some are called quasi-constitutional) laws to protect privacy, allow access to information, and protect online expression and press freedom.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?
Yes, clearly defined for illegal activities as listed above and few other criminal matters, such as hiring assassins.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?
If criminal.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?
Not really.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?
It does but there increasing protections and better technologies to protect users' right to privacy.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?
Sometimes, depending if it is terrorism, foreign or domestic, then yes there is precedent to require companies to help.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?
No.
Last edited by The Union of British North America on Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
An alt-history version of an America that peacefully avoided the American Revolution (Turtledove's "The Two Georges"), mixed with some of Sobel's "For Want of a Nail" and a lot of the anthology "Columbia and Britannia".

Real world territories that I am using: contiguous US, Alaska, Canada, British West Indies, Bermuda, and Baja California. Hawaii is an associated state. The NAU is a federal constitutional monarchy.

I don't use NS stats except for NS governmental policies (basic policies of course), and classification (I'm somewhat of a SuperCanada). MT+. In-Character/RP name: North American Union (NAU). IC/RP main supranational IGO: United Commonwealth of Nations.

CAPINTERN, CFME/GFTC, ECO, and Francophonie member. Amistad Declaration signatory.

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Zarnicovia nova
Diplomat
 
Posts: 973
Founded: Jun 03, 2020
Democratic Socialists

Postby Zarnicovia nova » Fri Oct 16, 2020 9:54 am

Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? no
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? yes but only to nativen tribe numbering around 78,000 who refuse to do anything modern and we let them
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? no
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? yes
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? no
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? no
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? yes but only deleting anti-science threads/posts
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?[ no/b]
[b]B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? no

B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? no
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? no
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? no
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? yes
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? no
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? yes but only if you steal peoples information/stalk
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? yes but only for people who steal other peoples information/slalk other people
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? no, and requires it.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? yes, but only on people who the state considers a possible criminal.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? no
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? no
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country founded by a religion based off of my and the views of Utah/the Mormons. far-left democracy very powerful.

English is 2nd language
A Chinese immigrant to the US
far-left
pro-nationalism/army
anti-corruption

PROUD MEMBER OF GRAIL
BREACKING NEWS: go tohttps://forum.nationstates.net/viewto ... ed4ec12314 to see BREAKING NEWS

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Mordka
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 153
Founded: Aug 12, 2018
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Mordka » Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:30 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: the Republic of Mordka
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?: no
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?: no because there is no legislation.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?: no because there are no elections
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?: no
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?: no they just get publicly executed
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?: no
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?: no, all races are kept apart and none of them (except for whites) have a chance to advance in rank, Mordka has officially became an atheist state since the coup as religion would have held the government back, woman have no political power and LGBT is illegal and is punishable by death
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?: yes but they are not elected.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?: yes
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?: no
D1. Are there free and independent media?: no
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?: no because religion is not allowed as the Republic is atheist and will crack down on it.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?: no, government propaganda is watched every day to get the message of submission to the Republic.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?: no and they are likely to get executed.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?: no
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?: no
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?: no
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?: no
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?: no
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?: no
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?: no
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?: no what they do in life is regulated by the government and there is a compulsory military service.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?: no as the economy is socialist all production is run by the government.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?: no, woman have no choice of who they marry as men have to go to the fathers and convince them and they organise the weddings and divorces are illegal, There are no limits to having children but abortion is illegal, men own their women and have complete say of their lives and their are no laws that protect them from violence, make-up is also illegal.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?: no because all industry is owned by the government.
Last edited by Mordka on Sat Oct 17, 2020 2:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Grand Autocracy of Atlantis
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 4
Founded: Sep 04, 2019
Iron Fist Consumerists

Postby Grand Autocracy of Atlantis » Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:46 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
Empire of Atlantea
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?
No, the current head of government was appointed by the Emperor and maintains little actual formal power. The Position of Emperor is hereditary, being inherited in absolute primogeniture succession.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
In the Lower House of the National Assembly, the Boule is elected through universal weighted suffrage every six years. Well, the Senate is unelected, being composed of 2 groups, hereditary nobility, who inherit their seat on the Senate as well as their title and rank in the nobility following the death of the previous holder through primogeniture and hold that seat for life, and appointed senator who holds their seat for life or until they step down from it, with their seat being filled by a new appointee chosen by the Emperor or head of government.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
No, voting well a universal right is weighted, with votes being grouped together and weighed depending on the class and ancestry(Nobility) of the voter. The Office of the Electorate is headed by the Electoral Commission, a commission reformed every electoral season and composed of 12 members of the Assembly, 5 Prefects from the Provinces, and 8 members of the nobility are chosen by sortition act as an impartial body in enforcing electoral laws.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
Yes and No. Well people are allowed to organize political parties on their own volition, parties representing certain policies and ideologies are banned(Such as those advocating for communism) and smaller newer parties will have little chance of surviving against the older and better-established parties.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
No
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?
Yes
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
Certain Religious and Ethnic Groups have been and are certainly barred from a number of political rights and electoral opportunities.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?
No, head of government is unelected and directed by the will of the monarchy in their decisions. But they otherwise do determine policies with the legislature.
No, the head of government is not elected. Otherwise, yes, the head of government and legislative body do determine policies.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
Yes, there are some
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
No
D1. Are there free and independent media?
Yes, there are some dotted throughout the Empire, but generally, those with the support of the Imperial Government have greater spread and influence.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
No, in more recent times and throughout history, certain religious groups have been suppressed.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
No, though some private institutions may be freer from political influence than others
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
No.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
No
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
Dependent on the organization and the relation between it and government
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
Large-Scale Unions, such as those on the national level are repressed. Those on the provincial or local level are left unmolested and free to do as they wish.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
Yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
Most of the time, yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
Yes
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
No
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
For the most part, yes. Though there are some minor restrictions, mostly dependent on the area as well as the class of the person.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
For the most part, Yes.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
Minor restrictions on certain freedoms, such as that as appearance.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
No
Last edited by Grand Autocracy of Atlantis on Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Indian Empire
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1966
Founded: Mar 29, 2013
Liberal Democratic Socialists

Postby Indian Empire » Sat Oct 17, 2020 1:04 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?- Kind of? The Prime Minister is selected by the legislature's majority party as determined through the elections.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?- Yes. The legislature is elected to a four year term in free & fair elections.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?- Elections are managed by the Indian Empire Election Commission, a non-partisan group of 10 Empirians confirmed by the legislature. However, the Supreme Court is permitted to take court cases related to election integrity and external parties are permitted to observe Indian Empire's election to ensure integrity.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?- Yes. The single greatest obstacle to the dominance of political groups outside of the two major parties is through the presence of first past the post as Indian Empire's voting system. A Constitutional Amendment is on the ballot in 2021's election to implement ranked choice voting, however.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?- Yes, the current primary opposition party previously ruled from 2001 to 2009 and gained 21 seats in the House of Commons in 2017's elections.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?- Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?- Yes. Indian Empire is a very ethnically diverse nation and as such, political rights/opportunities for different ethnic, religious, and gender groups have been protected since Independence in 1965. LGBT protections joined this category officially in 2009.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?- See the print about Prime Minister regarding the powers of that position. The legislature is fully responsible for what legislation is passed, and legislative sessions are conducted/lead by the Prime Minister.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?- Generally, yes. The IEEC and the Indian Empire Intelligence Agency investigate corruption within Indian Empire. Due to the freedoms Empirians enjoy, however, privately owned companies and external observers are welcome to investigate and report on these findings as well. Indian Empire prides itself on integrity.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?- Yes, and the government is open to external observers, allowing them to examine the government.
D1. Are there free and independent media?- Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?- Yes. Empirians are not that religious, broadly, but churches, mosques, and other places of worship can easily be located within large & medium sized cities.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?- Lean Yes. Education in Indian Empire operates on a level playing field, with no private/charter schools. The education ciriculum is also largely determined by legislative action along with the standards set by the Education Secretary. Political Indoctrination does not occur however, overturned by the court system.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?- Generally, yes, so long as such is peaceful. Elected Officials and individuals have been arrested in the past over calls for violence and terroristic threats- which are considered off limits in the scope of Empirian Law. However, this is clearly defined and as such the use of these laws is very rare in the modern day.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?- Yes, and is oftenly used.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?- Yes, NGO's are welcome to operate in Indian Empire, and are treated on equal ground with other organizations.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?- Yes, and labor organizations often work in turn with the Labor Secretary in negotiations regarding certain worker rights or working conditions.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?- Yes, and any justices appointed by the government into this judiciary must be appointed with all party leaders represented in parliament in favor.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?- Yes, the Empirian Judicial System has a similar framework to that in much of the western world.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?- Yes, as stated earlier there is low tolerance for violence & calls to violence in Indian Empire.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?- Yes, though these laws have been enshrined in various phases over Empirian History.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?- Yes, and the tuition for colleges & other training organizations is covered by the government under the law.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?- Yes, Empirians may purchase and own property.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?- Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?- Yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Indian Empire
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections?- No, internet access is considered crucial to the education & work of many Empirians and as such is heavily subsidized by the Government.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?- No. If a Family or Individual Living alone cannot afford the subsidized internet price (most typically if they are on some form of welfare) the Government will cover the cost as part of this welfare provided to lower-income households.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?- No, the internet is unfiltered in Indian Empire.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?- No, the Empirian Government is quick to break up companies that take up a high percentage of the market share and ensure competition in this regard. The Government does offer internet connectivity to residences that cannot afford the subsidized internet prices offered by providers.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?- No, the government only very rarely acts on things placed on the internet unless it breaks a law and the person is currently within Indian Empire's borders.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?- Very rarely, and it most often occurs in regards to high level officials who call for violence against groups of people, which is prohibited in Empirian Law. However, this is very rare, and the Government has filed less than five of these requests over the past 20 years.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?- No, though similar to above, occassionally requests may be made- but are never followed up with such action by ISP's.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?- No. In the very rare occassion that content has been filtered, a notice is attached explaining what provisions of Empirian law the post violates and a link is provided to the related law.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?- Empirian users on the internet do not self-censor.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?- No.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?- No.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?- No, you can often find a wide variety of opinions.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?- No, and plenty of organizations that mobilize within Indian Empire on certain issues or topics exist online.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?- The Empirian Constitiution protects freedom of the press, access to the information, and freedom of expression (outside of calls for violence as stated earlier). They are upheld by a judiciary that is non-partisan and requires the approval of all party leaders in parliament in order to get confirmed.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?- Not as a set in stone law, but it has largely been decided that laws in Indian Empire do also apply to conduct on the internet within Indian Empire's borders, with any set penalties the same as established in the law broken.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?- As mentioned above, they can be if they are within Indian Empire's jurisdiction and break a law within said jurisdiction.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?- No.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?- No, the government does not engage in surveillance of Empirians.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?- Only to a degree. The government is not interested in every search, but is interested in knowing about Empirians searching items related to terroristic or violent activities.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?- No.
Internet Explorer, IE, "Preacher of Defender Ideals"

User avatar
Aryax
Bureaucrat
 
Posts: 44
Founded: Oct 16, 2019
Psychotic Dictatorship

Postby Aryax » Sat Oct 17, 2020 1:37 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: the People's Republic of Aryax
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? The National President is both head of state and head of government, and it is elected by the People's Assembly, according to constitutional procedure. The National President then chooses a Cabinet, which forms the executive branch. Stanislav Tyrankov, who is serving a five-year term, firmly dominates the People's Revolutionary Movement (PRM), the sole legal party. Elections for the People's Assembly are tightly controlled as is the selection of a new National President, with positions being decided in advance in intraparty congresses.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? The People's Assembly is elected every five years. All candidates are preselected by the PRM and run unopposed. Every citizen aged 18 or more is eligible to vote. Turnouts are typically very high, at over 90%, but voting is mandatory.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? There is a clear legal framework to conduct elections, but it is carefully tailored to deny any genuine alternative to the PRM. Voting is mandatory, and the government closely tracks voting behavior - rejection of its preferred candidates leads to harsh persecution. Subnational delegates and councils are appointed vertically by the national government; similarly, mayors and municipal councils are appointed by the respective provincial council.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Aryax is a one-party state where the ruling PRM holds a legal and practical monopoly on political power and does not tolerate any opposition or deviation from the official line.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? The current political elite took power by force. Any dissent is outlawed and results in extreme punishments. Tyrankov continues to expand its already firm control over the PRM to prevent intraparty challenges, and benefits from a growing cult of personality.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Political participation outside the PRM is largely impossible, and citizens in general can not influence governmental decisions. A small elite increasingly centered around Tyrankov dominates the PRM and controls all institutions. Purges in these political structures often take place, removing all officials that may be a threat to the leadership.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? No segment of the population enjoys any political rights. In practice, the interests of women are not addressed by the political system. The LGBT collective and religious groups are subject to extremely severe repression and can not organize politically.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? No officials are freely elected at any level. The People's Assembly plays a minimal role in crafting policies, which are all set backstage by Tyrankov and his close allies and then rubber-stamped. Free debate within the PRM is impeded by a growing cult of personality around Tyrankov.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Corruption is pervasive and may sap as much as 20% of the national GDP. The few anticorruption efforts in place are heavily politicized, and often used as an excuse for purging PRM elites and increasing popular support in key moments. In fact, selective government tolerance of corruption is used to reward elite loyalty.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? The government is not accountable to the public. Even basic information about institutional operations is treated as a state secret. Official figures are known to be distorted to match the regime's ideological goals.
D1. Are there free and independent media? The state holds a legal monopoly on all domestic media outlets, which are heavily censored. Foreign broadcasts are barely accessible from within the country, and consumption of foreign media can be met with serious consequences. Private outlets do not exist even on the national intranet, while the global internet is subject to a government-controlled whitelist that denies any access to foreign media or content-creation platforms.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Intense state indoctrination precludes freedom of religion. Vaguely worded laws allow the state to crack down on any unauthorized religious activity; none are tolerated in practice. Thousands of religious believers are thought to have been killed by the state through mass internment in specialized prison camps for immediate execution. Proselytizing foreigners can face execution too.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? The state must approve all curriculums and controls all educational institutions. The education system in general is marred by corruption, political indoctrination, discriminatory curricula and bureaucratic obstacles. Other intrusive controls include the use of informants.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? A climate of fear surrounds private discussion and much of everyday life. The state operates an enormous surveillance apparatus that includes a huge number of informants, supported by the tagging of the population with unique ID chips. These chips support a Social Credit System that ranks citizens according to their political and non-political behavior. All communications are strictly monitored and isolated from global networks.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Freedom of assembly does not exist. The police and security services routinely break up unauthorized groups of more than three people and arrest participants. Organizing protests is extremely difficult and even spontaneous ones are almost non-existant in the face of overwhelming police and security presences and severe penalties.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? All organizations must be created by the state or the PRM. No true NGOs operate in Aryax.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Strikes, collective bargaining, or any organized labor activity is illegal.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? The judiciary is controlled by the government both in law and in practice.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? The rule of law is virtually non-existant. Vague offenses such as "anticonstitutional activities" criminalize an enormous range of activities and are enforced arbitrarily. Almost all detentions are carried abduction-style in conditions that amount to forced disappearences. Up to 1% of the population (70,000 people) may be imprisoned or in labor camps for political reasons. The powerful Ministry of State Security (MGB), the secret and political police, readily uses extralegal tactics to crush dissent. The state maintains a system of labor camps, located underground to avoid satellite imagery. Some have allegedly been transformed into extermination centres where detainees, mostly religious believers and LGBT people, are secretly executed upon arrival.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Aryax is free from war and insurgencies and the crime rate is extremely low, but state actors commit atrocities with absolute impunity. Torture, forced labor, starvation and other gruesome abuses are routine in labor camps. The state often carries public, private and extralegal executions.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Harsh discrimination is prevalent throughout daily life, and it is mainly based on political reliability and ideological conformity. Citizens are classified according to their behavior through a Social Credit System. The state actively seeks to destroy religious groups and dismantle the LGBT community. Women do not enjoy legal equality and face widespread discrimination: article 14 of the Constitution calls for gender equality only "within the limits of basic biology", and laws banning "gender supremacy", "false reporting of a crime" and "anticonstitutional activities" compound the problem.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? There are multiple draconian restrictions on freedom of movement. A citizen's Social Credit score affects his or her place of residence, employment and educational opportunities, and access to medical facilities and stores. Furthermore, changing place of residence, employment or education requires state approval, which largely depends on said Social Credit score. The state imposes a nationwide curfew and private motorized vehicles are banned, ostensibly for environmental reasons. Forced resettlement is also common. Internal travel requires prior explicit authorization and foreign travel is strictly controlled through a draconian exit visa system. Regulations define "illegal emigration" as treason.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Private property is not recognized, and the state owns all land and legally controls all economic activity.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Social freedoms are limited. Same-sexual activity is illegal, and state permission is required to marry a foreign citizen. Objectification and sexual harassment of women are rife. Women are also disproportionately affected by laws governing dress codes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Forced labor is common in detention camps and mass mobilization programs, even for children. A command economy and rampant corruption further diminish equality of opportunity.
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People's Republic of Aryax
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Ⰰⱃⱑⰽⱄⰰⱑ Ⱀⰰⱃⱁⰴⱀⰰⱑ Ⱃⰵⱄⱂⱆⰱⰾⰹⰽⰰ
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Aryaksaya Narodnaya Ryespublika
This nation does not represent my views.

User avatar
New Goldman
Spokesperson
 
Posts: 119
Founded: Jul 27, 2020
Capitalist Paradise

Postby New Goldman » Sat Oct 17, 2020 6:20 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Empire of New Goldman
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? 3/4. The Emperor (the overall head of state) is not elected. Things are different however for the Prime Minister, the #2 in the nation. He is elected to a 4 year term, with no term restrictions. The Emperor may even elongate his term when necessary.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? 4/4. This is true in our case. The Council of Representatives are elected directly by their respective regions, and the Council Speaker itself is elected directly. The Senate meanwhile also has their members elected respectively, but the Senate President is elected post general elections by the members.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? 4/4. The Empire of New Goldman has the typical electoral college vote of any other nation. The Commission of National Elections are the ones who manage it.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? 3/4. Not entirely. Article 1 Section VII mandates that political parties are only allowed to be formed in the Prime Ministerial Elections. Any election outside that will be considered illegal. As an alternative, candidates may form "Party Lists" with their mates. This is done to avoid chaos among state governments.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? 4/4. They can. The problem is that the people doesn't like them too much. There was in fact a communist Prime Minister in the 70s who was elected democratically.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? 4/4.Law mandates that no external government is to interfere in any form with the elections. Goldmanians in foreign countries however may cast a foreign vote, which will be counted as a popular vote.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? 4/4. Yes they may. Every citizen is obligated to vote in any elections, whatever their race, color or sex is.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? 3/4. The Prime Minister is in charge of the National Assembly and the entire government, and oversees its affairs. The Emperor however is the overall supreme head and figure that retains absolute power over any law.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? 3/4. Their fairly working, but not all the time it is always apprehended.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? 4/4. Yes. Even with the Emperor, this is mandated. The Government must always be open to its people and be honest with its every act. Any violation is considered treason.
D1. Are there free and independent media? 4/4. This is implemented rigorously. The Press is not moderated in any form by the government.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? 2/4. This is probably the only controlled thing in New Goldman. The Abrahamic Religions are constitutionally banned from the Empire, and any mention of it will result in imprisonment. The ARs are considered a bluff to take power and is therefore limited.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? 4/4. This is of course a right for each student. The Government must have no indoctrination implemented in the education system
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? 4/4. Yes. As long as the views aren't hostile to a particular audience, politicians are allowed to share their views.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? 4/4. Yes. This is also an essential right for a normal citizen.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? 4/4. This is true. Private Industry in fact aids the government sometimes in these kinds of issues. The Prime Minister himself is a CEO.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? 3/4. The only allowed far right organization is the Communist Party of New Goldman. The other trade unions are mostly Center Left or Democratic Socialists, and even Greens.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? 4/4. Yes. It is one of the 3 essential branches of the government, and the freedom for it to operate independently in some aspects is respected.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? 4/4. Yes. This is Constitutional law, and must be complied with.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? 4/4. New Goldman respects peace and negotiation to the extent of its ability, so this is true.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? 4/4. Racial and sexual equality, and basically any other treatment, is protected by various legislations to avoid the spread of racism and sexism.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? 4/4. Yes. This is a benefit of the citizen.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? 4/4. Of course, as long as it complies with business laws.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? 4/4. There is no apparent reason in New Goldman to control the lives of people. They are free to form relationships with anyone they wish without government interference.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? 4/4. The worker and employer both gets necessary freedoms that a citizen must have, and they have the opportunity to do independent things.
"United We Stand, For The Country Dear"

Tier 6: Digital Discoverer | Level 0: Inept | Type 6: Planetary Politician

User avatar
Thermodolia
Khan of Spam
 
Posts: 61708
Founded: Oct 07, 2011
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Thermodolia » Sat Oct 17, 2020 7:51 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The National Republic of Thermodolia
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?
The President of Thermodolia, who is the chief executive and head of state, is elected through free and fair elections in a two round system.

While the head of government is not elected but appointed they must be a member of the National Assembly and therefore are elected in free and fair elections.

A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
Yes. The Federal Senate and the National Assembly are both elected in free and fair elections.

A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
Somewhat. Thermodolia does ban communists and Nazis/fascists from running for office as well as those who belong to cults. The Federal Electoral Commission implements all laws in an impartial manner.

B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
Yes however they are prohibited from organizing any groups which promote communism, fascism, nazism, conspiracy theories, anti-vaccination, or anything else which could prove a threat to the nation.

B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
Yes. The opposition currently holds the Prime Minister and the majority in the National Assembly.

B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?
Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
Yes, though those who belong to cults are prohibited from standing for election. Those who identify as TQ+ while currently allowed to vote and stand for office are regularly harassed when attempting to do so.

C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?
Yes

C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
Extremely. In Thermodolia a corruption scandal can end a political career. In addition there is an entire agency devoted to removing corruption in the government.

C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
As much as possible.

D1. Are there free and independent media?
Yes.

D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
In Thermodolia religion is considered to be a private matter. As such it is rare and possibly illegal for one to publicly express their faith. Religious garments and icons are prohibited from wear in public.

Cults are religious groups which are banned in Thermodolia for exhibiting cult like and extremist behavior. Those who follow such cults have their legal rights severely curtailed.

D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
Yes

D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
Yes. Though those who express certain views in regards to anti-vaccination or communism/fascism will be monitored

E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
Yes, except for communist, fascist, nazi, anti-vacation, and other similar groups.

E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
Yes

E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
Yes

F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
Yes

F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
Yes

F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
Yes

F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
For the most part. Thermodolia, both legally and culturally, does tend to come down hard on non Thermodolian ethnic groups, cults, and those who identify as TQ+

G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
Yes

G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
Yes

G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
Yes, though members of cults are prohibited from doing the above

G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
Yes


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The National Republic of Thermodolia
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections?
No. Thermodolia spends quite a bit of money in making sure the vast majority of the nation has internet.

A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?
No. The federal government actually makes sure that hard to reach areas are provided with internet through the National Internet Service Corporation.

A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?
No

A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?
No

A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?
No

B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?
Sort of, the Federal Internet Registration Authority is required to prohibit the registration of websites using “.th” and its sub domains, which promote child abuse, child sexual acts, domestic violence, terrorism, animal cruelty, denialism, and general harm.

The FIRA is also allowed to block access to sites which promote those things.

B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?
No

B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?
No

B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?
Not really.

B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?
No

B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?
No

B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?
Diversity in opinion? No it doesn’t lack that.

B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?
No

C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?
No. The constitution and other laws most definitely do not fail to protect such rights and the judiciary in Thermodolia is very much independent.

C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?
Yes.

C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?
Yes. Those who use the internet to expose themselves to minors or use the internet to harm them, use the internet to organize terrorism, or use the internet to commit any other criminal act will be penalized for such actions.

C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?
No

C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?
No, not without a warrant

C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?
Yes. Service providers are required to send the government information such as phone calls, search histories, locations, and other such data when asked.

C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?
No
Last edited by Thermodolia on Sat Oct 17, 2020 7:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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User avatar
Wuchu
Envoy
 
Posts: 228
Founded: Aug 11, 2020
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Wuchu » Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:59 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Wuchu
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? We don't actually have a 'head of government' because... well, there's no government. The closest thing to the position are the Co-Chairmen of the Swamp Gang, whose authority comes entirely out of respect from the community - if the community decides they no longer like them, they will simply cease to follow their leadership. In that sense, yes, they were 'elected' freely and fairly.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Likewise, there is no legislature, and all policies and codes of conduct within Wuchu are established through consensus and consent of the community's members.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? All rules and regulations regarding the individual elections of positions such as the commanders of the Swamp Gang are decided by the electors themselves.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes, there are no prohibitions on organisation, association, or movement of peoples within Wuchu.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Technically speaking, there is no 'opposition' as all participants in the social structures of Wuchu can be counted as 'non-partisan.' Power and authority to positions are granted through consent and consensus out of the respect of those being led.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? There are no prohibitions on association and involvement in any activities, though the community is likely to ostracise anyone they deem to be harmful or toxic. 'Voter intimidation' is impossible due to the nature of our social structures and lack of institutional power over its member base.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes, and said groups in fact compose a majority of Wuchu residents.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? No, all policies, agendas, and codes are set by the community members themselves, although the vote and opinion of those in positions such as the Chairmen or commanders are highly influential and can sway groups of members.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, due to the nature of our systems, corruption is essentially impossible to carry out in any meaningful capacity.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, as all decisions and agendas are agreed upon by members themselves during union assemblies, and clerks are tasked to report all activities to the members during the beginning of union assemblies.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes. It is up to the individual teachers and the students to decide what they wish to learn, how they wish to learn; freedom of information is a core principle of our learning values.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Well, if their opinions prove to be a lil sus, the people around them may ostracise them from their circles, or keep an eye on their activities in order to stop them from doing any harm to the community at large.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes, although armed foreign groups are prohibited from entering Wuchu-occupied territories, to ensure the safety of Wuchu residents.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? No, there is no judiciary. All qualms, issues, and injustices are sorted out on an individual basis through mediated arbitration, through restorative justice, or some other agreed-upon mode.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes, the rights of persons are respected, even when it becomes evident they have committed an injustice to the community or its members. There is no process of violence or punishment, and should the arbitration fail, the guilty party is most likely to be simply ostracised and removed from Wuchu.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Due to the nature of our system, any large-scale activities must be supported and legitimised by the community. Rogue, illegitimate activities, such as discriminatory lynchings (which are unlikely, in any case, due to who our members tend to be and why they move to Wuchu in the first place) result in retaliation by the larger community against the perpetrators.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Exploitative practices, such as those under the traditional system of Capitalism, aren't going to go anywhere in Wuchu. Personal property, mutually beneficial exchange relationships are free to be established, although nearly all property is shared collectively.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, and in cases of domestic abuse, the abuser is removed from the community while the victim is generally supported by their friends and family, as well as the wider community.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes - most residents of Wuchu come here specifically in order to escape exploitation and oppression and enjoy our laissez-faire social structures.
专注于我为我自己铺平的道路
Documenting the experiment against spooks at the crossroads between worlds. | NS stats/policies not canon.
The Messianic Age of Pure Negation is clad in yellow and black, baby! No more spooks, sound all doots!
@kot- "log" -era feed: join the revolution, fight in the footsteps of uncle ted! | v.2 out rn! | explain deleuze to me like i'm one of ur french girls | don't talk to me if u like elon musk | happy anti-spooktober| nsg is a different fuckin' planet huh | i hope everyone has a wonderful apocalypse :) | vibin' up in the O̶̰̎t̷̲̅h̸̳̃e̷̙͛r̸̘͗ ̷̟̃P̷̩̌l̸̥̄a̴̳͂c̵͈͑e̷͚̅ with monke et al, hmu | remember kids, the difference between being homeless n being a nomad is *attitude!* | srsly, have u read heidegger doe?

User avatar
Namabi
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 14
Founded: Apr 24, 2020
Democratic Socialists

Postby Namabi » Sun Oct 18, 2020 1:11 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Namabi
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? The head of state (the President) was chosen via an election in which candidates had to have sufficient skills to lead the country. The head of government (the Head Technocrat) was hand-picked by a skilled, knowledgeable and experienced group of around 15 people.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Not quite, again, candidates had to have sufficient skills for the position prior to running.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Again, candidates were ensured to have sufficient skills before running for the office. Otherwise, yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes, in political groupings, since parties don’t exist.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Namabi doesn’t quite have an ‘opposition’, since political parties don’t exist. It is simply opposing ideologies, in which case, no, since society (at the moment) is very rigid in ideology.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes, assuming they have sufficient ability to hold office. If not, they are permitted to take part in the electoral system, but not hold a government office.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, except for certain types of incidents, and military operations.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Legally yes, though it’s best to practice a religion in private.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? For the law-abiding citizen, yes.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Almost always, yes. Of course, it isn’t perfect.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? No. They are subject to regulation.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Mostly yes. Namabians are not permitted to have more than 5 children, to help combat several serious issues.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Namabi
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Yes.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes, many regulations. A reliable internet provider, however, should have no problem with them.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? No.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes, cybercrime.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes, though again, the only contexts this comes in are cybercrimes.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No.
Last edited by Namabi on Sun Oct 18, 2020 1:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
The United Territories of Namabi | А Обеди Тэриторя в Намаби
Не всо та блэстит чет злотя.
A frozen land at the edge of the world.

Oct. 20
Windstorm predicted to stop in two days. | Pyattinovskians beggining to dislike their city’s conservatism. | Namabians finding more creative ways to spend their time.

User avatar
Charellia
Minister
 
Posts: 3122
Founded: Jul 24, 2012
New York Times Democracy

Postby Charellia » Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:58 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: United Federation of Charellia
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes. The threshold to register a political party is quite low, with the only requirements being to have 300 confirmed members at the time of founding and to run at least 1 candidate in an election within a four year period. This is not the same as receiving official recognition, which grants the party additional rights, such as sending a representative to national debates. Official recognition requires a party-member to hold an elected office at the level of government at which the party intends to contest an election (meaning that a party can be recognized within a province but not nationally, or vice versa). The last national party to receive official recognition was the Green Party, which claimed its first seat on the National Council in 2018.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? While the United Liberal Party has controlled the executive branch since 2004, control of the legislative branch has shifted three times during that same period, with the ULP, Democratic Socialist Party, and centre-right Federation Party all holding power at various times.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes. Most information is accessible to the public, except in cases where its release would compromise privacy or public safety
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: United Federation of Charellia
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No. The price of internet access is regulated, and the government has instituted low-income subsidies as part of its COVID-19 relief program.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? No
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Only in cases where the content constitutes a criminal offence, and only by court order.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Only in cases where there are grounds to lay a criminal charge against the producer of the content.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No. Rules are clear and non-onerous to the point that most citizens will never risk running afoul of them.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? Not within Charellia, although we cannot speak to foreign-based content that our citizens may choose to access.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No. Charellia is home to numerous independent blogs, journals, and newspapers, and does not restrict access to foreign media, even when it is hostile to our national interest. Ongoing education campaigns teach citizens to recognize online propaganda.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? The Charellian constitution holds freedom of expression and intellectual freedom to be the foundation of democracy, and courts have consistently enforced the precedent that any legal restriction of these rights must be both unambiguous in its scope and must show beyond a reasonable doubt that its enforcement is required to prevent demonstrable harm to a person or persons. (prosecuting somebody for inciting a riot would be an example of an enforceable restriction)
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Online activities are subject to the same laws as real-world activities.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? If those activities would constitute a crime in a non-online setting.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No
Last edited by Charellia on Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Motherland of Pindorama
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 3
Founded: Sep 30, 2020
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Motherland of Pindorama » Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:16 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Motherland of Pindorama
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Well, yes, he was elected in the 2029 election and re-elected in 2033 and 2037. However, during the Purple Revolution of 2039-40, he instigated a self-coup that installed him as a dictator.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes, they were directly elected, but not through "free and fair" means, unless banning popular opposition parties, arresting and torturing political rivals, and implementing laws that assure the election is won by a specific party is considered to be fair game.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? No, electoral laws are definitely not fair, since they guarantee the election is won by the government.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? No. People are forbidden from organizing parties unless it has the support of the National Popular Front (the ruling party). Opposition parties have a limit of how many members can join the party in a year, are limited to a maximum number of seats in the Congress, and these parties can be banned at any time without a given reason.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Given the way laws were written, it is currently impossible for the opposition to gain more seats than the governing coalition. Although these parties can have massive popular support, they will be dismantled at the Conductor's whim if they prove to be an obstacle.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extra-political means?
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? No. Clergymen are banned from entering politics, transexuals are not recognized as citizens and therefore can't be part of the government, women are excluded from roles of responsibility (there are exceptions though), and Muslims are stripped of their political rights.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? What freely elected head of government? Yes, the Conductor (both the head of government and head of state) determines the policies and laws, the legislative has some powers but it's subject to the Conductor.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, unless the Conductor and his friends are involved in some shady stuff. This rarely happens, as the Conductor is known for his hatred of corrupt politicians.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? No.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Independent media? Sure. Free media? Not so much.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? No. Islam and Scientology are banned, non-Christian institutions are heavily taxed and regulated, proselytism of foreign churches is banned, among other discriminatory policies, such as the complete ban on circumcision.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? No. The purpose of the educational system is not only to educate people but also to make them into obedient vassals of the state. Professors are banned from exposing their views.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? No. Communists, feminists, anarchists, libertarians, and nazis are always persecuted.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Technically yes, but in practice no.
E2. Is there freedom for nongovernmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? No. These are viewed with extreme suspicion.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? No. All trade unions are controlled by the state.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? No. The judiciary is obedient to the executive. The Supreme Court is a de facto puppet organization under the control of the Conductor, and the President of the Supreme Court holds a ceremonial role.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes. At least that's what the government says.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? No. Any citizen can be abducted and tortured at the whim of the military and the police, although these only happens against suspected criminals and dissidents.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? No. All laws and policies that protected certain groups from discrimination were scrapped shortly before and during the Purple Revolution, and many of these groups are subject to daily abuses, some of them promoted by the government.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? As long as they do not permanently leave Pindorama, yes. This only applies to native-born citizens, as naturalized citizens are free to leave at any moment.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes, as long as they are not on the watchlist of the government.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? No. The state controls the appearance of the citizens, as tattoos, piercings, and other body modifications are banned. Women are also forbidden from dyeing their hair and certain haircuts (such as mohawks) are banned for women. The state also arranges marriage between partners with "desirable traits", and prohibits marriage between a "desirable partner" and an "undesirable agent".
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes, provided they are neither a dissident nor a "unwanted minority".
Motherland of Pindorama
A post-civil war country in South America, led by an ultranationalist party. The one-eyed leader Rafael Serra truly believes that the country has Canaanite roots and that Pindorama is the rightful successor of the Roman Empire.
Overview | The National Conductor | Canon Policies
Perhaps NS stats should be used?
Tech Level: PMT (October 2042)
Puppet of the Neo Brazilian Empire
Metropolitan Diary: Mandatory community service to be extended for unemployed adults. Teenagers and retired citizens are already part of the service program. | Three new aircraft carriers ordered by Pindorama. "Down with American imperialism! Japan rules the pacific and Pindorama will rule the Atlantic" said the Pindoramese defense minister.

User avatar
New Akhetaten
Political Columnist
 
Posts: 5
Founded: Oct 14, 2020
Iron Fist Socialists

Postby New Akhetaten » Sun Oct 18, 2020 8:31 pm

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? No; the Pharaoh inherited his position, and the Grand Vizier was appointed.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? No, the Popular Council is chosen through sortition
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? NA
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Regular people do not. The members of the Popular Council can be grouped into whatever factions they choose
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? No
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Common people don't get political choices unless they are in the Popular Council. There they are free from any sort of pressures.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? No, the Popular Council's powers and elected officers are limited, although they do have a great deal of influence
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Moderate
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Moderate
D1. Are there free and independent media? There is a quasi-independent media
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? No
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? As long as they're not a threat to the state
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? If peaceable and with a permit
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? As long as they are not a threat to the state
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes (within limits)
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes

User avatar
New Transeurasia
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1184
Founded: Dec 22, 2016
Left-Leaning College State

Postby New Transeurasia » Mon Oct 19, 2020 12:55 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Democratic Federation of New Transeurasia
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes, though there may be some corporate corruption.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Not entirely, as corruption does exist in some lower parts of the government.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes. NT has freedom of dissent, meaning citizens have the right to political beliefs, and to voice them when asked(ie, ballot or interview or just questioning)
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Not entirely. While corporations have freedoms to organize events, protests and the like are generally not legal without permits.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes, though industries are not commonly unionized due to companies legally sabotaging trade unions.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, fully.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Democratic Federation of New Transeurasia
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Yes, though only at speed/quality of internet connections
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No. Satellite internet and cheap fiber internet have made internet access the exact opposite of expensive.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No. Internet is regulated extremely lightly.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? No. Regulatory administration of internet in NT is light, though fair.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No. NT's Right to Dissent has been modified in recent years to include statements over internet, which now do not need to be solicited.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? Some journalists do, but this is on their own accord and usually causes journalists to lose their jobs for misinformation
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? Some are, though news of politics is generally unpopular, so these sources are unpopular.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No. Though media giants exist, it is not uncommon for these media giants to own multiple news networks.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No. NT provides full rights on the internet.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Only for certain criminal activities that translate well over to internet, such as possession of child pornography or inciting an illegal gathering.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Again, only for certain criminal activities.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No. Only with a search warrant issued by a judge may they be compelled to.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No.
Last edited by New Transeurasia on Mon Oct 19, 2020 1:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
♦ The Democratic Federation of New TranseurasiaДемократическая Федерация Новой Трансевразии
歐亞民主聯盟トランスユーラシア民主連邦

NT Embassies
MT-PMT gang
NStats are a secret plot by the government to make Bepis smell like Coca-Cola.
[ ✝ [ [ ] ] ]
(•_•(•_•(•_•)•_•)•_•)
EURASIAWAVE
Russia/Soviet Union but democratic after a second russian civil war in 1928-1930. And also massive, Postcyberpunk, big 1980s-1990s-2000s aesthetics, and extremely capitalist. The flag is not yugoslavia, It is pan-slavic colors.

NTGN/New Transeurasian State News: Microsoft Corporation announces Windows Artemis OS as replacement for Windows 10.1/Mombasa ╫ ELN/Eurasian Newsfeed: National AudioTech announces DVM tape as competitor to JVC VHX, Philips SuperVideo CD, Delco HDD media ╫ NovostiNacional: Columbian airline Detroit National opens air route from Detroit to Moscow, flown by Boeing 747M-9 jets

User avatar
Nacrad
Diplomat
 
Posts: 969
Founded: Jan 16, 2020
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Nacrad » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:05 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes. It is chosen via PR-List election in the 20 constituencies.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Partly. As Nacrad's national legislature uses PR-list election, any and all candidates must be part of a political party or some other form of candidate lists to participate in the election. For a party to be able to run for election, it must be able to supply at least 10 representatives.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes. The biggest parties often take turns being the leader, though flips are irregular.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes. The legislature may, at times, override the President via a supermajority vote.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes/
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Partly. Some departments, like the Nacrad Intelligence Department, operate in secrecy but are nonetheless under the President's orders and may be forced to make the public informed of certain operations by court order.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes. It is enshrined in the Constitution.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes except for education. In Nacrad, every citizen is to finish 12 years of mandatory education. After which, there is total education freedom.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No. The minimum connection speed anywhere in Nacrad is 50 Mbps
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes, as there are no subsidies to purchase equipment to set up an ISP.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? no
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? no
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? no
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? There is proportionality in the punishment. The ruling may be appealed in a court.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest?Some. Most politicians have accounts on social media, and sometimes use such accounts o spread their agenda
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? no
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? no
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?no
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? The constitution protects all aforementioned rights. Any unconstitutional terms (i.e. those that violate these rights) are removable by the independent judiciary.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes. the Organised Crime Ordinance's ban on claiming oneself to be part of a crime organisation applies to online activities, and so does the Treason Act's ban on "Incitement of the subversion of the Federal Republic".
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? No, however journalistic organisations may be penalised for deliberately spreading misinformation and claiming such to be factual, as dictated by the Journalism Factuality Act.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? no
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? no
A 14 civilization (6-0-5), according to this index.
NS Stats run through a bombing raid
20/10/2020 (TUE)
NEWS:Tropical Storm SAUDEL makes landfall on Luzon, none injured so far | T.S. SAUDEL forecasted to move across Luzon into the South Sea, and to strengthen over the next week | T.S. SAUDEL "poses low to medium threat" for Nacrad, says Observatory | Kim Pyong-il, heir presumptive of North Korea, found dead in Taipei
Riverfort 26/19°C | Amoy 25/17°C | Taipei 24/20°C

User avatar
Nation of Hanguk
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 23
Founded: Jun 09, 2020
Liberal Democratic Socialists

Postby Nation of Hanguk » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:13 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Kingdom of Corea
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice and are the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extra-political means? Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Transitioning to strengthen anti-discrimination rights.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Transitioning to be fully realized.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Children are often looked down on if they speak about politics, otherwise, yes.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes.
E2. Is there freedom for nongovernmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Corea already has the right laws and policies. However, practices still need reform.
G1. Do individuals enjoy the freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Kingdom of Corea
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No. Corea is at the top, where internet speed never goes down lower than 85 Mbps.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure to restrict connectivity? No.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Internet service providers are heavily scrutinized in the National Assembly whenever a speed lower than 87 Mbps is recorded. Theoretically, this could get their franchise revoked.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? Yes, although in the last ten years, there are reports of ISPs bribing members of the Nat'l Assembly when renewing their franchises or caught in the "slow internet speed" incident.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No. However, there had been cases in the past that the public petitioned to block or censor information to certain groups (e.g. the youth) but was overturned by the Constitutional Court.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No. However, there are previous reports of Russian and Chinese accounts interfering with the Corean cyberspace.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? None initiated by the government. But due to the increased sensitivity of Coreans in public issues, netizens often take part in "canceling" others, despite speaking for something not necessarily offensive.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes, but often, these are only used by non-state actors.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes. Illegal gambling, libel, and inciting rebellion are of course criminalized. But as said earlier, non-state actors are the ones mostly invoking these laws.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No.
C6. Our service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Yes, but only for the confirmed accounts of designated rebels. (To be designate someone as a rebel/terrorist/against the State and Kingdom, the National Security Council/Prime Ministerial Secretariat is required to submit all information to a court for scrutiny before being approved.)
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No.
Last edited by Nation of Hanguk on Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:31 am, edited 2 times in total.
Kingdom of Corea | 대한제국
Focus: Hold Russians Accountable
| Royal Corean Press Agency |  War on Russia continues, say PM Koo :: Pyeongyang Stock Exchange had its highest growth post-outbreak :: Corean CDC will sell vaccines "fairly"

User avatar
Twithe Gilakish Republic
Civilian
 
Posts: 1
Founded: Oct 04, 2020
Liberal Democratic Socialists

Postby Twithe Gilakish Republic » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:31 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes. While some call the elections in Gilan unfree or unfair, OFN experts admitted that it was during the 2018 and 2013 elections.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes, though no non-socialist party has actually ever come close to challenging the status quo.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes. Political Parties are not allowed to employ paramilitaries or anything of the sort.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? We try to be as free from corruption as possible.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? We try to be as transparent as possible, though this is still a work in progress.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes, while a level of political indoctrination is inevitable -nobody wants to teach their kids our country's baaaaaaaad-, there is no extensive political indoctrination.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Free from legal or official retribution, yes.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes, as a socialist state, the rights of the trade unions are enshrined in our laws.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? No. Azeris in Astara, for example, are not treated equal to everyone else.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? No. As a socialist state, private businesses are not lawful. Private property (i.e. your own home, et al) are still allowed.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? By a definition of the word, yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? Yes, but we're trying to fix this.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No, like most other network connections, Internet is available to everyone with a connecting device, and its money is taken from everyone through taxation.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes. All service providers are publicly owned (though not by the state)
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? To a certain degree, yes.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Legal means are available, but are exercised rarely.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? We try to make sure this doesn't happen, though to a certain degree they are manipulated by the state.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No. While all sources of information are "public", they're manned by private individuals with little affiliation with each other.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No, the free access to information and freedom of expression are enshrined in law.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes. A certain number of activities are criminalized (net stalking, etc.)
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Not for lawful activities. Unlawful display of private information of people is still unlawful though.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? We try not to, but a certain degree of infringing does exist.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Yes.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No.
The Gilakish Republic
جمهوری گیلان

16 Oct 2020
Raust of Anzali: Astara's Turkish smallhood rises in uproar, calls for the Gilakish Regearing to back their Azerish homeland. | Anzali's haven to be outwidened to better answer the trading needs of the lands south of the Daylam Sea. | Azerish Rocket from Miyana misfires, falls down on Kashfi. No slaughtlost told, though three thorpers were wounded. Regearing to move 4 more companies to markcrossings with Azerland. | Dartford Dancepest reaches the Earthdole. First falls told in Kales, Dunkirk in Frankriche, Bridge in the Holy Romish Riche.
On my crusade to create a socialist state that doesn't slap PEOPLE'S or SOCIALIST on everything.

User avatar
The Allied Tribe
Envoy
 
Posts: 332
Founded: Apr 04, 2019
New York Times Democracy

Postby The Allied Tribe » Mon Oct 19, 2020 2:55 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Vegetarian Democratic States of The Allied Tribe (Forgot to add originally)
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes, elected directly.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes, elected directly. These representatives do have some power, but citizens retain sovereignty using initiatives and removing something they don't deem proper.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?Yes, being governed both by elected officials and the people directly.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, all government doings are released to the public. The Allied Tribe is well known for its transparency.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes. Most of the country believes in the Allied Tribal religion, but minorities are accepted.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes, but only if it is peaceful.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, it is independent from the rest of the government
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Kind of. All ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities are protected, but people are forced to be vegetarian unless ordered otherwise by religious beliefs due to a law passed by citizens thousands of years ago. The law still has almost unanimous support from people, but some want to repeal it.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes.
Last edited by The Allied Tribe on Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:47 am, edited 4 times in total.
Political Beliefs
Useless Link
Canon NS Policies - This proves that Child Labor and Compulsory Organ Harvesting are not actually enforced.
We are renowned for our vegetarianism. We are also mostly defensive isolationists who still give minor aid to nations that have helped us before.
Allied Tribe War is over in an Allied Tribal victory as The Allied Tribe repels an invasion by ZSeparatists. The Allied Tribe celebrates. At the same time, an alliance is signed with Champagne Socialist Sharifistan | Something is coming, unclear what | The Allied Tribe votes to take part in the UNDSC

User avatar
Destyntine
Attaché
 
Posts: 84
Founded: Jul 22, 2020
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Destyntine » Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:43 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Technocratic Space Kingdom of Destyntine
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? The queen was given her position through heritage. This has been the tradition for 14 centuries and the people strongly support this.
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes, the Jarls are decided through democratic elections and confirmed by the monarchy.
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes.
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes, although political parties are not relevant to the Kingdom, issues are voted on individually.
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? No, the values of the Kingdom are heavily skewed by a large majority to maintain support.
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes, people may vote on the issues they find as the most important, although the issues that will be presented are chosen by the Jarls.
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes.
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Our head of government is not freely elected, but they do control the majority of the policies.
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, the royal family is held to high standards to meet the needs of the people. The tradition of building the nation has been passed down for 14 centuries.
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, the government regularly informs the people of changes, research, and where funding goes. The government has very little to hide.
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes, media is allowed to give their own point of view on any issue as long as there is no extremism.
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes.
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes. The education system is completely free from political indoctrination.
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes.
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes, as long as there is no damage to anything or anyone.
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes.
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes.
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, although a judiciary decision may be overridden by an order from the monarchy.
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes.
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes.
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes, although immigrants are not allowed to hold any kind of romantic relationship with a native citizen, hold an office in government, become a police officer, or enter into poverty.
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes.
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes.
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes.
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes.


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Technocratic Space Kingdom of Destyntine
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No. Our internet bandwidth covers the entire nation on Homeworld Earth. We never have to worry about speed.
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No, everyone has free access to the internet.
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? No.
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? No.
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? No.
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No.
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? No.
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No.
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? No.
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No.
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No.
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No, people are encouraged to share their personal scientific studies and theories.
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No.
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? No.
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes, hacking, doxing, posting illegal content, or making illegal purchases are all prohibited.
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes, if they break a law.
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No.
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No, unless someone is suspected of something.
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No, unless warranted by the government.
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No.
▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄ I do stuff n' thangs.¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀

User avatar
Goldgamia
Envoy
 
Posts: 215
Founded: Jul 27, 2017
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Goldgamia » Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:50 am

Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? The Technocratic Assembly leader is appointed by the national government, which are appointed based on intelligence level, regional governments have elected officials, and the head of state/monarch is appointed if the previous leader decides to retire or dies.

A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? No, applicants to the technocratic assembly have to complete a long test and pass with at least 80% of answers being correct before they are appointed.

A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? While the head of state and technocratic assembly aren't voted in, regional governments do have elections, and yes, they are fair.

B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Though there are no political parties at the national level, regionally, people can form parties, and at all levels, all types of political groups are allowed, unless they harm the people or damage stability too much.

B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Region-wise, yes, however, national-wise, parties aren't involved in the running of the nation as a whole, however, opposition movements are allowed to increase support for themselves, unless it causes damage to stability.

B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extra-political means? The people's political choices are free from both.

B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes, everyone is considered equal.

C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? The Technocratic Assembly determines the national policies, and King Baran I does also determine the path Goldgamia goes on as well.

C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, they are.

C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, on a national scale, however, regional governments may try to be untransparent, however, this is very unlikely to happen and is discouraged by the national government.

D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes

D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes

D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes

D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes

E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes

E2. Is there freedom for non-governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes

E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labour organizations? Yes

F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Though there is influence from the monarchy, it is very free, although, it is regulated.

F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Though the monarch is able to have people punished, arrested or executed at will, as well as pardon at will, this usually doesn't happen, and people's rights to a fair trial are taken into account if the monarch is not involved in any way.

F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes

F4. Do laws, policies, and practises guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?Yes

G1. Do individuals enjoy the freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes

G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes

G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes

G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes
Recent Goldgamian News:

A Goldgamian Embassy in Krishnama was attacked recently by criminals, there is currently an investigation and Krishnama may be annexed by the Democratic Legion.

BaranTech, a business controlled by the head of state has recently come up with a new product, a humanoid robot that does everything you would need to do for you, like cooking, cleaning, checking around the building at night, providing care for children/pets and way more, all for a subscription of £30 a month.

Flight destinations may be beginning to open again due to the disappearance of Covid-19 in Goldgamia, only some would be reopened however due to the risks of it spreading to Goldgamia again.

User avatar
Goldgamia
Envoy
 
Posts: 215
Founded: Jul 27, 2017
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Goldgamia » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:25 am

Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No, even the suburban areas and the countryside usually have as fast of an internet connection as Goldgamia City has.

A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? No, the last survey provided information that all but 20K people out of a 7B population have access to the internet, however, more people are gaining access every few days.

A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? Though the government and monarchy can shut down internet access for specific regions or the entire nation, this power has not been used since the coup attempt of 2017, temporarily for Goldgamia City and surrounding regions and not ordered by King Baran I either.

A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? The government-controlled internet is the most popular option, however, ISPs are regulated in order to provide a fast internet connection for everyone without gouging prices too much.

A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? People are not monitored online unless they are found to be suspicious of committing a crime soon, and people are left alone when searching the internet.

B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? No unless it involves weapon manufacturing tutorials, other generally illegal content or crimes I won't mention here.

B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Not unless this content harms someone or a group of people.

B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No, there is transparency, and there are independent appeal processes.

B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? Usually, this does not happen.

B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? No

B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No

B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No

B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No

C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks
independence?
Legislation doesn't fail to protect the people's rights.

C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Sometimes, yes, however, getting convicted of this is very rare.

C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Usually, no, this is very rare.

C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? No

C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? Sometimes, yes, however, only if there is a suspected criminal activity going on in that area.

C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? Yes, however, people only get monitored if they are suspicious of committing a crime or have already committed a crime I won't mention here.

C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? This doesn't happen, unless the crime is deemed worthy of the punishment.
Recent Goldgamian News:

A Goldgamian Embassy in Krishnama was attacked recently by criminals, there is currently an investigation and Krishnama may be annexed by the Democratic Legion.

BaranTech, a business controlled by the head of state has recently come up with a new product, a humanoid robot that does everything you would need to do for you, like cooking, cleaning, checking around the building at night, providing care for children/pets and way more, all for a subscription of £30 a month.

Flight destinations may be beginning to open again due to the disappearance of Covid-19 in Goldgamia, only some would be reopened however due to the risks of it spreading to Goldgamia again.

User avatar
The United States of Ibica
Diplomat
 
Posts: 600
Founded: Mar 02, 2018
New York Times Democracy

Postby The United States of Ibica » Mon Oct 19, 2020 12:45 pm

Kergstan wrote:
Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? No, IT infrastructure is well developed. 5
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons? All citizens have access to internet for free, they can pay for faster or additional services. 5
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity? It does have the tool to do so but there haven't been internet blackouts in years. 5
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers? Yes, only state-owned service providers are allowed. Foreign firms aren't allowed to invest in this sector. 3
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner? There's no need for regulatory bodies as all companies are owned by the state. 1
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content? Hate speech, severe inhumane treatment, rape are some of the contents that are blocked.
Some foreign news sources are blocked for spreading fake news. 2
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content? Yes. 1
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process? No. 5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship? State employees may practice self-censorship. 3
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? Some online sources are, most are independent. 3
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online? No 5
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity? No, but the most visited information sites show the establishment views. 5
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues? No unless the objective contravenes the law. 4
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence? The law protects those rights, the judiciary is not completely independent. 5
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities? Yes 3
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities? Yes 3
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption? Yes 1
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy? No 5
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users? No 5
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities? No 5
Notes : Our government employs almost 100k people who own 10 to 20 accounts they utilize to spread pro-government views and shame or counter-argument anti-government views. -2

Aggregate Score: 72




Anatoliyanskiy wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation:
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes. The last one was in 2020. 4
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes. The last one was in 2020. 4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes. This is mainly managed by the Department of Electoral Affairs and the Electoral Council, both sub-bodies of the Ministry of the Interior. 4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes. There are over 15 registered political parties. 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes. The opposition currently has 84 seats. 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes. Monitors are imposed at all polling stations during election time. 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? Yes. All minorities listed are represented in the House of Commons.4
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes. There are meetings every week. 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes. 4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes. There is a Department of Transparency that operates under the Ministry of Justice. 4
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes. 4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes. There are religious buildings for all religions practiced in the country. 4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes. 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Yes, though hate speech against minorities is extensively monitored. 3
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? Yes. 4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes. 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes. In fact, trade unions have large political say and are quite powerful. 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes, with 11 elected judges who are elected for a 6-year term. 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes. 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? Yes. 4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes. There are extensive laws that protect ethnic and cultural minorities. 4
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? Yes. 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? To own property, yes. Private businesses are monitored and there is a limit on how many can be formed. If the number of private businesses exceeds this limit, then they are transferred over to the government or state. 1
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes, quite extensively. 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes. There are many barriers preventing companies from exploiting consumers and workers. 4

Aggregate Score: 96


Toin wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: Democratic States of Toin
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections? Yes. 4
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? Yes. 4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies? Yes. 4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings? Yes. 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections? Yes. 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means? Yes. 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities? No. Only registered voters may vote. Registered voters have to be citizens and cannot be incarcerated or convicted of a felony at the time of election. To get registered, there usually is no prejudice by voting staff or volunteers, but generally more rural or older staffers or volunteers may hold a prejudice in places of Toin - the rule generally is the more rural the more frequent. To the average citizen, though, prejudice is not often encountered in the voting sphere. Once registered, the "no" becomes a "yes" (OOC: The answer here would've been yes, with isolated incidents of discrimination) 3
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government? Yes, but don't necessarily carry it out. The Cabinet carries the policy and legislation out. 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective? Yes, but it's not perfect. Cases slip through occasionally. 4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency? Yes, with certain exceptions. Documents that have the potential of being a threat to national security are not freely available, regardless of where they came from, but if someone makes a Freedom of Information Act request, chances are they will receive the document. 4
D1. Are there free and independent media? Yes. There is also public media that is owned by the state, but it is no different than private media. 4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private? Yes. Historically, the clerk of Parliament invited members to join in a moment of silent prayer before the session started. Since 2012, the clerk invites members to join in a moment of silent meditation instead. 4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination? Yes. 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution? Usually. Extremist views, such as calling for a Nazi-esque regime or an Islamic government that organizations such as ISIS are actively trying to implement will most likely call for you being placed on a surveillance list, but most anything else flies. 3
E1. Is there freedom of assembly? No. 1 (OOC: this question meant in general, not during special circumstances)
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work? Yes. 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations? Yes. 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary? Yes. 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters? Yes. 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies? The former: yes. The latter: all male residents over the age of 20 must register for the draft to enable them to be called up for service should it be absolutely necessary. Thus, there is no "freedom from war." However, Toin has not used the draft since World War II and follows a pacifist military policy when it comes to foreign engagements, so effectively this is an archane law. 4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population? Yes. There is always prejudice, but it is not frequently encountered, especially in denser areas. 3
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education? No. 1
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors? Yes. 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance? Yes. 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation? Yes. 4

Aggregate Score: 91


The Union of British North America wrote:
Freedom in the Multiverse
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Union of British North America
A1. Was the current head of government or other chief national authority elected through free and fair elections?
Yes, in a parliamentary system 3
A2. Were the current national legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections?
Yes, in a parliamentary system 4
A3. Are the electoral laws and framework fair, and are they implemented impartially by the relevant election management bodies?
Yes, the All-Union Chief Electoral Officer oversees general-level elections and related general-level political financing and election laws. The CELO is appointed by the President-General with the General Council of State upon hearing the nomination by the Grand Council. 4
B1. Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system free of undue obstacles to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?
Yes 4
B2. Is there a realistic opportunity for the opposition to increase its support or gain power through elections?
Yes 4
B3. Are the people’s political choices free from domination by forces that are external to the political sphere, or by political forces that employ extrapolitical means?
Yes 4
B4. Do various segments of the population (including ethnic, religious, gender, LGBT, and other relevant groups) have full political rights and electoral opportunities?
Yes 4
C1. Do the freely elected head of government and national legislative representatives determine the policies of the government?
Yes 4
C2. Are safeguards against official corruption strong and effective?
Yes, there are independent government officials with long terms and nonpoliticized appointment processes 4
C3. Does the government operate with openness and transparency?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
D1. Are there free and independent media?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
D2. Are individuals free to practice and express their religious faith or nonbelief in public and private?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
D3. Is there academic freedom, and is the educational system free from extensive political indoctrination?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
D4. Are individuals free to express their personal views on political or other sensitive topics without fear of surveillance or retribution?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
E1. Is there freedom of assembly?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
E2. Is there freedom for non governmental organizations, particularly those that are engaged in human rights– and governance-related work?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
E3. Is there freedom for trade unions and similar professional or labor organizations?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
F1. Is there an independent judiciary?
Yes, at both the general and provincial levels 4
F2. Does due process prevail in civil and criminal matters?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
F3. Is there protection from the illegitimate use of physical force and freedom from war and insurgencies?
There are checks against the general government from utilizing conscription; the general government must get provincial approval to conscript citizens. The general government must also get provincial approval to use provincial forces in general or general-provincial operations. 4
F4. Do laws, policies, and practices guarantee equal treatment of various segments of the population?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
G1. Do individuals enjoy freedom of movement, including the ability to change their place of residence, employment, or education?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
G2. Are individuals able to exercise the right to own property and establish private businesses without undue interference from state or nonstate actors?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
G3. Do individuals enjoy personal social freedoms, including choice of marriage partner and size of family, protection from domestic violence, and control over appearance?
Yes, at the general and provincial levels 4
G4. Do individuals enjoy equality of opportunity and freedom from economic exploitation?
Yes, there is equality of opportunity and programs to promote it at the general and provincial levels 4

Aggregate Score: 99


Internet Freedom Report
Make sure to answer honestly. Questions are freeform, a simple yes or no may not always suffice.


Nation: The Union of British North America
A1. Do infrastructural limitations restrict access to the internet or the speed and quality of internet connections? In some parts of the NAU, where they are rural and may lack infrastructural access. 4
A2. Is access to the internet prohibitively expensive or beyond the reach of certain segments of the population for geographical, social, or other reasons?
If in impoverished, rural areas it can be expensive but the general and provincial governments in question are pushing for public broadband and more infrastructure. 4
A3. Does the government exercise technical or legal control over internet infrastructure for the purposes of restricting connectivity?
Given the development of the internet in my country, called the 'combinet' and based more on Project Xanadu's ideas for the world wide web, there is some centralized control but not enough to deter people from getting on the web. 5
A4. Are there legal, regulatory, or economic obstacles that restrict the diversity of service providers?
No, aside from the growing oligopoly of service providers in the NAU. 4
A5. Do national regulatory bodies that oversee service providers and digital technology fail to operate in a free, fair, and independent manner?
No, they are independent and impartial to service providers and digital technology providers. 5
B1. Does the state block or filter, or compel service providers to block or filter, internet content?
Only for things deemed criminal or extremely obscene, such as snuff films, abuse of animals, abuse of children, or buying or selling hard drugs 4
B2. Do state or nonstate actors employ legal, administrative, or other means to force publishers, content hosts, or digital platforms to delete content?
Not really. It's practically impossible to delete content because it's based on Project Xanadu, which stresses backwards attribution to an extreme level. 5
B3. Do restrictions on the internet and digital content lack transparency, proportionality to the stated aims, or an independent appeals process?
No, there is an appeals process through administrative tribunals and even the law courts. 5
B4. Do online journalists, commentators, and ordinary users practice self-censorship?
Sometimes, depending on who they work for, but it is not widespread. Chilling effect is limited. 4
B5. Are online sources of information controlled or manipulated by the government or other powerful actors to advance a particular political interest? ? 3
B6. Are there economic or regulatory constraints that negatively affect users’ ability to publish content online?
My nation's version of the internet has built-in micropayment systems for content, so content creators are far less dependent on advertisers. And prices are not prohibitively expensive. 5
B7. Does the online information landscape lack diversity?
No, there is wide diversity thanks to the interconnected backwards attribution to all created documents, leading people to past documents and ongoing discussions. Copyright is somewhat strong but still reasonable. 5
B8. Do conditions impede users’ ability to mobilize, form communities, and campaign, particularly on political and social issues?

Not really, though there are 'moshnets', servers and platforms pushing against the micropayment systems and somewhat strong copyright protections of the combinet. 5
C1. Do the constitution or other laws fail to protect rights such as freedom of expression, access to information, and press freedom, including on the internet, and are they enforced by a judiciary that lacks independence?
No, there is constitutional and statutory (some are called quasi-constitutional) laws to protect privacy, allow access to information, and protect online expression and press freedom. 5
C2. Are there laws that assign criminal penalties or civil liability for online activities?
Yes, clearly defined for illegal activities as listed above and few other criminal matters, such as hiring assassins. 5
C3. Are individuals penalized for online activities?
If criminal. 5
C4. Does the government place restrictions on anonymous communication or encryption?
Not really. 5
C5. Does state surveillance of internet activities infringe on users’ right to privacy?
It does but there increasing protections and better technologies to protect users' right to privacy. 4
C6. Are service providers and other technology companies required to aid the government in monitoring the communications of their users?
Sometimes, depending if it is terrorism, foreign or domestic, then yes there is precedent to require companies to help. 4
C7. Are individuals subject to extralegal intimidation or physical violence by state authorities or any other actor in retribution for their online activities?
No. 5

Aggregate Score: 91
Last edited by The United States of Ibica on Mon Oct 19, 2020 12:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The United States of Ibica, or just Ibica if you will, is a large nation encompassing roughly half of the continent of Ibica, hence the name. Ibica is a presidential federation with a republican government, home to about 124 million people. The current president is Conservative Evaline Buckley.



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