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American Politics Thread V: We're Just Biden Our Time ...

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:28 am
by Untecna
Our Last Thread
Welcome back, guys and gals, Democrats and Republicans, leftists, rightists, centrists, and Kowani, to the American Politics Thread. It's our big 5th edition, and to celebrate, I brought some cake!

More than 18% of the US is vaccinated, 24 states are going further with the voting restriction laws, and we're still here, NSG. So let's get this show on the road and start off this edition great.

You know the rules, ready, set, Allez!

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:29 am
by Picairn
Edit: First time being first at a thread. :p

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:30 am
by Drew Durrnil
second owo

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:31 am
by Vassenor
-bonk-

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:31 am
by San Lumen
Tomorrow we have a statewide election in Wisconsin and multiple state legislative special elections in addition to many municipal elections including St Louis. As usual me and Shrilland will be providing coverage and analysis.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:32 am
by Untecna
San Lumen wrote:Tomorrow we have a statewide election in Wisconsin and multiple state legislative special elections in addition to many municipal elections. As usual me and Shrilland will be providing coverage and analysis.

If anything in Cali comes up, I have coverage dibs.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:34 am
by San Lumen
Untecna wrote:
San Lumen wrote:Tomorrow we have a statewide election in Wisconsin and multiple state legislative special elections in addition to many municipal elections. As usual me and Shrilland will be providing coverage and analysis.

If anything in Cali comes up, I have coverage dibs.


There is a special election in the 79th assembly district. Its the seat Shirley Weber held prior to becoming Secretary of State.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 9:39 am
by Untecna
San Lumen wrote:
Untecna wrote:If anything in Cali comes up, I have coverage dibs.


There is a special election in the 79th assembly district. Its the seat Shirley Weber held prior to becoming Secretary of State.

And I claim my dibs.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 10:00 am
by Shrillland
Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:
On October 9 alongside the amendment underneath, voters will decide on an amendment to allow levee districts founded between January 1, 2006 and this Election Day to raise taxes by five mills, or $5 per $1,000 of assessed property values. It would also allow the Orleans Levee District to raise taxes by 2.5 mills. Any future levee districts would need voter approval to raise similar taxes.

The second amendment would double the limit on how much money the state could redirect to purposes besides what was originally allocated in the budget. The limit would go up from 5 to 10%.

Back in 2016, Massachusetts passed a law requiring 9.45 million megawatts of its power to be generated by hydro or a hydro/renewable mix. This means having to buy power from hydro dams up in Quebec powered by the provincial energy company, Hydro-Quebec. To bring it down to Massachusetts requires high-capacity transmission lines....right across the Upper Kennebec Region of Maine, which in turn means cutting down a lot of trees. This became known as the NECEC(New England Clean Energy Connect)Corridor. After four years of pulling teeth, Maine was able to secure 500 Megawatt Hours worth of power each year from the lines and compensation from Hydro-Quebec, but many don't think this is worth the environmental impacts that the corridor will cause. So, this November, Maine will be voting on a measure that would explicitly ban the construction of high-capacity lines in the Upper Kennebec region and require a two-thirds majority of the Legislature to approve any future lines.

First up is an amendment that would lead to redistricting reform. The amendment would allow the state 10-member redistricting commission(made up of 4 Democrats, 4 Republicans, and 2 non-partisans) to approve a new legislative map by majority vote if a single party holds both legislative houses. Currently, it requires a two-thirds majority when a party holds both. Second, the amendment would require prisoners to be counted in the census according to their last known residence rather than the prison they're in. Third, it would require the state to count non-citizens when it comes to redistricting. Fourth, State Senate district would no longer be bound to the "block-on'-border" requirement, meaning that (A), city blocks could now be divided into different districts, and (B), the commission is no longer required to take adjacent towns or city blocks on the borders of districts in mind when drawing maps. Currently, they have to ensure that towns or blocks are placed in such a way as to make neighbouring districts equal in population and the districts can't have a greater population difference between them than the population of that border town or block. Fifth, it would permanently cap the State Senate at 63 seats, and sixth, it moves up the deadline for redistricting to November 1, 2021(and so on) from January 1, 2022(and so on).

Amendment number two would create a constitutional right to clean water, clean air, and a healthful environment.

Amendment number three would allow the legislature to pass a law allowing no-excuse absentee voting.

Amendment number four would allow the legislature to pass a law to allow same-day voter registration, eliminating the current deadline of 10 days before an election.

Amendment number five would increase the jurisdiction of the NYC Civil Court. It would now be able to preside over lawsuits up to $50,000, double the current jurisdictional limit of $25,000.

Questions 1 and 2 both regard emergency declarations. Question 1 would limit emergency declarations issued by the governor to no more than 21 days unless the legislature votes for an extension. The amendment would also allow the legislature to pass laws regarding how these declarations can be managed. Question 2 would allow the legislature to unilaterally extend or terminate a governor's emergency declaration by a simple majority vote. This resolution could not be vetoed by the governor. BOTH APPROVED

Question 3, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity. APPROVED

Question 4 would allow municipal fire departments and EMS services to apply for state loans from the State Fire Commission. Currently, only volunteer fire departments and ambulance services can apply for these loans. APPROVED

Texans will be voting on an amendment to their constitution that would prohibit the state or any local authorities from prohibiting or placing limits on any form of religious services.

Amendment number two would allow the legislature to provide a homestead property tax exemption to the surviving spouse of a disabled person if the spouse is 55 or older. Currently, such exemptions are only available to surviving spouses of people if they're 65 or older. It would also create a retroactive exemption for anyone who would qualify as far back as tax year 2020 and give such people full refunds for 2020 and 2021.

Amendment number three would change the eligibility requirements for judges and higher justices. First, they would have to be residents of Texas and US citizens(currently, they only have to be citizens of Texas and the US). Second, the experience requirement for district court judges would be doubled to 8 years from the current 4. Third, the experience requirement of being either a lawyer, judge, or both for the State Supreme Court would remain at 10 years, but a new provision would be added for both types of judge and those for state appeals courts. Namely, if a lawyer or judge's law licence was suspended or revoked at any time during the 8- or 10-year period, they would be disqualified from higher benches. This will take effect for any judge that's appointed for a term on the court starting in 2025.

Amendment number four would authorise the State Commission on Judicial Conduct to subject candidates for the judiciary to the same investigative and disciplinary powers that judicial officeholders are currently subject to.

Amendment number five would allow the legislature to provide a homestead property tax exemption to a surviving military spouse if they died in the line of duty. Currently, they can only get the exemption if the person was killed in action.

Amendment number six would declare professional rodeo organisations to be professional sports teams. This would also allow their charitable foundations to set up charitable raffles at rodeo events.

Amendment number seven would allow counties to issue bonds to pay for transportation and infrastructure programmes in blighted areas. Currently, only cities and towns can do so. They would be forbidden from building toll roads with these bonds, and they couldn't allocate more than 65% of their annual property tax revenue increases to paying the bonds back

Amendment number eight would ensure that residents of nursing or assisted living homes have the right to assign an essential caregiver. This caregiver can't be barred from in-person visitations.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 10:26 am
by The Black Forrest
Shrillland wrote:Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:

The first amendment, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity, primarily to stop Affirmative Action.



So AA was created to pressure institutions into compliance with the nondiscrimination mandate of the Civil Rights Act so they are going to make non-discrimination happen by stopping AA?......uhm......ok.....

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 10:32 am
by Shrillland
The Black Forrest wrote:
Shrillland wrote:Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:

The first amendment, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity, primarily to stop Affirmative Action.



So AA was created to pressure institutions into compliance with the nondiscrimination mandate of the Civil Rights Act so they are going to make non-discrimination happen by stopping AA?......uhm......ok.....


It's the same logic a lot of the western states use, reverse discrimination and such.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:39 am
by Zurkerx
Shrillland wrote:Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:

First up is an amendment that would lead to redistricting reform. The amendment would allow the state 10-member redistricting commission(made up of 4 Democrats, 4 Republicans, and 2 non-partisans) to approve a new legislative map by majority vote if a single party holds both legislative houses. Currently, it requires a two-thirds majority when a party holds both. Second, the amendment would require prisoners to be counted in the census according to their last known residence rather than the prison they're in. Third, it would require the state to count non-citizens when it comes to redistricting. Fourth, State Senate district would no longer be bound to the "block-on'-border" requirement, meaning that (A), city blocks could now be divided into different districts, and (B), the commission is no longer required to take adjacent towns or city blocks on the borders of districts in mind when drawing maps. Currently, they have to ensure that towns or blocks are placed in such a way as to make neighbouring districts equal in population and the districts can't have a greater population difference between them than the population of that border town or block. Fifth, it would permanently cap the State Senate at 63 seats, and sixth, it moves up the deadline for redistricting to November 1, 2021(and so on) from January 1, 2022(and so on).

Amendment number two would create a constitutional right to clean water, clean air, and a healthful environment.

The first amendment, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity, primarily to stop Affirmative Action.

Amendments number two and three both regard emergency declarations. Two would limit emergency declarations issued by the governor to no more than 21 days unless the legislature votes for an extension. The amendment would also allow the legislature to pass laws regarding how these declarations can be managed. Three would allow the legislature to unilaterally extend or terminate a governor's emergency declaration by a simple majority vote. This resolution could not be vetoed by the governor.


I can add everything from the previous topic into Op if you would like me too though that would have to be later.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:43 am
by Shrillland
Zurkerx wrote:
Shrillland wrote:Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:

First up is an amendment that would lead to redistricting reform. The amendment would allow the state 10-member redistricting commission(made up of 4 Democrats, 4 Republicans, and 2 non-partisans) to approve a new legislative map by majority vote if a single party holds both legislative houses. Currently, it requires a two-thirds majority when a party holds both. Second, the amendment would require prisoners to be counted in the census according to their last known residence rather than the prison they're in. Third, it would require the state to count non-citizens when it comes to redistricting. Fourth, State Senate district would no longer be bound to the "block-on'-border" requirement, meaning that (A), city blocks could now be divided into different districts, and (B), the commission is no longer required to take adjacent towns or city blocks on the borders of districts in mind when drawing maps. Currently, they have to ensure that towns or blocks are placed in such a way as to make neighbouring districts equal in population and the districts can't have a greater population difference between them than the population of that border town or block. Fifth, it would permanently cap the State Senate at 63 seats, and sixth, it moves up the deadline for redistricting to November 1, 2021(and so on) from January 1, 2022(and so on).

Amendment number two would create a constitutional right to clean water, clean air, and a healthful environment.

The first amendment, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity, primarily to stop Affirmative Action.

Amendments number two and three both regard emergency declarations. Two would limit emergency declarations issued by the governor to no more than 21 days unless the legislature votes for an extension. The amendment would also allow the legislature to pass laws regarding how these declarations can be managed. Three would allow the legislature to unilaterally extend or terminate a governor's emergency declaration by a simple majority vote. This resolution could not be vetoed by the governor.


I can add everything from the previous topic into Op if you would like me too though that would have to be later.


Oh no, it's all right. I can put any updates here, it's in my sig. I'll just wait my turn for the next thread like everyone else.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:46 am
by Zurkerx
Shrillland wrote:
Zurkerx wrote:
I can add everything from the previous topic into Op if you would like me too though that would have to be later.


Oh no, it's all right. I can put any updates here, it's in my sig. I'll just wait my turn for the next thread like everyone else.


You got it.

Also, it seems 538 has updated their rankings:

https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/pollster-ratings/

Some changes include Rasmussen's having a B Rating now (they were C+ I think) while NBC/WSJ fell to B+ (they were A-).

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:53 am
by San Lumen
https://thehill.com/business-a-lobbying ... ht-to-vote

United Airlines put out a scathing statement against the Georgia election law.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:57 am
by Arisyan
Shrillland wrote:Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:

First up is an amendment that would lead to redistricting reform. The amendment would allow the state 10-member redistricting commission(made up of 4 Democrats, 4 Republicans, and 2 non-partisans) to approve a new legislative map by majority vote if a single party holds both legislative houses. Currently, it requires a two-thirds majority when a party holds both. Second, the amendment would require prisoners to be counted in the census according to their last known residence rather than the prison they're in. Third, it would require the state to count non-citizens when it comes to redistricting. Fourth, State Senate district would no longer be bound to the "block-on'-border" requirement, meaning that (A), city blocks could now be divided into different districts, and (B), the commission is no longer required to take adjacent towns or city blocks on the borders of districts in mind when drawing maps. Currently, they have to ensure that towns or blocks are placed in such a way as to make neighbouring districts equal in population and the districts can't have a greater population difference between them than the population of that border town or block. Fifth, it would permanently cap the State Senate at 63 seats, and sixth, it moves up the deadline for redistricting to November 1, 2021(and so on) from January 1, 2022(and so on).

Amendment number two would create a constitutional right to clean water, clean air, and a healthful environment.

The first amendment, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity, primarily to stop Affirmative Action.

Amendments number two and three both regard emergency declarations. Two would limit emergency declarations issued by the governor to no more than 21 days unless the legislature votes for an extension. The amendment would also allow the legislature to pass laws regarding how these declarations can be managed. Three would allow the legislature to unilaterally extend or terminate a governor's emergency declaration by a simple majority vote. This resolution could not be vetoed by the governor.


Support New York amendment 2, but definitely not 1. That's obviously gonna lead to gerrymandering.

Neutral on Pennsylvania's amendments.

Not like I live there though!

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 11:59 am
by San Lumen
Arisyan wrote:
Shrillland wrote:Since I woke up too late, the Plaza goes here:

First up is an amendment that would lead to redistricting reform. The amendment would allow the state 10-member redistricting commission(made up of 4 Democrats, 4 Republicans, and 2 non-partisans) to approve a new legislative map by majority vote if a single party holds both legislative houses. Currently, it requires a two-thirds majority when a party holds both. Second, the amendment would require prisoners to be counted in the census according to their last known residence rather than the prison they're in. Third, it would require the state to count non-citizens when it comes to redistricting. Fourth, State Senate district would no longer be bound to the "block-on'-border" requirement, meaning that (A), city blocks could now be divided into different districts, and (B), the commission is no longer required to take adjacent towns or city blocks on the borders of districts in mind when drawing maps. Currently, they have to ensure that towns or blocks are placed in such a way as to make neighbouring districts equal in population and the districts can't have a greater population difference between them than the population of that border town or block. Fifth, it would permanently cap the State Senate at 63 seats, and sixth, it moves up the deadline for redistricting to November 1, 2021(and so on) from January 1, 2022(and so on).

Amendment number two would create a constitutional right to clean water, clean air, and a healthful environment.

The first amendment, to be voted on on May 18 like the others, would amend the constitution to prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on race or ethnicity, primarily to stop Affirmative Action.

Amendments number two and three both regard emergency declarations. Two would limit emergency declarations issued by the governor to no more than 21 days unless the legislature votes for an extension. The amendment would also allow the legislature to pass laws regarding how these declarations can be managed. Three would allow the legislature to unilaterally extend or terminate a governor's emergency declaration by a simple majority vote. This resolution could not be vetoed by the governor.


Support New York amendment 2, but definitely not 1. That's obviously gonna lead to gerrymandering.

Neutral on Pennsylvania's amendments.

Not like I live there though!


How do you figure it would lead to gerrymandering?

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:02 pm
by The Derpy Democratic Republic Of Herp
Mmm new thread

Anyway, remember Jan 6th 2021, May 31st 2020, and June 2nd 2020.

Don't ever forget the evil actions done by US police and right wingers on these days.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:03 pm
by San Lumen
https://thehill.com/homenews/administra ... cture-bill

Biden says he will push as "hard as I can" to pass infrastructure bill.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:11 pm
by Chan Island
Just taking a moment to appreciate being on the first page of the American politics thread.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:14 pm
by North Washington Republic
Looking at the Senate races, I think we may have a GOP House and Democratic Senate come January 2023.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:21 pm
by Loeje
A new thread!

San Lumen wrote:https://thehill.com/homenews/administration/546489-biden-says-he-will-push-as-hard-as-i-can-to-pass-infrastructure-bill

Biden says he will push as "hard as I can" to pass infrastructure bill.

I would hope so.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:26 pm
by Kowani
…why am I a separate category


Anyway, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) has vetoed a bill banning gender-affirming healthcare for trans youth

Arkansas’ governor on Monday vetoed a ban on gender-affirming medical care for transgender youth, calling the legislation a “vast government overreach” and a “product of the cultural war in America.”
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) said that if signed into law, the bill would interfere with physicians and parents “as they deal with some of the most complex and sensitive matters involving young people.”
The bill, which is part of a wave of similar legislation across the country, would have banned doctors from providing transgender minors with gender-affirming treatments such as puberty blockers, hormone therapies and transition-related surgeries, or referring them for such treatments. Because it takes a simple majority to override a governor’s veto in Arkansas, Hutchinson acknowledged that the general assembly is likely to override the veto, given the overwhelming support for the bill in the state legislature.
“I’m hopeful, though, that my action will cause conservative Republican legislators to think through the issue again and hopefully come up with a more restrained approach,” Hutchinson said.
Arkansas was the first state to send such a bill to a governor’s desk, after lawmakers last week voted 28 to 7 in favor of the legislation.
Hutchinson said he came to his decision after hearing out the concerns of transgender people and doctors in his state. He cited opposition from leading national medical associations who feared that denying access to this medical care could result in “significant harm” to transgender young people.
“The bill is overbroad, extreme and does not grandfather those young people who are currently under hormone treatment,” Hutchinson said. “The young people who are currently under a doctor’s care will be without treatment when this law goes into effect. That means they will be looking to the black market or go out of state … to find the treatment that they want and need. This is not the right path to put them on.”
If the legislature overrides the governor’s veto, Chase Strangio, deputy director for transgender justice at the American Civil Liberties Union, has vowed to challenge the ban in court.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:28 pm
by Senkaku
Chan Island wrote:Just taking a moment to appreciate being on the first page of the American politics thread.

Savor it while you can. >_<

PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2021 12:29 pm
by Nakena
Kowani wrote:…why am I a separate category


Because you have ascended beyond. You are neither a part of the regular spectrum anymore. You are simply... Kowani. :p