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USAF nearly nuked North Carolina in 1961

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AiliailiA
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Ex-Nation

USAF nearly nuked North Carolina in 1961

Postby AiliailiA » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:48 am

US nearly detonated atomic bomb over North Carolina – secret document. The Guardian.

Ed Pilkington in New York
The Guardian, Saturday 21 September 2013 02.03 AEST

A secret document, published in declassified form for the first time by the Guardian today, reveals that the US Air Force came dramatically close to detonating an atom bomb over North Carolina that would have been 260 times more powerful than the device that devastated Hiroshima.

The document, obtained by the investigative journalist Eric Schlosser under the Freedom of Information Act, gives the first conclusive evidence that the US was narrowly spared a disaster of monumental proportions when two Mark 39 hydrogen bombs were accidentally dropped over Goldsboro, North Carolina on 23 January 1961. The bombs fell to earth after a B-52 bomber broke up in mid-air, and one of the devices behaved precisely as a nuclear weapon was designed to behave in warfare: its parachute opened, its trigger mechanisms engaged, and only one low-voltage switch prevented untold carnage.

Each bomb carried a payload of 4 megatons – the equivalent of 4 million tons of TNT explosive. Had the device detonated, lethal fallout could have been deposited over Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and as far north as New York city – putting millions of lives at risk.

Though there has been persistent speculation about how narrow the Goldsboro escape was, the US government has repeatedly publicly denied that its nuclear arsenal has ever put Americans' lives in jeopardy through safety flaws. But in the newly-published document, a senior engineer in the Sandia national laboratories responsible for the mechanical safety of nuclear weapons concludes that "one simple, dynamo-technology, low voltage switch stood between the United States and a major catastrophe".

Writing eight years after the accident, Parker F Jones found that the bombs that dropped over North Carolina, just three days after John F Kennedy made his inaugural address as president, were inadequate in their safety controls and that the final switch that prevented disaster could easily have been shorted by an electrical jolt, leading to a nuclear burst. "It would have been bad news – in spades," he wrote.

Jones dryly entitled his secret report "Goldsboro Revisited or: How I learned to Mistrust the H-Bomb" – a quip on Stanley Kubrick's 1964 satirical film about nuclear holocaust, Dr Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

The accident happened when a B-52 bomber got into trouble, having embarked from Seymour Johnson Air Force base in Goldsboro for a routine flight along the East Coast. As it went into a tailspin, the hydrogen bombs it was carrying became separated. One fell into a field near Faro, North Carolina, its parachute draped in the branches of a tree; the other plummeted into a meadow off Big Daddy's Road.

Jones found that of the four safety mechanisms in the Faro bomb, designed to prevent unintended detonation, three failed to operate properly. When the bomb hit the ground, a firing signal was sent to the nuclear core of the device, and it was only that final, highly vulnerable switch that averted calamity. "The MK 39 Mod 2 bomb did not possess adequate safety for the airborne alert role in the B-52," Jones concludes.

The document was uncovered by Schlosser as part of his research into his new book on the nuclear arms race, Command and Control. Using freedom of information, he discovered that at least 700 "significant" accidents and incidents involving 1,250 nuclear weapons were recorded between 1950 and 1968 alone.

"The US government has consistently tried to withhold information from the American people in order to prevent questions being asked about our nuclear weapons policy," he said. "We were told there was no possibility of these weapons accidentally detonating, yet here's one that very nearly did."


Unfortunately, the link to the document the Guardian say they are releasing doesn't work for me.

The story also appeared in USA Today but I can't find it now. In the first paragraph the author linked to

Eric Schlosser: If We Don't Slash Our Nukes, "a Major City Is Going to Be Destroyed". Mother Jones.

—By Michael Mechanic, senior Editor at Mother Jones
Sun Sep. 15, 2013 12:01 AM PDT

The term "wake-up call" is a tired cliché, but it is appropriate in the case of Command and Control, the frightening new exposé of America's nuclear weapons mishaps by Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser. (Click here to read an excerpt and my detailed review.) In short, Schlosser delivers a book full of revelations that left me agape. While we still worry in the abstract about Iran and North Korea and Pakistan, it's easy to forget that we still have thousands of our own ungodly devices on hair-trigger alert at this very moment. And even if we never drop or launch another nuke on purpose, these weapons are, in Schlosser's words, "the most dangerous machines ever invented. And like every machine, sometimes they go wrong."

That's what the book is about. Through hard-fought documents and deep digging and extensive interviews, Schlosser reveals how close we've come, on numerous occasions, to a domestic nuclear detonation or an accidental war in which there are only losers. Command and Control will leave many readers with a deep unease about America's ability to handle our nukes safely. Schlosser's hope is that this unease will beget a long-neglected debate about "why we have them and when we use them and how many we need." But his book is no screed. Schlosser delivers an engrossing page-turner. Would that it were fiction.

Mother Jones: The safety of America's nuclear arsenal is far cry from fast food. What got you interested in this topic?

Eric Schlosser: I spent some time with the Air Force before Fast Food Nation came out. I was interested in the future of warfare in space: space weapons, particle-beam weapons, lasers, directed-energy devices. A lot of the people who were involved in it had started their careers as missile-crew officers. As I spent time with them, I became more interested in their stories from the Cold War about nuclear weapons than I did in the future of warfare in space.

MJ: How long did it take to research the book?

ES: A lot longer than I thought it would. I originally was going to write a relatively short book about this accident in Damascus, Arkansas, which was an extraordinary story. But the deeper I got, the more I realized that the subject of nuclear weapons accidents hadn't really been written about, and that the threat was much greater than I thought it was. So what started out as a two-year project turned into six—and an extraordinary amount of digging around in strange places.

MJ: My general takeaway is that, given our history of near misses, it's essentially dumb luck that we haven't had an accidental nuclear detonation on American soil, or an accidental launch.

ES: If we don't greatly reduce the number of nuclear weapons in the world, or completely eliminate them, a major city is going to be destroyed by a nuclear weapon. It's remarkable—it's incredible!—that a major city hasn't been destroyed since Nagasaki. We can confront this problem or we can accept that hundreds of thousands or more will be killed. And I don't think that's inevitable. The book was really written with a notion of trying to prevent that.

MJ: But is you suppose it's inevitable if we maintain our current course?

ES: My background, academically, is history. I hate the word "inevitable" because I feel like things don't have to be the way they are. But we really need to change our policies. I think Obama has done a terrific job of trying to raise awareness about nuclear weapons. But we really need to sit down with Russia, China, England, France, India, Pakistan, and think about how to greatly reduce, if not eliminate, these weapons. And that may sound totally absurd and unrealistic, but when I was in my 20s, if someone had said that the Soviet Union would vanish without a nuclear war and the Berlin Wall would come down and all this would happen without tens of thousands, or millions, of deaths, people would have thought that was absurd.

MJ: What do you think might befall our society were an accidental detonation to occur? I mean, suppose that H-bomb had exploded in North Carolina?

ES: It would have profoundly shocked this country and the world. When you look back at the response after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that was around the period that the United Nations was nominally created, and support for eliminating nuclear weapons was not only in the air, but was embraced by the majority of Americans. As the decades passed, particularly since the Second World War, we lost the sense of how devastating these weapons can be—and also what its like to be in a society that's been completely destroyed by warfare. We're very fortunate in the United States that we've been protected by geography. I was in Manhattan on 9/11, and the difference between having 3,000 Americans killed, which was horrible on 9/11, versus 500,000 or a million is almost impossible to comprehend. These weapons are machines, and I think they are the most dangerous machines ever invented. And like every machine, sometimes they go wrong.

MJ: I find it remarkable how little public attention has been paid to the safety of nuclear weapons since the end of the Cold War.

ES: I can't really blame the media. The government—lying might be too strong a word, although in some instances they absolutely lied about it—but they did everything they could to cover up these accidents, to distract attention from them, and when attention was paid to them, in most cases, to mislead the press

MJ: Some examples?
"The official list of broken arrows the Pentagon released in the '80s includes 32 serious accidents involving nuclear weapons. That list is entirely arbitrary."

ES: Throughout the '50s and '60s, it was almost boilerplate for Defense Department officials to say that during an accident there was no possibility of a nuclear detonation, while privately, at the weapons laboratories, there were physicists and engineers who were extremely worried and were well aware that we had come close to having it happen on American soil. If you look at the official list of broken arrows that the Pentagon released in the '80s, it includes 32 serious accidents involving nuclear weapons that might have threatened the public safety. The list is entirely arbitrary: Some of those accidents didn't even involve weapons that had a nuclear core, so they never could have detonated. But many, many serious accidents aren't on that list.

One document I got through a Freedom of Information Act request listed more than 1,000 weapons involved in accidents, some of them trivial and some of them not trivial. There's somebody who worked at the Pentagon who has read this book, and one of his criticisms was that I'm so hard on the Air Force—he said that there were a great number of accidents involving Army weapons that I don't write about.

You know, it's very difficult to get this information. I did the best that I could, but I have no doubt that there are other incidents and accidents that still have not been reported, so I can't blame the mainstream media so much as blame this national security apparatus. Again and again I would see by comparing documents that what was being redacted wasn't information that would threaten the national security—it was information that would be embarrassing, or put these defense bureaucracies in an unflattering light.

MJ: Were you surprised the Air Force gave you as much as it did?

ES: The Air Force was remarkably unhelpful. I was able to get what I got through FOIA requests to the Department of Energy and the Pentagon—some of these things took a couple of years, and some of them were heavily excised. We're talking about a nation that no longer exists, the Soviet Union. We're talking about weapons that are no longer in the stockpile. And yet when you get these documents, it's remarkable how much has been blacked out. The thing that was enormously helpful to me, and surprising, was to find that some of the most anti-nuclear people in the US are the people who designed, handled, had command of these weapons.

MJ: When most people think of nukes, we think of these massive, high-yield bombs, but you also write about nuclear artillery shells, nuclear depth charges, and even a nuclear rifle called the Davy Crockett. How is it even possible, given the institutional dysfunction of the military, to maintain tight control with all these small nukes around?
"We've probably made 70,000 of these things; if one of them had detonated...that's very good management. But still."

ES: It was a constant challenge, and particularly when these weapons were being stored in Europe for use against an invading Red Army, it was a matter of inventory control. This book is critical of the management of our nuclear weapons, and yet the Pentagon deserves its due: To my knowledge, there was never an accidental detonation. If you add them all up, we probably made 70,000 of these things. If one of them had detonated, it means 69,999 did not. And that's very good management. But still, the consequences of one detonation are almost unimaginable.

MJ: You can't screw up!

ES: You can't screw up once! And that's the unique danger of these machines. The incident in 2007, when we lost half a dozen hydrogen bombs for a day and a half, was an incredibly serious security lapse: The fact that nobody was asked to sign for the weapons when they were removed from the bunker, the fact that nobody in the loading crew or on the airplane even knew that the plane was carrying nuclear weapons is just remarkable.

MJ: And this was six years ago!

ES: Yes. And the Air Force seems still not to have gotten its act together. There was a decertification of launch crews at Malmstrom Air Force Base, one of our three Minuteman bases, just a few weeks ago. There was a decertification at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico, which is where the Air Force stores most of its nuclear weapons.

MJ: What's a decertification?

ES: It means they're failing their safety inspections. This is very, very serious stuff. The margin for error is as small as can be.

MJ: In the book, you relate how Harold Agnew, a Los Alamos physicist visiting a German base in 1960, "nearly wets his pants" when he saw planes with fully assembled H-bombs being guarded by lone US soldiers who weren't even trained in what to do if someone tried to commandeer the plane. I can't imagine that we're still so careless.
"There was a learning curve in the management of nuclear weapons, and we are very, very lucky. And there's no guarantee that luck will last."

ES: What was remarkable then was that we were sharing these weapons with our NATO allies. In that case, he saw a powerful nuclear weapon loaded onto a jet that was part of the German air force and had the Iron Cross markings on its wings. His concern—this wasn't so long after the end of World War II—was that a disgruntled German pilot might just take off, head for Russia, drop his bomb, and there was absolutely nothing except for the air defense system of the Soviet Union to prevent him from doing that. There were no locks on the bombs. There were no codes required to activate the bomb. It was in the early days of the Kennedy administration that there was a crash program begun to do something you'd think common sense would dictate, which would be: Put locks on the nuclear weapons, and put coded switches on them so only the person who has the code could set them off. But there was a learning curve in the management of nuclear weapons, and we are very, very lucky. And there's no guarantee that luck will last.

MJ: Describe the reaction of Sandia weapons safety expert Bob Peurifoy when you showed him the list of broken arrows you obtained through FOIA requests.

ES: I think Peurifoy is a national hero. He was a weapons designer at the lab who became concerned about safety and fought for 20 years to get modern safety devices installed on our nuclear weapons, at great personal cost. He knew as much about nuclear weapons accidents as any person in our national security establishment. There was a document I got listing accidents and less-serious nuclear incidents, and I gave him a copy to see what he thought of it. And he was stunned and very depressed by it, because it was clear that there were many incidents that were not being shared with him.
"The people designing the weapons literally often didn't know how they were being handled in the field by the Air Force...There's a very strong element of madness in this."

There was an enormous amount of compartmentalized secrecy, and that was to prevent secrets from being too widely shared and potentially leaked. But what that meant was people in different parts of the system didn't have an overall view of how the system was operating—and that can be very dangerous. The people designing the weapons literally often didn't know how they were being handled in the field by the Air Force—and a lot of people in the Air Force didn't understand some of the dangers. There's a very strong element of madness in this.

MJ: One of the Peurifoy's greatest challenges was this constant tug-of-war between the desire to deploy a weapon quickly and the desire to have it not go off accidentally. The military invariably erred on the side of speed. Has that balance changed since the end of the Cold War?

ES: It hasn't. There's always going to be that inherent tension when you have these conflicting design goals. They can be expressed by the phrase "always/never." The things that would ensure the weapon always works flawlessly may conflict with the things that make sure it never goes off accidentally, never gets stolen, never gets sabotaged.

This is especially important when you want your nuclear weapons available for immediate use, as we do in the United States. Right now, our land-based missiles are ready to be launched pretty much within a minute or so. To keep these WMDs on a trigger like that means that you're adding an element of danger, a chance of accidental launch—whereas if you, for example, were to take the warheads off the missiles and not have them available for immediate use, they would be considerably safer. We still have the capability, if we get a signal that China or Russia has attacked the United States, to launch our missiles before they're destroyed by these incoming weapons. But that means you've got to really make sure the radar signals are the right ones.

MJ: And you haven't much time, especially with a submarine launch.

ES: Yeah, the time between when you see them on the radar and when they might hit might be six, seven, eight minutes if the sub is off the coast of the United States.
During the Carter era, "there was a computer error at NORAD that basically said more than 1,000 missiles were on their way."

MJ: You describe a bunch of WarGames-type incidents during which this really happened—we got false launch signals or the Russians got false signals.

ES: There were two major false alarms during the Carter administration. One of them occurred when a training tape was accidentally put into the computer at NORAD that was supposed to warn us of a Soviet attack. It was a very realistic simulation of a Soviet attack, and so that created a great deal of concern until it was realized that it was a false alarm. Not that long afterward, during the tense period after the Soviets had invaded Afghanistan, there was a computer error at NORAD that basically said that more than 1,000 missiles were on their way. National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski was woken up in the middle of the night and told that it looked like the US was under attack. He waited for more confirmation before calling the president, but he was fully prepared for this nuclear strike and to order a counter-attack. According to Bob Gates, who was head of the CIA and later Secretary of Defense, Brzezinski deliberately didn't wake his wife, because if they were all going to die, he just wanted it to happen while she was sleeping. Having a launch-on-warning capability like we do, and having our missiles on alert is a very dangerous game, because once one of our missiles is launched—unlike bombers—there's no calling it back.

MJ: In the early days of nuclear weapons, the authority to launch was solely in the hands of the president, and that got diluted. How many people have that authority now?

ES: Good question, and that's probably very top secret. What happened was, as there was a great realization that Washington could be destroyed by the Soviets with little or no warning, there was a need to delegate the presidential authority so that if the president were killed, the United States could mount a retaliation. But once you start delegating authority—essentially sharing the launch codes—you introduce the possibility that somebody could start using our weapons without the authorization of the president. And this was particularly of concern with NATO, because it's clear that the supreme allied commander in Europe had been delegated the authority to use nuclear weapons; if there was a communications breakdown between the United States and Europe, the NATO officers on their own could initiate the use of nuclear weapons, and things could spiral completely out of control very quickly. It's not clear to me who is delegated to authorize their use today.

MJ: NATO no longer has that authority?
Lesson from the Titan II disaster: "If you're going to have nuclear weapons, you must spare no expense" to maintain them.

ES: NATO doesn't really have nuclear weapons on alert anymore—there are some delegated to NATO through submarines, and there are maybe 200 tactical nuclear bombs, but they're not mounted on airplanes.

MJ: Your book's central narrative involves the deadly explosion you mentioned, which took place at a Titan II missile silo in Arkansas in 1980. What were the key lessons of that disaster, and do you think the military has learned them?

ES: I'm quite concerned. One of the lessons would be, if you're going to have nuclear weapons, you must spare no expense in the proper maintenance of them. The Titan II was widely regarded as obsolete. They were running out of spare parts. There were frequent leaks, and the warhead was acknowledged not to have adequate safety devices. The people working on it were often poorly trained, poorly paid, overworked. There were shortages of trained technicians. In retrospect, it was completely irresponsible to have all of those things occurring with a missile carrying the most powerful warhead ever put on an Air Force missile. It's just extraordinary! And there were high rates of drug use. I spoke to people who had been involved in sensitive nuclear positions who were smoking pot at the time. You don't want people smoking pot and handling nuclear weapons. So those are some of the crucial takeaways. And yet our land-based missile, the Minuteman III, is upward of 40 years old. The B-52 bomber hasn't been manufactured since John F. Kennedy was president, and some of those bombers are getting close to 65 years old. We really should either invest in our weapons systems or get rid of them.
17 Air Force launch officers "were taken off duty earlier this year for safety violations; there's a sense of a lack of direction, and mismanagement."

Look at what happened with the Air Force, starting with that 2007 incident when they lost those hydrogen bombs. A few years ago, they lost communication with an entire squadron of Minutemen missiles—50 missiles!—for almost an hour. They had to decertify the maintenance crew that looks after the biggest Air Force storage facility in New Mexico. Seventeen launch officers were taken off duty earlier this year for safety violations. There's a sense of a lack of direction, and mismanagement right now—particularly in the Air Force. And it's intolerable. It's unacceptable.

MJ: Obviously, the warhead on that Titan II didn't detonate. But even barring a nuclear explosion, should we be worried about a dirty-bomb type scenario where, say, plutonium is dispersed over a populated area?

ES: Yes. That warhead didn't contain plutonium, but the warheads on top of our Trident II missiles do. They are mounted around the third stage of the missile in a way so that if the rocket fuel were to detonate, you could have a major scattering—and that's still a major issue with our Trident bases in Washington state and in Georgia. You have to be extremely careful about how these warheads are mounted on the missiles and how the missiles are put in the submarines. These are dangerous devices. And I'm not the first person to say that. I know that the Navy is quite aware of it, but I don't think the general public is.

In college, I studied game theory and nuclear strategy, and I was interested in the nuclear freeze movement, so I read an enormous amount about nuclear weapons. But doing this book, I realized that my ignorance was profound. And this is important knowledge for American citizens to have, because we need to have a meaningful debate about nuclear weapons, about nuclear strategy, and why we have them and when we use them and how many we need. That's pretty much why I wrote the book.

MJ: Curtis LeMay, who ran the Strategic Air Command back in the day, was almost this kind of caricature of a military hawk. On the other hand, it seems like America's nuclear weapons were under far tighter control on his watch.

ES: Yeah. LeMay at one point was considered a great American hero, protecting us from the Soviets. He later became widely reviled in the United States, the symbol of a warmongering general who was caricatured in Dr. Strangelove as the mad general played by George C. Scott. LeMay's politics are different from mine, and many of his theories of nuclear warfare are ones that I don't endorse, but I think he was one of our truly great generals. He was an engineer by training, and if you're going to have nuclear weapons, you want them managed by someone who has absolutely no tolerance for error, who's a great believer in checklists and proper organization. He was all of those things. LeMay was absolutely ruthless with his men about ensuring that there was no sloppiness.

The other thing I think made him a great general was that he was brave and willing to take risks himself. During the Second World War, he flew the lead plane during some dangerous bombing missions just to show his men that the plan was a sound one. He was the sort of commander that's more and more sort of missing in America.

With this nuclear weapon accident in Arkansas, there was a remarkable lack of accountability. The people who were held responsible and punished for it were the low-level enlisted men, and not some of the high-ranking officers and generals who had made the crucial decisions that contributed to the disaster. So, LeMay certainly made mistakes, but if you look at how our nuclear weapons are being managed now, we could use a little bit more of Curtis LeMay.


Judge for yourself how objective Eric Schlosser is as a source, but it seems likely the secret document does exist and says what he claims it does: that of two nuclear bombs jettisoned by a B-52 over Goldsboro NC in 1961, one had all four sequential safety locks still engaged when it hit the ground ... but the other armed itself and would have detonated if someone had flipped a switch on the bomb.

While it's annoying that the Guardian can't help referencing a satirical movie, maybe it is oddly relevant. It seems that to fully arm the Mark 39 Hydrogen Bomb, some crew member needed to go down in the bomb hold of the B-52 and flick a switch on each bomb.
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Blekksprutia
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Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:49 am

I don't know about you, but this is enough to make me move to Iceland forever.
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Postby Divair » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:50 am

Blekksprutia wrote:I don't know about you, but this is enough to make me move to Iceland forever.

Isn't Iceland's awesomeness enough to do that?

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Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:53 am

Divair wrote:
Blekksprutia wrote:I don't know about you, but this is enough to make me move to Iceland forever.

Isn't Iceland's awesomeness enough to do that?

Yes, but I'm waiting until I'm out of college to move to Reykjavik forever.
This makes me just want to leave... now.
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Postby Sebtopiaris » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:54 am

Come to Australia, the climate's great!
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Mewtinigrad
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Postby Mewtinigrad » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:55 am

Well boy, am I glad I don't live in North Carolina

Blekksprutia wrote:
Divair wrote:Isn't Iceland's awesomeness enough to do that?

Yes, but I'm waiting until I'm out of college to move to Reykjavik forever.
This makes me just want to leave... now.

Wouldn't it be better to move to a town that's easier to pronounce?
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Postby Benuty » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:55 am

Sebtopiaris wrote:Come to Australia, the climate's great!

Amazing considering the pacific was sunbathed several times from atom bomb detonations for decades on end.
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The blood ravens
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Postby The blood ravens » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:57 am

Accidents like this happened alot.

I think there have been nearly a dozen B-29 crashes during training missions with nuclear weapons.
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Saint Kitten
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Postby Saint Kitten » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:57 am

Dammit. Nearly nuked us. I'm moving to NYC, screw Tar Heels
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Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:57 am

Mewtinigrad wrote:Well boy, am I glad I don't live in North Carolina

Blekksprutia wrote:Yes, but I'm waiting until I'm out of college to move to Reykjavik forever.
This makes me just want to leave... now.

Wouldn't it be better to move to a town that's easier to pronounce?

"ray-kyuh-vik"

It's not hard.

Snaefellsjokull, now that's hard.
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Arg: Blekk does that. The topics of same sex marriage and the human race's fight against idiocy motivate him to write some truly impressive and glorious rants that deserve to be remembered and sigged.
Zott: I see our Blekky has discovered the joys of amphetamines.
Horus: blekky you are blekky i am horus
Rio: Blekky you are the best person on this website. Figuratively, kiss me.
Blekky is like a bunny. He looks adorable, yet he might bite you till it hurts.
Veccy: you're the worst blekky
The Balkens: Blekk does that, he has been taught by NSG's greatest practitioners of Snark to Snark combat.
Napki: Marry me, Blekk
Aeq: Blekk, you are Jesus!!!

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Saiwania
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 17584
Founded: Jun 30, 2008
New York Times Democracy

Postby Saiwania » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:57 am

Blekksprutia wrote:I don't know about you, but this is enough to make me move to Iceland forever.


I want to move to Iceland because it is supposedly the most ethnically White country in the world. It would be getting closer to my own. But with regards to this story, yeah- that is outrageous.

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Benuty
Post Czar
 
Posts: 36388
Founded: Jan 21, 2013
Corrupt Dictatorship

Postby Benuty » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:58 am

Saint Kitten wrote:Dammit. Nearly nuked us. I'm moving to NYC, screw Tar Heels

NYC was in the path of the radiation from the fallout. I suggest you go to Boston.
Last edited by Hashem 13.8 billion years ago
King of Madness in the Right Wing Discussion Thread. Winner of 2016 Posters Award for Insanity.
Please be aware my posts in NSG, and P2TM are separate.

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Blekksprutia
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5957
Founded: Mar 21, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:58 am

Sebtopiaris wrote:Come to Australia, the climate's great!

I'm into cold weather. I'd have to live on Mount Kosciuszko.
KILLUGON and BERNIE SANDERS and my moirail, ERIDEL.
Founder of Kotturheim, home to my GAY POLECATS, who are TOO FABULOUS FOR YOU.
Arg: Blekk does that. The topics of same sex marriage and the human race's fight against idiocy motivate him to write some truly impressive and glorious rants that deserve to be remembered and sigged.
Zott: I see our Blekky has discovered the joys of amphetamines.
Horus: blekky you are blekky i am horus
Rio: Blekky you are the best person on this website. Figuratively, kiss me.
Blekky is like a bunny. He looks adorable, yet he might bite you till it hurts.
Veccy: you're the worst blekky
The Balkens: Blekk does that, he has been taught by NSG's greatest practitioners of Snark to Snark combat.
Napki: Marry me, Blekk
Aeq: Blekk, you are Jesus!!!

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Blekksprutia
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5957
Founded: Mar 21, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:59 am

Saiwania wrote:
Blekksprutia wrote:I don't know about you, but this is enough to make me move to Iceland forever.


I want to move to Iceland because it is supposedly the most ethnically White country in the world. It would be getting closer to my own. But with regards to this story, yeah- that is outrageous.

:blink: That's very racist of you. Very un-Icelander.
Iceland is considered one of the most socially progressive nations in the world. The mayor of Reykjavik is a drag-queen.
tsk, tsk. How un-Iceland. I'm ashamed.
KILLUGON and BERNIE SANDERS and my moirail, ERIDEL.
Founder of Kotturheim, home to my GAY POLECATS, who are TOO FABULOUS FOR YOU.
Arg: Blekk does that. The topics of same sex marriage and the human race's fight against idiocy motivate him to write some truly impressive and glorious rants that deserve to be remembered and sigged.
Zott: I see our Blekky has discovered the joys of amphetamines.
Horus: blekky you are blekky i am horus
Rio: Blekky you are the best person on this website. Figuratively, kiss me.
Blekky is like a bunny. He looks adorable, yet he might bite you till it hurts.
Veccy: you're the worst blekky
The Balkens: Blekk does that, he has been taught by NSG's greatest practitioners of Snark to Snark combat.
Napki: Marry me, Blekk
Aeq: Blekk, you are Jesus!!!

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Saint Kitten
Senator
 
Posts: 4436
Founded: Jul 10, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Saint Kitten » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:59 am

Benuty wrote:
Saint Kitten wrote:Dammit. Nearly nuked us. I'm moving to NYC, screw Tar Heels

NYC was in the path of the radiation from the fallout. I suggest you go to Boston.

I do have relatives there..
LOVEWHOYOUARE~
"In religion and politics, people's beliefs and convictions are in almost every case gotten at second hand, and without examination."
-Mark Twain
I Side With
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Dear Future Generations

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Wolfmanne
Senator
 
Posts: 4418
Founded: Mar 16, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Wolfmanne » Sun Sep 22, 2013 5:59 am

Put all your nukes on submarines America, like in Britain, where we station our submarines by other countries so we can pollute their waters in case something goes wrong.
Cicero thinks I'm Rome's Helen of Troy and Octavian thinks he'll get his money, the stupid fools.

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Mewtinigrad
Envoy
 
Posts: 350
Founded: Sep 10, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Mewtinigrad » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:00 am

Blekksprutia wrote:
Mewtinigrad wrote:Well boy, am I glad I don't live in North Carolina


Wouldn't it be better to move to a town that's easier to pronounce?

"ray-kyuh-vik"

It's not hard.

Snaefellsjokull, now that's hard.

Well, perhaps not hard for you and me, but the average amerifat would bumble over like an idiot trying to pronounce anything that looks vaguely foreign. And as someone with a Czech last name, I've experienced this firsthand.
Ayreonia wrote:I just knew nobody would say they like Fox News without serious incentive.

Economic Left/Right: -9.25
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.92
If your name ends with in, time to get out

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Blekksprutia
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5957
Founded: Mar 21, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:00 am

Benuty wrote:
Saint Kitten wrote:Dammit. Nearly nuked us. I'm moving to NYC, screw Tar Heels

NYC was in the path of the radiation from the fallout. I suggest you go to Boston.

I suggest you go to Boston as well. I actually don't hate it here.
KILLUGON and BERNIE SANDERS and my moirail, ERIDEL.
Founder of Kotturheim, home to my GAY POLECATS, who are TOO FABULOUS FOR YOU.
Arg: Blekk does that. The topics of same sex marriage and the human race's fight against idiocy motivate him to write some truly impressive and glorious rants that deserve to be remembered and sigged.
Zott: I see our Blekky has discovered the joys of amphetamines.
Horus: blekky you are blekky i am horus
Rio: Blekky you are the best person on this website. Figuratively, kiss me.
Blekky is like a bunny. He looks adorable, yet he might bite you till it hurts.
Veccy: you're the worst blekky
The Balkens: Blekk does that, he has been taught by NSG's greatest practitioners of Snark to Snark combat.
Napki: Marry me, Blekk
Aeq: Blekk, you are Jesus!!!

User avatar
Inquilabstan
Minister
 
Posts: 3002
Founded: Nov 15, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Inquilabstan » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:00 am

Well.....This is definately reassuring.
☭ The People's Socialist Republic of Inquilabstan ☭
Economic Left/Right: -10.00 Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -6.77
Cosmopolitan – 58% Secular – 73% Visionary – 53% Anarchistic – 26% Communistic – 92% Pacifist – 18% Ecological – 54%

INQUILABSTANI TRIBUNE: Jamshedpur: Students protest alleged medical exam paper leakage. Matrapuram: Onset of rain excites farmers. Laltara: ILEL unveils new low cost tablet. Bishkek: Security forces kill four militants following two hour firefight. Laltara: Foreign ministry holds talks with Emmerian ambassador regarding conflict in Suafrika.

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Saint Kitten
Senator
 
Posts: 4436
Founded: Jul 10, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Saint Kitten » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:00 am

Wolfmanne wrote:Put all your nukes on submarines America, like in Britain, where we station our submarines by other countries so we can pollute their waters in case something goes wrong.

Then you lose the fish industry. Why not put them in space?
LOVEWHOYOUARE~
"In religion and politics, people's beliefs and convictions are in almost every case gotten at second hand, and without examination."
-Mark Twain
I Side With
Political Compass
Dear Future Generations

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Sebtopiaris
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 10250
Founded: Jun 26, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Sebtopiaris » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:01 am

Blekksprutia wrote:
Sebtopiaris wrote:Come to Australia, the climate's great!

I'm into cold weather. I'd have to live on Mount Kosciuszko.

don't worry, I think there's some room in my freezer!
Sebtopiaris is a culturally and ethnically Mediterranean, single-party democratic socialist state in the New Warsaw Pact with a population of 39 million Sebtopiariots. Sebtopiaris and its IC actions do not represent my personal beliefs, and Sebtopiaris's overview page does not represent much at all.

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Blekksprutia
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5957
Founded: Mar 21, 2013
Ex-Nation

Postby Blekksprutia » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:02 am

Mewtinigrad wrote:
Blekksprutia wrote:"ray-kyuh-vik"

It's not hard.

Snaefellsjokull, now that's hard.

Well, perhaps not hard for you and me, but the average amerifat would bumble over like an idiot trying to pronounce anything that looks vaguely foreign. And as someone with a Czech last name, I've experienced this firsthand.

Well, I am not "average amerifat". I love Iceland. I love everything about it (except hvalur).
And I'm both Jewish and Russian. I have double pronunciation advantages, genetically :p
KILLUGON and BERNIE SANDERS and my moirail, ERIDEL.
Founder of Kotturheim, home to my GAY POLECATS, who are TOO FABULOUS FOR YOU.
Arg: Blekk does that. The topics of same sex marriage and the human race's fight against idiocy motivate him to write some truly impressive and glorious rants that deserve to be remembered and sigged.
Zott: I see our Blekky has discovered the joys of amphetamines.
Horus: blekky you are blekky i am horus
Rio: Blekky you are the best person on this website. Figuratively, kiss me.
Blekky is like a bunny. He looks adorable, yet he might bite you till it hurts.
Veccy: you're the worst blekky
The Balkens: Blekk does that, he has been taught by NSG's greatest practitioners of Snark to Snark combat.
Napki: Marry me, Blekk
Aeq: Blekk, you are Jesus!!!

User avatar
Benuty
Post Czar
 
Posts: 36388
Founded: Jan 21, 2013
Corrupt Dictatorship

Postby Benuty » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:02 am

Saint Kitten wrote:
Wolfmanne wrote:Put all your nukes on submarines America, like in Britain, where we station our submarines by other countries so we can pollute their waters in case something goes wrong.

Then you lose the fish industry. Why not put them in space?

So some unfortunate city can explode in seconds when it falls after the satellite becomes obsolete?
Last edited by Hashem 13.8 billion years ago
King of Madness in the Right Wing Discussion Thread. Winner of 2016 Posters Award for Insanity.
Please be aware my posts in NSG, and P2TM are separate.

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Lemanrussland
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5078
Founded: Dec 10, 2012
Ex-Nation

Postby Lemanrussland » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:02 am

Blekksprutia wrote:
Divair wrote:Isn't Iceland's awesomeness enough to do that?

Yes, but I'm waiting until I'm out of college to move to Reykjavik forever.
This makes me just want to leave... now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unethical_ ... xperiments

What's that? :p

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Wolfmanne
Senator
 
Posts: 4418
Founded: Mar 16, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Wolfmanne » Sun Sep 22, 2013 6:02 am

Saint Kitten wrote:
Wolfmanne wrote:Put all your nukes on submarines America, like in Britain, where we station our submarines by other countries so we can pollute their waters in case something goes wrong.

Then you lose the fish industry. Why not put them in space?

I don't like fish.
Cicero thinks I'm Rome's Helen of Troy and Octavian thinks he'll get his money, the stupid fools.

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