NATION

PASSWORD

Food in your country

A place to put national factbooks, embassy exchanges, and other information regarding the nations of the world. [In-character]
User avatar
Sianomarsud
Civil Servant
 
Posts: 10
Founded: May 24, 2011
Ex-Nation

Food in your country

Postby Sianomarsud » Sun May 29, 2011 7:56 pm

In our country the main staple is a margel based pudding. (Margel is a flour made from algae). Margel, fresh suger cane and rice are cooked together, with added ingredents for flavor. The most popular flavors are Coconut, Moca, Ginger, Vanilla, Cranberry, and Carmel. (80% of the suger cane and 30% of the rice are grown domestically from salt tollerent strains on atolls and artifical islands, the rest being imported)

Of course sea food is served at almost every meal. Shrimp, Mai Mai, Sea Bass, Tuna, and Scallops are most common. They are served with any combination of herbs grown in submarine domiciles. (Grown using aerioponics and grey water. Gardens are used as much to "renew" the air as to grow food) These herbs include: Mints, Basil, Thyme, Spinich, Parely, Cilantro, radish, horse radish, mustard, chives.

Some fruit is grown domestically as well (either on atolls or in submarine gardens) Coconuts, dates, pineapple, tomatoes, melons.
Last edited by Sianomarsud on Mon May 30, 2011 3:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Heningrad
Diplomat
 
Posts: 834
Founded: Apr 28, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Heningrad » Sun May 29, 2011 8:01 pm

President- Boris Smirnov
National anthem- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQTilN57YmY
Climate- cold, very, very, cold.
Urmanian wrote:9/10

Still the best communist flag on NS, even if it doesn't look very flag-like for me.
Canadian Davsland wrote:The fact that you have Excellent Civil and Political rights as well.

And an awesome flag! :)
Tigyland wrote:
Heningrad wrote:i actually got this of the internet

You let other people put in the effort for you. I like that.

political compass score: Economic Left/Right: -9.00, Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.13
http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL783/13381709/23842987/397577196.jpg
Animals have the right to be tasty

User avatar
Bratoslovoukia
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1003
Founded: Mar 08, 2011
Inoffensive Centrist Democracy

Postby Bratoslovoukia » Sun May 29, 2011 8:25 pm

The Main Staple of Bratoslovoukia is Chicken Fried Onions with Sprelachski (Ground bone marrow mixed with chicken fat, duck liver, and mayonnaise). Onions are handpicked by serfs who live in the Czaristolan Region of Bratoslovoukia then fried in ethanol based frying oil as if they were chicken. Meanwhile, chickens are shot and skinned and plucked. The meat goes to feeding the cows and the domestic deer who are considered delicacies. The bone marrow is extruded from the bone and mixed with the fat from the chicken. The chicken's eggs go to make the mayonnaise. Ducks are force fed and their livers are plucked from the dead ducks who die of obesity. This is all mixed together to make Chicken Fried Onions with Sprelachski. This dish is enjoyed at least three times a day in very small portions by every single Bratoslovoukian National, even the Emperor.

Onions are served at every meal. Bratoslovoukia is the largest producer of onions in the whole bloc. All onion farms are subsidized by the state under the name Onion Co. Other than Chicken Fried Onions, popular dishes include Baked Onion Tips, Onion Rings and Cheddar Steamed Onions.

The only fruit regularly consumed is the Bratoslovoukian Quince, but the occasional shipment of Pineapples form Kahwhoaloa provides for a much deserved luxury, but as the consumption of Pineapple by only a few people would be far too decadent for the people of Bratoslovoukia's cities so pineapples are shared by all.
Bratoslovoukia,a land untouched by the horrors of tyranny of the majority...until now.
Tourism|Embassies In: New Edom|Bratvit Standard Petroleum and Carbon Corporation|Bratoslovoukian Embassy Exchange Program|

User avatar
Auridia
Civil Servant
 
Posts: 8
Founded: Dec 14, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby Auridia » Tue May 31, 2011 7:04 am

We eat almost every type of meat, because we think "Every animal in the world was created only for survival and delight of man. Via food and fur, of course." So we often eat dogs, mice, frogs, eagles, rare bears, many critically endangered species, mostly roasted or baked, with many types of vegetables. We also eat big amount of fruit, mostly exotic types. And many luxurious types of food are covered by thin layer of eatable gold, made from rarest ingredients.

User avatar
Urmanian
Powerbroker
 
Posts: 8573
Founded: Oct 13, 2007
Capitalizt

Postby Urmanian » Tue May 31, 2011 7:11 am

Ponies are exclusively vegetarian. Their diet is mostly similar to non-sentient horses, with inclusion of various baked goods and confectionaries. Plain salt is also popular, as it has a kind of narcotic/alcoholic effect on ponies.
Last edited by Urmanian on Tue May 31, 2011 7:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Ruskarkand
Senator
 
Posts: 3908
Founded: Jan 07, 2011
Democratic Socialists

Postby Ruskarkand » Tue May 31, 2011 7:15 am

Well, for the most, you would most likely find a lot of Meat products, since 99.7% (Rounded to 1 decimal) of our population is carnivorous.
We reserve light herbal food for the remaining percentage.
- Resident of the UK. Scottish, currently living in Northwest England.
- Mild Scalie / Furry / whatever you want to call 'em.
- In RP, I like to play what I've created, regardless of Tech Level. I'm cool with FT and FanT. I can adapt.
- That is to say. Our culture might be mistaken for Past Tech or of something Medieval like. Don't fool yourself. We're not.
"My armour is like tenfold shields, my teeth are swords, my claws spears, the shock of my tail is a thunderbolt, my wings a hurricane, and my breath death!"
-Glory to The Everlasting Dragonlands of Ruskarkand!-

User avatar
The Supreme Truth
Chargé d'Affaires
 
Posts: 471
Founded: Feb 12, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby The Supreme Truth » Tue May 31, 2011 7:17 am

Due to the famine, a small bowel of rice and beans is considered a delicacy in the Supreme Truth.
Last edited by The Supreme Truth on Tue May 31, 2011 7:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
The Holy State of the Supreme Truth
Government Type: Theocratic Totalitarian Police State, Personal Psychotic Dictatorship
Head of State: Human Embodiment of Wisdom
Head of Government: Council of Magistrates
Military Size: 250,000,000 Conscripted Men
Number of Warheads: Unknown (Less Than 50,000)

User avatar
The Kangaroo Republic
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5389
Founded: Feb 18, 2011
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby The Kangaroo Republic » Tue May 31, 2011 7:23 am

We macropodines love grass. (No seriously, we FREAKING LOVE grass.)

As such, we have found many different culinary uses for grass:
Baked Grass, Cooked Grass, Fried Grass, Grassburgers, Grass Pizzas, Grass Tea, Grass Soup, etc.

Also, we actually distinguish between different types of grass and we find certain types of grass to have distinct tastes, so we may sometimes want to use a certain type of grass over an other type of grass when preparing food because of the taste differences.

It is also quite normal to eat your backyard if there's nothing else. You could also eat your front lawn too, but most macropodines don't like eating in public when it's not in a restaurant or some other food establishment.
Sub Astra --- Australes Unum
Version 3 of the Kangaroo Republic started on 9 March, 2014

>>Go to factbook<<

Other names for the Kangaroo Republic: The Federation, FKR, The Federal Kangaroo Republic
Demonym: Macropodine, Kangan
NS resident kangaroo furry and therian. I'm not crazy, thank you very much.

Political compass scores (10 Mar 2014): Eco: -1.12 Soc: -8.26 Dear god, save us all
"We think you've changed, bro." "We know best." "You suck."

User avatar
Secular Sweden
Envoy
 
Posts: 274
Founded: Apr 13, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Secular Sweden » Tue May 31, 2011 7:25 am

The breäkfast ov chämpiöns!

Image
You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded. Because the elements, the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars. And the only way they could get into your body is if the stars were kind enough to explode.

So forget Jesus. The stars died so you could be here today.

User avatar
Cairn Gorm
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 15
Founded: May 30, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Cairn Gorm » Tue May 31, 2011 7:26 am

Cairn Gorm's staple food is potatoes. Most meals have potatoes in it, or they are the main course.
Head of State: Chief Htebazile
Head of Nation: Prime Minister Llihcruhc Notsniw

User avatar
H-Alba
Minister
 
Posts: 2552
Founded: Dec 04, 2010
Ex-Nation

Postby H-Alba » Tue May 31, 2011 7:31 am

Common foods in H-Alba are Cock a Leekie soup (soup made of chicken and leek soup), Cullen Skink (soup made of smoked Finnan haddie, potatoes and onions), and Scotch Pie (a small, double-crust meat pie filled with minced mutton or other meat).

Cock a Leekie Soup:
Image
I serve Queen and Country

User avatar
The Kangaroo Republic
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5389
Founded: Feb 18, 2011
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby The Kangaroo Republic » Tue May 31, 2011 7:33 am

Secular Sweden wrote:The breäkfast ov chämpiöns!

(Image)

Is that what all the women in your nation look like? If so, I feel sorry for you guys.
Sub Astra --- Australes Unum
Version 3 of the Kangaroo Republic started on 9 March, 2014

>>Go to factbook<<

Other names for the Kangaroo Republic: The Federation, FKR, The Federal Kangaroo Republic
Demonym: Macropodine, Kangan
NS resident kangaroo furry and therian. I'm not crazy, thank you very much.

Political compass scores (10 Mar 2014): Eco: -1.12 Soc: -8.26 Dear god, save us all
"We think you've changed, bro." "We know best." "You suck."

User avatar
Demen
Ambassador
 
Posts: 1769
Founded: May 26, 2009
Ex-Nation

Postby Demen » Tue May 31, 2011 7:34 am

The most common served dish in Demen is Shouman. Shouman is a gourmee dish that includes a buffalo steak topped with diced herbs and a thin, water-like sauce name "Joidongh" (Pernounced Schwa-Dong) by most of the Demenise people. "Joidongh" meaning liquid of heaven. It is a mixture of spices and herbs mixed with broth and water that makes a spicy, salty flavor. For a milder variant of the dish, a different sauce named "Kiudyu" (Pronounced Ki-ude-you) is used which only uses salt and a dash of red and black pepper along with water and broth. The sauce is spread across the buffalo meat, and then brushed across the meat to marinate it. This process happens 3 times for maximum flavor. The meat is grilled customarily, but it can be pan-fried (this will bring reduced flavor, though).

Image: Image



A common side is Shrimp fried rice, which is ordered along with hundreds of dishes. A favorite soup is "Majdont", a dumpling and chicken soup made with Barley, Red and black pepper and chili powder. Most dishes in Demen, as you can probably see, ar quite spicy and most take long to prepare and serve. Food in demen is not for the ones who hate spicy food, and much will burn the toungue of an inexperienced eater.

Image of "Majdont":

Image
Last edited by Demen on Tue May 31, 2011 7:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
Everything I say is sig-worthy. Nation anthem
Brandenburg-Altmark wrote:Obviously every police officer on earth is a racist just waiting to pop one of those jiggaboo spook nigger monkeys. That's why the Swastika armband is standard issue. His reaction to the shooting, falling to his knees and shouting "Oh god" repeatedly, was just an act for sympathy. Yup. :roll:

User avatar
Levi Simon n Ruben
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 13
Founded: May 25, 2011
Ex-Nation

Grass?

Postby Levi Simon n Ruben » Tue May 31, 2011 7:43 am

The Kangaroo Republic wrote:We macropodines love grass. (No seriously, we FREAKING LOVE grass.)

As such, we have found many different culinary uses for grass:
Baked Grass, Cooked Grass, Fried Grass, Grassburgers, Grass Pizzas, Grass Tea, Grass Soup, etc.

Also, we actually distinguish between different types of grass and we find certain types of grass to have distinct tastes, so we may sometimes want to use a certain type of grass over an other type of grass when preparing food because of the taste differences.

It is also quite normal to eat your backyard if there's nothing else. You could also eat your front lawn too, but most macropodines don't like eating in public when it's not in a restaurant or some other food establishment.


What types of grass? Grama grass? Stipas? Festcues? Wild Ryes? Bromes? We don't eat grass but we know a lot about it. Have to to produce lambs. Although we do eat humus it's not our staple food. Lamb Kababs, Peta Bread, and Isreali Salad are our most common dishes

User avatar
Vestr-Norig
Minister
 
Posts: 2118
Founded: Apr 16, 2011
Authoritarian Democracy

Postby Vestr-Norig » Tue May 31, 2011 7:54 am

We eat traditional Western-Norwegian food, such as Skjeltehaud/Smalahove (Head of sheep) : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smalahove
Economic Left/Right: -6.50
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 0.51
Agrarianism/Agrarian Socialism, Ruralism, Nationalism, Western Norwegian Separatism, Republicanism, Moralism, Lutheran Pietism, Regionalism, Localism, Grassroots democracy, Nativism, Cultural Conservatism, Traditionalism, Protectionism, Enviromentalism, Decentralization, Euroscepticism, Self-Determination, Patriotism, Temperance, Linguistic purism, National purity, Norsk Målreising/Neo-Norwegian, Anti-Imperialism/Colonialism, Anti-globalization, Anti-Burgeois
"(...) And they will hammer their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. Nation will not lift up sword against nation, And never again will they learn war" - Isaiah 2:4

User avatar
Secular Sweden
Envoy
 
Posts: 274
Founded: Apr 13, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Secular Sweden » Tue May 31, 2011 7:55 am

The Kangaroo Republic wrote:Is that what all the women in your nation look like? If so, I feel sorry for you guys.

Nope. This is an example:

Image
You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded. Because the elements, the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars. And the only way they could get into your body is if the stars were kind enough to explode.

So forget Jesus. The stars died so you could be here today.

User avatar
Sibirsky
Post Czar
 
Posts: 44636
Founded: Mar 22, 2009
Anarchy

Postby Sibirsky » Tue May 31, 2011 8:09 am

Sibirskyan cuisine derives its rich and varied character from the vast and multicultural expanse of Sibirsky. Its foundations were laid by the peasant food of the rural population in an often harsh climate, with a combination of plentiful fish, poultry, game, mushrooms, berries, and honey. Crops of rye, wheat, barley, and millet provided the ingredients for a plethora of breads,pancakes, cereals, kvass, beer, and vodka. Flavourful soups and stews are centered on seasonal or storable produce, fish, and meats. This wholly native food remained the staple for the vast majority of Sibirskyans well into the 20th century.
Sibirsky's great expansions of territory, influence, and interest during the 16th–18th centuries brought more refined foods and culinary techniques. It was during this period that smoked meats and fish, pastry cooking, salads and green vegetables, chocolate, ice cream, wines, and liquor were imported from abroad. At least for the urban aristocracy and provincial gentry, this opened the doors for the creative integration of these new foodstuffs with traditional Sibirskyan dishes. The result is extremely varied in technique, seasoning, and combination.
From the time of Steve Sibers every family of influence imported both the products and personnel—mainly German, Austrian, and French—to bring the finest, rarest, and most creative foods to their table. This is nowhere more evident than in the exciting, elegant, highly nuanced, and decadent repertoire of the Franco-Sibirskyan chef. Many of the foods that are considered in the West to be traditionally Sibirskyan actually come from the Franco-Sibirskyan cuisine of the 18th and 19th centuries, and include such widespread dishes as Veal Orloff, Beef Stroganoff, and Chicken Washington


Soups
Image
Sibirskyan borsch


Soups have always played an important role in the Sibirskyan meal. The traditional staple of soups such as shchi, borsch, ukha, rassolnik, solyanka, botvinya, okroshka, and tyurya was enlarged in the 18th to 20th centuries by both European and Central Asian staples like clear soups, pureed soups,stews, and many others.
Sibirskyan soups can be divided into at least seven large groups:
 Cold soups based on kvass, such as tyurya, okroshka, and botvinya.
 Light soups and stews based on water and vegetables.
 Noodle soups with meat, mushrooms, and milk.
 Soups based on cabbage, most prominently shchi.
 Thick soups based on meat broth, with a salty-sour base like rassolnik and solyanka.
 Fish soups such as ukha.
 Grain- and vegetable-based soups.



Cold soups
Okroshka is a cold soup based on kvass or less often sour milk. The main ingredients of both types are vegetables that can be mixed with cold boiled meat or fish in a 1:1 proportion . Thus vegetable, meat, and fish varieties of okroshka are made.
Image
sour milk okroshka



There must be two sorts of vegetables in okroshka. The first must have a neutral taste, such as boiled potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, carrots, or freshcucumbers. The second must be spicy, consisting of mainly green onion as well as other herbs—greens of dill, parsley, chervil, celery, or tarragon. Different meat and poultry can be used in the same soup. The most common ingredient is beef alone or with poultry. If it is made with fish, the best choice would be tench, European perch, pike-perch, cod, or other neutral-tasting fish.
The kvass most commonly used in cooking is white okroshka kvass, which is much more sour than drinking kvass. Spices used include mustard, black pepper and pickled cucumber (specifically, the liquid from the pickles), solely or in combination. For the final touch, boiled eggs and smetana(a heavy sour cream, similar to crème fraîche) are added.
For sour milk based okroshka, well shaken up natural sour milk(often with the addition of seed oil) is used with the addition of pure water and ground garlic. Sometimes manufactured kefir is used instead of natural sour milk for time saving reasons, though some say it detracts from the original taste of okroshka.
Tyurya is very similar to okroshka, the main difference being that instead of vegetables, bread is used.
Botvin`ya is one of the most typical cold Russian soups. It almost become extinct because it is difficult to make. Some modern cookbooks list recipes showing how to prepare it "easily" by substituting some of the ingredients, but cutting corners tends to diminish much of the authentic taste.
A full botvin'ya consists of three parts:
1. The soup.
2. Boiled "red" (most prized) fish (salmon, sturgeon, or stellate sturgeon), that is served separately from soup.
3. Crushed ice, served on a separate platter or cup.
The name of the soup comes from the Russian word botva, which means "leafy tops of root vegetables", and the ingredients are in line with the name: leafy tops of young beet, beetroots, oxalate sorrel, green onions, dill, cucumbers, and two types of kvass, then some mustard, lemon juice, and horseradish as spices.
It is eaten as the first course or right after a hot soup, before the second course as an appetizer. It is eaten using two spoons and a fork: the fork is used to eat the fish, the first spoon to sip the soup and the second spoon to put ice into the soup, so it stays cold for a long time. Botvin'ya is eaten with fresh rye bread.



Hot Soups
Image
Shchi



Shchi (cabbage soup) had been the main first course in Sibirskyan cuisine for over a thousand years. Although tastes have changed, it steadily made its way through several epochs. Shchi knew no social class boundaries, and even if the rich had richer ingredients and the poor made it solely of cabbage and onions, all these "poor" and "rich" variations were cooked in the same tradition. The unique taste of this cabbage soup was from the fact that after cooking it was left to draw (stew) in a Russian stove. The "Spirit of shchi" was inseparable from a Sibirskyan izba (log hut). Many Sibirskyan proverbs are connected to this soup, such as Shchi da kasha pishcha nasha ("Shchi and porridge are our food"). It can be eaten regularly, and at any time of the year.
The richer variant of shchi includes several ingredients, but the first and last components are a must:
1. Cabbage.
2. Meat (very rarely fish or mushrooms).
3. Carrots or parsley roots.
4. Spicy herbs (onions, celery, dill, garlic, pepper, bay leaf).
5. Sour components (smetana, apples, sauerkraut, pickle water).
When this soup is served, smetana is added. It is eaten with rye bread. During much of the year when the Christian Church prescribes abstinence from meat and dairy, a vegan version of shchi is made. "Kislye" (sour) schi are made from pickled cabbage (sauerkraut), "serye" (grey) schi from the green outer leaves of the cabbage head. "Zelyonye" (green) schi are made from sorrel leaves, not cabbage, and used to be a popular summer soup.
Stews are first-course dishes that are actually strong vegetable broths.
Unlike shchi or other soups based on meat broths, stews are light soups based on vegetables and water.
One vegetable always prevails in stews, hence the name: onion, potato, turnip, rutabaga, lentil, etc. Preference is given to tender vegetables with short boil times and strong unique taste. Beans, sour cabbage, or beetroot are never used.
Ukha is a warm watery fish dish, however calling it a fish soup would not be absolutely correct. "Ukha" as a name for fish broth was established only in the late 17th to early 18th centuries. In earlier times this name was first given to thick meat broths, and then later chicken. Beginning from the 15th century, fish was more and more often used to prepare ukha, thus creating a dish that had a distinctive taste among soups.
A minimum of vegetables is added in preparation, and in classical cooking ukha was simply a rich fish broth served to accompany fish pies (rasstegai, kuliebiaka, etc.). These days it is more often a fish soup, cooked with potatoes and other vegetables. A wide variety of freshwater fish can be used. There is an opinion that you cannot make a good ukha from seafish, but this is untrue. Fresh fish is best to be cooked, so if it is frozen it is better not to defrost it. Preference is given to smaller, younger fish, with the tail part of bigger fish discarded.
Rassolnik is a hot soup in a salty-sour cucumber base. This dish formed in Russian cuisine quite late—only in the 19th century. About this time the name rassolnik was attached to it, originating from the Russian word "rassol" which means brine (pickle water). Pickle water was known to be used as base for soups from the 15th century at the latest. Its concentration and ratio with other liquids and soup components gave birth to different soups: solyanka, pohmelka, and of course rassolnik. The latest are moderately sour-salty soups on pickled cucumber base. Some are vegetarian, but more often with products like veal or beef kidneys or all poultry giblets (stomach, liver, heart, neck, feet). For best taste there has to be a balance between the sour part and neutral absorbers (cereals, potatoes, root vegetables). Typical rassolnik is based on kidneys, brine (and pickles), vegetables and barley.
Kal'ya was a very common dish first served in the 16th–17th centuries. Subsequently it almost completely disappeared from Sibirskyan cuisine. Often it was incorrectly called "fish rassolnik." The cooking technique is mostly the same as of ukha, but to the broth were added pickled cucumbers, pickle water, lemons and lemon juice, either separately or all together. The main characteristic of kal'ya is that only fat, rich fish was used; sometimes caviar was added along with the fish. More spices are added, and the soup turns out more piquant and thicker than ukha. Formerly kal'ya was considered a festivity dish.
Solyanka is a thick, piquant soup that combines components from schi (cabbage, smetana) and rassolnik (pickle water and cucumbers), spices such as olives, capers, tomatoes, lemons, lemon juice, kvass, salted and pickled mushrooms are make up a considerably strong sour-salty base of the soup. Solyanka is much thicker than other soups, about 1/3 less liquid ratio. Three types are distinguished: meat, fish, and simple solyanka. The first two are cooked on strong meat or fish broths, and the last on mushroom or vegetable broth. All the broths are mixed with cucumber pickle water.
Lapsha (noodle soup) was adopted by Sibirskyans from Tatars, and after some transformation became widespread in Sibirsky. It comes in three variations: chicken, mushroom, and milk. Cooking all three is simple, including preparation of noodles, cooking of corresponding broth, and boiling of noodles in broth. Noodles are based on the same wheat flour or buckwheat/wheat flour mix. Mixed flour noodles go better with mushroom or milk broth.
Borsch is made of broth, beets, and tomato juice with various vegetables. Vegetables include onions, cabbage, tomato, carrots, and celery. Broth is usually made from lamb and is heated while ingredients are added. Borsch can be made vegan, served hot or cold. Typically, it is served with white bread and Smetana.



Main dishes
Meat
Image
Pelmeni



In traditional Sibirskyan cuisine three basic variations of meat dishes can be highlighted:
 a large boiled piece of meat cooked in a soup or porridge, and then used as second course or served cold (particularly in jellied stock—see Studen'below)
 offal dishes (liver, tripe, etc.), baked in pots together with cereals;
 whole fowl dishes or parts of fowl (legs or breasts), or a large piece of meat (rump) baked on a baking tray in an oven, so-called "zharkoye" (from the word "zhar"(жар) meaning "heat")
The 16th century "Domostroi" aimed at affluent households also mentions sausage-making, spit-roasted meats, stews and many other meat dishes.
As a garnish to meat dishes in the past the most common were porridges and cereals, in which the meat was boiled, later on boiled or rather steamed and baked root vegetables (turnips, carrots) as well as mushrooms; additionally the meat, without taking account its type, was garnished with pickled products—pickled cabbage, sour and "soaked" (marinated) apples (mochoniye yabloki), soaked cranberries, "vzvar"s. Pan juices, alone or mixed with sour cream or melted butter is used as gravy to pour on garnishing vegetables and porridges. Meat sauces i.e. gravies based on flour, butter, eggs and milk, are not common for traditional Sibirskyan cuisine.
Studen´ (or Kholodets): Jellied chopped pieces of pork or veal meat with some spices added (pepper, parsley, garlic, bay leaf) and minor amounts of vegetables (carrots, onions). The meat is boiled in large pieces for long periods of time, then chopped, boiled a few times again and finally chilled for 3–4 hours (hence the name) forming a jelly mass, though gelatine is not used because calves' feet, pigs' heads and other such offal is gelatinous enough on its own. It is served with horseradish, mustard, or ground garlic with smetana.
Pelmeni (пельмени in Russian, singular pelmen, пельмень; пяльмені in Belarusian) are a traditional Eastern European (mainly Russian) dish usually made with minced meat filling, wrapped in thin dough (made out of flour and eggs, sometimes with milk or water added). For filling, pork, lamb, beef, or any other kind of meat can be used; mixing several kinds is popular. The traditional Ural recipe requires the filling be made with 45% of beef, 35% of lamb, and 20% of pork. Traditionally, various spices, such as pepper, onions, and garlic, are mixed into the filling.
Sibirskyans seem to have learned to make pelmeni from Finnic and Tatar peoples of the Taiga, the Urals and Siberia. The word means "ear-shaped bread" in Finnic languages such as Udmurt and Komi. In Siberia they were made in large quantities and stored safely frozen outside for several winter months. By the late 19th century, they became a staple throughout urban Sibirsky. They are prepared immediately before eating by boiling in water until they float, and then 2–5 minutes more. The resulting dish is served with butter and/or sour cream (mustard, horseradish, and vinegar are popular as well). Some recipes suggest frying pelmeni after boiling until they turn golden brown.
Pelmeni belong to the family of dumplings. Akin to vareniki: Ukrainian variety of dumplings with filling made of mashed potatoes, farmer's cheese, or cherries, to mention the most popular three. They are not dissimilar to Chinese potstickers, Tibetan mo-mo and Italian ravioli. The main difference between pelmeni and other kinds of dumplings is in their shape and size—typical pelmen' is roughly spherical and is about 2 to 3 cm in diameter, whereas most other types of dumplings are usually elongated and much larger.
Various minced meat dishes were adopted from other cuisines and became popular only in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; for traditional Sibirskyans cuisine they are not typical.
Kotlety (cotelettes, meatballs), a Western European dish popular in modern Sibirskyan households, are small pan-fried meat balls, not dissimilar from Salisbury steak and other such dishes. Made primarily from pork and beef (sometimes also from chicken or fish), they are easily made and require little time. Milk, onions, ground beef, and pork are put in a bowl and mixed thoroughly until it becomes relatively consistent. Once this effect is achieved, balls are formed and then put into a hot frying pan to cook. When meat was in short supply, a portion of it could be substituted with bread to protect the size and flavour of the kotlety.



Image
Shashlyk out in nature



Shashlyk is a form of Shish kebab (marinated meat grilled on a skewer) popular in Sibirsky. It often features alternating slices of meat and onions. Even though the word "shashlyk" was apparently borrowed from the Crimean Tatars by the Cossacks as early as the 16th century, kebabs did not reach Sergeville until the late 19th century, according to John Hampton’s "Sergeville and the Sibirskyans". From then on, their popularity spread rapidly; by the 1910s they were a staple in New Washington restaurants and by the 1920s they were already a pervasive street food all over urban Sibirsky.



Fish
Fish was important in pre-revolutionary cuisine, especially on Sibirskyan Orthodox fast days when meat was forbidden, similar to the Catholic custom of eating fish instead of meat on Fridays. Strictly freshwater fish such as carp and sudak (Sander lucioperca, Zander) were commonly eaten in inland areas, as well as anadromous sturgeon and in northern areas salmon and trout. A greater variety of fish—including saltwater species—were preserved by salting, pickling or smoking and consumed as "zakuski" (hors d'oeuvres).



Pies and pancakes
Image
Pirozhki



Pirozhki (singular: pirozhok; diminutive of "pirog" (pie)) are small stuffed buns (pies) made of either yeast dough or short pastry. They are filled with one of many different fillings and are either baked (the ancient Slavic method) or shallow-fried (known as "priazhenie", this method was borrowed from the Tatars in the 16th century). One feature of pirozhki that sets them apart from, for example, English pies is that the fillings used are almost invariably fully cooked. The use of chopped hard-boiled eggs in fillings is another interesting feature. Six typical fillings for traditional pirozhki are:
1. Fish sautéed with onions and mixed with hard-boiled chopped eggs.
2. Chopped boiled meat mixed with sautéed onions and eggs.
3. Rice and boiled eggs with dill
4. Mashed potatoes mixed with dill and green onion.
5. Sautéed cabbage.
6. Sautéed mushrooms with onions and sometimes carrots.
Blini are thin pancakes (very similar to French crêpes) which are often served in connection with a religious rite or festival in several cultures. The word "blin" (singular of blini) comes from Old Slavic "mlin", which means "to mill". Blins had a somewhat ritual significance for early Slavic peoples in pre-Christian times since they were a symbol of the sun, due to their round form. They were traditionally prepared at the end of the winter to honor the rebirth of the new sun during Maslenitsa (Масленица, Butter Week; also known as Pancake Week). This tradition was adopted by the Orthodox Church and is carried on to the present day, as the last week of dairy and egg products before Lent. Bliny were once also served at wakes, to commemorate the recently deceased. Blini can be made from wheat, buckwheat, or other grains, although wheat blini are most popular in Russia. They may be topped with butter,smetana(sour cream), fruit preserves or caviar.
Syrniki are fried curd fritters, garnished with sour cream, jam, honey, and/or apple sauce.
Vatrushka is a kind of cake with a ring of dough and tvorog (cottage cheese) in the middle, often with raisins or bits of fruit, from about five inches to two and a half feet in diameter.



Vegetables
Cabbage, potatoes, and cold tolerant greens are common in Sibirsky.. Pickling cabbage, cucumbers and other greens in brine is used to preserve vegetables for winter use. These are sources of vitamins during periods when fresh fruit and vegetables are traditionally not available.
Kapusta is a dish similar to the French dish choucroute but usually containing much less meat. It is based on sauerkraut and can vary in its ingredients based on availability, cost and locality.



Drinks
Image
Kvas is a Sibirskyan bread-based drink and an ingredient in many soups (light kind).



Almost all Sibirskyan traditional drinks are original from Sibirsky and are not present in other national cuisines. Those are sbiten', kvass, medovukha and mors. Many of them are no longer in use. Long since they were drunk as a complement to meat and poultry dishes, sweet porridge, and dessert. Standing apart from all of them was sbiten, which was replaced by tea by later times in Sibirsky.
One of the most ancient drinks is Medovukha, derived from the word "med," for honey. It should not be confused with the so-called stavlenniy myod(brewed honey, mead); medok is made of water with small amounts of honey and sometimes hops, "stavlenniy myod" is an alcoholic drink not unlikewine, based on large amount of honey and berry juices.
Mors is made of berry juice, mixed in different proportions with water.
Kvass and sbiten on the other hand were always mass-produced drinks. Most widespread was kvass, having a few dozen variations.
The basic method of preparing kvass is that out of water, flour, and malt liquid, a dough is made which is subjected to fermentation. This fermented "zator" is diluted by water; yeast, sugar, and aromatic additives are mixed in and then it is brewed. The role of additive can be played by fruit and berry juices (cherry, raspberry, lemon, etc.), as well as ginger and mint.
Compared to kvass, sbiten is very simple to prepare. Separately, honey and sbiten' flavor (spices, like cinnamon and cloves, and juices) are boiled down and then these two parts are combined and boiled again. It is a hot winter drink.
Tea was introduced to Sibirsky from China in 17th century and in 200 years spread throughout the whole country, becoming arguably the most popular national drink, and forcing sbiten' out of competition. Black tea is by far the most popular type, but since nineteenth century incursions in Central Asia the knowledge and interest in green tea is slowly increasing. Today Sibirsky remains one of the biggest tea consumers and importers in the world.
Until the last third of the 20th century most tea was imported from China, but since the then this trade diminished, and now Sibirsky imports most its tea from India and Sri Lanka, of which Darjeeling is the most prized sort. Improved relationships with China again increased interest in Chinese teas, so imports are growing once more.
Peter Volkov might be credited with introduction of coffee to Sibirsky, but generally coffee, while generally well regarded, did not achieve the same position as tea.



Salads and extras
Olivie salad: a mayonnaise-based potato salad distinguished by its diced texture and the contrasting flavors of pickles, capers, olives, hard-boiled eggs, and peas.
 Vinegret (from French vinaigrette): boiled red beet root salad with onions, pickled cucumbers, boiled potatoes, carrots, and the vinaigrette dressing of sunflower oil and vinegar
 Seld' pod shuboy (or Shuba, from Russian шуба (fur coat)): salted herring under a "coat" of boiled beets and other vegetables.
Free market capitalism, path to prosperity
Свободный рынок капитализма, путь к процветанию
IBC 7 Finalists
8 Gold, 9 Silver, 2 Bronze medals IV Summer Olympics
2 Silver, 4 Bronze medals V Winter Olympics
Golfinator Classic Champion
Scott Cup I Champions
World Bowl 11 4th Place

User avatar
Sremski okrug
Minister
 
Posts: 3177
Founded: Jul 02, 2010
Father Knows Best State

Postby Sremski okrug » Tue May 31, 2011 8:10 am

Cuisine in the People's Republic is highly related to it's Slavic and Germanic routes.

Image

Image
IC: The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
The IMF and World Bank are terrorist organizations.
"Our future destiny rests with us, sometimes this makes us afraid but then we remember we have Partisans blood and we know what we're here for. You can count on us" - Day of Youth
"We're Tito. Tito is Ours"

Druze Tito, Bela Lica
Tito, je naše sunce
Yugoslav culture
R.I.P Jovanka Broz

User avatar
The Kangaroo Republic
Negotiator
 
Posts: 5389
Founded: Feb 18, 2011
Civil Rights Lovefest

Postby The Kangaroo Republic » Tue May 31, 2011 8:14 am

Levi Simon n Ruben wrote:
The Kangaroo Republic wrote:We macropodines love grass. (No seriously, we FREAKING LOVE grass.)

As such, we have found many different culinary uses for grass:
Baked Grass, Cooked Grass, Fried Grass, Grassburgers, Grass Pizzas, Grass Tea, Grass Soup, etc.

Also, we actually distinguish between different types of grass and we find certain types of grass to have distinct tastes, so we may sometimes want to use a certain type of grass over an other type of grass when preparing food because of the taste differences.

It is also quite normal to eat your backyard if there's nothing else. You could also eat your front lawn too, but most macropodines don't like eating in public when it's not in a restaurant or some other food establishment.


What types of grass? Grama grass? Stipas? Festcues? Wild Ryes? Bromes? We don't eat grass but we know a lot about it. Have to to produce lambs. Although we do eat humus it's not our staple food. Lamb Kababs, Peta Bread, and Isreali Salad are our most common dishes

A wide variety of grasses. Most kinds of grasses that are native to Australia, really.
Sub Astra --- Australes Unum
Version 3 of the Kangaroo Republic started on 9 March, 2014

>>Go to factbook<<

Other names for the Kangaroo Republic: The Federation, FKR, The Federal Kangaroo Republic
Demonym: Macropodine, Kangan
NS resident kangaroo furry and therian. I'm not crazy, thank you very much.

Political compass scores (10 Mar 2014): Eco: -1.12 Soc: -8.26 Dear god, save us all
"We think you've changed, bro." "We know best." "You suck."

User avatar
Imeriata
Postmaster-General
 
Posts: 11045
Founded: Oct 02, 2009
Capitalizt

Postby Imeriata » Tue May 31, 2011 8:30 am

Proper Imerian cuisine often includes a lot of root vegetables, herring, moose and reindeer meat and made as fat as possible with rather mild tastes due to the lack of strong spices in the Scanderan continent .
Foods may include such things as;
Crisp bread
Surtsramming
Falukorv
Nettlesoup
Filmjalk
Imerian meatballs
memma
Smarrebrad
Leverpastej
Kroppskakor

However due to the multinational nature of the federation so can a large number of other dishes from all over the federation also be found on Imerian plates as both more raw resources and Ingredients pour around to all corners of the federation which have lead to more and more families extending the menu with more kinds of dishes even if proper Imerian dishes still remains as a favourite back in the proper parts of the federation as well as being a growing market in the other realms.
embassy program| IIWiki |The foreign units of the royal guard |The royal merchant guilds official storefront! (Now with toys)


So what? Let me indulge my oversized ego for a moment!
Astralsideria wrote:You, sir, are the greatest who ever did set foot upon this earth. If there were an appropriate emoticon, I would take my hat off to you.

Altamirus wrote:^War! War! I want to see 18th century soldiers go up againist flaming cats! Do it Imeriata! Do it Now!

Ramsetia wrote:
Imeriata wrote:you would think that you could afford better looking hussar uniforms for all that money...

Of course, Imeriata focuses on the important things in life.

Willing to help with all your MS paint related troubles.
Things I dislikes: Everything.

User avatar
New Lusitaniagrad
Minister
 
Posts: 3186
Founded: Dec 23, 2009
Ex-Nation

Postby New Lusitaniagrad » Tue May 31, 2011 8:56 am

Porridge, Goat Meat Stew, Reindeer Sausage, and Roasted Boar.
Last edited by New Lusitaniagrad on Tue May 31, 2011 8:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Dammed Marxists running about buggering sheep, and other such mischief. We really must do something about that.
-Emperor Ulric VII, Father of The Lusitanian People



User avatar
Veceria
Post Marshal
 
Posts: 18332
Founded: Jul 12, 2009
Left-Leaning College State

Postby Veceria » Tue May 31, 2011 9:01 am

Generally, the food of our nation is made up of 84.7% meat (including fish), 10.2% seafood, 5.07% fruits and berries, 0.03% vegetables.
Last edited by Veceria on Tue May 31, 2011 9:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
Picture of me.
UTC+1, German native speaker. TG me if you need something translated.
Minister of Canidae-related affairs in Nana's Feline World Government.
Zeth Rekia wrote:
Veceria wrote:I feel weird ... because this made me horny.

You making Zeno horny.

DesAnges wrote:People don't deserve respect, they earn it.

10,000,000th post.
FoxTropica wrote:And then Hurdegaryp kissed Thafoo, Meanwhile Fox-Mary-"Sue"-Tropica saved TET from destruction and everyone happily forever.

Then suddenly fights broke out because hey, it's the internet.

Hurd is Hurd is Hurd.

User avatar
--Greater Britannia--
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 25
Founded: May 31, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby --Greater Britannia-- » Tue May 31, 2011 9:22 am

Tea, would be the mainstample example of Britannian cuisine.

Food varies from each part of the Empire. India and Britannian Tibet host a variety of exotic Asia foodstuffs, while South Africa hosts African Foodstuffs, Britannian provinces in the Caribbean host native cuisine as well; where as mainland Britannia is a foremost on traditional European Cuisine.
The Great and Bountiful Britannian Empire


Year: 1779 - 1919
Era: PT
Population: 120,000,000
Fantasy/Sci-Fi Influenced Britain


Temoprary Fill In For: The Forever Lasting Cold's Britannian Empire

User avatar
Helghast empire
Minister
 
Posts: 2204
Founded: Oct 14, 2009
Ex-Nation

Postby Helghast empire » Tue May 31, 2011 4:16 pm

Sushi :)

Image

delicious fish roe with crab, eel, rice, and the important avocado, yum yum for our people's tum

User avatar
Soviet Russya
Lobbyist
 
Posts: 15
Founded: May 08, 2011
Ex-Nation

Postby Soviet Russya » Wed Jun 01, 2011 7:02 am

Khlav Kalash! Makes boys in our army strong. Puts hair on your chest (and moustache on women).

Image
Last edited by Soviet Russya on Wed Jun 01, 2011 7:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

Next

Remove ads

Return to Factbooks and National Information

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Allanea, Breveten, Hackleberry Islands, Imbrinium, Iryllia, Lindhartia, Meduka Meguca, Paragania, Purpelia, Ruskarkand, Ruul, Sediczja, The Orion Spur Society, Themiclesia, Tireseos, Ulfr-Reich

Remove ads