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Ouldale
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Founded: Jul 03, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Ouldale » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:24 pm

Nature-Spirits wrote:Hmm.... I would suggest you at least have some sort of plot, simply because RPs that are too freeform tend to die quickly. A compromise would be to have one (or more) of the players playing an antagonist to (the majority of) the other characters.

An antogonist could work well, I am not a very good OP in the sense of actually guiding a plot, but creating ideas and and actual opening post are no problem for me. Maybe multiple plots happening at the same time? The first rule is that one of your maximum of two characters must start out situated in the region known as "the Cauldron". This will make character interactions easier, and that set of characters could have a guided plot, and secondary characters, in a seperate IC, can have their own freeform storylines which may or may not be connected.
Econ Right: -2
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Largely unsuccessful attempt at representing my RL not RP political views:Ouldale Irl Political Views

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Rupudska
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Founded: Sep 16, 2010
Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Rupudska » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:30 pm

Grenartia wrote:
Rupudska wrote:
Gliese 581 is the farthest one humans have colonized, so basically every planetary system within about 20 light years.


According to wiki, there are 59 star systems within that distance. However, only 4 planetary systems are currently known to exist within that range. Though it lists 12 systems with either confirmed or hypothesized planets in that same range.

Alpha Centauri's only currently hypothesized planet (Alpha Centauri Bb) is most decidedly too hot for human habitation (or habitation by any known life on Earth, for that matter), being 1500K, or 2200F, and being 10 times closer to its parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, and a year lasting only about 3 days. Instead, a potentially habitable planet would have to be farther out from Alpha Centauri B (about 0.7 AU), orbiting within A's habitable zone (which would be farther out than the Sun's due to A's being slightly more massive and brighter/hotter, in this case being about 1.25 AU, which lies somewhere between Earth and Mars in our system), or orbiting around AB itself (this option being more likely, as accretion environments around the individual stars are probably less likely to promote planetary formation). Since the stars are fairly comparable to the sun, any possible habitable planets (as far as gravity, temperature, atmospheric composition, and radiation protection are concerned) could harbor Earth life with little to no modifications. Anybody on a planet orbiting A alone at the aforementioned 1.25 AU would find that B would be about 190-2500 times dimmer than A (as well as the sun in our system would be from Earth), but 190-2500 times brighter than the full moon on Earth. An observer on a planet 0.7 AU from B (likewise, making B appear as bright as the sun does here on Earth) would notice that A appears 70-830 times dimmer than the Sun, but 580-6900 times brighter than the full moon.

Epsilon Eridani is probably less than a billion years old, and is thus quite young as far as star systems go. Its stellar winds are about 30 times more intense than solar winds from our Sun, so any habitable planet there (of equivalent magnetospheric strength to Earth) would have brilliant auroras, assuming such a magnetosphere could withstand 30 times the radiation of the Sun without frying life on the surface (I don't have the scientific knowledge to answer that question). EE is also orange in color, compared to the Sun, so plants there (whether native or introduced from Earth) would have to have a different color to best take advantage of the available light (I'm guessing a color like this as opposed to the green we're all familiar with here on Earth, though that's literally just a guess on my part). Despite having 82% of the Sun's mass (Alpha Centauri B having 90%, for reference), EE only has a third of the brightness of the Sun. EE's habitable zone currently lies somewhere between 0.5 and 1 AU (within the inner asteroid belt), though as it ages over the next several billion years, this radius will expand to 0.6-1.4 AU. EE has two dust disks (large disks at that), and probably has at least two planets (one confirmed, one not). EEb is about 1.5 Jupiter masses, and 3.4 AU from the star (any Earth-sized moons could be tidally heated, but I doubt you'd get enough light there for significant photosynthesis). I'd hold out even less hope for EEc, which is 20 AU away.

Tau Ceti is a bit older than the Sun, but also more stable (meaning less flares and the like). It has a large debris disk ranging from 50 AU all the way down to 10 AU. Its the same spectral class as the Sun (being the second closest, after Alpha Centauri A), is about 0.78 solar masses, and about half as bright as the Sun. Tau Ceti has 5 unconfirmed planets, with orbital periods ranging from 14 days to 642. TCb is about 0.1 AU from its star, is 2 Earth masses, and orbits TC in 13.9 days. TCc is about 0.19 AU away, is 3.1 Earth masses, and orbits in about 35 days. TCd is 3.6 Earth masses, is 0.37 AU away, and orbits in 94 days. All three are entirely too close to their stars to have any hope of supporting Earth life. TCe, however, is 4.3 Earth masses, 0.55 AU away, and orbits in about 168 days. TCf is 6.67 Earth masses, 1.35 AU away, and has a 642 day year. Given as e and f (well, every planet in the system) are super Earths, life there would have to be heavily adapted to higher gravities (probably not even genetic engineering would be able to produce such adaptations). However, both e and f are in TC's habitable zone (f would have to have a thicker atmosphere than Earth to have Earthlike temperatures, and e would be much too hot for anything other than heat-loving extremophiles, given that it would be around 70C/158F).

Kapteyn's Star is a red dwarf about 30% the size of the sun, and 0.1% as bright. It moves retrograde, with respect to most other stars in the Milky Way, and this fact, along with its variation in chemical makeup, means it could very well have once been part of a small galaxy that got swallowed up by ours. The system is also extremely old, somewhere in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion years. It also has 2 confirmed planets. Kapteyn b is 4.8 Earth masses, orbits the star in 48 days, and is 0.16 AU from its star, putting it within Kapteyn's habitable zone. Kapteyn c, on the other hand, is 7 Earth masses, has a 121 day year, and is 0.31 AU from the star, and is probably too cold to harbor life. Speaking of which, any life in a red dwarf system which relies on photosynthesis to harvest its energy would probably have to be colored black, to maximize the energy coming in from the low levels of light the star produces. Likewise, Earth life here would probably have to have genetic modifications allowing them to see beyond the visual spectrum. This is not helped by most red dwarfs being highly variable, with starspots possibly hindering light output by as much as 40%, and at other times flaring up to double their brightness in only a few minutes.

Gliese 687 is another red dwarf system. Wiki doesn't give its luminosity, but it's got half the Sun's radius, and about 40% of its mass. It also is chromospherically active, and emits X rays. It is also known to have a 19 Earth mass planet (about the size of Neptune), but no info about its distance or habitability is given.

Groombridge 34 is a binary red dwarf system (separation is about 147 AU). Both are flare stars. Groombridge 34 Ab is 5.3 Earth masses, and orbits at about 0.07 AU, completing its orbit in 11.4 days, thus making it too close to its star to be habitable.

Gliese 674 is yet another red dwarf system (noticing a pattern here?), with 0.35 solar masses, and a brightness 0.016 of the Sun's. 674b is about 11 Earth masses, and orbits its star at about 0.039 AU, and completes its orbit in 4.7 days.

Gliese 876 is yet again, another red dwarf system, and has about a third the mass of the Sun (and about a third of the radius), and a luminosity about 0.013 compared to the Sun. Its age is somewhere between 0.1 and 9.9 billion years (its chromosphere suggests an age between 6.5 billion and 9.9 billion, but its rotational period and membership in the young disk suggest 0.1 and 5 billion). It is a variable star and emits X rays. Its habitable zone is in the range of 0.11 to 0.22 AU. 876 has 4 planets, which strongly gravitationally influence each other. 876 b is 2 Jupiter masses (thus making it most certainly a gas giant), and orbits at about 0.206 AU (an orbit it completes in about 60 days), on the outer edge of the star's habitable zone. This means that b could very well harbor large, Earth like moons, moons that would likely be habitable. 876 c is about 0.7 Jupiter masses (also probably making it a gas giant), and orbits around the star in about a month, at a distance of 0.13 AU (putting it inside the habitable zone as well). Like b, therefore, it could harbor a large habitable moon. 876 d is 6.8 Earth masses, and orbits at a distance of about 0.02 AU, an orbit it completes in about 2 days. It is probably fairly volcanic, like Io is in our system, due to large amounts of tidal heating from being in such a close orbit with its star. 876 e is about 14.6 Earth masses, making it quite similar to Uranus (the planet, not your asshole). It takes about 124 days to make an orbit of about 0.33 AU.

Gliese 832 is a black hole system. No, just fucking with you, its another red dwarf system. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun, and a luminosity of 0.035 compared to the Sun. It emits X rays. Also, it has 2 planets. 832 b is about 0.64 Jupiter masses, has a distance of about 3.4 AU from its star (which looks as bright at this distance as our Sun does from 80 AU, or about 100 times brighter than a full moon on Earth), and completes said orbit once every 9.3 years. 832 c is a special little rock. Its about 5.4 Earth masses, has a high ranking on the Earth Similarity Index (0.81 out of 1.00), and is inside the star's habitable zone. However, its orbit is eccentric enough that grazes the inner edge of the habitable zone, and is thought to have fairly extreme seasons. Its equilibrium temperature is thought to range from -40C/-40F to 7C/44.6F, with the average being about -20C/-4F. However, that doesn't account for a sufficiently thick atmosphere. Too thick/too much of a greenhouse effect, however, which is possible given the planet's mass, and it could be even hotter than Venus. Its year is 36 days.

82 G Eridani is (FINALLY!) a G-class star, with 0.7 Solar masses, 0.92 Solar radii, and 74% of the Sun's brightness. Its between 6.1 and 12.7 billion years old. It has 2 confirmed planets, and a 3rd unconfirmed (some discrepancies in the data caused the scientists to have some doubts about its validity). However, all three are super Earths between 0.12 and 0.34 AU (habitable for a planet in many red dwarf systems, but not so in a G-type system), and the third alone (assuming it does indeed exist) would probably have a temperature of 115C/239F, assuming a Bond albedo similar to Earth's. 82GEb is about 2.7 Earth masses, and is around 0.12 AU from 82EG itself, with a year only lasting 18 days, while c is 2.4 Earth masses, 0.20 AU out, and has a year of 40 days, and finally, d (again, assuming its real) is about 4.8 Earth masses, 0.34 AU distant, and has a year lasting 90 days. It also has a dust disk at around 19 AU out.

Finally, we have Gliese 581 (another red dwarf). It has 0.31 Solar masses, 0.29 Solar radii, and a brightness of 0.013 compared to the Sun, and is 7-11 billion years old. It has 3 confirmed planets (was thought to have 6, but three (d, f, and g) were later shown to be what I'm going to call 'data phantoms', in that they were illusions created by various aspects of 581), and a cometary disk from 25-60 AU (ruling out a Saturn-mass planet at 0.75 AU, though still allowing for a Neptune-mass planet at 5 AU). Although it is technically a variable star, this is only long-term variability (and even then, falls in the margin of error), and in the short term, its variability (if it exists) is utterly trivial. Like the other red dwarfs I've covered here, it emits X rays. 581 b is sort of a 'hot Neptune', having 15.8 Earth masses, and orbiting at 0.04 AU, completing its orbit in only 5.3 days (coincidentally, the amount of time this post feels like it took to write). 581 c is about 5.5 Earth masses, and is the farthest out from 581 proper, being 0.72 AU from its star. Its year lasts 12.9 days. Depending on c's makeup (and therefore density), its surface gravity should fall somewhere between 1.25-2.24 G, while its radius should fall somewhere between 1.5-2.0 Earth radii. 581 c is within its star's habitable zone, albeit on the warm side. 581 c is also probably tidally locked (which would induce volcanism and plate tectonics). However, it could be much like Venus, having a runaway greenhouse effect. Depending on albedo, the effective temperature could range from -3C/27F (for a Venus-like albedo, although this doesn't account for trapping of heat that does get through, like what keeps Venus as hot as it is, because by these same measurements, Venus's temperature should be 34C/93F, which is clearly not the case), to a balmy 40C/104F for an Earth-like albedo (again, not accounting for atmosphere). Gliese 581 e is actually the closest planet to the star, being 0.028 AU away from the star, and completing its orbit in 3.1 days. Its mass is one of the closest to Earth's, being 1.9 Earth masses. However, it is highly unlikely to have an atmosphere.

There's nothing I can think of that says you can't make a new planet in any of these systems (if needed) if you keep the above facts in mind. However, when making them, you should keep the things mentioned in the following article in mind: Linky.


You are either dedicated or completely insane, most likely both. I will probably get to work on this soon, on the other hand...


How many people would be interested in a Valkyria Chronicles RP, now that it's out for PC?
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Nature-Spirits
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Founded: Feb 25, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Nature-Spirits » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:39 pm

Grenartia wrote:
Rupudska wrote:
Gliese 581 is the farthest one humans have colonized, so basically every planetary system within about 20 light years.


According to wiki, there are 59 star systems within that distance. However, only 4 planetary systems are currently known to exist within that range. Though it lists 12 systems with either confirmed or hypothesized planets in that same range.

Alpha Centauri's only currently hypothesized planet (Alpha Centauri Bb) is most decidedly too hot for human habitation (or habitation by any known life on Earth, for that matter), being 1500K, or 2200F, and being 10 times closer to its parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, and a year lasting only about 3 days. Instead, a potentially habitable planet would have to be farther out from Alpha Centauri B (about 0.7 AU), orbiting within A's habitable zone (which would be farther out than the Sun's due to A's being slightly more massive and brighter/hotter, in this case being about 1.25 AU, which lies somewhere between Earth and Mars in our system), or orbiting around AB itself (this option being more likely, as accretion environments around the individual stars are probably less likely to promote planetary formation). Since the stars are fairly comparable to the sun, any possible habitable planets (as far as gravity, temperature, atmospheric composition, and radiation protection are concerned) could harbor Earth life with little to no modifications. Anybody on a planet orbiting A alone at the aforementioned 1.25 AU would find that B would be about 190-2500 times dimmer than A (as well as the sun in our system would be from Earth), but 190-2500 times brighter than the full moon on Earth. An observer on a planet 0.7 AU from B (likewise, making B appear as bright as the sun does here on Earth) would notice that A appears 70-830 times dimmer than the Sun, but 580-6900 times brighter than the full moon.

Epsilon Eridani is probably less than a billion years old, and is thus quite young as far as star systems go. Its stellar winds are about 30 times more intense than solar winds from our Sun, so any habitable planet there (of equivalent magnetospheric strength to Earth) would have brilliant auroras, assuming such a magnetosphere could withstand 30 times the radiation of the Sun without frying life on the surface (I don't have the scientific knowledge to answer that question). EE is also orange in color, compared to the Sun, so plants there (whether native or introduced from Earth) would have to have a different color to best take advantage of the available light (I'm guessing a color like this as opposed to the green we're all familiar with here on Earth, though that's literally just a guess on my part). Despite having 82% of the Sun's mass (Alpha Centauri B having 90%, for reference), EE only has a third of the brightness of the Sun. EE's habitable zone currently lies somewhere between 0.5 and 1 AU (within the inner asteroid belt), though as it ages over the next several billion years, this radius will expand to 0.6-1.4 AU. EE has two dust disks (large disks at that), and probably has at least two planets (one confirmed, one not). EEb is about 1.5 Jupiter masses, and 3.4 AU from the star (any Earth-sized moons could be tidally heated, but I doubt you'd get enough light there for significant photosynthesis). I'd hold out even less hope for EEc, which is 20 AU away.

Tau Ceti is a bit older than the Sun, but also more stable (meaning less flares and the like). It has a large debris disk ranging from 50 AU all the way down to 10 AU. Its the same spectral class as the Sun (being the second closest, after Alpha Centauri A), is about 0.78 solar masses, and about half as bright as the Sun. Tau Ceti has 5 unconfirmed planets, with orbital periods ranging from 14 days to 642. TCb is about 0.1 AU from its star, is 2 Earth masses, and orbits TC in 13.9 days. TCc is about 0.19 AU away, is 3.1 Earth masses, and orbits in about 35 days. TCd is 3.6 Earth masses, is 0.37 AU away, and orbits in 94 days. All three are entirely too close to their stars to have any hope of supporting Earth life. TCe, however, is 4.3 Earth masses, 0.55 AU away, and orbits in about 168 days. TCf is 6.67 Earth masses, 1.35 AU away, and has a 642 day year. Given as e and f (well, every planet in the system) are super Earths, life there would have to be heavily adapted to higher gravities (probably not even genetic engineering would be able to produce such adaptations). However, both e and f are in TC's habitable zone (f would have to have a thicker atmosphere than Earth to have Earthlike temperatures, and e would be much too hot for anything other than heat-loving extremophiles, given that it would be around 70C/158F).

Kapteyn's Star is a red dwarf about 30% the size of the sun, and 0.1% as bright. It moves retrograde, with respect to most other stars in the Milky Way, and this fact, along with its variation in chemical makeup, means it could very well have once been part of a small galaxy that got swallowed up by ours. The system is also extremely old, somewhere in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion years. It also has 2 confirmed planets. Kapteyn b is 4.8 Earth masses, orbits the star in 48 days, and is 0.16 AU from its star, putting it within Kapteyn's habitable zone. Kapteyn c, on the other hand, is 7 Earth masses, has a 121 day year, and is 0.31 AU from the star, and is probably too cold to harbor life. Speaking of which, any life in a red dwarf system which relies on photosynthesis to harvest its energy would probably have to be colored black, to maximize the energy coming in from the low levels of light the star produces. Likewise, Earth life here would probably have to have genetic modifications allowing them to see beyond the visual spectrum. This is not helped by most red dwarfs being highly variable, with starspots possibly hindering light output by as much as 40%, and at other times flaring up to double their brightness in only a few minutes.

Gliese 687 is another red dwarf system. Wiki doesn't give its luminosity, but it's got half the Sun's radius, and about 40% of its mass. It also is chromospherically active, and emits X rays. It is also known to have a 19 Earth mass planet (about the size of Neptune), but no info about its distance or habitability is given.

Groombridge 34 is a binary red dwarf system (separation is about 147 AU). Both are flare stars. Groombridge 34 Ab is 5.3 Earth masses, and orbits at about 0.07 AU, completing its orbit in 11.4 days, thus making it too close to its star to be habitable.

Gliese 674 is yet another red dwarf system (noticing a pattern here?), with 0.35 solar masses, and a brightness 0.016 of the Sun's. 674b is about 11 Earth masses, and orbits its star at about 0.039 AU, and completes its orbit in 4.7 days.

Gliese 876 is yet again, another red dwarf system, and has about a third the mass of the Sun (and about a third of the radius), and a luminosity about 0.013 compared to the Sun. Its age is somewhere between 0.1 and 9.9 billion years (its chromosphere suggests an age between 6.5 billion and 9.9 billion, but its rotational period and membership in the young disk suggest 0.1 and 5 billion). It is a variable star and emits X rays. Its habitable zone is in the range of 0.11 to 0.22 AU. 876 has 4 planets, which strongly gravitationally influence each other. 876 b is 2 Jupiter masses (thus making it most certainly a gas giant), and orbits at about 0.206 AU (an orbit it completes in about 60 days), on the outer edge of the star's habitable zone. This means that b could very well harbor large, Earth like moons, moons that would likely be habitable. 876 c is about 0.7 Jupiter masses (also probably making it a gas giant), and orbits around the star in about a month, at a distance of 0.13 AU (putting it inside the habitable zone as well). Like b, therefore, it could harbor a large habitable moon. 876 d is 6.8 Earth masses, and orbits at a distance of about 0.02 AU, an orbit it completes in about 2 days. It is probably fairly volcanic, like Io is in our system, due to large amounts of tidal heating from being in such a close orbit with its star. 876 e is about 14.6 Earth masses, making it quite similar to Uranus (the planet, not your asshole). It takes about 124 days to make an orbit of about 0.33 AU.

Gliese 832 is a black hole system. No, just fucking with you, its another red dwarf system. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun, and a luminosity of 0.035 compared to the Sun. It emits X rays. Also, it has 2 planets. 832 b is about 0.64 Jupiter masses, has a distance of about 3.4 AU from its star (which looks as bright at this distance as our Sun does from 80 AU, or about 100 times brighter than a full moon on Earth), and completes said orbit once every 9.3 years. 832 c is a special little rock. Its about 5.4 Earth masses, has a high ranking on the Earth Similarity Index (0.81 out of 1.00), and is inside the star's habitable zone. However, its orbit is eccentric enough that grazes the inner edge of the habitable zone, and is thought to have fairly extreme seasons. Its equilibrium temperature is thought to range from -40C/-40F to 7C/44.6F, with the average being about -20C/-4F. However, that doesn't account for a sufficiently thick atmosphere. Too thick/too much of a greenhouse effect, however, which is possible given the planet's mass, and it could be even hotter than Venus. Its year is 36 days.

82 G Eridani is (FINALLY!) a G-class star, with 0.7 Solar masses, 0.92 Solar radii, and 74% of the Sun's brightness. Its between 6.1 and 12.7 billion years old. It has 2 confirmed planets, and a 3rd unconfirmed (some discrepancies in the data caused the scientists to have some doubts about its validity). However, all three are super Earths between 0.12 and 0.34 AU (habitable for a planet in many red dwarf systems, but not so in a G-type system), and the third alone (assuming it does indeed exist) would probably have a temperature of 115C/239F, assuming a Bond albedo similar to Earth's. 82GEb is about 2.7 Earth masses, and is around 0.12 AU from 82EG itself, with a year only lasting 18 days, while c is 2.4 Earth masses, 0.20 AU out, and has a year of 40 days, and finally, d (again, assuming its real) is about 4.8 Earth masses, 0.34 AU distant, and has a year lasting 90 days. It also has a dust disk at around 19 AU out.

Finally, we have Gliese 581 (another red dwarf). It has 0.31 Solar masses, 0.29 Solar radii, and a brightness of 0.013 compared to the Sun, and is 7-11 billion years old. It has 3 confirmed planets (was thought to have 6, but three (d, f, and g) were later shown to be what I'm going to call 'data phantoms', in that they were illusions created by various aspects of 581), and a cometary disk from 25-60 AU (ruling out a Saturn-mass planet at 0.75 AU, though still allowing for a Neptune-mass planet at 5 AU). Although it is technically a variable star, this is only long-term variability (and even then, falls in the margin of error), and in the short term, its variability (if it exists) is utterly trivial. Like the other red dwarfs I've covered here, it emits X rays. 581 b is sort of a 'hot Neptune', having 15.8 Earth masses, and orbiting at 0.04 AU, completing its orbit in only 5.3 days (coincidentally, the amount of time this post feels like it took to write). 581 c is about 5.5 Earth masses, and is the farthest out from 581 proper, being 0.72 AU from its star. Its year lasts 12.9 days. Depending on c's makeup (and therefore density), its surface gravity should fall somewhere between 1.25-2.24 G, while its radius should fall somewhere between 1.5-2.0 Earth radii. 581 c is within its star's habitable zone, albeit on the warm side. 581 c is also probably tidally locked (which would induce volcanism and plate tectonics). However, it could be much like Venus, having a runaway greenhouse effect. Depending on albedo, the effective temperature could range from -3C/27F (for a Venus-like albedo, although this doesn't account for trapping of heat that does get through, like what keeps Venus as hot as it is, because by these same measurements, Venus's temperature should be 34C/93F, which is clearly not the case), to a balmy 40C/104F for an Earth-like albedo (again, not accounting for atmosphere). Gliese 581 e is actually the closest planet to the star, being 0.028 AU away from the star, and completing its orbit in 3.1 days. Its mass is one of the closest to Earth's, being 1.9 Earth masses. However, it is highly unlikely to have an atmosphere.

There's nothing I can think of that says you can't make a new planet in any of these systems (if needed) if you keep the above facts in mind. However, when making them, you should keep the things mentioned in the following article in mind: Linky.

Wow. That is... amazing.
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Grenartia
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Founded: Feb 14, 2010
Left-wing Utopia

Postby Grenartia » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:46 pm

Rupudska wrote:
Grenartia wrote:
According to wiki, there are 59 star systems within that distance. However, only 4 planetary systems are currently known to exist within that range. Though it lists 12 systems with either confirmed or hypothesized planets in that same range.

Alpha Centauri's only currently hypothesized planet (Alpha Centauri Bb) is most decidedly too hot for human habitation (or habitation by any known life on Earth, for that matter), being 1500K, or 2200F, and being 10 times closer to its parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, and a year lasting only about 3 days. Instead, a potentially habitable planet would have to be farther out from Alpha Centauri B (about 0.7 AU), orbiting within A's habitable zone (which would be farther out than the Sun's due to A's being slightly more massive and brighter/hotter, in this case being about 1.25 AU, which lies somewhere between Earth and Mars in our system), or orbiting around AB itself (this option being more likely, as accretion environments around the individual stars are probably less likely to promote planetary formation). Since the stars are fairly comparable to the sun, any possible habitable planets (as far as gravity, temperature, atmospheric composition, and radiation protection are concerned) could harbor Earth life with little to no modifications. Anybody on a planet orbiting A alone at the aforementioned 1.25 AU would find that B would be about 190-2500 times dimmer than A (as well as the sun in our system would be from Earth), but 190-2500 times brighter than the full moon on Earth. An observer on a planet 0.7 AU from B (likewise, making B appear as bright as the sun does here on Earth) would notice that A appears 70-830 times dimmer than the Sun, but 580-6900 times brighter than the full moon.

Epsilon Eridani is probably less than a billion years old, and is thus quite young as far as star systems go. Its stellar winds are about 30 times more intense than solar winds from our Sun, so any habitable planet there (of equivalent magnetospheric strength to Earth) would have brilliant auroras, assuming such a magnetosphere could withstand 30 times the radiation of the Sun without frying life on the surface (I don't have the scientific knowledge to answer that question). EE is also orange in color, compared to the Sun, so plants there (whether native or introduced from Earth) would have to have a different color to best take advantage of the available light (I'm guessing a color like this as opposed to the green we're all familiar with here on Earth, though that's literally just a guess on my part). Despite having 82% of the Sun's mass (Alpha Centauri B having 90%, for reference), EE only has a third of the brightness of the Sun. EE's habitable zone currently lies somewhere between 0.5 and 1 AU (within the inner asteroid belt), though as it ages over the next several billion years, this radius will expand to 0.6-1.4 AU. EE has two dust disks (large disks at that), and probably has at least two planets (one confirmed, one not). EEb is about 1.5 Jupiter masses, and 3.4 AU from the star (any Earth-sized moons could be tidally heated, but I doubt you'd get enough light there for significant photosynthesis). I'd hold out even less hope for EEc, which is 20 AU away.

Tau Ceti is a bit older than the Sun, but also more stable (meaning less flares and the like). It has a large debris disk ranging from 50 AU all the way down to 10 AU. Its the same spectral class as the Sun (being the second closest, after Alpha Centauri A), is about 0.78 solar masses, and about half as bright as the Sun. Tau Ceti has 5 unconfirmed planets, with orbital periods ranging from 14 days to 642. TCb is about 0.1 AU from its star, is 2 Earth masses, and orbits TC in 13.9 days. TCc is about 0.19 AU away, is 3.1 Earth masses, and orbits in about 35 days. TCd is 3.6 Earth masses, is 0.37 AU away, and orbits in 94 days. All three are entirely too close to their stars to have any hope of supporting Earth life. TCe, however, is 4.3 Earth masses, 0.55 AU away, and orbits in about 168 days. TCf is 6.67 Earth masses, 1.35 AU away, and has a 642 day year. Given as e and f (well, every planet in the system) are super Earths, life there would have to be heavily adapted to higher gravities (probably not even genetic engineering would be able to produce such adaptations). However, both e and f are in TC's habitable zone (f would have to have a thicker atmosphere than Earth to have Earthlike temperatures, and e would be much too hot for anything other than heat-loving extremophiles, given that it would be around 70C/158F).

Kapteyn's Star is a red dwarf about 30% the size of the sun, and 0.1% as bright. It moves retrograde, with respect to most other stars in the Milky Way, and this fact, along with its variation in chemical makeup, means it could very well have once been part of a small galaxy that got swallowed up by ours. The system is also extremely old, somewhere in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion years. It also has 2 confirmed planets. Kapteyn b is 4.8 Earth masses, orbits the star in 48 days, and is 0.16 AU from its star, putting it within Kapteyn's habitable zone. Kapteyn c, on the other hand, is 7 Earth masses, has a 121 day year, and is 0.31 AU from the star, and is probably too cold to harbor life. Speaking of which, any life in a red dwarf system which relies on photosynthesis to harvest its energy would probably have to be colored black, to maximize the energy coming in from the low levels of light the star produces. Likewise, Earth life here would probably have to have genetic modifications allowing them to see beyond the visual spectrum. This is not helped by most red dwarfs being highly variable, with starspots possibly hindering light output by as much as 40%, and at other times flaring up to double their brightness in only a few minutes.

Gliese 687 is another red dwarf system. Wiki doesn't give its luminosity, but it's got half the Sun's radius, and about 40% of its mass. It also is chromospherically active, and emits X rays. It is also known to have a 19 Earth mass planet (about the size of Neptune), but no info about its distance or habitability is given.

Groombridge 34 is a binary red dwarf system (separation is about 147 AU). Both are flare stars. Groombridge 34 Ab is 5.3 Earth masses, and orbits at about 0.07 AU, completing its orbit in 11.4 days, thus making it too close to its star to be habitable.

Gliese 674 is yet another red dwarf system (noticing a pattern here?), with 0.35 solar masses, and a brightness 0.016 of the Sun's. 674b is about 11 Earth masses, and orbits its star at about 0.039 AU, and completes its orbit in 4.7 days.

Gliese 876 is yet again, another red dwarf system, and has about a third the mass of the Sun (and about a third of the radius), and a luminosity about 0.013 compared to the Sun. Its age is somewhere between 0.1 and 9.9 billion years (its chromosphere suggests an age between 6.5 billion and 9.9 billion, but its rotational period and membership in the young disk suggest 0.1 and 5 billion). It is a variable star and emits X rays. Its habitable zone is in the range of 0.11 to 0.22 AU. 876 has 4 planets, which strongly gravitationally influence each other. 876 b is 2 Jupiter masses (thus making it most certainly a gas giant), and orbits at about 0.206 AU (an orbit it completes in about 60 days), on the outer edge of the star's habitable zone. This means that b could very well harbor large, Earth like moons, moons that would likely be habitable. 876 c is about 0.7 Jupiter masses (also probably making it a gas giant), and orbits around the star in about a month, at a distance of 0.13 AU (putting it inside the habitable zone as well). Like b, therefore, it could harbor a large habitable moon. 876 d is 6.8 Earth masses, and orbits at a distance of about 0.02 AU, an orbit it completes in about 2 days. It is probably fairly volcanic, like Io is in our system, due to large amounts of tidal heating from being in such a close orbit with its star. 876 e is about 14.6 Earth masses, making it quite similar to Uranus (the planet, not your asshole). It takes about 124 days to make an orbit of about 0.33 AU.

Gliese 832 is a black hole system. No, just fucking with you, its another red dwarf system. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun, and a luminosity of 0.035 compared to the Sun. It emits X rays. Also, it has 2 planets. 832 b is about 0.64 Jupiter masses, has a distance of about 3.4 AU from its star (which looks as bright at this distance as our Sun does from 80 AU, or about 100 times brighter than a full moon on Earth), and completes said orbit once every 9.3 years. 832 c is a special little rock. Its about 5.4 Earth masses, has a high ranking on the Earth Similarity Index (0.81 out of 1.00), and is inside the star's habitable zone. However, its orbit is eccentric enough that grazes the inner edge of the habitable zone, and is thought to have fairly extreme seasons. Its equilibrium temperature is thought to range from -40C/-40F to 7C/44.6F, with the average being about -20C/-4F. However, that doesn't account for a sufficiently thick atmosphere. Too thick/too much of a greenhouse effect, however, which is possible given the planet's mass, and it could be even hotter than Venus. Its year is 36 days.

82 G Eridani is (FINALLY!) a G-class star, with 0.7 Solar masses, 0.92 Solar radii, and 74% of the Sun's brightness. Its between 6.1 and 12.7 billion years old. It has 2 confirmed planets, and a 3rd unconfirmed (some discrepancies in the data caused the scientists to have some doubts about its validity). However, all three are super Earths between 0.12 and 0.34 AU (habitable for a planet in many red dwarf systems, but not so in a G-type system), and the third alone (assuming it does indeed exist) would probably have a temperature of 115C/239F, assuming a Bond albedo similar to Earth's. 82GEb is about 2.7 Earth masses, and is around 0.12 AU from 82EG itself, with a year only lasting 18 days, while c is 2.4 Earth masses, 0.20 AU out, and has a year of 40 days, and finally, d (again, assuming its real) is about 4.8 Earth masses, 0.34 AU distant, and has a year lasting 90 days. It also has a dust disk at around 19 AU out.

Finally, we have Gliese 581 (another red dwarf). It has 0.31 Solar masses, 0.29 Solar radii, and a brightness of 0.013 compared to the Sun, and is 7-11 billion years old. It has 3 confirmed planets (was thought to have 6, but three (d, f, and g) were later shown to be what I'm going to call 'data phantoms', in that they were illusions created by various aspects of 581), and a cometary disk from 25-60 AU (ruling out a Saturn-mass planet at 0.75 AU, though still allowing for a Neptune-mass planet at 5 AU). Although it is technically a variable star, this is only long-term variability (and even then, falls in the margin of error), and in the short term, its variability (if it exists) is utterly trivial. Like the other red dwarfs I've covered here, it emits X rays. 581 b is sort of a 'hot Neptune', having 15.8 Earth masses, and orbiting at 0.04 AU, completing its orbit in only 5.3 days (coincidentally, the amount of time this post feels like it took to write). 581 c is about 5.5 Earth masses, and is the farthest out from 581 proper, being 0.72 AU from its star. Its year lasts 12.9 days. Depending on c's makeup (and therefore density), its surface gravity should fall somewhere between 1.25-2.24 G, while its radius should fall somewhere between 1.5-2.0 Earth radii. 581 c is within its star's habitable zone, albeit on the warm side. 581 c is also probably tidally locked (which would induce volcanism and plate tectonics). However, it could be much like Venus, having a runaway greenhouse effect. Depending on albedo, the effective temperature could range from -3C/27F (for a Venus-like albedo, although this doesn't account for trapping of heat that does get through, like what keeps Venus as hot as it is, because by these same measurements, Venus's temperature should be 34C/93F, which is clearly not the case), to a balmy 40C/104F for an Earth-like albedo (again, not accounting for atmosphere). Gliese 581 e is actually the closest planet to the star, being 0.028 AU away from the star, and completing its orbit in 3.1 days. Its mass is one of the closest to Earth's, being 1.9 Earth masses. However, it is highly unlikely to have an atmosphere.

There's nothing I can think of that says you can't make a new planet in any of these systems (if needed) if you keep the above facts in mind. However, when making them, you should keep the things mentioned in the following article in mind: Linky.


You are either dedicated or completely insane, most likely both. I will probably get to work on this soon, on the other hand...


How many people would be interested in a Valkyria Chronicles RP, now that it's out for PC?


A bit of both, I think.

I have no clue what Valkyria Chronicles is, though.

Nature-Spirits wrote:
Grenartia wrote:
According to wiki, there are 59 star systems within that distance. However, only 4 planetary systems are currently known to exist within that range. Though it lists 12 systems with either confirmed or hypothesized planets in that same range.

Alpha Centauri's only currently hypothesized planet (Alpha Centauri Bb) is most decidedly too hot for human habitation (or habitation by any known life on Earth, for that matter), being 1500K, or 2200F, and being 10 times closer to its parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, and a year lasting only about 3 days. Instead, a potentially habitable planet would have to be farther out from Alpha Centauri B (about 0.7 AU), orbiting within A's habitable zone (which would be farther out than the Sun's due to A's being slightly more massive and brighter/hotter, in this case being about 1.25 AU, which lies somewhere between Earth and Mars in our system), or orbiting around AB itself (this option being more likely, as accretion environments around the individual stars are probably less likely to promote planetary formation). Since the stars are fairly comparable to the sun, any possible habitable planets (as far as gravity, temperature, atmospheric composition, and radiation protection are concerned) could harbor Earth life with little to no modifications. Anybody on a planet orbiting A alone at the aforementioned 1.25 AU would find that B would be about 190-2500 times dimmer than A (as well as the sun in our system would be from Earth), but 190-2500 times brighter than the full moon on Earth. An observer on a planet 0.7 AU from B (likewise, making B appear as bright as the sun does here on Earth) would notice that A appears 70-830 times dimmer than the Sun, but 580-6900 times brighter than the full moon.

Epsilon Eridani is probably less than a billion years old, and is thus quite young as far as star systems go. Its stellar winds are about 30 times more intense than solar winds from our Sun, so any habitable planet there (of equivalent magnetospheric strength to Earth) would have brilliant auroras, assuming such a magnetosphere could withstand 30 times the radiation of the Sun without frying life on the surface (I don't have the scientific knowledge to answer that question). EE is also orange in color, compared to the Sun, so plants there (whether native or introduced from Earth) would have to have a different color to best take advantage of the available light (I'm guessing a color like this as opposed to the green we're all familiar with here on Earth, though that's literally just a guess on my part). Despite having 82% of the Sun's mass (Alpha Centauri B having 90%, for reference), EE only has a third of the brightness of the Sun. EE's habitable zone currently lies somewhere between 0.5 and 1 AU (within the inner asteroid belt), though as it ages over the next several billion years, this radius will expand to 0.6-1.4 AU. EE has two dust disks (large disks at that), and probably has at least two planets (one confirmed, one not). EEb is about 1.5 Jupiter masses, and 3.4 AU from the star (any Earth-sized moons could be tidally heated, but I doubt you'd get enough light there for significant photosynthesis). I'd hold out even less hope for EEc, which is 20 AU away.

Tau Ceti is a bit older than the Sun, but also more stable (meaning less flares and the like). It has a large debris disk ranging from 50 AU all the way down to 10 AU. Its the same spectral class as the Sun (being the second closest, after Alpha Centauri A), is about 0.78 solar masses, and about half as bright as the Sun. Tau Ceti has 5 unconfirmed planets, with orbital periods ranging from 14 days to 642. TCb is about 0.1 AU from its star, is 2 Earth masses, and orbits TC in 13.9 days. TCc is about 0.19 AU away, is 3.1 Earth masses, and orbits in about 35 days. TCd is 3.6 Earth masses, is 0.37 AU away, and orbits in 94 days. All three are entirely too close to their stars to have any hope of supporting Earth life. TCe, however, is 4.3 Earth masses, 0.55 AU away, and orbits in about 168 days. TCf is 6.67 Earth masses, 1.35 AU away, and has a 642 day year. Given as e and f (well, every planet in the system) are super Earths, life there would have to be heavily adapted to higher gravities (probably not even genetic engineering would be able to produce such adaptations). However, both e and f are in TC's habitable zone (f would have to have a thicker atmosphere than Earth to have Earthlike temperatures, and e would be much too hot for anything other than heat-loving extremophiles, given that it would be around 70C/158F).

Kapteyn's Star is a red dwarf about 30% the size of the sun, and 0.1% as bright. It moves retrograde, with respect to most other stars in the Milky Way, and this fact, along with its variation in chemical makeup, means it could very well have once been part of a small galaxy that got swallowed up by ours. The system is also extremely old, somewhere in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion years. It also has 2 confirmed planets. Kapteyn b is 4.8 Earth masses, orbits the star in 48 days, and is 0.16 AU from its star, putting it within Kapteyn's habitable zone. Kapteyn c, on the other hand, is 7 Earth masses, has a 121 day year, and is 0.31 AU from the star, and is probably too cold to harbor life. Speaking of which, any life in a red dwarf system which relies on photosynthesis to harvest its energy would probably have to be colored black, to maximize the energy coming in from the low levels of light the star produces. Likewise, Earth life here would probably have to have genetic modifications allowing them to see beyond the visual spectrum. This is not helped by most red dwarfs being highly variable, with starspots possibly hindering light output by as much as 40%, and at other times flaring up to double their brightness in only a few minutes.

Gliese 687 is another red dwarf system. Wiki doesn't give its luminosity, but it's got half the Sun's radius, and about 40% of its mass. It also is chromospherically active, and emits X rays. It is also known to have a 19 Earth mass planet (about the size of Neptune), but no info about its distance or habitability is given.

Groombridge 34 is a binary red dwarf system (separation is about 147 AU). Both are flare stars. Groombridge 34 Ab is 5.3 Earth masses, and orbits at about 0.07 AU, completing its orbit in 11.4 days, thus making it too close to its star to be habitable.

Gliese 674 is yet another red dwarf system (noticing a pattern here?), with 0.35 solar masses, and a brightness 0.016 of the Sun's. 674b is about 11 Earth masses, and orbits its star at about 0.039 AU, and completes its orbit in 4.7 days.

Gliese 876 is yet again, another red dwarf system, and has about a third the mass of the Sun (and about a third of the radius), and a luminosity about 0.013 compared to the Sun. Its age is somewhere between 0.1 and 9.9 billion years (its chromosphere suggests an age between 6.5 billion and 9.9 billion, but its rotational period and membership in the young disk suggest 0.1 and 5 billion). It is a variable star and emits X rays. Its habitable zone is in the range of 0.11 to 0.22 AU. 876 has 4 planets, which strongly gravitationally influence each other. 876 b is 2 Jupiter masses (thus making it most certainly a gas giant), and orbits at about 0.206 AU (an orbit it completes in about 60 days), on the outer edge of the star's habitable zone. This means that b could very well harbor large, Earth like moons, moons that would likely be habitable. 876 c is about 0.7 Jupiter masses (also probably making it a gas giant), and orbits around the star in about a month, at a distance of 0.13 AU (putting it inside the habitable zone as well). Like b, therefore, it could harbor a large habitable moon. 876 d is 6.8 Earth masses, and orbits at a distance of about 0.02 AU, an orbit it completes in about 2 days. It is probably fairly volcanic, like Io is in our system, due to large amounts of tidal heating from being in such a close orbit with its star. 876 e is about 14.6 Earth masses, making it quite similar to Uranus (the planet, not your asshole). It takes about 124 days to make an orbit of about 0.33 AU.

Gliese 832 is a black hole system. No, just fucking with you, its another red dwarf system. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun, and a luminosity of 0.035 compared to the Sun. It emits X rays. Also, it has 2 planets. 832 b is about 0.64 Jupiter masses, has a distance of about 3.4 AU from its star (which looks as bright at this distance as our Sun does from 80 AU, or about 100 times brighter than a full moon on Earth), and completes said orbit once every 9.3 years. 832 c is a special little rock. Its about 5.4 Earth masses, has a high ranking on the Earth Similarity Index (0.81 out of 1.00), and is inside the star's habitable zone. However, its orbit is eccentric enough that grazes the inner edge of the habitable zone, and is thought to have fairly extreme seasons. Its equilibrium temperature is thought to range from -40C/-40F to 7C/44.6F, with the average being about -20C/-4F. However, that doesn't account for a sufficiently thick atmosphere. Too thick/too much of a greenhouse effect, however, which is possible given the planet's mass, and it could be even hotter than Venus. Its year is 36 days.

82 G Eridani is (FINALLY!) a G-class star, with 0.7 Solar masses, 0.92 Solar radii, and 74% of the Sun's brightness. Its between 6.1 and 12.7 billion years old. It has 2 confirmed planets, and a 3rd unconfirmed (some discrepancies in the data caused the scientists to have some doubts about its validity). However, all three are super Earths between 0.12 and 0.34 AU (habitable for a planet in many red dwarf systems, but not so in a G-type system), and the third alone (assuming it does indeed exist) would probably have a temperature of 115C/239F, assuming a Bond albedo similar to Earth's. 82GEb is about 2.7 Earth masses, and is around 0.12 AU from 82EG itself, with a year only lasting 18 days, while c is 2.4 Earth masses, 0.20 AU out, and has a year of 40 days, and finally, d (again, assuming its real) is about 4.8 Earth masses, 0.34 AU distant, and has a year lasting 90 days. It also has a dust disk at around 19 AU out.

Finally, we have Gliese 581 (another red dwarf). It has 0.31 Solar masses, 0.29 Solar radii, and a brightness of 0.013 compared to the Sun, and is 7-11 billion years old. It has 3 confirmed planets (was thought to have 6, but three (d, f, and g) were later shown to be what I'm going to call 'data phantoms', in that they were illusions created by various aspects of 581), and a cometary disk from 25-60 AU (ruling out a Saturn-mass planet at 0.75 AU, though still allowing for a Neptune-mass planet at 5 AU). Although it is technically a variable star, this is only long-term variability (and even then, falls in the margin of error), and in the short term, its variability (if it exists) is utterly trivial. Like the other red dwarfs I've covered here, it emits X rays. 581 b is sort of a 'hot Neptune', having 15.8 Earth masses, and orbiting at 0.04 AU, completing its orbit in only 5.3 days (coincidentally, the amount of time this post feels like it took to write). 581 c is about 5.5 Earth masses, and is the farthest out from 581 proper, being 0.72 AU from its star. Its year lasts 12.9 days. Depending on c's makeup (and therefore density), its surface gravity should fall somewhere between 1.25-2.24 G, while its radius should fall somewhere between 1.5-2.0 Earth radii. 581 c is within its star's habitable zone, albeit on the warm side. 581 c is also probably tidally locked (which would induce volcanism and plate tectonics). However, it could be much like Venus, having a runaway greenhouse effect. Depending on albedo, the effective temperature could range from -3C/27F (for a Venus-like albedo, although this doesn't account for trapping of heat that does get through, like what keeps Venus as hot as it is, because by these same measurements, Venus's temperature should be 34C/93F, which is clearly not the case), to a balmy 40C/104F for an Earth-like albedo (again, not accounting for atmosphere). Gliese 581 e is actually the closest planet to the star, being 0.028 AU away from the star, and completing its orbit in 3.1 days. Its mass is one of the closest to Earth's, being 1.9 Earth masses. However, it is highly unlikely to have an atmosphere.

There's nothing I can think of that says you can't make a new planet in any of these systems (if needed) if you keep the above facts in mind. However, when making them, you should keep the things mentioned in the following article in mind: Linky.

Wow. That is... amazing.


Thanks. I try my best. This kind of shit is what I want to study in college.
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Lavan Tiri
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Founded: Feb 18, 2014
Ex-Nation

Postby Lavan Tiri » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:48 pm

Nature-Spirits wrote:
Grenartia wrote:
According to wiki, there are 59 star systems within that distance. However, only 4 planetary systems are currently known to exist within that range. Though it lists 12 systems with either confirmed or hypothesized planets in that same range.

Alpha Centauri's only currently hypothesized planet (Alpha Centauri Bb) is most decidedly too hot for human habitation (or habitation by any known life on Earth, for that matter), being 1500K, or 2200F, and being 10 times closer to its parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, and a year lasting only about 3 days. Instead, a potentially habitable planet would have to be farther out from Alpha Centauri B (about 0.7 AU), orbiting within A's habitable zone (which would be farther out than the Sun's due to A's being slightly more massive and brighter/hotter, in this case being about 1.25 AU, which lies somewhere between Earth and Mars in our system), or orbiting around AB itself (this option being more likely, as accretion environments around the individual stars are probably less likely to promote planetary formation). Since the stars are fairly comparable to the sun, any possible habitable planets (as far as gravity, temperature, atmospheric composition, and radiation protection are concerned) could harbor Earth life with little to no modifications. Anybody on a planet orbiting A alone at the aforementioned 1.25 AU would find that B would be about 190-2500 times dimmer than A (as well as the sun in our system would be from Earth), but 190-2500 times brighter than the full moon on Earth. An observer on a planet 0.7 AU from B (likewise, making B appear as bright as the sun does here on Earth) would notice that A appears 70-830 times dimmer than the Sun, but 580-6900 times brighter than the full moon.

Epsilon Eridani is probably less than a billion years old, and is thus quite young as far as star systems go. Its stellar winds are about 30 times more intense than solar winds from our Sun, so any habitable planet there (of equivalent magnetospheric strength to Earth) would have brilliant auroras, assuming such a magnetosphere could withstand 30 times the radiation of the Sun without frying life on the surface (I don't have the scientific knowledge to answer that question). EE is also orange in color, compared to the Sun, so plants there (whether native or introduced from Earth) would have to have a different color to best take advantage of the available light (I'm guessing a color like this as opposed to the green we're all familiar with here on Earth, though that's literally just a guess on my part). Despite having 82% of the Sun's mass (Alpha Centauri B having 90%, for reference), EE only has a third of the brightness of the Sun. EE's habitable zone currently lies somewhere between 0.5 and 1 AU (within the inner asteroid belt), though as it ages over the next several billion years, this radius will expand to 0.6-1.4 AU. EE has two dust disks (large disks at that), and probably has at least two planets (one confirmed, one not). EEb is about 1.5 Jupiter masses, and 3.4 AU from the star (any Earth-sized moons could be tidally heated, but I doubt you'd get enough light there for significant photosynthesis). I'd hold out even less hope for EEc, which is 20 AU away.

Tau Ceti is a bit older than the Sun, but also more stable (meaning less flares and the like). It has a large debris disk ranging from 50 AU all the way down to 10 AU. Its the same spectral class as the Sun (being the second closest, after Alpha Centauri A), is about 0.78 solar masses, and about half as bright as the Sun. Tau Ceti has 5 unconfirmed planets, with orbital periods ranging from 14 days to 642. TCb is about 0.1 AU from its star, is 2 Earth masses, and orbits TC in 13.9 days. TCc is about 0.19 AU away, is 3.1 Earth masses, and orbits in about 35 days. TCd is 3.6 Earth masses, is 0.37 AU away, and orbits in 94 days. All three are entirely too close to their stars to have any hope of supporting Earth life. TCe, however, is 4.3 Earth masses, 0.55 AU away, and orbits in about 168 days. TCf is 6.67 Earth masses, 1.35 AU away, and has a 642 day year. Given as e and f (well, every planet in the system) are super Earths, life there would have to be heavily adapted to higher gravities (probably not even genetic engineering would be able to produce such adaptations). However, both e and f are in TC's habitable zone (f would have to have a thicker atmosphere than Earth to have Earthlike temperatures, and e would be much too hot for anything other than heat-loving extremophiles, given that it would be around 70C/158F).

Kapteyn's Star is a red dwarf about 30% the size of the sun, and 0.1% as bright. It moves retrograde, with respect to most other stars in the Milky Way, and this fact, along with its variation in chemical makeup, means it could very well have once been part of a small galaxy that got swallowed up by ours. The system is also extremely old, somewhere in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion years. It also has 2 confirmed planets. Kapteyn b is 4.8 Earth masses, orbits the star in 48 days, and is 0.16 AU from its star, putting it within Kapteyn's habitable zone. Kapteyn c, on the other hand, is 7 Earth masses, has a 121 day year, and is 0.31 AU from the star, and is probably too cold to harbor life. Speaking of which, any life in a red dwarf system which relies on photosynthesis to harvest its energy would probably have to be colored black, to maximize the energy coming in from the low levels of light the star produces. Likewise, Earth life here would probably have to have genetic modifications allowing them to see beyond the visual spectrum. This is not helped by most red dwarfs being highly variable, with starspots possibly hindering light output by as much as 40%, and at other times flaring up to double their brightness in only a few minutes.

Gliese 687 is another red dwarf system. Wiki doesn't give its luminosity, but it's got half the Sun's radius, and about 40% of its mass. It also is chromospherically active, and emits X rays. It is also known to have a 19 Earth mass planet (about the size of Neptune), but no info about its distance or habitability is given.

Groombridge 34 is a binary red dwarf system (separation is about 147 AU). Both are flare stars. Groombridge 34 Ab is 5.3 Earth masses, and orbits at about 0.07 AU, completing its orbit in 11.4 days, thus making it too close to its star to be habitable.

Gliese 674 is yet another red dwarf system (noticing a pattern here?), with 0.35 solar masses, and a brightness 0.016 of the Sun's. 674b is about 11 Earth masses, and orbits its star at about 0.039 AU, and completes its orbit in 4.7 days.

Gliese 876 is yet again, another red dwarf system, and has about a third the mass of the Sun (and about a third of the radius), and a luminosity about 0.013 compared to the Sun. Its age is somewhere between 0.1 and 9.9 billion years (its chromosphere suggests an age between 6.5 billion and 9.9 billion, but its rotational period and membership in the young disk suggest 0.1 and 5 billion). It is a variable star and emits X rays. Its habitable zone is in the range of 0.11 to 0.22 AU. 876 has 4 planets, which strongly gravitationally influence each other. 876 b is 2 Jupiter masses (thus making it most certainly a gas giant), and orbits at about 0.206 AU (an orbit it completes in about 60 days), on the outer edge of the star's habitable zone. This means that b could very well harbor large, Earth like moons, moons that would likely be habitable. 876 c is about 0.7 Jupiter masses (also probably making it a gas giant), and orbits around the star in about a month, at a distance of 0.13 AU (putting it inside the habitable zone as well). Like b, therefore, it could harbor a large habitable moon. 876 d is 6.8 Earth masses, and orbits at a distance of about 0.02 AU, an orbit it completes in about 2 days. It is probably fairly volcanic, like Io is in our system, due to large amounts of tidal heating from being in such a close orbit with its star. 876 e is about 14.6 Earth masses, making it quite similar to Uranus (the planet, not your asshole). It takes about 124 days to make an orbit of about 0.33 AU.

Gliese 832 is a black hole system. No, just fucking with you, its another red dwarf system. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun, and a luminosity of 0.035 compared to the Sun. It emits X rays. Also, it has 2 planets. 832 b is about 0.64 Jupiter masses, has a distance of about 3.4 AU from its star (which looks as bright at this distance as our Sun does from 80 AU, or about 100 times brighter than a full moon on Earth), and completes said orbit once every 9.3 years. 832 c is a special little rock. Its about 5.4 Earth masses, has a high ranking on the Earth Similarity Index (0.81 out of 1.00), and is inside the star's habitable zone. However, its orbit is eccentric enough that grazes the inner edge of the habitable zone, and is thought to have fairly extreme seasons. Its equilibrium temperature is thought to range from -40C/-40F to 7C/44.6F, with the average being about -20C/-4F. However, that doesn't account for a sufficiently thick atmosphere. Too thick/too much of a greenhouse effect, however, which is possible given the planet's mass, and it could be even hotter than Venus. Its year is 36 days.

82 G Eridani is (FINALLY!) a G-class star, with 0.7 Solar masses, 0.92 Solar radii, and 74% of the Sun's brightness. Its between 6.1 and 12.7 billion years old. It has 2 confirmed planets, and a 3rd unconfirmed (some discrepancies in the data caused the scientists to have some doubts about its validity). However, all three are super Earths between 0.12 and 0.34 AU (habitable for a planet in many red dwarf systems, but not so in a G-type system), and the third alone (assuming it does indeed exist) would probably have a temperature of 115C/239F, assuming a Bond albedo similar to Earth's. 82GEb is about 2.7 Earth masses, and is around 0.12 AU from 82EG itself, with a year only lasting 18 days, while c is 2.4 Earth masses, 0.20 AU out, and has a year of 40 days, and finally, d (again, assuming its real) is about 4.8 Earth masses, 0.34 AU distant, and has a year lasting 90 days. It also has a dust disk at around 19 AU out.

Finally, we have Gliese 581 (another red dwarf). It has 0.31 Solar masses, 0.29 Solar radii, and a brightness of 0.013 compared to the Sun, and is 7-11 billion years old. It has 3 confirmed planets (was thought to have 6, but three (d, f, and g) were later shown to be what I'm going to call 'data phantoms', in that they were illusions created by various aspects of 581), and a cometary disk from 25-60 AU (ruling out a Saturn-mass planet at 0.75 AU, though still allowing for a Neptune-mass planet at 5 AU). Although it is technically a variable star, this is only long-term variability (and even then, falls in the margin of error), and in the short term, its variability (if it exists) is utterly trivial. Like the other red dwarfs I've covered here, it emits X rays. 581 b is sort of a 'hot Neptune', having 15.8 Earth masses, and orbiting at 0.04 AU, completing its orbit in only 5.3 days (coincidentally, the amount of time this post feels like it took to write). 581 c is about 5.5 Earth masses, and is the farthest out from 581 proper, being 0.72 AU from its star. Its year lasts 12.9 days. Depending on c's makeup (and therefore density), its surface gravity should fall somewhere between 1.25-2.24 G, while its radius should fall somewhere between 1.5-2.0 Earth radii. 581 c is within its star's habitable zone, albeit on the warm side. 581 c is also probably tidally locked (which would induce volcanism and plate tectonics). However, it could be much like Venus, having a runaway greenhouse effect. Depending on albedo, the effective temperature could range from -3C/27F (for a Venus-like albedo, although this doesn't account for trapping of heat that does get through, like what keeps Venus as hot as it is, because by these same measurements, Venus's temperature should be 34C/93F, which is clearly not the case), to a balmy 40C/104F for an Earth-like albedo (again, not accounting for atmosphere). Gliese 581 e is actually the closest planet to the star, being 0.028 AU away from the star, and completing its orbit in 3.1 days. Its mass is one of the closest to Earth's, being 1.9 Earth masses. However, it is highly unlikely to have an atmosphere.

There's nothing I can think of that says you can't make a new planet in any of these systems (if needed) if you keep the above facts in mind. However, when making them, you should keep the things mentioned in the following article in mind: Linky.

Wow. That is... amazing.

I think my brain exploded.

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Zeinbrad
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Postby Zeinbrad » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:23 pm

Thinking of doing an RP similar to This War of Mine,again, but better and set in a modern world. Because personally I would like that more.
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Meinkraft
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Postby Meinkraft » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:13 pm

Vancon wrote:
Meinkraft wrote:Thinking of creating a RP within the Arpeggio of Blue Steel (ARS NOVA) 'verse. Creating OCs, traveling the world, defeating, (or joining) the Fog, and some points of basic tomfoolery.

Shakii~iim

I had some ideas about this a while ago...

Share please!
Last edited by Kirby Delauter on Wed, Jan 7, 2015 2:00 am, edited Delauter times in total.


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Vancon
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Postby Vancon » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:25 pm

Meinkraft wrote:
Vancon wrote:I had some ideas about this a while ago...

Share please!

Simply put, we'd do it like a school or something with the people there being the personifications of boats who can *poof* their true form into existance whenever.

So pretty much that.

I know at least one other person interested in this kind of idea.
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Which just so happens to be within the next half-hour

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TriStates
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Postby TriStates » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:37 pm

Vancon wrote:
Meinkraft wrote:Share please!

Simply put, we'd do it like a school or something with the people there being the personifications of boats who can *poof* their true form into existance whenever.

So pretty much that.

I know at least one other person interested in this kind of idea.


Sounds legit.
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Escalan Corps-Star Island
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Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Escalan Corps-Star Island » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:57 pm

Vancon wrote:
Meinkraft wrote:Share please!

Simply put, we'd do it like a school or something with the people there being the personifications of boats who can *poof* their true form into existance whenever.

So pretty much that.

I know at least one other person interested in this kind of idea.


I could have fun with that.

Grenartia wrote:
Rupudska wrote:
Gliese 581 is the farthest one humans have colonized, so basically every planetary system within about 20 light years.


According to wiki, there are 59 star systems within that distance. However, only 4 planetary systems are currently known to exist within that range. Though it lists 12 systems with either confirmed or hypothesized planets in that same range.

Alpha Centauri's only currently hypothesized planet (Alpha Centauri Bb) is most decidedly too hot for human habitation (or habitation by any known life on Earth, for that matter), being 1500K, or 2200F, and being 10 times closer to its parent star than Mercury is to the Sun, and a year lasting only about 3 days. Instead, a potentially habitable planet would have to be farther out from Alpha Centauri B (about 0.7 AU), orbiting within A's habitable zone (which would be farther out than the Sun's due to A's being slightly more massive and brighter/hotter, in this case being about 1.25 AU, which lies somewhere between Earth and Mars in our system), or orbiting around AB itself (this option being more likely, as accretion environments around the individual stars are probably less likely to promote planetary formation). Since the stars are fairly comparable to the sun, any possible habitable planets (as far as gravity, temperature, atmospheric composition, and radiation protection are concerned) could harbor Earth life with little to no modifications. Anybody on a planet orbiting A alone at the aforementioned 1.25 AU would find that B would be about <a href="tel:190-2500">190-2500</a> times dimmer than A (as well as the sun in our system would be from Earth), but <a href="tel:190-2500">190-2500</a> times brighter than the full moon on Earth. An observer on a planet 0.7 AU from B (likewise, making B appear as bright as the sun does here on Earth) would notice that A appears 70-830 times dimmer than the Sun, but <a href="tel:580-6900">580-6900</a> times brighter than the full moon.

Epsilon Eridani is probably less than a billion years old, and is thus quite young as far as star systems go. Its stellar winds are about 30 times more intense than solar winds from our Sun, so any habitable planet there (of equivalent magnetospheric strength to Earth) would have brilliant auroras, assuming such a magnetosphere could withstand 30 times the radiation of the Sun without frying life on the surface (I don't have the scientific knowledge to answer that question). EE is also orange in color, compared to the Sun, so plants there (whether native or introduced from Earth) would have to have a different color to best take advantage of the available light (I'm guessing a color like this as opposed to the green we're all familiar with here on Earth, though that's literally just a guess on my part). Despite having 82% of the Sun's mass (Alpha Centauri B having 90%, for reference), EE only has a third of the brightness of the Sun. EE's habitable zone currently lies somewhere between 0.5 and 1 AU (within the inner asteroid belt), though as it ages over the next several billion years, this radius will expand to 0.6-1.4 AU. EE has two dust disks (large disks at that), and probably has at least two planets (one confirmed, one not). EEb is about 1.5 Jupiter masses, and 3.4 AU from the star (any Earth-sized moons could be tidally heated, but I doubt you'd get enough light there for significant photosynthesis). I'd hold out even less hope for EEc, which is 20 AU away.

Tau Ceti is a bit older than the Sun, but also more stable (meaning less flares and the like). It has a large debris disk ranging from 50 AU all the way down to 10 AU. Its the same spectral class as the Sun (being the second closest, after Alpha Centauri A), is about 0.78 solar masses, and about half as bright as the Sun. Tau Ceti has 5 unconfirmed planets, with orbital periods ranging from 14 days to 642. TCb is about 0.1 AU from its star, is 2 Earth masses, and orbits TC in 13.9 days. TCc is about 0.19 AU away, is 3.1 Earth masses, and orbits in about 35 days. TCd is 3.6 Earth masses, is 0.37 AU away, and orbits in 94 days. All three are entirely too close to their stars to have any hope of supporting Earth life. TCe, however, is 4.3 Earth masses, 0.55 AU away, and orbits in about 168 days. TCf is 6.67 Earth masses, 1.35 AU away, and has a 642 day year. Given as e and f (well, every planet in the system) are super Earths, life there would have to be heavily adapted to higher gravities (probably not even genetic engineering would be able to produce such adaptations). However, both e and f are in TC's habitable zone (f would have to have a thicker atmosphere than Earth to have Earthlike temperatures, and e would be much too hot for anything other than heat-loving extremophiles, given that it would be around 70C/158F).

Kapteyn's Star is a red dwarf about 30% the size of the sun, and 0.1% as bright. It moves retrograde, with respect to most other stars in the Milky Way, and this fact, along with its variation in chemical makeup, means it could very well have once been part of a small galaxy that got swallowed up by ours. The system is also extremely old, somewhere in the neighborhood of 11.5 billion years. It also has 2 confirmed planets. Kapteyn b is 4.8 Earth masses, orbits the star in 48 days, and is 0.16 AU from its star, putting it within Kapteyn's habitable zone. Kapteyn c, on the other hand, is 7 Earth masses, has a 121 day year, and is 0.31 AU from the star, and is probably too cold to harbor life. Speaking of which, any life in a red dwarf system which relies on photosynthesis to harvest its energy would probably have to be colored black, to maximize the energy coming in from the low levels of light the star produces. Likewise, Earth life here would probably have to have genetic modifications allowing them to see beyond the visual spectrum. This is not helped by most red dwarfs being highly variable, with starspots possibly hindering light output by as much as 40%, and at other times flaring up to double their brightness in only a few minutes.

Gliese 687 is another red dwarf system. Wiki doesn't give its luminosity, but it's got half the Sun's radius, and about 40% of its mass. It also is chromospherically active, and emits X rays. It is also known to have a 19 Earth mass planet (about the size of Neptune), but no info about its distance or habitability is given.

Groombridge 34 is a binary red dwarf system (separation is about 147 AU). Both are flare stars. Groombridge 34 Ab is 5.3 Earth masses, and orbits at about 0.07 AU, completing its orbit in 11.4 days, thus making it too close to its star to be habitable.

Gliese 674 is yet another red dwarf system (noticing a pattern here?), with 0.35 solar masses, and a brightness 0.016 of the Sun's. 674b is about 11 Earth masses, and orbits its star at about 0.039 AU, and completes its orbit in 4.7 days.

Gliese 876 is yet again, another red dwarf system, and has about a third the mass of the Sun (and about a third of the radius), and a luminosity about 0.013 compared to the Sun. Its age is somewhere between 0.1 and 9.9 billion years (its chromosphere suggests an age between 6.5 billion and 9.9 billion, but its rotational period and membership in the young disk suggest 0.1 and 5 billion). It is a variable star and emits X rays. Its habitable zone is in the range of 0.11 to 0.22 AU. 876 has 4 planets, which strongly gravitationally influence each other. 876 b is 2 Jupiter masses (thus making it most certainly a gas giant), and orbits at about 0.206 AU (an orbit it completes in about 60 days), on the outer edge of the star's habitable zone. This means that b could very well harbor large, Earth like moons, moons that would likely be habitable. 876 c is about 0.7 Jupiter masses (also probably making it a gas giant), and orbits around the star in about a month, at a distance of 0.13 AU (putting it inside the habitable zone as well). Like b, therefore, it could harbor a large habitable moon. 876 d is 6.8 Earth masses, and orbits at a distance of about 0.02 AU, an orbit it completes in about 2 days. It is probably fairly volcanic, like Io is in our system, due to large amounts of tidal heating from being in such a close orbit with its star. 876 e is about 14.6 Earth masses, making it quite similar to Uranus (the planet, not your asshole). It takes about 124 days to make an orbit of about 0.33 AU.

Gliese 832 is a black hole system. No, just fucking with you, its another red dwarf system. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun, and a luminosity of 0.035 compared to the Sun. It emits X rays. Also, it has 2 planets. 832 b is about 0.64 Jupiter masses, has a distance of about 3.4 AU from its star (which looks as bright at this distance as our Sun does from 80 AU, or about 100 times brighter than a full moon on Earth), and completes said orbit once every 9.3 years. 832 c is a special little rock. Its about 5.4 Earth masses, has a high ranking on the Earth Similarity Index (0.81 out of 1.00), and is inside the star's habitable zone. However, its orbit is eccentric enough that grazes the inner edge of the habitable zone, and is thought to have fairly extreme seasons. Its equilibrium temperature is thought to range from -40C/-40F to 7C/44.6F, with the average being about -20C/-4F. However, that doesn't account for a sufficiently thick atmosphere. Too thick/too much of a greenhouse effect, however, which is possible given the planet's mass, and it could be even hotter than Venus. Its year is 36 days.

82 G Eridani is (FINALLY!) a G-class star, with 0.7 Solar masses, 0.92 Solar radii, and 74% of the Sun's brightness. Its between 6.1 and 12.7 billion years old. It has 2 confirmed planets, and a 3rd unconfirmed (some discrepancies in the data caused the scientists to have some doubts about its validity). However, all three are super Earths between 0.12 and 0.34 AU (habitable for a planet in many red dwarf systems, but not so in a G-type system), and the third alone (assuming it does indeed exist) would probably have a temperature of 115C/239F, assuming a Bond albedo similar to Earth's. 82GEb is about 2.7 Earth masses, and is around 0.12 AU from 82EG itself, with a year only lasting 18 days, while c is 2.4 Earth masses, 0.20 AU out, and has a year of 40 days, and finally, d (again, assuming its real) is about 4.8 Earth masses, 0.34 AU distant, and has a year lasting 90 days. It also has a dust disk at around 19 AU out.

Finally, we have Gliese 581 (another red dwarf). It has 0.31 Solar masses, 0.29 Solar radii, and a brightness of 0.013 compared to the Sun, and is 7-11 billion years old. It has 3 confirmed planets (was thought to have 6, but three (d, f, and g) were later shown to be what I'm going to call 'data phantoms', in that they were illusions created by various aspects of 581), and a cometary disk from 25-60 AU (ruling out a Saturn-mass planet at 0.75 AU, though still allowing for a Neptune-mass planet at 5 AU). Although it is technically a variable star, this is only long-term variability (and even then, falls in the margin of error), and in the short term, its variability (if it exists) is utterly trivial. Like the other red dwarfs I've covered here, it emits X rays. 581 b is sort of a 'hot Neptune', having 15.8 Earth masses, and orbiting at 0.04 AU, completing its orbit in only 5.3 days (coincidentally, the amount of time this post feels like it took to write). 581 c is about 5.5 Earth masses, and is the farthest out from 581 proper, being 0.72 AU from its star. Its year lasts 12.9 days. Depending on c's makeup (and therefore density), its surface gravity should fall somewhere between 1.25-2.24 G, while its radius should fall somewhere between 1.5-2.0 Earth radii. 581 c is within its star's habitable zone, albeit on the warm side. 581 c is also probably tidally locked (which would induce volcanism and plate tectonics). However, it could be much like Venus, having a runaway greenhouse effect. Depending on albedo, the effective temperature could range from -3C/27F (for a Venus-like albedo, although this doesn't account for trapping of heat that does get through, like what keeps Venus as hot as it is, because by these same measurements, Venus's temperature should be 34C/93F, which is clearly not the case), to a balmy 40C/104F for an Earth-like albedo (again, not accounting for atmosphere). Gliese 581 e is actually the closest planet to the star, being 0.028 AU away from the star, and completing its orbit in 3.1 days. Its mass is one of the closest to Earth's, being 1.9 Earth masses. However, it is highly unlikely to have an atmosphere.

There's nothing I can think of that says you can't make a new planet in any of these systems (if needed) if you keep the above facts in mind. However, when making them, you should keep the things mentioned in the following article in mind: Linky.

You have earned much respect. I may use this in the future.

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Vancon
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Postby Vancon » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:59 pm

Escalan Corps-Star Island wrote:
Vancon wrote:Simply put, we'd do it like a school or something with the people there being the personifications of boats who can *poof* their true form into existance whenever.

So pretty much that.

I know at least one other person interested in this kind of idea.


I could have fun with that.



I've got this image of some dude getting pissed off in class and poofing into a battleship, obliterating his class.
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The balkens wrote:Please tell me that condoms and Hazelnut spread are NOT on the same table.

Well what the fuck do you use for lube?

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Rupudska wrote:I avoid NSG like one would avoid ISIS-occupied Syria.
Alimeria- wrote:I'll go to sleep when I want to, not when some cheese-eating surrender monkey tells me to.

Which just so happens to be within the next half-hour

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Escalan Corps-Star Island
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Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby Escalan Corps-Star Island » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:34 pm

Vancon wrote:
Escalan Corps-Star Island wrote:
I could have fun with that.



I've got this image of some dude getting pissed off in class and poofing into a battleship, obliterating his class.


But Mental Models are all female. . .

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Vancon
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Postby Vancon » Mon Nov 17, 2014 9:36 pm

Escalan Corps-Star Island wrote:
Vancon wrote:
I've got this image of some dude getting pissed off in class and poofing into a battleship, obliterating his class.


But Mental Models are all female. . .

Dudette*
Mike the Progressive wrote:You know I don't say this often, but this guy... he gets it. Like everything. As in he gets life.

Imperializt Russia wrote:
The balkens wrote:Please tell me that condoms and Hazelnut spread are NOT on the same table.

Well what the fuck do you use for lube?

Krazakistan wrote:How have you not died after being exposed to that much shit on a monthly basis?
Rupudska wrote:I avoid NSG like one would avoid ISIS-occupied Syria.
Alimeria- wrote:I'll go to sleep when I want to, not when some cheese-eating surrender monkey tells me to.

Which just so happens to be within the next half-hour

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Torsiedelle
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Postby Torsiedelle » Mon Nov 17, 2014 10:28 pm

*as I type this, I'm running low on sleep*

What about...

Like, there's a border between the world of dreams and reality, right? The average mortal mind gets lost in the border when they dream, and just float around in the daze and fog, which is why they brush off their dreams and go about their day. However, a few people can break out of the fog and pass to the other side of the border, into the world of dreams.

In the world of dreams, people live and interact just like in reality, but a person is manifested in a different body and personality. Since it IS the dream world, stuff like magic and super powers, and other crazy shit is commonplace. The dream world's reality is influenced by the majority of the world's subconscious thoughts while they sleep.

This isn't always for the best. The bad thoughts and dark side of the human mind manifests from the fog as dark, twisted beings, who prey on the people inside the dream world. These people work to stop the threat while in the dream world. If they die in the dream, they die in real life.

People who grow used to the dream world start to become unable to tell their real identity from their dream identity, and become withdrawn and antisocial. Some find each other in the real world and band together to help each other out, all the while keeping their secrets from family and friends. In the dream world, they often feel free and unconcerned, as if that's where they belong. Some people even fall into permanent comas, or even die, as their spirits are bound to the world of dreams.

And through in a nice, anime-esque theme and atmosphere, and that's about it. I'm done. I'm gonna drink some grape juice and go the hell to bed. I'm too tired.
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Nature-Spirits
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Postby Nature-Spirits » Mon Nov 17, 2014 10:32 pm

Torsiedelle wrote:*as I type this, I'm running low on sleep*

What about...

Like, there's a border between the world of dreams and reality, right? The average mortal mind gets lost in the border when they dream, and just float around in the daze and fog, which is why they brush off their dreams and go about their day. However, a few people can break out of the fog and pass to the other side of the border, into the world of dreams.

In the world of dreams, people live and interact just like in reality, but a person is manifested in a different body and personality. Since it IS the dream world, stuff like magic and super powers, and other crazy shit is commonplace. The dream world's reality is influenced by the majority of the world's subconscious thoughts while they sleep.

This isn't always for the best. The bad thoughts and dark side of the human mind manifests from the fog as dark, twisted beings, who prey on the people inside the dream world. These people work to stop the threat while in the dream world. If they die in the dream, they die in real life.

People who grow used to the dream world start to become unable to tell their real identity from their dream identity, and become withdrawn and antisocial. Some find each other in the real world and band together to help each other out, all the while keeping their secrets from family and friends. In the dream world, they often feel free and unconcerned, as if that's where they belong. Some people even fall into permanent comas, or even die, as their spirits are bound to the world of dreams.

And through in a nice, anime-esque theme and atmosphere, and that's about it. I'm done. I'm gonna drink some grape juice and go the hell to bed. I'm too tired.

So basically, it's NS as a dream reality.
Sounds cool.
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Postby Alleniana » Mon Nov 17, 2014 10:38 pm

Nature-Spirits wrote:
Torsiedelle wrote:*as I type this, I'm running low on sleep*

What about...

Like, there's a border between the world of dreams and reality, right? The average mortal mind gets lost in the border when they dream, and just float around in the daze and fog, which is why they brush off their dreams and go about their day. However, a few people can break out of the fog and pass to the other side of the border, into the world of dreams.

In the world of dreams, people live and interact just like in reality, but a person is manifested in a different body and personality. Since it IS the dream world, stuff like magic and super powers, and other crazy shit is commonplace. The dream world's reality is influenced by the majority of the world's subconscious thoughts while they sleep.

This isn't always for the best. The bad thoughts and dark side of the human mind manifests from the fog as dark, twisted beings, who prey on the people inside the dream world. These people work to stop the threat while in the dream world. If they die in the dream, they die in real life.

People who grow used to the dream world start to become unable to tell their real identity from their dream identity, and become withdrawn and antisocial. Some find each other in the real world and band together to help each other out, all the while keeping their secrets from family and friends. In the dream world, they often feel free and unconcerned, as if that's where they belong. Some people even fall into permanent comas, or even die, as their spirits are bound to the world of dreams.

And through in a nice, anime-esque theme and atmosphere, and that's about it. I'm done. I'm gonna drink some grape juice and go the hell to bed. I'm too tired.

So basically, it's NS as a dream reality.
Sounds cool.

:rofl:
magnificent
and reply 2014 as well
Last edited by Alleniana on Mon Nov 17, 2014 10:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kassaran
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Founded: Jun 16, 2013
Capitalist Paradise

Postby Kassaran » Tue Nov 18, 2014 12:16 am

Cerillium wrote:
Kassaran wrote:Thanks, I actually went and looked at the general content of each of the opening crawls to each movie. I discovered that I truly enjoyed the condensed form with the emphasis placed on key subjects in the sentences by the capitalization of all the letters in a said word. I feel it was kind of the genius in that crawl, and given it was based off of the old Flash Gordon opening crawls, I think I did a decent job emulating it all.

You did indeed.

*giggles maniacally*

Cer noticed me? And said I did good? I think I will now need to go and change my thoroughly soiled pants.

Alleniana wrote:
Nature-Spirits wrote:So basically, it's NS as a dream reality.
Sounds cool.

:rofl:
magnificent
and reply 2014 as well

Sounds like Persona... but I like the idea a lot and would like to join just because I see it as being a proper plot for an anime of sorts. And given that I love anime, I think I'd like this too.
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bloody hell, mate.
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The following came from an interesting discussion regarding ANTIFA:
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Altito Asmoro
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Posts: 33371
Founded: May 18, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Altito Asmoro » Tue Nov 18, 2014 1:38 am

Rupudska wrote:IDEA TIME WITH RUPPY-SEMPAI
Please provide as much detail as possible.
RP's Overarching Concept: Dirty Dozen plus Evangelion plus Edge of Tomorrow plus Jedi magic. In space!
Genre/s: Science Fantasy, Action, Asskicking
Character or Faction Based: Character
Detailed Description:
It's the 23rd Century and humanity had colonized most of the Solar System, at least we'd got most of the dwarf planets and Plutoids, along with some of the larger asteroids, and some in other systems. We'd even managed to develop a primitive FTL drive, fast enough to take us to Gliese 581 in about three months - as far out as we have colonies. And yet we'd yet to encounter any alien presence - not much, at least. Sure, there were the Dryads, but our relationship with them was (and is) much like that of Rome and China. We had even managed to terraform most of the worlds we colonized in a way that each one still had its own unique biosphere via the dryad technology of genetic scrambling. It was a time of peace. Life was good, the economy was good, 'twas all good.

And then these squid-faced bastards show up and fuck up everything.

They weren't really warriors, we knew that from the start. They, the Zarnikhs as they were called, were scientists, like the Dryads. They seemed harmless enough, but some of our higher-ups knew better. The first tip-off was their 'requests' for trade. They were asking a hell of a lot while offering so little. The UN smelled bullshit and declined their offer. They again made a request, a bit more forcefully, in a way that sounded almost like they were threatening us with military force. We again politely declined, a bit more forcefully, in a way that almost sounded like we were telling them to bring it. And holy hell did they ever bring it.

As we suspected, they weren't the best at war. At least any semblance to conventional war. We had thought of the idea of using genetic scrambling as a weapon, hell, the Scandinavians came up with it - but we all agreed that it wasn't worth the money, and we didn't have anyone we hated enough to use it on at the time. These bastards had turned genetic warfare into an art form. They had three main kinds of bombs that they really loved to use. The first kind was the standard genetic scrambler turned into a weapon that could be dropped from a starship or fired out of one. They'd drop them on the wilderness - theirs seemed to be geared more towards turning everything predatorial - and watch as they wroke havoc on the more rural areas. That's how they first targeted Gliese 581c. And that was just the beginning. They also had accelerator bombs, that (you guessed it) accelerated the evolution of whatever they hit. And just like the future is unpredictable, so was this thing. Some animals became docile little pet-things, others, well, when the whales on your planet turn into Gaghiel, you know what to blame. The Zarnikhs fired these at wildernesses, too, but every once in a while it'll hit a human settlement and turn everyone into 'Freaks'. It's not pretty, and most die either by the mutations or suicide. Some get good mutations (like faster legs, stronger jaws, stronger arms, things like that, though they always look mutated), though that's pretty rare.

But by far the worst thing these assholes have come up with is the Atavistic Bomb. You ever want to get turned into an ape, or walk on all fours, or sprout a tail? Get hit by one of these things, it'll do that. They dropped these things on every city on every planet 15 lightyears out or more within the first week of the war, and suddenly each one turned into Planet of the Apes. Not literally, of course - even those directly hit didn't go further back than Sahelanthropus, physically or mentally - but it did enough damage to do its intended job, and that job was to screw our colonies to hell. And then they would send in their Warbeasts - Genetically altered monsters created by the Zarnikhs specifically for waging war. And they do their job flawlessly.

That war started four years ago, and they've been continuously hammering us ever since, with conventional warfare, gene bombs, and Warbeasts. Now all we have left are Alpha Centauri and the Sol system, officially. But we've started to do better, despite losing ground. We've still got no cure, but we've developed better power armor, better space weaponry, and better shielding systems (and tactics) to keep from getting effed up by those genetic bombs. More importantly, we've discovered a neat little quirk of those gene bombs. You see, if someone were to somehow get hit by an Atavistic and Accelerative bomb at the same time, it would do this neat thing to the brain I like to call 'turning you into a Jedi'. Well, it gives you some sort of psionic power, at least. These people, young and old, got scooped up by UN Skyfleet and put into special battalions, alongside certain Freaks that got lucky to go out and beat the shit out of the Zarnikhs, and pry their filthy little hands off our worlds, getting the more dangerous missions, because UN Skyfleet thinks they can handle it.

And y'all are just a few of them. In fact, you're the worst, the scummiest, the Dirty Dozenest, the most inglorious basterds the UN has yet found out of all the psionics on all the worlds, military or otherwise. And y'all are the best, because this could be the last chance you get before we throw you to the Zarks in a gift bag. But the United Nations Secretary General is a merciful god, and has decided to give you this second chance.

And you had best use it.


Need Help With: Maybe I should describe these planets.

Please leave this hashtag in place: #Mentorhelp


So the players will be the kind of Bad Company? Band of misfits?
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Or Tito.

I'm calling you "non-aligned comrade."

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Rupudska
Postmaster of the Fleet
 
Posts: 20395
Founded: Sep 16, 2010
Scandinavian Liberal Paradise

Postby Rupudska » Tue Nov 18, 2014 4:02 am

Altito Asmoro wrote:
Rupudska wrote:IDEA TIME WITH RUPPY-SEMPAI
Please provide as much detail as possible.
RP's Overarching Concept: Dirty Dozen plus Evangelion plus Edge of Tomorrow plus Jedi magic. In space!
Genre/s: Science Fantasy, Action, Asskicking
Character or Faction Based: Character
Detailed Description:
It's the 23rd Century and humanity had colonized most of the Solar System, at least we'd got most of the dwarf planets and Plutoids, along with some of the larger asteroids, and some in other systems. We'd even managed to develop a primitive FTL drive, fast enough to take us to Gliese 581 in about three months - as far out as we have colonies. And yet we'd yet to encounter any alien presence - not much, at least. Sure, there were the Dryads, but our relationship with them was (and is) much like that of Rome and China. We had even managed to terraform most of the worlds we colonized in a way that each one still had its own unique biosphere via the dryad technology of genetic scrambling. It was a time of peace. Life was good, the economy was good, 'twas all good.

And then these squid-faced bastards show up and fuck up everything.

They weren't really warriors, we knew that from the start. They, the Zarnikhs as they were called, were scientists, like the Dryads. They seemed harmless enough, but some of our higher-ups knew better. The first tip-off was their 'requests' for trade. They were asking a hell of a lot while offering so little. The UN smelled bullshit and declined their offer. They again made a request, a bit more forcefully, in a way that sounded almost like they were threatening us with military force. We again politely declined, a bit more forcefully, in a way that almost sounded like we were telling them to bring it. And holy hell did they ever bring it.

As we suspected, they weren't the best at war. At least any semblance to conventional war. We had thought of the idea of using genetic scrambling as a weapon, hell, the Scandinavians came up with it - but we all agreed that it wasn't worth the money, and we didn't have anyone we hated enough to use it on at the time. These bastards had turned genetic warfare into an art form. They had three main kinds of bombs that they really loved to use. The first kind was the standard genetic scrambler turned into a weapon that could be dropped from a starship or fired out of one. They'd drop them on the wilderness - theirs seemed to be geared more towards turning everything predatorial - and watch as they wroke havoc on the more rural areas. That's how they first targeted Gliese 581c. And that was just the beginning. They also had accelerator bombs, that (you guessed it) accelerated the evolution of whatever they hit. And just like the future is unpredictable, so was this thing. Some animals became docile little pet-things, others, well, when the whales on your planet turn into Gaghiel, you know what to blame. The Zarnikhs fired these at wildernesses, too, but every once in a while it'll hit a human settlement and turn everyone into 'Freaks'. It's not pretty, and most die either by the mutations or suicide. Some get good mutations (like faster legs, stronger jaws, stronger arms, things like that, though they always look mutated), though that's pretty rare.

But by far the worst thing these assholes have come up with is the Atavistic Bomb. You ever want to get turned into an ape, or walk on all fours, or sprout a tail? Get hit by one of these things, it'll do that. They dropped these things on every city on every planet 15 lightyears out or more within the first week of the war, and suddenly each one turned into Planet of the Apes. Not literally, of course - even those directly hit didn't go further back than Sahelanthropus, physically or mentally - but it did enough damage to do its intended job, and that job was to screw our colonies to hell. And then they would send in their Warbeasts - Genetically altered monsters created by the Zarnikhs specifically for waging war. And they do their job flawlessly.

That war started four years ago, and they've been continuously hammering us ever since, with conventional warfare, gene bombs, and Warbeasts. Now all we have left are Alpha Centauri and the Sol system, officially. But we've started to do better, despite losing ground. We've still got no cure, but we've developed better power armor, better space weaponry, and better shielding systems (and tactics) to keep from getting effed up by those genetic bombs. More importantly, we've discovered a neat little quirk of those gene bombs. You see, if someone were to somehow get hit by an Atavistic and Accelerative bomb at the same time, it would do this neat thing to the brain I like to call 'turning you into a Jedi'. Well, it gives you some sort of psionic power, at least. These people, young and old, got scooped up by UN Skyfleet and put into special battalions, alongside certain Freaks that got lucky to go out and beat the shit out of the Zarnikhs, and pry their filthy little hands off our worlds, getting the more dangerous missions, because UN Skyfleet thinks they can handle it.

And y'all are just a few of them. In fact, you're the worst, the scummiest, the Dirty Dozenest, the most inglorious basterds the UN has yet found out of all the psionics on all the worlds, military or otherwise. And y'all are the best, because this could be the last chance you get before we throw you to the Zarks in a gift bag. But the United Nations Secretary General is a merciful god, and has decided to give you this second chance.

And you had best use it.


Need Help With: Maybe I should describe these planets.

Please leave this hashtag in place: #Mentorhelp


So the players will be the kind of Bad Company? Band of misfits?


That's...exactly what the last paragraph implies, so yes.
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seem to be blowing up everyones banks
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Questers wrote:
Rupudska wrote:So do you fight with AK-47s or something even more primitive? Since I doubt any economy could reasonably sustain itself that way.
Presumably they use advanced technology like STRIKE WITCHES

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Ouldale
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1083
Founded: Jul 03, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Ouldale » Tue Nov 18, 2014 1:45 pm

Zeinbrad wrote:Thinking of doing an RP similar to This War of Mine,again, but better and set in a modern world. Because personally I would like that more.

Sounds cool, I might be interested. I never played the game but it looks interesting, surviving a seige and all. Near future, or alt-history, and what would be the scenario?
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Zeinbrad
Postmaster of the Fleet
 
Posts: 29535
Founded: Jun 04, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Zeinbrad » Tue Nov 18, 2014 2:00 pm

Ouldale wrote:
Zeinbrad wrote:Thinking of doing an RP similar to This War of Mine,again, but better and set in a modern world. Because personally I would like that more.

Sounds cool, I might be interested. I never played the game but it looks interesting, surviving a seige and all. Near future, or alt-history, and what would be the scenario?

I don't know.

The first thing that popped in my head was a Israeli invasion of Gaza scenario. Through that may be too soon.
“There are three ways to ultimate success:
The first way is to be kind.
The second way is to be kind.
The third way is to be kind.”
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Gvozdevsk
Minister
 
Posts: 2338
Founded: Dec 20, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Gvozdevsk » Tue Nov 18, 2014 2:05 pm

Zeinbrad wrote:
Ouldale wrote:Sounds cool, I might be interested. I never played the game but it looks interesting, surviving a seige and all. Near future, or alt-history, and what would be the scenario?

I don't know.

The first thing that popped in my head was a Israeli invasion of Gaza scenario. Through that may be too soon.

The Israel-Palestine conflict is a massive can of worms that should be avoided at all costs in RPs unless you can do it well. I'd suggest doing something in the Donbass, but again, too soon and also a can of worms that shouldn't be opened with how many Putin apologists are roaming the internet. Better off coming up with something fictional.

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Zarkenis Ultima
P2TM RP Mentor
 
Posts: 42221
Founded: Feb 22, 2011
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Zarkenis Ultima » Tue Nov 18, 2014 3:08 pm

Meinkraft wrote:Here's the main synopsis:

"Due to global warming and rising sea levels in the early 21st century, much of Earth's landmass has been lost. In 2039, fleets of powerful sentient warships, armed with advanced technology and weaponry, mysteriously appear and devastate the world's naval forces. These ships, collectively called 'The Fleet of Fog', impose a worldwide naval and aerial blockade, preventing humanity from both traveling the oceans and to other nations. During the blockade, the Fleet of Fog created Mental Models, humanoid avatars containing a ship's Union core, as a means to develop self cultivation and overcome their lack of creative thinking of tactics like humans, which at the same time made the Mental Models have their own unique personality."

So it's an adventure on the high seas, I guess? It's hard to explain....


Well, that's something you'll have to define yourself, though the concept sounds interesting for a roleplay. First of all, what will your characters be doing? How will they start out? That, I think, is the important question here. You seem to know enough about the world you're trying to use, so, you really just seem to need to figure out your plot to be all set. I'm afraid I can't help you much there, since I don't know anything about the universe, but if you want any more advice, I'll do what I can.

Torsiedelle wrote:*as I type this, I'm running low on sleep*

What about...

Like, there's a border between the world of dreams and reality, right? The average mortal mind gets lost in the border when they dream, and just float around in the daze and fog, which is why they brush off their dreams and go about their day. However, a few people can break out of the fog and pass to the other side of the border, into the world of dreams.

In the world of dreams, people live and interact just like in reality, but a person is manifested in a different body and personality. Since it IS the dream world, stuff like magic and super powers, and other crazy shit is commonplace. The dream world's reality is influenced by the majority of the world's subconscious thoughts while they sleep.

This isn't always for the best. The bad thoughts and dark side of the human mind manifests from the fog as dark, twisted beings, who prey on the people inside the dream world. These people work to stop the threat while in the dream world. If they die in the dream, they die in real life.

People who grow used to the dream world start to become unable to tell their real identity from their dream identity, and become withdrawn and antisocial. Some find each other in the real world and band together to help each other out, all the while keeping their secrets from family and friends. In the dream world, they often feel free and unconcerned, as if that's where they belong. Some people even fall into permanent comas, or even die, as their spirits are bound to the world of dreams.

And through in a nice, anime-esque theme and atmosphere, and that's about it. I'm done. I'm gonna drink some grape juice and go the hell to bed. I'm too tired.


This reminds me of a story I found once in the net (it was labelled as a Creepypasta, but it was too fantasy-esque for something like that :P). It was rather well-made.

Anyway, this sounds like an idea that could get very interesting, depending on where you go with it, as it's obviously an idea that could develop in hundreds of ways. I can't think of much advice right now but I do have one question: To what extent can the dreamworld affect the real world? You mention death. Does injury transfer as well? What about the death of those dark thought creatures you mention?
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G-Tech Corporation
P2TM RP Mentor
 
Posts: 54831
Founded: Feb 03, 2010
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby G-Tech Corporation » Tue Nov 18, 2014 3:22 pm

Gvozdevsk wrote:
Zeinbrad wrote:I don't know.

The first thing that popped in my head was a Israeli invasion of Gaza scenario. Through that may be too soon.

The Israel-Palestine conflict is a massive can of worms that should be avoided at all costs in RPs unless you can do it well. I'd suggest doing something in the Donbass, but again, too soon and also a can of worms that shouldn't be opened with how many Putin apologists are roaming the internet. Better off coming up with something fictional.


Honestly, those are cans that should remain closed. The Ukraine issue is one with less ambiguity, but ho boy, don't touch the Is-Pal conflict.
TG if you have questions about RP. If I don't know the answer, I know someone who does.

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Zeinbrad
Postmaster of the Fleet
 
Posts: 29535
Founded: Jun 04, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Zeinbrad » Tue Nov 18, 2014 3:23 pm

Gvozdevsk wrote:
Zeinbrad wrote:I don't know.

The first thing that popped in my head was a Israeli invasion of Gaza scenario. Through that may be too soon.

The Israel-Palestine conflict is a massive can of worms that should be avoided at all costs in RPs unless you can do it well. I'd suggest doing something in the Donbass, but again, too soon and also a can of worms that shouldn't be opened with how many Putin apologists are roaming the internet. Better off coming up with something fictional.

I meant based on.

Has anyone actually tried to do a RP in the Israel-Palestine conflict? Any stories if so?
“There are three ways to ultimate success:
The first way is to be kind.
The second way is to be kind.
The third way is to be kind.”
― Fred Rogers
Currently looking for an artist for a Star Wars fan comic I want to make.

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